New-english sentence example

new-english
  • It is partly due to this early meaning that the derivation from the root of " brood " has been usually accepted; this the New English Dictionary regards as " inadmissible."
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  • The use of the word "clergy" as a plural, though the New English Dictionary quotes the high authority of Cardinal Newman for it, is less rare than wrong; in the case cited "Some hundred Clergy" should have been "Some hundred of the Clergy."
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  • After wasting the critical moment of the war in the diversions of court life, the new English king, Edward II., made an inglorious march to Cumnock and back without striking a blow; and then returned south, leaving the war to a succession of generals.
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  • The new English High and Latin school, founded in 1635, is the oldest school of the country.
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  • The New English Dictionary takes it to be of northern French origin.
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  • The New English Dictionary points out that whereas the old Teutonic type of the word is neuter, corresponding to the Latin numen, in the Christian applications it becomes masculine, and that even where the earlier neuter form is still kept, as in Gothic and Old Norwegian, the construction is masculine.
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  • There are a number of art galleries in and about Bond Street and Piccadilly, Regent Street and Pall Mall, such as the New Gallery, where periodical exhibitions are given by the New English Art Club, the Royal Society of Painters in WaterColours, the Royal Institute of Painters in Water-Colours, other societies and art dealers.
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  • The development of meaning in French from a label to ceremonial rules is not difficult in itself, but, as the New English Dictionary points out, the history has not been clearly established.
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  • The New English Dictionary connects it with a Teutonic stem meaning "holy"; from which is derived the Lithuanian szwentas, and Lettish swats.
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  • About the same time a new English version was made by Isaac Taylor (London, 1829).
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  • But " congregational " (due to the rendering of ecclesia by " congregation " in early English Bibles) appears about 1642, to judge from the New English Dictionary.
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  • The New English Dictionary does not attempt any explanation of the term, and takes "hogshead" as the original form, from which the forms in other languages have been corrupted.
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  • Kington-Oliphant (Old and Middle English, 1878) regards his work as the definite starting point of the New English which with slight changes was to form the language of the Book of Common Prayer.
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  • The New English Dictionary suggests that the sense-development may be from "whole," i.e.
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  • He, however, much regretted the gradual and very natural trend of his new English allies towards extreme Ultramontane views, of which Archdeacon, afterwards Cardinal, Manning ultimately became an enthusiastic advocate.
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  • In the New English Dictionary the earliest example of the word " classical " is the phrase " classical and canonical," found in the Europae Speculum of Sir Edwin Sandys (1599), and, as applied to a writer, it is explained as meaning " of the first rank or authority."
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  • Government House, the residence of the high commissioner, the government offices, hospital, central prison and the new English church are without the walls.
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  • In its logical aspect pragmatism originates in a criticism of fundamental conceptions like "truth," "error," "fact" 2 The New English Dictionary quotes for nine distinct senses of the word, of which the philosophic is the eighth.
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  • The New English Dictionary quotes Piers Plowman as containing the earliest personification of the name.
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  • In the New English Dictionary no fewer than thirteen different nuances of vowel sound are distinguished under the symbol A alone.
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  • The New English Dictionary points out that the transferred use is due less to Homer's Odyssey than to Fenelon's Telemaque, in which Mentor is a somewhat prominent character.
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  • (For a discussion of the etymology, see the New English Dictionary, especially the concluding note with reference to authorities.) In Shipping.
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  • In 1551 he seems to have been made a royal chaplain; in 1552 he was certainly offered an English bishopric, which he declined; and during most of this year he used his influence, as preacher at court and in London, to make the new English settlement more Protestant.
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  • The first official use appears, according to the New English Dictionary, in the appointment of "Commissioners of Police" for Scotland in 1714.
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  • The New English Dictionary points out that "change" appears earlier than "exchange" in this sense.
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  • The New English Dictionary suggests a connexion with "lathe," a term which survives as a division of the county of Kent, containing several "hundreds."
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  • In March 1548 he was at Frankfort, when the new English Order of Communion reached him; he at once translated it into German and Latin and sent a copy to Calvin, whose wife had befriended Coverdale at Strassburg.
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  • I have mentioned the name of the new English consul.
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  • Day's input into the new English martyrology is undoubted.
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  • The English form "eremite," which was used, according to the New English Dictionary, quite indiscriminately with "hermit" till the middle of the 17th century, is now chiefly used in poetry or rhetorically, except with reference to the early hermits of the Libyan desert, or sometimes to such particular orders as the eremites of St Augustine (see Augustinian Hermits).
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  • Further quotations of the use of the word by the Parliamentary party are given in the New English Dictionary.
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  • See Felix Liebermann, Die Gesetze der Angelsachsen (Halle, 1888-89); William Stubbs, Constitutional History of England; Richard Cleasby, Icelandic Dictionary; New English Dictionary; and William Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum, vol.
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  • It is supposed that this use arose in 1693 in Jena after a " town and gown " row in which a student had been killed and a sermon preached on the text " the Philistines be upon you, Samson " (see Quarterly Review, April 18 99, 43 8, note, quoted in the New English Dictionary).
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  • Tag; according to the New English Dictionary, " in no way related to the Lat.
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  • Archbishop Trench (Study of Words) supposed that when " religion " became equivalent to the monastic life, and " religious " to a monk, the words lost their original meaning, but the Ancren Riwle, ante 1225, and the Cursor Mundi use the words both in the general and the more particular sense (see quotations in the New English Dictionary), and both meanings can be found in the Imitatio Christi and in Erasmus's Colloquia.
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  • The New English Dictionary is misled by the 1866 reprint of Paul Bayne on Ephesians when it quotes "anthropomorphist" as r7th century English.
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  • The Philological Society of London decided that a new English Dictionary needed to be created.
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  • According to the New English Dictionary, although the origin of the word "cat" is unknown, yet the name is found in various languages as far back as they can be traced.
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