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new-england

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new-england

new-england Sentence Examples

  • For all you gadabouts and tourists used to driving hither and yon, a weekend trip to New England is a piece of cake.

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  • I filled Betsy in on our hosts as we maneuvered the country roads of New England.

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  • Ah; New England in the autumn!

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  • I've finished my business in New England and must be moving on.

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  • Only Betsy was raised outside of New England and she easily bowed to our collective desires to remain within its six state bounds.

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  • We all liked New England but Quinn in particular, despised the high taxes of his home state.

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  • New, disease resistant trees are bringing back the splendor of what has been called one of the prettiest towns in New England.

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  • I think I'll mosey up to New England.

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  • It looks like he's moving east and maybe will drop down in the states in New York or New England.

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  • They had been in New England for a mere three months, but Sarah had fallen fast and hard for Connor.

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  • It was early September, and he felt no more beautiful place existed than New England in the fall.

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  • The restaurant was close by, so the ride there consisted of small talk about the weather, when peak foliage would be, and how much they both loved New England.

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  • I fell in love with New England.

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  • St. Thomas the Apostle Church was a scrubbed-white structure looking like a New England calendar except for its city loca­tion.

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  • The frequency and intensity of thunderstorms are unquestionably greater in the Rocky Mountain than in the New England states, but the difference is not so great as the statistics at first sight suggest.

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  • He was prominent in the affairs of the New England Confederation, of which he was one of the founders (1643).

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  • He was the last notable representative of the New England School, in which his predecessors were the younger Edwards, John Smalley (1734-1820) and Nathaniel Emmons.

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  • This influence was due not only to his publications, but also to the "school" or classes for the training of clergymen which he conducted for many years at his home and from which went forth scores of preachers to every part of New England and the middle colonies (states).

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  • Beginning with 1620, New England was colonized by English Presbyterians of the two types which developed from the discussions of the Westminster Assembly (1643-1648) into Presbyterianism and Congregationalism.

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  • 1710) was another of the New England missionaries along the Delaware river and bay.

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  • These New England ministers in the Delaware valley, with Francis Makemie as moderator, organized in 1706 the first American presbytery, the presbytery of Philadelphia.

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  • From New England, as has been seen, Puritan settlers established Presbyterian churches (or churches which immediately became Presbyterian) in Long Island, on New Jersey, and in South Carolina; but the Puritans who remained in New England usually established Congregational churches.

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  • But there were exceptions: Irish Presbyterians from Ulster formed a church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, which, about 1729, grew into a presbytery; the Boston presbytery, organized in 1745, became in 1774 the synod of New England with three presbyteries and sixteen ministers; and there were two independent presbyteries, that of "the Eastward" organized at Boothbay, Maine, in 1771, and that of Grafton, in New Hampshire, founded by Eleazar Wheelock and other ministers interested in Dartmouth College.

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  • The Associate Reformed Synod added in 1794 a fourth presbytery, that of Londonderry, containing most of the New England churches, but in 1801 "disclaimed" this presbytery because it did not take a sufficiently strict view of the question of psalmsinging.

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  • The mass widens out once more in the Liverpool Range, where the highest peak, Mount Oxley, reaches 4500 ft., and farther north, in the New England Range, Ben Lomond reaches an elevation of 5000 ft.

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  • Deposits have also been found in the New England and southern districts, as well as at Broken Hill, showing that the mineral is widely distributed throughout the state.

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  • In New South Wales lode tin occurs principally in the granite and stream tin under the basaltic country in the extreme north of the state, at Tenterfield, Emmaville, Tingha, and in other districts of New England.

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  • The principal mine in New South Wales is situated at Kingsgate, in the New England district, where the mineral is generally associated with molybdenum and gold.

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  • Vermont is a portion of the plateau-like New England upland, broken by mountain ranges, individual mountains and high hills, rising above the general upland surface, and by deep narrow valleys, cut below that surface.

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  • Vermont was almost the last of the New England states to develop textile manufactures, though the manufacture of woollen goods was begun in 1824.

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  • Her father (the Congregational minister of the town) and her mother were both descended from members of the company that, under John Davenport, founded New Haven in 1638; and the community in which she spent her childhood was one of the most intellectual in New England.

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  • in diameter, and with the shoots or young branches more or less angular; the glossy deltoid leaves are sharply pointed, somewhat cordate at the base, and with flattened petioles; the fertile catkins ripen about the middle of June, when their opening capsules discharge the cottony seeds which have given the tree its common western name; in New England it is sometimes called the "river poplar."

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  • long; it is found in New England and the milder parts of Canada, and is frequently planted in Britain; its growth is extremely rapid in moist land; the buds are covered with a balsamic secretion.

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  • Such bodies, established to appraise land for railway purposes, to apportion receipts and expenditures of interstate traffic, and in a general way to supervise railway transportation, had been in existence in New England before 1860, one of the earliest being that of Rhode Island in 1839.

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  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

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  • Studies," Baltimore, 1897); Henry Adams, Documents relating to New England Federalism, 1800-1815 (Boston, 1878); A.

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  • Admitted to the bar in Boston in 1805, Webster began the practice of law at Boscawen, but his father died a year later, and Webster removed in the autumn of 1807 to Portsmouth, then one of the leading commercial cities of New England.

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  • The tree also occurs in the New England states and extends over nearly the whole of British North America, its northern limit occurring at about 67° N.

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  • MAYFLOWER, the vessel which carried from Southampton, England, to Plymouth, Massachusetts, the Pilgrims who established the first permanent colony in New England.

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  • In the parts of the state settled by people from New England township meetings were held in the early days, but their functions were gradually transferred, , to the trustees, and by 1820 the meetings had been given up almost entirely.

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  • In March 1786 the second Ohio Company (q.v.), composed chiefly of New England officers and soldiers, was organized in Boston, Massachusetts, with a view to founding a new state between Lake Erie and the Ohio river.

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  • His close relation with the Scotch Church secured important material assistance for the college of which he now became president, and he toured New England to collect contributions.

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  • In Huntington Avenue, at its junction with Massachusetts Avenue, is another group of handsome new buildings, including Horticultural Hall, Symphony Hall (1900) and the New England Conservatory of Music. In the Back Bay Fens, reclaimed swamps laid out by F.

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  • and pamphlets), the Massachusetts Historical Society (founded 1791; 50,300), the Boston medical library (founded 1874; about 80,000), the New England Historic-Genealogical Society (founded 18 45; 33,750 volumes and 34,150 pamphlets), the state library (founded 1826; 140,000), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (founded 1780; 30,000), the Boston Society of Natural History (founded 1830; about 35,000 volumes and 27,000 pamphlets).

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  • Its ascendancy was identical with the long predominance of the New England literary school, who lived in Boston or in the country round about.

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  • The Cunard arrangement was the first of various measures that worked for a commercial rapprochement between the New England states and Canada, culminating in the reciprocity treaty of 1854, and Boston's interests are foremost to-day in demanding a return to relations of reciprocity.

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  • The government of the Jurisdiction was of the strictest Puritan type, and although the forty-five "blue laws" which the Rev. Samuel Peters, in his General History of Connecticut, ascribed to New Haven were much confused with the laws of the other New England colonies and some were mere inventions, yet many of them, and others equally "blue," were actually in operation as enactments or as court decisions in New Haven.

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  • Gallatin tried to earn a living by teaching French in Harvard College, apparently not without success, but the cold and rigid civilization of New England repelled him, and he made his way to the South.

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  • The Thompson family had been settled in New England since the middle of the previous century, and belonged to the class of moderately wealthy farmers.

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  • a memorial was presented to him by the Quakers in England stating the persecutions which their fellow-members had undergone in New England.

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  • Even the careless Charles was moved to issue an order to the colony which effectually stopped the hanging of the Quakers for their religion, though it by no means put an end to the persecution of the body in New England.

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  • A fugitive slave clause was inserted in the Articles of Confederation of the New England Confederation of 1643, providing for the return of the fugitive upon the certificate of one magistrate in the jurisdiction out of which the said servant fled - no trial by jury being provided for.

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  • The system reached from Kentucky and Virginia across Ohio, and from Maryland across Pennsylvania and New York, to New England and Canada, and as early as 1817 a group of anti-slavery men in southern Ohio had helped to Canada as many as moo slaves.

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  • John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.

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  • The city has, besides, numerous fine office buildings, including that of the Society for Savings (an institution in which each depositor is virtually a stockholder), the Citizens', Rose, Williamson, Rockefeller, New England and Garfield buildings; and several beautiful churches, notably the Roman Catholic and Trinity cathedrals, the First Presbyterian ("Old Stone"), the Second Presbyterian, the First Methodist and Plymouth (Congregational) churches.

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  • It was as a theologian that Dr Emmons was best known, and for half a century probably no clergyman in New England exerted so wide an influence.

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  • was a typical New England yeoman.

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  • From about 1825 to 1845 Woodbury was the undisputed leader of the Jacksonian Democracy in New England.

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  • Albany is an important railway and commercial centre, particularly as a distributing point for New England markets, as a lumber market and - though to a much less extent than formerly - as a depot for transhipment to the south and west.

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  • He studied law, and in 1817 came under the influence of a religious revival in Vermont, where at Lyndon in the following year he was licensed as a local preacher and was admitted to the New England conference.

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  • He was an able controversialist, and in the interests of Arminianism attacked both New England Calvinism and Unitarianism; he published in 1837 The Calvinistic Controversy.

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  • Adams also published: Life of Albert Gallatin (1879), John Randolph (1882) in the "American Statesmen Series," and Historical Essays (1891); besides editing Documents Relating to New England Federalism (1877), and the Writings of Albert Gallatin (3 volumes, 1879).

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  • In Coolidge's Tavern (still standing) Washington was entertained on his New England tour in 1789; and in a house recently moved from Mt Auburn Street to Marshall Street the Committee of Safety met in 1775.

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  • As early as the close of the 17th century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates.

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  • From 1826 to 1837 he edited the Hartford Times, making it the official organ of the Jacksonian Democracy in southern New England.

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  • In 1745 he was commander-in-chief of the New England force of about 4000, which, with the assistance of a British squadron under Commodore Peter Warren, besieged and captured the French fortress of Louisburg, the garrison surrendering on the 16th of June and Pepperrell and Warren taking possession on the following day.

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  • Title to Nantucket and the neighbouring islands was claimed under grants of the Council for New England both by William Alexander, Lord Stirling, and by Sir Ferdinando Gorges.

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  • See Memoir and Official Correspondence of General John Stark (Concord, N.H., 1860) by his grandson Caleb Stark (1804-1864), who wrote in 1831 Reminiscences of the French War containing Rogers's Expeditions with the New England Rangers and an Account.

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  • RHODE ISLAND, a North Atlantic state of the American Union, belonging to the New England group, and lying between 41° 18' and 42° 3' N.

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  • Rhode Island has a more moderate climate than that of the northern sections of New England.

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  • To capture this British garrison, later increased to 6000 men, the co-operation of about 10,000 men (mostly New England militia) under Major-General John Sullivan, and a French fleet carrying 4000 French regulars under Count D'Estaing, was planned in the summer of 1778.

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  • The influence of Roger Williams's ic'eas and the peculiar conditions under which the first settlements established have tended to differentiate the history of Rho: Island from that of the other New England states.

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  • In 1640 the Generar Court of Massachusetts declared that the representatives of Aquidneck were " not to be capitulated withal either for themselves or the people of the isle where they inhabit," and in 1644 and again in 1648 the application of the Narragansett settlers for admission to the New England Confederacy was refused except on condition that they should pass under the jurisdiction of either Massachusetts or Plymouth.

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  • The other pre-revolutionary magazines were the Boston American Magazine (1743-1747), in imitation of the London Magazine; the Boston Weekly Magazine (1743); the Christian History (1743-1744); the New York Independent Reflector (1752-1754); the Boston New England Magazine (1758-1760), a collection of fugitive pieces; the Boston Royal American Magazine (1774-1775); and the Pennsylvania Magazine (1775-1776), founded by Robert Aitken, with the help of Thomas Paine.

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  • These were followed by Scribner's Magazine (1887), the New England Magazine (1889), the Illustrated Review of Reviews (1890), McClure's Magazine (1893), the Bookman (1895), the World's Work (1902), the American Magazine (1906) succeeding Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly, and Munsey's Magazine (1889).

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  • In his thirteenth year he was apprenticed to his halfbrother James, who was establishing himself in the printing business, and who in 1721 started the New England Courant, one of the earliest newspapers in America.

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  • But Benjamin's management of the paper, and particularly his free-thinking, displeased the authorities; the relations of the two brothers gradually grew unfriendly, possibly, as Benjamin thought, because of his brother's jealousy of his superior ability; and Benjamin determined to quit his brother's employ and to leave New England.

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  • Franklin early rebelled against New England Puritanism and spent his Sundays in reading and in study instead of attending church.

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  • He later called himself a deist, or theist, not discriminating between the terms. To his favourite sister he wrote: " There are some things in your New England doctrine and worship which I do not agree with; but I do not therefore condemn them, or desire to shake your belief or practice of them."

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  • The Cambridge Platform of 1648 by which the New England churches defined their practice, devotes ch.

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  • With the exception of this corner, Massachusetts is a part of the slanting upland that includes all of southern New England.

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  • Thus the original native trees and plants were those common to New England and northern New York.

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  • Systematic quarrying of siliceous crystalline rocks in New England began at Quincy in about 1820.

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  • Already by 1660 New England products were an " important element in the commerce and industries of the mother country " (Weeden).

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  • In Massachusetts, as in New England generally, the word " town " is used, officially and colloquially, to designate a township, and during the colonial era the New England town-meeting was a notable school for education in self-government.

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  • The Boston public library, exceeded in size in the United States by the library of Congress at Washington - and probably first, because of the large number of duplicates in the library of Congress - and the largest free municipal library in the world; the library of Harvard, extremely well chosen and valuable for research; the collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1791); the Boston Athenaeum (1807); the State Library (1826); the New England Historic Genealogical Society (1845); the Congregational Library; the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1780); and the Boston Society of Natural History (1830), all in Boston, leave it easily unrivalled, unless by Washington, as the best research centre of the country.

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  • The Horace Mann school in Boston, a public day school for the deaf, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes at Beverly and the Clarke school for the deaf at Northampton are maintained in part by the state.

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  • When it had become known that the colony was within the territory of the New England Council, John Pierce, in 1621, procured from that body a grant which made the colonists its tenants.

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  • King James having by patent in 1620 created a Council for New England to whom he made a large grant of territory, the council in 1628 made a sub-grant, confirmed by a royal charter that passed the seals on the 4th of March 1629, to the "Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in Newe England."

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  • After more than half a century of struggle, the crown finally annulled the charter of the colony in 1684, though not until 1686 was the old government actually supplanted on the arrival of Joseph Dudley, a native of the colony, as president of a provisional council; later, Sir Edmund Andros was sent over with a commission to unite New York and New England under his rule.

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  • Davis, Physical Geography of Southern New England (New York, 1895), and for the western counties, R.

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  • Winthrop, History of New England 1630-1649, edited by J.

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  • Palfrey, History of New England (5 vols., Boston, I 85 f;-1890), to the War of Independence.

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  • Drake, Annals of Witchcraft (Boston, 1869) and The Witchcraft Delusion in New England (3 vols., Roxbury, 1866), this last a reprint of accounts of the time by Cotton Mather and R.

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  • Lowell are two on " New England two Centuries Ago " and " Witchcraft."

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  • On New England discontent preceding 1812, Henry Adams, Documents Relating to New England Federalism, 1880-1815 (Boston, 1877); T.

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  • In American works of fiction, particularly of New England authors, the reader will find a wealth of description of Massachusetts and New England life, past and present, as in the writings of William D.

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  • MILLARD FILLMORE (1800-1874), thirteenth president of the United States of America, came of a family of English stock, which had early settled in New England.

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  • They sailed in a single ship, the "Mayflower," and landed near Cape Cod, where they founded the colony of Plymouth, afterwards (1621) obtaining a patent from the council for New England.

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  • These are the New England states and a few others in their vicinity or influenced by their example.

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  • But besides this telling pamphlet and the controversy which ensued, the experience of New England as to the practicability of Congregationalism, at least in that modified form known as the " New England Way," produced a growing impression, especially on parliament.

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  • - The history of American Congregationalism during its early years is practically that of the origin of New England.

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  • Of these it is enough to name John Cotton, able both as a divine and as a statesman, potent in England by his expositions and apologies of the " New England way," potent in America for his organizing and administrative power; Thomas Hooker, famed as an exponent and apologist of the " New England way "; John Eliot, famous as the " apostle of the Indians," first of Protestant missionaries to the heathen; Richard Mather, whose influence and work were carried on by his distinguished son, and his still more distinguished grandson, Cotton Mather.

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  • This wave of enthusiasm spread from Northampton, Mass., till it swept New England.

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  • Beyond the limits of New England the progress of the denomination as such was, as we have seen, a good deal hindered for a long period by the willingness of New Englanders going West either to join the Presbyterians, with whom they were substantially agreed in doctrine, or to combine with them in a mixed scheme of policy in which the Presbyterian element was uppermost.

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  • The Hudson (q.v.) is essentially a New York stream, though it receives some drainage from the New England States through its small eastern tributaries.

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  • These inducements encouraged immigration not only from the Fatherland but from New England and Virginia.

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  • Notwithstanding the good claim to their province which the Dutch had established by discovery and occupancy, the government of Great Britain, basing its claim to the same territory on Cabot's discovery (1498), the patent to the London and Plymouth companies (1606), and the patent to the Council for New England (1620), contended that the Dutch were intruders.

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  • About the same time the new king adopted a policy for strengthening the imperial control over New England.

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  • as well as for the erection of a stronger barrier against the French, and in 1688 New York and New Jersey were consolidated with the New England colonies into the Dominion of New England and placed under the viceregal authority of Sir Edmund Andros as governor-general.

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  • Such a scheme, if successfully carried out, would have driven a wedge into the line of colonial defence and cut off communication between New England and the southern colonies.

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  • Fauna and Flora: Reports of the Forest, Fish and Game Commissioner (Albany, 1902 sqq.); Ralph Hoffmann, Guide to the Birds of New England and Eastern New York (Boston, 1904); and Bulletins of the New York State Museum (Albany, 1888 sqq.).

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  • His parents were of Scottish-Irish descent, but the ancestors of both had been in New England for several generations.

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  • In August, on representations of the alarming state of the contest, he took the field in person, and made a series of campaign speeches, beginning in New England and extending throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, which aroused great enthusiasm, and were regarded at the time by both friends and opponents as the most brilliant continuous exhibition of varied intellectual power ever made by a candidate in a presidential canvass.

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  • The glacial drift east of the Missouri river, unlike that of the New England states, is remarkably free from boulders and gravel, except in a few morainic belts.

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  • The crystallines are confined to the portion of the belt east of the Great Valley where Paleozoic rocks are always highly metamorphosed and occur for the most part in limited patches, excepting in New England and Canada, where they assume greater areal importance, and are besides very generally intruded by granites.

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  • ==Flora and Fauna== Much of the region is covered with forest yielding quantities of valuable timber, especially in Canada and northern New England.

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  • The hills furnish excellent grazing for cattle, and much milk is shipped to New England cities.

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  • In 1824 duties were considerably raised; and thereafter the New England states, which so far had been lukewarm in supporting the movement, joined in it unreservedly.

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  • He insisted on the use of the prayer-book among the English soldiers in the service of Holland, and forced strict conformity on the church of the merchant adventurers at Delft, endeavouring even to reach the colonists in New England.

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  • In the summer of 1827, through the persistent efforts of persons most interested in the woollen manufactures of Massachusetts and other New England states to secure legislative aid for that industry, a convention of about loo delegates - manufacturers, newspaper men and politicians - was held in Harrisburg, and the programme adopted by the convention did much to bring about the passage of the famous high tariff act of 1828.

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  • Hartford is served by two divisions of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by the Central New England railway, by the several electric lines of the Connecticut Company which radiate to the surrounding towns, and by the steamboats of the Hartford & New York Transportation Co., all of which are controlled by the N.Y., N.H.

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  • is Keney Park (680 acres), the gift of Henry Keney, and, next to the Metropolitan Reservations near Boston, the largest park in the New England states.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mill in New England was opened in Hartford; and here, too, about 1846, the Rogers process of electro-silver plating was invented.

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  • The War of 1812, with the Embargo Acts (1807-1813), which were so destructive of New England's commerce, thoroughly aroused the Federalist leaders in this part of the country against the National government as administered by the Democrats, and in 1814, when the British were not only threatening a general invasion of their territory but had actually occupied a part of the Maine coast, and the National government promised no protection, the legislature of Massachusetts invited the other New England states to join with her in sending delegates to a convention which should meet at Hartford to consider their grievances, means of preserving their resources, measures of protection against the British, and the advisability of taking measures to bring about a convention of delegates from all the United States for the purpose of revising the Federal constitution.

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  • C. Lodge, Life and Letters of George Cabot (Boston, 1877); and Henry Adams, Documents Relating to New England Federalism (Boston, 1877).

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  • Like all old New England cities, it is irregularly laid out.

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  • In the city are a public library, the Beverly hospital, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes (organized, 1876; incorporated, 1879), and the Beverly historical society (1891), which owns a large colonial house, in which there is a valuable historical collection.

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  • George Cabot lived for many years in Beverly, which he represented in the provincial congress (1779); Nathan Dane (1752-1835) was also a resident; and it was the birthplace of Wilson Flagg (1805-1884), the author of Studies in the Field and Forest (1857), The Woods and By-Ways of New England (1872), The Birds and Seasons of New England (1875), and A Year with the Birds (1881).

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  • It was also the birthplace and early home of Lucy Larcom (1826-1893), and the scene of much of her Story of a New England Girlhood (Boston, 188q).

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  • In September 1650 he came to an agreement with the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England at Hartford upon the boundary between New Netherland and Connecticut, involving the sacrifice of a large amount of territory, the new boundary crossing Long Island from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, and on the mainland north from a point west of Greenwich Bay, 4 m.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and by the Central New England railways, which meet at Simsbury village.

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  • The Corporation for the Promoting and Propagating of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in New England (founded in 1649) bore the expense of printing both the New Testament and the Bible as a whole (Cambridge, Mass., 1663 - the earliest Bible printed in.America), which John Eliot, one of the Pilgrim Fathers, translated into "the language of the Massachusetts Indians," whom he evangelized.

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  • GREAT AWAKENING, the name given to a remarkable religious revival centring in New England in 1740-1743, but covering all the American colonies in 1740-1750.

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  • NEW HAMPSHIRE, a North Atlantic state of the United States, one of the New England group, and one of the Original Thirteen, lying between latitudes 42° 40' and 45° 18' 23" N., and between longitudes 70° 37' and 72° 37' W.

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  • The delightful scenery of mountains, lakes, streams and woodlands gives to the greater part of New Hampshire, which is in the New England physiographic province, the appearance of a vast and beautiful park; and the state is a favourite summer resort.

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  • South of the mountains a plateau-like surface - a part of the New England Uplands - broken by residual mountains, or " monadnocks " (a term derived from Mount Monadnock, 3186 ft.

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  • Of the 323,481 native-born, 80,435, or 24.8%, were natives of other states than New Hampshire; 56,210 of these were natives of other New England states, however, and 7502 were natives of New York.

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  • Martin Pring was at the mouth of the Piscataqua in 1603 and, returning to England in the same year, gave an account of the New England coast from Casco Bay to Cape Cod Bay.

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  • Samuel de Champlain discovered the Isles of Shoals and sailed along the New Hampshire coast in 1605, and much more information concerning this part of the New World was gathered in 1614 by Captain John Smith, who in his Description of New England refers to the convenient harbour at the mouth of the Piscataqua and praises the country back from the rocky shore.

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  • The commission appointed by the king in 1664 to hear and determine complaints in New England decided that Mason's lands were not within the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, and made an attempt to set up a government under which his claims could be tried, but this was a failure.

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  • Ward, " The New Hampshire Constitution," in The New England Magazine, N.S., vol.

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  • This encounter roused the New England colonies, and in a few days some 16,000 of their townsmen marched in small bands upon Boston to protest against and resist further similar incursions; and in this irregular body we have the nucleus of the colonial forces which carried the war through.

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  • As much more than one-half of the population and resources of the colonists lay north of Chesapeake Bay - New England alone having an estimated population of over 700,000 persons - it was only a question as to what point in this area should be made the future base of operations.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • Captain Gosnold rounded Gay Head, which he named Dover Cliff, and established on what is now Cuttyhunk Island, which he called Elizabeth Island, the first (though, as it proved, a temporary) English settlement in New England.

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  • The territory within the jurisdiction of the Council for New England was parcelled in 1635 among the patentees in such 1 In the 17th century both "Martha's Vineyard" and "Martin's Vineyard" were used, and the latter appears in a book as early as.

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  • His views were ably presented in his sermon Enthusiasm and in his Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England (1743), written in answer to Jonathan Edwards's Some Thoughts Concerning the Present Revival of Religion in New England (1742).

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  • Theologically he has been classed as a precursor of the New England Unitarians.

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  • Y., 1884); and Williston Walker's Ten New England Leaders (New York, 1901).

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  • It is situated on elevated land, and is one of the most attractive of southern New England summer resorts.

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  • The town is the centre of great educational activity, its schools including the New England girls' school, St Patrick's college, the high school, the Ursuline convent and state schools.

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  • In a north-eastern section, practically all of New England is occupied by the older crystalline belt; the corresponding northern part of the stratified belt in the St Lawrence and Champlain-Hudson valleys on the inland side of New England is comparatively free from the ridge-making rocks which abound farther south; and here the plateau member is wanting, being replaced, as it were, by the Adirondacks, an outlier of the Laurentian highlands of Canada which immediately succeeds the deformed stratified belt west of Lake Champlain.

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  • The community of characteristics that is suggested by the association of six north-eastern states under the name New England The North- is in large measure warranted by the inclusion of easternA all these states within the broadened crystalline belt palachians of the north-eastern Appalachians, which is here 150 m.

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  • in the north-west, before descent is made to the lowlands of the stratified belt (St Lawrence-Champlain-Hudson valleys, described later on as part of the Great Appalachian valley), and at the same time the rising uplands are diversified with monadnocks of increasing number and height and by mature valleys cut to greater and greater depths; thus the interior of New England is moderately mountainous.

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  • The Appalachian trends (N.E.S.W.) that are so prominent in the stratified belt of the middle Appalachians, and are fairly well marked in the crystalline belt of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, are prevailingly absent in New England.

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  • But in general the dissection of the New England upland is as irregular as is the distribution of the surmounting monadnocks.

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  • The drainage of New England is unlike that of the middle and south-western Appalachians in the occurrence of numerous lakes and falls.

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  • In New England also a wellestablished drainage undoubtedly prevailed in preglacial times; but partly in consequence of the irregular scouring of the rock floor, and even more because of the very irregular deposition of unstratified and stratified drift in the valleys, the drainage is now in great disorder.

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  • The maturely dissected and recently glaciated uplands of New England are now somewhat depressed with respect to sea-level, so that the sea enters the valleys, forming bays and estuaries, while the interfiuve uplands and hills stand forth in headlands and islands.

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  • As in the north-east, so in the south-west, the crystalline belt widens and gains in height; but while New England is an indivisible unit, the southern crystalline belt must be subdivided The Southinto a higher mountain belt on the north-west, 60 m.

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  • A strikin,g contrast between New England and the rest of the Appalachians is found in the descent of the New England uplands Th At!

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  • The small triangular section of the coastal plain in New Jersey north of Delaware Bay deserves separate treatment because of the development there of a pectiliar topographic feature, which throws light on the occurrence of the islands off the New England coast, described in the next paragraph.

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  • There is good reason for believing that at least along the southern border of New England a narrow coastal plain was for a time added to the continental border; and that, as in the New Jersey section the plain was here stripped from a significant breadth of inland overlap and worn down so as to form an inner lowland enclosed by a longitudinal upland or cuesta; and that when this stage was reached a submergence, of the kind which has produced the many embayments of the New England coast, drowned the outer part of thy plain and the inner lowland, leaving only the higher parts of the cuesta as islands.

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  • It appears in the cores of some of the western mountains, in some of the deep canyons of the west, as in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado in northern Arizona, and over considerable areas in northern Wiscpnsin and Minnesota, in New England and the piedmont plateau east of the Appalachian Mountains, and in a few other situations.

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  • The above section is fairly representative for considerable parts of New England.

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  • A curious feature of the cyclonic storms is that, whether they cross the interior of the country near the northern or southern boundary or along an intermediate path, they converge towards New England as they pass on toward the Atlantic; and hence that the north-eastern part of the United States is subjected to especially numerous and strong weather changes.

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  • The Alleghanian area comprises most of the lowlands of New England.

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  • In 1900 more than half of every 100 whites in New England and the Middle states (from New York to Maryland) were of foreign parentage (i.e.

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  • The median age of the aggregate population is highest in New England and the Pacific states, lowest in the South, and in the North Central about equal to the countrys average.

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  • Within the area of 1790 there were twice as many families in 1900 as in 1790 consisting of 2 persons, and barely half as many consisting of 7 and upward; New England having shown the greatest and the South the least decrease.

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  • The decline in the proportion of children since 1860 has been decidedly less in the South (Southern Atlantic and South Central states as defined below) than in the North and West, but in the most recent decades the last section has apparently fast followed New England in having a progressively lesser proportion of children.

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  • So also the immigration of French Canadians and of Irish explains the fact that in every state of one-time Puritan New England the Roman Catholics were a majority over Protestants and all other churches.

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  • Early in the I 8th century the industry began to extend over New England and into New Jersey, the German bloomery forge being employed for reducing the ore directly to bar iron, and by the middle of that century it had taken a pretty firm hold in the Atlantic colonies.

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  • The East Indian trade had been opened from New England ports late in the 18th century.

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  • The town, or township, of New England is generally a rural community occupying a comparatively small area, and with a population averaging about 3000, hut ranging from 200 in newly-settled, districts or thinly-peopled hilly districts up to 17,000 in the vicinity of large cities and in manufacturing neighborhoods.

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  • In the Middle and Western states the township is a more artificial organism than the rural town of New England.

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  • In New England the county was originally an aggregation of towns for judicial purposes, and in that part of the Union it is still in the main a judicial district.

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  • Besides these officials there are generally to be found in New England a county school superintendent and an overseer of roads.

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  • In some Southern states some counties have been subdivided into school districts, each of which elects a school committee, and from this nucleus there may possibly develop something resembling the New England town.

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  • In those Middle and Western states where the town meeting is not found, the functions and officials of the county tend to resemble those existing in the Southern states, while even in those parts of the west where the town meeting is found the county remains more important than in New England.

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  • c. Within each state powers of taxation, to a determinate or to an indeterminate extent, as the case may be, are by the constitution and laws of the state conferred, almost always for strictly defined purposes, (1) upon counties, (2) upon cities, boroughs and incorporate villages, and (3) in nearly all the states, though in widely varying degrees, upon the primary geographical divisions of counties, such as the town of New England and the township of the Middle and Western states.

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  • Newburyport in the early part of the 18th century was one of the most prosperous commercial centres in New England.

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  • Buckwheat flour is used in considerable quantities in some districts for the making of buckwheat cakes, eaten with maple syrup. These two make an excellent breakfast dish, characteristic of Canada and some of the New England states.

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  • An ascetic, who practised the whole cycle of medieval austerities, he was determined that Canada should be ruled by the church, and he desired for New France a Puritanism as strict as that of New England.

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  • Frontenac planned attacks upon New England and encouraged a ruthless border warfare that involved many horrors.

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  • In 1744, when the war of the Austrian Succession broke out, the New England colonies planned and in 1745 effected the capture of Louisbourg, the stronghold of France in Cape Breton Island, which menaced their commerce.

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  • HALFWAY COVENANT, an expedient adopted in the Congregational churches of New England between 1657 and 1662.

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  • Meanwhile the New England Conference of the M.E.

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  • In many of the states, especially those with an enlightened public spirit, such as most of the New England states and many of the North-Western, the elections are fairly conducted, there being no intimidation at all, little or no bribery, and an honest count.

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  • The north-east part is a south-westward arm of the New England uplands, is known as the Reading Prong, and extends from New Jersey through Easton to Reading.

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  • The local government is a combination of the county system of the South and the township system of New England.

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  • At Salem he was a member of the congregation of Roger Williams, whom he resolutely defended in his trouble with the New England clerical hierarchy, and excited by Williams's teachings, cut the cross of St George from the English flag in token of his hatred of all symbols of Romanism.

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  • The volunteers organized as the Educational Commission for Freedmen (afterward the New England Freedmen's Aid Society), and the government granted them transportation, subsistence and quarters, and paid them small salaries.

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  • The discontent of New England with the war both hampered the American generals and also aided the British, who drew their supplies to a great extent from United States territory.

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  • No blockade of New England was at first attempted.

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  • During the Protectorate, in 1649, an ordinance was passed for " the promoting and propagating of the gospel of Jesus Christ in New England " by the erection of a corporation, to be called by the name of the President and Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England, to receive and dispose of moneys for the purpose, and a general collection was ordered to be made in all the parishes of England and Wales; and Cromwell himself devised a scheme for setting up a council for the Protestant religion, which should rival the Roman Propaganda, and consist of seven councillors and four secretaries for different provinces.'

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  • For now the corporation was styled " The Propagation of the Gospel in New England and the parts adjacent in America," and its object was defined to be " not only to seek the outward welfare and prosperity of those colonies, but more especially to endeavour the good and salvation of their immortal souls, and the publishing the most glorious gospel of Christ among them."

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  • Corporation for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England.

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  • Assertions of the right and necessity of secession were frequent from the beginning; separatist conspiracies were rife in the West until 1812; various leaders in New England made threats of secession in1790-1796and 1800-18r5 - especially in 1803 on account of the purchase of Louisiana, in 1811 on account of the proposed admission of Louisiana as a state, and during the troubles ending in the War of 1812.

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  • The forests of northern New England and of the province of Quebec supply the raw material for the extensive saw-mills and planing-mills, the pulpand paper-mills, and the sulphite fibre mills, said to be the largest in existence.

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  • Child, An Old New England Town, Sketches of Life, Scenery and Character (New York, 1895); and Mrs E.

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  • The New Hampshire Patriot, founded here in 1808 (and for twenty years edited) by Isaac Hill (1788-1851), who was a member of the United States Senate in 1831-1836, and governor of New Hampshire in 1836-1839, became one of the leading exponents of Jacksonian Democracy in New England.

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  • It is one of the largest secondary schools in New England and enjoys a wide and high reputation.

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  • JOHN LOWELL (1743-1802), American jurist, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on the 17th of June 1743, and was a son of the Reverend John Lowell, the first pastor of Newburyport, and a descendant of Perceval Lowle or Lowell (1571-1665), who emigrated from Somersetshire to Massachusetts Bay in 1639 and was the founder of the family in New England.

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  • Adams's Review of Mr Ames's Works (1809), New England Patriot, being a Candid Comparison of the Principles and Conduct of the Washington and Jefferson Administrations (1810), Appeals to the People on the Causes and Consequences of War with Great Britain (1811) and Mr Madison's War (1812).

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  • In 1628 a patent for the territory was granted by the New England Council to the Dorchester Company, in which the Rev. John White of Dorchester, England, was conspicuous, and which in the same year sent out a small company under John Endecott as governor.

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  • Lundy was then publishing in Baltimore a small monthly paper, entitled The Genius of Universal Emancipation, and he resolved to go to Bennington and invite Garrison to join him in the editorship. With this object in view he walked from Boston to Bennington, through the frost and snow of a New England winter, a distance of 125 m.

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  • He first proposed to establish his paper at Washington, in the midst of slavery, but on returning to New England and observing the state of public opinion there, he came to the conclusion that little could be done at the South while the non-slaveholding North was lending her influence, through political, commercial, religious and social channels, for the sustenance of slavery.

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  • The first society organized under Garrison's auspices, and in accordance with his principles, was the New England Anti-Slavery Society, which adopted its constitution in January 1832.

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  • Agents of the American Colonization Society in England having succeeded in deceiving leading Abolitionists there as to its character and tendency, Garrison was deputed by the New England Anti-Slavery Society to visit England for the purpose of counteracting their influence.

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  • This was General Burgoyne's force of 7000 men which marched from Canada in June 1777 with the view of reaching the upper Hudson and combining with British troops from New York to isolate New England from the colonies below.

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  • Milford is a typical old New England town, and many of the permanent inhabitants are descendants from the first settlers.

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  • Farlow, Marine Algae of New England (Washington, 1881); W.

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  • The American settlers came by way of the Ohio river, and the immigrants from the New England and Eastern states found their way to Illinois over the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes.

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  • The local government of Illinois includes both county and township systems. The earliest American settlers came from the Southern States and naturally introduced the county system; but the increase of population from the New England and Middle States led to a recognition of township organization in the constitution of 1848, and this form of government, at first prevalent only in the northern counties, is now found in most of the middle and southern counties.

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  • of all New England except Connecticut) in 1734, and in 1741, while representing Massachusetts in a boundary dispute with Rhode Island, was appointed governor.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to New England.

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  • The support of a measure so unpopular in New England caused him to be hated by the Federalists there and cost him his seat in the Senate; his successor was chosen on the 3rd of June 1808, several months before the usual time of filling the vacancy, and five days later Adams resigned.

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  • The market was soon flooded with carelessly made and inferior wampum, but it continued to be circulated in the remote districts of New England through the 17th century, and even into the beginning of the 18th.

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  • Weeden, Indian Money as a Factor in New England Civilization (Baltimore, 1884); E.

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  • The majority of the early settlers came from the southern and border states, principally from Missouri and Kentucky; but subsequently there was a large immigration of New England and Eastern people, and these elements were stronger in the population of Jacksonville than in any other city of southern Illinois.

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  • Winthrop's history in New England was very largely that of the Massachusetts colony, of which he was twelve times chosen governor by annual election, serving in 1629-1634, 1637-1640, in 1642-1644, and in 1646-1649, and dying in office.

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  • She followed him to New England in 1631, bore him eight children, and died on the 14th of June 1647.

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  • Winthrop's Journal, an invaluable record of early Massachusetts history, was printed in part in Hartford in 1790; the whole in Boston, edited by James Savage, as The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, in 1825-1826, and again in 1853; and in New York, edited by James K.

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  • He developed four well-defined characters in the process - a country farmer, Ezekiel Biglow, and his son Hosea; the Rev. Homer Wilbur, a shrewd old-fashioned country minister; and Birdofredum Sawin, a Northern renegade who enters the army, together with one or two subordinate characters; and his stinging satire and sly humour are so set forth in the vernacular of New England as to give at once a historic dignity to this form of speech.

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  • (Later he wrote an elaborate paper to show the survival in New England of the English of the early 17th century.) He embroidered his verse with an entertaining apparatus of notes and mock criticism.

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  • The Philippine " municipality " is an administrative area, often sparsely settled, is often called a town, and may be compared to a New England township; the municipalities are the units into which the provinces are divided.

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  • Each municipality is made up of barrios or small villages (about 13,400 in the entire archipelago) and of one, or more, more thickly peopled areas, each called a poblacion, and resembling the township " centre " of New England.

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  • In the vicinity was the house of the Rev. William Hubbard (1621-1704), author of a Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England (Boston, 1677) and a general History of New England, published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1815.

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  • In northern New England and Canada it is largely manufactured into wood-pulp; it is occasionally used in turnery and for wooden-ware.

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  • The Virginia resolutions and the Kentucky resolutions (the latter having been drafted by Jefferson) were met by dissenting resolutions from the New England states, from New York, and from Delaware.

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  • Madison himself had attempted alternately to prevent war by his "commercial weapons" and to prepare the country for war, but he had met with no success, because of the tricky diplomacy of Great Britain and of France, and because of the general distrust of him coupled with the particular opposition to the war of the prosperous New England Federalists, who suggested with the utmost seriousness that his resignation should be demanded.

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  • It is served by the Lehigh Valley, the Philadelphia & Reading, the Central of New Jersey and the Lehigh & New England railways.

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  • The next year Lady Deborah Moody with some followers from New England founded Gravesend near the southern extremity of the borough.

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  • Up to 1840 the mill hands, with the exception of English dyers and calico printers, were New England girls.

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  • Harriet Hanson wrote Early Factory Labor in New England (1883) and Loom and Spindle (1898), an important contribution to the industrial and social history of Lowell.

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  • An Idyl of Work (1875) describes the life of the mills and A New England Girlhood (1889) is autobiographical; she wrote many stories and poems, of which Hannah Binding Shoes is best known.

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  • The same tendency, moreover, is traceable in the New England States of America, so far as statistics are available.

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  • The war began in Massachusetts, troops from New England flocking to the neighbourhood of Boston almost spontaneously; but the resistance, if it was to be effective, must have the support of the colonies to the southward, and the Virginia colonel who was serving on all the military committees of Congress, and whose experience in the Braddock campaign had made his name favourably known in England, was the obvious as well as the politic choice.

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  • His official visits to New England in 1789, to Rhode Island in 1790 and to the South in 1791 enabled him to test public opinion at the same time that they increased popular interest in the national government.

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  • But the picturesque scenery and delightful summer climate have made New England a favourite resort.

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  • When the commerce of New England was interrupted as a consequence of the Napoleonic wars, the abundance of water power afforded by the rivers encouraged manufacturing, and the region rapidly acquired prominence in this industry, especially in the manufacture of textiles, of boots and shoes, and of paper and wood pulp; in 1905 the value of the textile products of New England (excluding flax, hemp and jute) alone was $522,821,440 (more than 45% of that of the entire country), the value of boots and shoes was $181,023,946 (more than 55% of the total for the entire country), the value of paper and wood pulp was $49,813,133 (more than one-quarter of that of the entire country), and the value of all factory products amounted to $2,025,998,437 (nearly one-seventh of the total for the entire country).

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  • A new charter of 1620 conveyed to the New England Council, the successor of the Plymouth Company, all.

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  • permanent settlement was established at Plymouth by a band of Separatists, who, although they had expected to settle in Virginia, were prevailed upon by the captain of their vessel to land in New England.

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  • During its existence of fifteen years the New England Council made numerous grants of territory, and from three of these grew three of the present states: Massachusetts, from a grant to the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1628; Maine, from the grant to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and John Mason (the two most influential members of the council) in 1622; and New Hampshire, from the grant to John Mason in 1629.

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  • To meet these needs they organized, under Articles of Confederation signed in 1643, the first form of colonial union in America; they called it The United Colonies of New England, but it is more commonly known as the New England Confederacy.

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  • In 1676 the Lords of Trade and Plantations sent over Edward Randolph to investigate and gather information which would show the justice and expediency of imposing imperial control, and two years later Randolph was appointed Collector and Surveyor of Customs in New England.

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  • This done, the home government set to work to organize the royal domain which should be known as New England, or the Dominion of New England, and its plan for this provided for the annulment of the charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut, and the inclusion in the Dominion of these colonies, and New Hampshire, Maine, New York and the Jerseys, thereby restoring to New England all the territory, with the exception of Pennsylvania, that was included in the grant to the New England Council in 1620.

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  • A temporary government was established at Boston in May 1686, with Joseph Dudley as president, and in December of the same year Edmund Andros arrived with a commission and instructions which were a copy of those to the governor of New York and made him governor of all New England except Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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  • Connecticut successfully baffled the royal servants for a time, but when threatened with a division of its territory agreed not to resist the royal purpose, and on the last day of October 1687 it passed under the general government of New England.

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  • Finally, a new commission to Andros, issued in April 1688, extended his jurisdiction over New York and the Jerseys, and the whole region over which he was made governor by this instrument was named "Our Territory and Dominion of New England in America."

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  • But the English Revolution of 1688 inspired a revolt in New England by which Andros was deposed in April 1689.

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  • So long as the religious motive remained dominant, "blue laws" were a prominent feature of the administration, but by a slow transition the economic motive became the dominant one, and, as a consequence of this transition and of the corporate form of government, European institutions were transformed into American institutions and new political ideas were generated more rapidly in New England than in either the Middle or the Southern colonies.

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  • Owing to its geographical position, nearer to Canada than any other group of colonies, New England had to stand the brunt of the fighting during the wars between the English and the French (aided by their Indian allies) in America, terminating with the conquest of Canada by the English in 1759-1760, and a sense of common danger helped to create a certain solidarity, which made easier the union of the colonies for common action against the mother country at the time of the War of American Independence.

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  • See the articles on the separate New England states and the authorities there given; among good general works are J.

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  • Palfrey, History of New England (5 vols., Boston, 1858-1890); J.

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  • James, The Colonization of New England (Philadelphia, 1904); H.

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  • Drake, The Making of New England (New York, 1896); W.

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  • Weeden, Economic and Social History of New England (2 vols., Boston, 1890); and Edward Channing, History of the United States, vols.

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  • She was one of the organizers of the American Woman-Suffrage Association and of the Association for the Advancement of Women (1869), and in 1870 became one of the editors of the Woman's Journal, and in 1872 president of the New England Women's Club.

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  • Howe (1876), Life of Margaret Fuller (1883), in the "Famous Women" series, Sketches of Representative Women of New England (1905) and her own Reminiscences (Boston, 1899).

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  • From 1643 onward antipaedobaptists from New England and elsewhere had settled in the New Netherlands (New York).

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  • In many New England communities a majority in the churches of the standing order bitterly opposed the new evangelism, and those who came under its influence felt constrained to organize "Separate" or "New Light" churches.

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  • Among the Baptist leaders gained from Congregationalism as a result of the awakening was Isaac Backus (1724-1806), who became the New England champion in the cause of religious liberty and equality, and the historian of his denomination.

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  • The Baptist cause in New England that had profited so largely from the Great Awakening failed to reap a like harvest from the War of Independence.

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  • The standing order in New England represented the patriotic and popular party.

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  • Though a large proportion of the New England Baptists co-operated heartily in the cause of independence, the denomination failed to win the popularity that comes from successful leadership.

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  • Hezekiah Smith was a highly successful evangelist, and through his labours scores of churches were constituted in New England.

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  • He became a skilled linguist, a widely read scholar - though much of his learning was more curious than useful - a powerful preacher, a valued citizen, and a voluminous writer, and did a vast deal for the intellectual and spiritual quickening of New England.

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  • It is in seven books and concerns itself mainly with the settlement and religious history of New England.

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  • His other writings include A Poem Dedicated to the Memory of the Reverend and Excellent Mr Urian Oakes (1682); The Present State of New England (1690); The Life of the Renowned John Eliot (1691), later included in Book III.

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  • of the Magnalia; The Short History of New England (1694); Bonifacius, usually known as Essays To Do Good (Boston, 1710; Glasgow, 1825; Boston, 1845), one of his principal books and one which had a shaping influence on the life of Benjamin Franklin; Psalterium Americanum (1718), a blank verse translation of the Psalms from the original Hebrew; The Christian Philosopher: A Collection of the Best Discoveries in Nature, with Religious Improvements (1721); Parentator (1724), a memoir of his father; Ratio Disciplinae (1726), an account of the discipline in New England churches; Manuductio ad Ministerium: Directions for a Candidate of the Ministry (1726), one of the most readable of his books.

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  • Among his works are The Life of Cotton Mather (3729); An Apology for the Liberties of the Churches in New England (1738), and America Known to the Ancients (1773).

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  • In 1844 he was consecrated bishop of Axieren in partibus, and was made coadjutor to Bishop Hughes of New York with the right of succession; in 1847 he became bishop of the newly created see of Albany; and in 1864 he succeeded to the archdiocese of New York, then including New York, New Jersey, and New England.

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  • The red pine of Canada and New England (so called from the colour of its bark), P. resinosa, is a tree of considerable size, sometimes attaining the dimensions of P. sylvestris.

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  • Formerly Maine and Vermont were celebrated for the size of their pines, but few of these great trees now exist in New England.

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  • Having continued twelve years at Franeker (where he was rector in 1626), his health gave way, and he contemplated removal to New England.

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  • His valuable library found a home in New England.

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  • In May 1679 Mather was a petitioner to the General Court for the call of a Synod to consider the reformation in New England of "the Evils that have Provoked the Lord to bring his Judgments," 2 and when the "Reforming Synod" met in September it appointed him one of a committee to draft a creed; this committee reported in May, 680, at the Synod's second session, of which Mather was moderator, the Savoy Declaration (slightly modified, notably in ch.

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  • Sibley's Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University (Cambridge, 1873), with an exhaustive list of Mather's works (about 150 titles); there is much valuable matter in Williston Walker's Ten New England Leaders (New York, 1901) and in his Creeds and Platforms of Congregationalism (New York, 1893); for literary criticism of the Mathers see ch.

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  • the American of New England and the Boer of South Africa, prove that man is no less readily affected by his surroundings.

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  • His principal published works are: Stories from the Life of the Teacher (1863), A Child's Book of Religion (1866), and other works of religious teaching for children; several volumes of sermons; Beliefs of Unbelievers (1876), The Cradle of the Christ: a Study in Primitive Christianity (1877), The Spirit of New Faith (1877), The Rising and the Setting Faith (1878), and other expositions of the "new faith" he preached; Life of Theodore Parker (1874), Transcendentalism in New England (1876), which is largely biographical, Gerrit Smith, a Biography (1878), George Ripley (1882), in the "American Men of Letters" series, Memoir of William Henry Channing (1886), Boston Unitarianism, 1820-1850 (1890), really a biography of his father; and Recollections and Impressions, 1822-1890 (1891).

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  • It was during those years that there grew up in New England that form of thought or philosophy known as Transcendentalism.

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  • and to the upland region of southern New England.

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  • During the colonial period there were schools maintained by churches, a few town schools of the New England type, and, in the latter part of the era, a number of private schools.

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  • By the English of New England and Virginia the Dutch and Swedes were regarded as intruders, and were repeatedly warned against trespassing on English soil.'

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  • showed an unyielding determination to annul the privileges of the colonies, and to unite New York, New Jersey and the New England colonies under a single government.

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  • Andros, previously appointed viceroy of New England, thereupon received a new commission extending his authority over New York and the Jerseys, and in August 1688 he formally annexed these provinces to the Dominion of New England.

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  • The former, settled largely by people from New England and Long Island, was dominated by Puritans; the latter by Quakers.

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  • On the New England tableland, under latitude 30° S., the yearly average temperature is 56.5°, the mean summer 67.7° and the mean winter 44.3°.

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  • The highland rocks no doubt once extended along the whole length of the state from north to south; but they are now crossed by a band of Upper Palaeozoic sediments, which extend up to the valley of the Hunter river and separate the Blue Mountains and the Southern Highlands of New South Wales from the New England tableland to the north.

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  • The oldest rocks in New South Wales are referrable to the Archean system, and consist of gneisses and schists, including the glaucophane-schists in the New England tableland, and hornblendeschists of Berthong.

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  • The Lower Carboniferous rocks also occur in the Blue Mountains, along the Cox river and Capertee river; and a northern continuation occurs along the western slope of the New England tableland, from the Macintyre river to the Queensland border.

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  • In a basic neck of this period at Inverell, there are eclogite boulders, containing diamonds in situ; and it is doubtless from these basic volcanic necks that the diamonds of the New England tableland have been derived.

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  • Tin is worked in the rivers of the New England tableland as at Vegetable Creek.

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  • MAINE, a North Atlantic state of the United States of America, the most north-easterly state in the Union, and the largest of the New England group. It lies between 43° 4' and 47° 2 7' 33" N., and between 66° 56' 48" and 71° 6' 41" W.

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  • The surface is a gently rolling upland, forming a part of the " New England uplands," above which rise isolated mountain peaks and clusters of peaks, and below which are cut numerous river valleys.'

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  • Because of the cold climate, the large areas in which there is little or no good arable land, the growing demand for timber land, and the large and constant supply of waterpower afforded by the principal rivers, agriculture in Maine, as in all the other New England states except Vermont, is a smaller industry than manufacturing; in 1900 there were 87,932 people engaged in manufacturing and only 76,932 engaged in agriculture.

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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States, 588,211, or 97.8%, were natives of New England and 560,506 were natives of Maine, and of the foreign-born 67,077, or 71.8%, were natives of Canada (36,169 English and 30,908 French), and 10,159, or 10.8%, were natives of Ireland.

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  • The Council for New England surrendered its charter in 1635.

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  • Cape Porpoise to Casco, and in issuing which the Council for New England had granted governmental as well as territorial rights.

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  • Seven of his ancestors were ministers of New England churches.

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  • All through his life he navigated the Transcendental sea, piloted by a clear moral sense, warned off the rocks by the saving grace of humour, and kept from capsizing by a good ballast of New England prudence.

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  • The doctrine which in others seemed to produce all sorts of extravagances - communistic experiments at Brook Farm and Fruitlands, weird schemes of political reform, long hair on men and short hair on women - in his sane, wellbalanced nature served only to lend an ideal charm to the familiar outline of a plain, orderly New England life.

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  • He thus drew an important distinction between the " Deutschland," which had peacefully brought a cargo to America, and the U53, which had raided several ships off the New England coast Oct.

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  • In reply to Edwards, Charles Chauncy anonymously wrote The Late Religious Cornmotions in New England Considered (1743), urging conduct as the sole test of conversion; and the general convention of Congregational ministers in the Province of Massachusetts Bay protested " against disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land."

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  • His position at the time was not unpopular throughout New England, and it is needless to say that his doctrine that the Lord's Supper is not a cause of regeneration and that communicants should be professing Christians has since (very largely through the efforts of his pupil Joseph Bellamy) become a standard of New England Congre gationalism.

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  • He edited his father's incomplete History of the Work of Redemption, wrote in answer to Stephen West, A Dissertation Concerning Liberty and Necessity (1797), which defended his father's work on the Will by a rather strained interpretation, and in answer to Chauncy on universal salvation formulated what is known as the " Edwardean," New England or Governmental theory of the atonement in The Necessity of the Atonement and its Consistency with Free Grace in Forgiveness (1785).

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  • These poems went far to wake in the youth of New England a sense of the great national wrong, and to prepare them for that bitter struggle in which it was wiped out at the expense of the lives of so many of them.

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  • Next came the New England Tragedies (1868) and The Divine Tragedy (1871), which found no large public. In 1868-1869 the poet visited Europe, and was everywhere received with the greatest honour.

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  • Mason became a member of the Council for New England in June 1632, and its vice-president in the following November; and in 1635, when the members decided to divide their territory among themselves and surrender their charter, he was allotted as his share all the region between the Naumkeag and Piscataqua rivers extending 60 m.

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  • Bunyan has told us, with very pardonable vanity, that in New England his dream was the daily subject of the conversation of thousands, and was thought worthy to appear in the most superb binding.

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  • He was not indeed a parish pastor; he inspired church activities which grew to large proportions, but trusted the organization of them to laymen of organizing abilities in the church; and for acquaintance with his people he depended on such social occasions as were furnished in the free atmosphere of this essentially New England church at the close of every service.

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  • Retaining to the day of his death the forms and phrases of the New England theology in which he had been reared, he poured into them a new meaning and gave to them a new significance.

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  • The principal books by Beecher, besides his published sermons, are: Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844); Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes (1855); Star Papers, Experiences of Art and Nature (1855); Life Thoughts (1858); New Star Papers; or Views and Experiences of Religious Subjects (1859); Plain and Pleasant Talks about Fruits, Flowers and Farming (1859); American Rebellion, Report of Speeches delivered in England at Public Meetings in Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London (1864); Prayers from Plymouth Pulpit (1867); Norwood: A Tale of Village Life in New England (1867); The Life of Jesus the Christ (1871), completed in 2 vols., by his sons (1891); and Yale Lectures on Preaching (3 vols., 1872-1874).

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  • It lies on the border of the meadow-land, and with its irregular, semi-rural streets, and venerable trees is considered one of the prettiest villages in New England.

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  • The dwelling was built in the 17th century by his ancestor, the sturdy immigrant, Thomas Whittier, notable through his efforts to secure toleration for the disciples of George Fox in New England.

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  • While in Hartford Whittier issued in prose and verse his first book, Legends of New England (1831), and edited the writings of the poet John Gardiner C. Brainard.

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  • Meanwhile he did much editing and compiling, and produced, among other works in prose, The Stranger in Lowell (1845), Supernaturalism in New England (1847), Leaves from Margaret Smith's Journal (1849), a pleasing treatment in old-style English of an early Colonial theme.

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  • Parkman called him " the poet of New England," but as the North and West then were charged with the spirit of the New England states, the two verdicts were much the same.

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  • Dr Stiles published several sermons, notably, a Discourse on the Christian Union (1761), which has remarkable ecclesiastical breadth of view; an Account of the Settlement of Bristol, Rhode Island (1785); and a History of Three of the Judges of King Charles I.: MajorGeneral Whalley, Major-General Goffe and Colonel Dixwell (1794) He began in 1768 but never finished an Ecclesiastical History of New England and British America.

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  • Dexter, who quotes largely from Dr Stiles's Itineraries, a daily account of his travels; the Diary gives a valuable picture of the life of New England in 1769-1795 and many interesting estimates of Stiles's contemporaries.

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  • The most famous example of the pseudo-philosophic use of the term is for a movement of thought which was prominent in the New England states from about 1830 to 1850.

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  • Ames was one of the group of New England ultraFederalists known as the "Essex Junto," who opposed the French policy of President John Adams in 1798, and were conspicuous for their British sympathies.

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  • Cambridge is a typical New England city, built up in detached residences, with irregular streets pleasantly shaded, and a considerable wealth of historic and literary associations.

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  • Other notable dates in history are 1637 and 1647, when general synods of New England churches met at Cambridge to settle disputed doctrine and define orthodoxy; the departure for Connecticut of Thomas Hooker's congregation in 1636; the meeting of the convention that framed the present constitution of the commonwealth, 1779-1780; the separation of the Congregationalists and Unitarians of the first parish church, in 1829; and the grant of a city charter in 1846.

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  • In some of the New England States, it has been usual for the governor to appoint by proclamation at some time in spring a day of fasting, when religious services are conducted in the churches.

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  • As early as the middle of the 18th century Harvard College represented the most advanced thought of the time, and a score or more of clergymen in New England were preaching what was essentially Unitarianism.

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  • long to the Neponset river was built here - the first in New England - for carrying granite from the quarries to tide-water; the cars were drawn by horses.

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  • Throughout his life he was much interested in politics, and though his temperamental indolence and his aversion for public life often prevented his accepting office, he exercised as a contributor, to the press and through his friendships, a powerful political influence, especially in New England.

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  • Its effects are most clearly seen in Scotland, in Puritan England and in the New England states, but its influence was and is felt among peoples that have little desire or claim to be called Calvinist.

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  • The New England Homestead (weekly; published by the Orange Judd Company), Farm and Home, a semi-monthly, and Good Housekeeping, a monthly (published by the Phelps Publishing Company), and the Kindergarten Review (monthly, published by the MiltonBradley Company, who publish other educational matter) are important periodicals.

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  • In July of that year representatives of the New England States and New York met here in convention to consider plans of co-operation for meeting Burgoyne's invasion.

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  • On the 16th of October 1690 several New England ships under the command of Sir William Phipps appeared off the Island of Orleans, and an officer was sent ashore to demand the surrender of the fort.

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  • It was founded in 1788 by a company of Revolutionary officers from New England under the leadership of General Rufus Putnam, and in the same year the North-West Territory was formally organized here.

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  • His last letter on politics, written two days before his death, illustrates the two sides of his thinking already emphasized: in this letter he warns his New England friends against dismemberment of the union as " a clear sacrifice of great positive advantages, without any counterbalancing good; administering no relief to our real disease, which is democracy, the poison of which, by a subdivision, will only be more concentrated in each part, and consequently the more virulent."

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  • CONNECTICUT, one of the thirteen original states of the United States of America, and one of the New England group of states, It is bounded N.

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  • portion of the peneplain region of New England.

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  • The climate of Connecticut, though temperate, is subject to sudden changes, yet the extremes of cold and heat are less than in the other New England states.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mills in New England were established at Hartford, and about 1803 one hundred merino sheep were imported by David Humphreys, who in 1806 built a mill in that part of Derby which is now Seymour and which was practically the first New England factory town; in 1812 steam was first used by the Middletown Woollen Manufacturing Company.

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  • Of the laws (45 in number) given by Peters, more than one-half really existed in New Haven, and more than four-fifths existed in some form in the New England colonies.

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  • It created a corporation under the name of the Governor and Company of the English Colony of Connecticut in New England in America, sanctioned the system of government already existing, provided that all acts of the general court should be valid upon being issued under the seal of the colony, and made no reservation of royal or parliamentary control over legislation or the administration of justice.

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  • Although the governmental and religious influences which moulded Connecticut were similar to those which moulded New England at large, the colony developed certain distinctive characteristics.

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  • Soon after the first settlements were made, a dispute arose with Massachusetts regarding the boundary between the two colonies; after the brief war with the Pequot Indians in 1637 a similar quarrel followed regarding Connecticut's right to the Pequot lands, and in the New England Confederation (established in 1643) friction between Massachusetts and Connecticut continued.

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  • The relations of Connecticut and New Haven with the mother country were similar to those of the other New England colonies.

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  • The period of most serious friction was that during the administration of the New England colonies by Sir Edmund Andros, who in pursuance of the later Stuart policy both in England and in her American colonies visited Hartford on the 31st of October 1687 to execute quo warranto proceedings against the charter of 1662.

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  • The New England Half Way Covenant of 1657, which extended church membership so as to include all baptized persons, was sanctioned by the general court in 1664.

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  • Davis's Physical Geography of Southern New England (National Geographical Society Publications, 1895).

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  • For law and administration, consult the last two chapters on 1648-1649 1 649 - 1 6 50 1650-1651 -1651-1652 1652-1653 -1653-1654 1654-1655.1655-1656 -1656-1657 1657-1658 -1658-1659 1659-1676 -1676-1683 1683-1687 -1687-1689 1689-1698 -1698-1708 -1 1725- 1708-1742 725 1-1 175 7421-1754 175 1754- 1766-1766 -1769 1769-1776 -1639-1657 1658-1660 -1661-1665Governors 1776-1784 -1784-1786 1786-1796 -1796-1797 1797-1809 -1809-1811 1811- 1812-1812 -1817 1817-1827 -1827-1831 1831-1833 -1833-1834 1834-1835 -1835-1838 1838-1842 -1842-1844 1844-1846 -1846-1847 1847-1849 -1849-1850 1850-1853 -1853-1854 1854-1855 -1855-1857 1857-1858 -1858-1866 1866-1867 -1867-1869 1869-1870 -1870-1871 1871-1873 -1873-1877 1877-1879 -1879-1881 1881-1883 -1883-1885 1885-1887 -1887-1889 1889-1893 -1893-1895 1895-1897 -1897-1899 1899-1901 -1901-1903 1903-1905 -1905-1907-1907-1909 1909 1909 Federalist Democrat Federalist Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Know-Nothing Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Democrat Republican Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican The Constitution and Laws of Connecticut " in New England States (vol.

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  • After good times and hard times and a number of renovations, it is once again a major New England travel hub, second only to Logan Airport where I'd just left my wife Even the iconic clock on the front of the building with its twelve foot face, styled after Big Ben, has been restored and running again.

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  • No matter where they were living, Jackson always made a trip to New England during peak foliage.

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  • adjunct British board member ' of Children's Literature New England.

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  • folk art, Americana and New England inspired seasonal decorations, home decor and much more!

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  • Individual proprietors, not uncommonly powerful families which were almost feudal in character, owned the great cotton and woolen mills of New England.

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  • European settlers introduced European honeybees to New England in about 1638.

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  • I get the slightly incongruous sight of an East German sat next to me screaming " New England " !

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  • Sponsored Search Watermark Holidays in The Cotswolds Self-catering New England style lakeside lodges and holiday homes in a country setting.

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  • The gals from an New England village dealing with a visiting sex pervert getting his willy out in front of their kids.

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  • backup quarterback Matt Cassel was a seventh round pick by the New England Patriots.

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  • The township of Plymouth was settled in 1769 by immigrants from New England - many originally from Plymouth, Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, Connecticut, whence the name - under the auspices of the Susquehanna Company, which claimed this region as a part of Connecticut, and Plymouth became a centre of the contest between the "Pennamites" and the "Yankees" (representing respectively Pennsylvania and Connecticut), which grew out of the conflict of the royal charter of Pennsylvania (granted in 1681) with the royal charter of Connecticut (granted in 1662), a matter which was not settled until 1799.

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  • 5 o 8 New England.

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  • In 1655 he and Davenport drew up the code of laws, popularly known as the "Connecticut Blue Laws," which were published in London in 1656 under the title New Haven's Settling in New England and some Lawes for Government published for the Use of that Colony.

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  • To the banks of the Delaware the clergy of New England sent missionaries: Benjamin Woodbridge went to Philadelphia in 1698 and was followed almost immediately by Jedediah Andrews (1674-1746), who was ordained in 1701, and under whom the first Presbyterian church in Philadelphia was organized; in 1698 John Wilson (d.

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  • north of Philadelphia) to educate candidates for the ministry; and the synod in 1738 passed an act, aimed at the Log College, providing that all students not educated in the colleges of New England or Great Britain should be examined by a committee of synod, thus depriving the presbyteries of the right of determining in the case.

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  • VERMONT, a North Atlantic state of the United States of America and one of the New England group, lying between latitude 42° 44' and 45° o' 43' s N., and between longitudes 3° 35' and 5° 29' E.

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  • He wrote A History of American Politics (1881); The Genesis of a New England State - Connecticut (1883), in "Johns Hopkins University Studies"; A History of the United States for Schools (1886); Connecticut (1887) in the "American Commonwealths Series"; the article on the history of the United States for the 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, reprinted as The United States: Its History and Constitution (1887); a chapter on the history of American political parties in the seventh volume of Winsor's Narrative and Critical History of America, and many articles on the history of American politics in Lalor's Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and Political History of the United States (1881-1884).

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  • Corning in the New England Magazine, vol.

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  • It took up, too, the Democratic weapon of states' rights, and in New England carried sectionalism dangerously near secession in 1808, and in 1812-1814,during the movement, in opposition to the war of 1812, which culminated in the Hartford Convention (see Hartford).

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  • (who were really a very remarkable body of men) distrusted democratic government; that their Sedition Law was outrageous in itself, and (as well as the Alien Law) bad as a party measure; that in disputes with Great Britain they were true English Tories when contrasted with the friendly attitude toward America held by many English Liberals; and that they persisted in New England as a pro-British, aristocratic social-cult long after they lost effective political influence.

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  • The tree also occurs in the New England states and extends over nearly the whole of British North America, its northern limit occurring at about 67° N.

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  • The dramatic history of the city is largely associated with the Boston Museum, built in 1841 by Moses Kimball on Tremont Street, and rebuilt in 1846 and 1880; here for half a century the principal theatrical performances were given (see an interesting article in the New England Magazine, June 1903), in later years under the management of R.

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  • on an important commission sent to Massachusetts and the other New England colonies (see Nicolls, Richard), and spent the last years of his life in New York.

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  • The particulars of the proceedings of Governor Endecott and the magistrates of New England as given in Besse's Sufferings of the Quakers (see below) are startling to read.

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  • From his New England Puritan mother, from his Scottish grandmother, from his Jersey-American grandfather and from his remoter French ancestry Thoreau inherited distinctive traits: the Saxon element perhaps predominated, but the " hauntings of Celtism " were prevalent and potent.

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  • See his Writings, Political, Judicial and Literary (3 vols., Boston, 1852), edited by Nahum Capen; and an article in the New England Magazine, new series, xxxvii.

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  • RHODE ISLAND, a North Atlantic state of the American Union, belonging to the New England group, and lying between 41° 18' and 42° 3' N.

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  • 1690-1868," in New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol.

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  • In the 10th and 11th centuries Norse sea-rovers, starting from Iceland, had made small settlements in Greenland and had pushed as far as the coast of New England (or possibly Nova Scotia) in transient visits (see Vinland and Leif Ericsson).

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  • The northern or New England element began by endeavouring to establish a Puritan theocracy which broke down.

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  • Hence when, after the Toleration Act of 1689, a serious attempt was made to draw the two types together on the basis of Heads of Agreement assented to by the United Ministers in and about London, formerly called Presbyterian and Congregational, the basis partook of both (much after the fashion of the New England Way), though on the whole it favoured Congregationalism (see Dale, pp. 474 ff.).

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  • To the reaction against the gross methods of the revival has been ascribed the religious apathy of New England during the last years of the 18th century; but the martial and political excitement, beginning with King George's War (i.e.

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  • NEW HAMPSHIRE, a North Atlantic state of the United States, one of the New England group, and one of the Original Thirteen, lying between latitudes 42° 40' and 45° 18' 23" N., and between longitudes 70° 37' and 72° 37' W.

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  • The following is a partial list of his writings: The Diverting History of John Bull and Brother Jonathan (1812); The Lay of the Scottish Fiddle (1813), a good-natured parody on The Lay of the Last Minstrel; Letters from the South (1817); The Backwoodsman: a Poem (1818); Salmagundi (2nd series, 1819-1820); A Sketch of Old England, by a New England Man (1822); Koningsmarke, the Long Finne (1823), a quiz on the romantic school of Walter Scott; John Bull in America; or the New Munchausen (1824), a broad caricature of the early type of British traveller in America; The Merry Tales of the Three Wise Men of Gotham (1826); Chronicles of the City of Gotham, from the Papers of a Retired Common Councilman (183 0); The Dutchman's Fireside (1831); Westward Ho!

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  • In the middle section, as already stated, the Great Valley is somewhat open on the east, by reason of the small height and broad interruptions of the narrow crystalline belt; on the west it is limited by the complex series of Alleghany ridges and valleys; in the north-east section the valley is strongly enclosed on the east by the New England uplands, and on the west by the Adirondacks and Catskills (see below); in the south-west section the valley broadens from the North Carolina highlands on the south-east almost to the Cumberland plateau on the north-west, for here also the ridge-making formations weaken, although they do not entirely disappear.

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  • The name Laconia was first applied in New England to the region granted in 1629 to Mason and Gorges (see Mason, John).

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  • After that war, New England was long the most essentially commercial and industrial group of states, and was a stronghold of Federalism; and in the period immediately before and during the War of 1812, when its commercial interests suffered terribly, first from the restrictive measures of the general government and then from warfare, New England was a centre of that opposition to the policy of the National Administration (then Democratic), which culminated in the famous Hartford Convention of1814-1815(see Hartford).

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  • On the New England tableland, under latitude 30° S., the yearly average temperature is 56.5°, the mean summer 67.7° and the mean winter 44.3°.

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  • MAINE, a North Atlantic state of the United States of America, the most north-easterly state in the Union, and the largest of the New England group. It lies between 43° 4' and 47° 2 7' 33" N., and between 66° 56' 48" and 71° 6' 41" W.

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  • The immigration of these from the North was fostered in every way, notably through the New England Emigrant Aid Company (see Lawrence, A.

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  • Originally "mugwump" (mogkiomp) was a North American Indian word, in the Massachusett dialect of the Algonquian, meaning "great man" (mogki, great; omp, man); and in New England it was used of self-conceited politicians.

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  • Once I went on a visit to a New England village with its frozen lakes and vast snow fields.

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  • Last summer I spent in one of the loveliest nooks of one of the most charming villages in New England.

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  • Dr. Howe was an experimental scientist and had in him the spirit of New England transcendentalism with its large faith and large charities.

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  • It is as much Asia or Africa as New England.

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  • Almost every New England boy among my contemporaries shouldered a fowling-piece between the ages of ten and fourteen; and his hunting and fishing grounds were not limited, like the preserves of an English nobleman, but were more boundless even than those of a savage.

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  • Great Expecter! to converse with whom was a New England Night's Entertainment.

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  • Backup quarterback Matt Cassel was a seventh round pick by the New England Patriots.

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  • It is New England 's only indoor outlet shopping mall.

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  • These are long-haired cats, and they are particularly well suited to the extreme winter conditions of New England.

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  • Tufted feet give the cat an appearance of having snowshoes and help him easily walk through drifts of snow.Many of the original Maine Coon cats from New England have multiple toes; this is known as polydactalism.

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  • Regardless of the precise origin of their ancestors, a few generations of harsh New England winters finalized the traits of the breed, creating a very hardy, large, intelligent, long-haired cat.

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  • This Main Coon cat organization is located in New England.

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  • If you are looking for something just like your grandmother had, look no further than Best of New England.

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  • Northern states and New England do not receive the same amount of daily solar radiation.

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  • For instance, New England homes favor blues, grays, and greens, whereas Southwestern homes are best painted a sienna or beige color.

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  • However, there are also antique tables from the colonial days of America which can be found mainly on the East coast and in the New England area.

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  • Their looks work in homes from New England to Chicago to San Francisco.

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  • Braided Rugs: These rugs reflect the colonial era and distinct designs that were created out of necessity by the Early American settlers in the New England region.

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  • If you are visiting New England and plan to rent or buy ski equipment, Vermont is an excellent place to start your search.

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  • The ski slopes in Pennsylvania, however, tend to be smaller than what you would find in New England or Colorado.

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  • It's accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is affiliated with the National Catholic Education association.

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  • Performing Arts Programs - These camps cultivate talent in the New England area.

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  • Early studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1995 linked soy proteins with a decrease in serum cholesterol and LDL's, the so-called 'bad' cholesterol.

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  • At 15, he toured the New England Vaudeville Circuit as a juggler, unicyclist, magician, and comedian.

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  • Supermodel Gisele and New England Patriot Tom Brady are officially engaged.

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  • That relationship fizzled in 2005 and Leo moved on to another model (Bar Rafaeli) and Gisele began dating New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

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  • Needless to say, Mr. Brady was met with many boos and hisses at the next New England game.

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  • For example, the NEASC is the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

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  • Charter Oak State College has accreditation from The New England Association of Schools and Colleges and the Connecticut Board of Governors for Higher Education.

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  • Post University receives its accreditation from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

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  • Bermuda Cruises are a favorite for departure ports in the northeastern United States, and New England and Canadian cruises are seasonal variations that explore magnificent autumn foliage.

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  • The summer and fall months are the busiest for itineraries leaving from the Big Apple, simply because New England and Canadian destinations are among the most popular for fall foliage tours.

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  • Caribbean ports of call demand bright colors and loose-fitting, comfortable clothes, while New England cruises may be better paired with muted colors.

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  • Canadian and New England cruises are also available.

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  • C. sulcata (King-nut), a tall forest tree over 100 feet high in the New England States and westwards.

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  • C. tomentosa (Fragrant Hickory) growing nearly 100 feet high and inhabiting the cold regions of the West and New England.

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  • C. microcarpa (Small-fruited Hickory), a tall tree of nearly 90 feet high; New England and westwards.

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  • Meadow Beauty (Rhexia) - R. virginica is a beautiful dwarf bog plant with vivid, deep rosy flowers 6 or 8 inches high, in sandy swamps in New England and the Eastern States, and is found as far west as Illinois and Wisconsin.

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  • In the New England area, for example, the Shakers, a religious sect that flourished in the 1800's and was renowned for their gardening prowess, made hot beds lined with fresh animal dung to generate heat.

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  • Such cold frames harnessed two natural elements, manure and solar power, to create warm temperatures that withstood cold New England winters.

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  • Facilities Expo.com lists regional shows such as the South Florida Facilities Expo, the New England Facilities Expo and the Northwest Facilities Expo.

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  • Baldwin - New England produced this favorite apple in the 1700s.

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  • We spent one long weekend visiting seven New England states!

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  • Independent retirement living in Connecticut and New England can give seniors a relaxing and comfortable option in a supportive community.

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  • The beauty of the New England architecture, combined with close-knit communities and a healthy environment, make this location top-notch.

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  • For additional resources on living in New England during retirement, visit Connecticut Magazine and the Senior's Guide to Connecticut.

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