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nests

nests Sentence Examples

  • Some species build their nests in trees - great globular masses sometimes three feet in diameter, supported on the larger branches, and connected with the ground by covered passages on the outside of the tree.

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  • Witches-brooms are the tufted bunches of twigs found on silver firs, birches and other trees, and often present resemblances to birds nests or clumps of mistletoe if only seen from a distance.

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  • It constructs large ball-like nests of dried leaves, lodged in a fork of the branches of a large tree, and with the opening on one side.

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  • These driver ants shelter in temporary nests made in FIG.

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  • A bird known locally as Hangi, not met elsewhere in Europe, nests at Filfla.

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  • Some of the inmates of ants' nests are here for the purpose of preying upon the :ants or their larvae, so that we find all kinds of relations between the owners of the nests and their companions, from mutual benefit to active hostility.

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  • Perhaps they are the nests of the chivin.

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  • In the Spanish plains, however, the young are often produced in nests built in trees, or among tall bamboos in FIG.

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  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.

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  • The nests of different kinds of ants are constructed in very different situations; many species (Lasius, for example) make underground nests; galleries and chambers being hollowed out in the soil, and opening by small holes on the surface, or protected above by a large stone.

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  • In tropical countries ants sometimes make their nests in the hollow thorns of trees or on leaves; species with this habit are believed to make a return to the tree for the shelter that it affords by protecting it from the ravages of other insects, including their own leaf-cutting relations.

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  • The colonies of Aphaenogaster occupy nests extending over an area of fifty to a hundred square yards several feet below the surface of the ground.

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  • The tracks along which the ants carry the leaves to their nests are often in part subterranean.

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  • This consideration leads us to one of the most remarkable and fascinating features of 'ant-communities - the presence in the nests of insects and other small arthropods, which are tended and cared for by the ants as their " guests," rendering to the ants in return the sweet food which they desire.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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  • The warmth, shelter and abundant food in the nests, due both to the fresh supplies brought in by the ants and to the large amount of waste matter that accumulates, must prove strongly attractive to the various " guests."

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  • Formica sanguinea is a well-known European slavemaking ant that inhabits England; its workers raid the nests of F.

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  • fusca and other species, and carry off to their own nests pupae from which workers are developed that live contentedly as slaves of their captors.

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  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

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  • The earliest churches were built with cemeteries for the dead; and thus we find the nucleus of the city of Venice, little isolated groups of dwellings each on its separate islet, scattered, as Cassiodorus 1 says, like sea-birds' nests over the face of the waters.

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  • Along one line there was a gradual elaboration of the tube until it culminated, so far as structural complexity is concerned, in the so-called trapdoor nests or burrows of various families; along the other line the tubular retreat either retains its primitive simplicity in association with a new structure, the snare or net, or is entirely superseded by the latter.

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  • Trap-door nests are made by spiders belonging to two widely different groups, namely the Lycosidae or wolf-spiders, to which the true tarantula belongs, and the Mygalomorphae, containing the species which construct the best-known types of this style of burrow.

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  • What in popular usage are spoken of as the instincts of animals, for example, the hunting of prey by foxes and wolves, or the procedure of ants in their nests, are generally joint products of hereditary and acquired factors.

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  • If, as often happens, the water-level sinks, the nests stand out higher.

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  • In tropical countries ants sometimes make their nests in the hollow thorns of trees or on leaves; species with this habit are believed to make a return to the tree for the shelter that it affords by protecting it from the ravages of other insects, including their own leaf-cutting relations.

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  • The warmth, shelter and abundant food in the nests, due both to the fresh supplies brought in by the ants and to the large amount of waste matter that accumulates, must prove strongly attractive to the various " guests."

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  • It is said also to dig up the nests of wasps in order to eat the larvae, as the ratel - a closely allied South African form - is said to rob the bees of their honey.

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  • It is probable that what he had suffered during his first year in London had often reminded him of some parts of the satire in which Juvenal had described the misery and degradation of a needy man of letters, lodged among the pigeons' nests in the tottering garrets which overhung the streets of Rome.

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  • Nests of this species were found in 1821 by Johana Wilhelm Zetterstedt near Juckasj,rwi in Swedish Lapland, but little was known concerning its nidification until 1855, when John Wolley, after two years' ineffectual search, succeeded in obtaining near the Finnish village Muonioniska, on the Swedish frontier, well-authenticated specimens with the eggs, both of which are like exaggerated bullfinches'.

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  • The true love-birds (Agapornis) may also be said to build nests, for they line their nest-hole with strips of pliant bark.

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  • A large number of beetles inhabit the deep limestone caves of Europe and North America, while many genera and some whole families are at home nowhere but in ants' nests.

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  • Many Staphylinidae are constant inmates of ants' nests.

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  • Spring-tails and bristle-tails (order Aptera) of several species also frequent ants' nests.

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  • Wasmann, who has compiled a list of nearly 1 50o species of insects, arachnids and crustaceans, inhabiting ants' nests.

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  • But the Peckhams' careful observations and experiments show that, with the American wasps, the victims stored in the nests are quite as often dead as alive; that those which are only paralysed live for a varying number of days, some more, some less; that wasp larvae thrive just as well on dead victims, sometimes dried up, sometimes undergoing decomposition, as on living and paralysed prey; that the nerve-centres are not stung with the supposed uniformity; and that in some cases paralysis, in others death, follows when the victims are stung in parts far removed from any nerve-centre.

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  • A considerable trade is carried on in the export of horses, buffaloes, goats, dinding (dried flesh), skins, birds' nests, wax, rice, katyang, sappanwood, &c. Sumbawa entered into treaty relations with the Dutch East India Company in 1674.

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  • Galena occurs in veins in the Cambrian clay-slate, accompanied by copper and iron pyrites, zinc-blende, quartz, calcspar, iron-spar, &c.; also in beds or nests within sandstones and rudimentary limestones, and in a great many other geological formations.

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  • Scorpions do not possess spinning organs nor form either snares or nests, so far as is known.

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  • Spiders form at least two kinds of constructions - snares for the capture of prey and nests for the preservation of the young.

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  • For an account of the courtship and dancing of spiders, of their webs and floating lines, the reader is referred to the works of M'Cook (30) and the Peckhams (31), whilst an excellent account of the nests of trap-door spiders is given by Moggridge (32).

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  • Such are Victor Rakosi (Sipulus tdredi, " The y Essas of Sipulus "; Rejtett feszkek, " Hidden Nests "); Stephen Mora (A J tyankfiai, " Our Compatriots "); Alexius Benedek, the author of numerous distinctly sympathetic and truly Magyar tales, fables and novels, one of the most gifted and deserving literary workers of modern Hungary (Huszar Anna, " Anna Huszar "; Egy szalmaozvegy levelei, " Letters of a grass widow "; A sziv konyve, " The Book of the Heart "; Katalin, " Catherine "; Csendes ordk, " Quiet Hours "; Testamentum es hat level, " Last Will and Six Letters," translated into German by Dr W.

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  • The eggs are laid in the nests of various bees and wasps, the chrysid larva living as a " cuckoo " parasite.

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  • The Trigonalidae, a small family whose larvae are parasitic in wasps' nests, also probably belong here.

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  • In two of the families - the Mutillidae and Thynnidae - the females are wingless and the larvae live as parasites in the larvae of other insects; the female Mutilla enters humble-bees' nests and lays her eggs in the bee-grubs.

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  • The chief exports consist of rice, rattans, torches, dried fish, areca-nuts, sesamum seeds, molasses, sea-slugs, edible birds' nests and tin.

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  • Before they are confined to their nests, it is wonderful with what devotion the females are attended by their gay followers, who seem to be each trying to be more attentive than the rest.

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  • 2 The nests of the sun-birds, domed with a penthouse porch, and pensile from the end of a bough or leaf, are very neatly built.

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  • Of other Totaninae,one of the most remarkable is that to which the inappropriate name of Green Sandpiper has been assigned, the Totanus or Helodromas ochropus of ornithologists, which differs (so far as is known) from all others of the group both in its osteology2 and mode of nidification, the hen laying her eggs in the deserted nests of other birds, - Jays, Thrushes or Pigeons, - but nearly always at some height (from 3 to 30 ft.) from the ground (Prot.

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  • A peculiar local industry is the manufacture of so-called "petrified" birds' nests, plants, and other objects.

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  • Deep to these is the ovarian stroma, composed of fibrous tissue, and embedded in it are numerous nests of epithelial cells, the Graafian follicles, in various stages of development.

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  • They are about the size of a pigeon, with orange-coloured plumage, a pronounced crest, and orange-red flesh, and build their nests on rock.

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  • These caves are frequented by a species of night-hawk, called guacharo, which nests in the recesses of the rocks.

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  • The webs and nests, &c., formed by spiders are also of silk.

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  • Wolley in June 1853, when he found several of its nests near Muonioniska in Lapland.

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  • Some cuckoos are singular for their habit of using the nests of smaller birds to lay their eggs in, so that the young may be reared by foster-parents; and it has been suggested that the object of the likeness exhibited to the hawk is to enable the cock cuckoo either to frighten the small birds away from their nests or to lure them in pursuit of him, while the hen bird quietly and without molestation disposes of her egg.

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  • But it has been ascertained that the species of Volucella which behave in this manner also visit for a like purpose the nests of wasps, which they do not resemble.

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  • Preserve the ripening fruits on the wall and other trees from insects, and destroy wasp nests.

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  • By the 15th century in many cases they had utterly sunk in reputation, their obligation to nurse the sick was quite neglected, and they had, rightly or wrongly, acquired the reputation of being mere nests of beggars and women of ill fame.

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  • These floral products which form the food of bees and of their larvae, are in most cases collected and stored by the industrious insects; but some genera of bees act as inquilines or "cuckoo-parasites," laying their eggs in the nests of other bees, so that their larvae may feed at the expense of the rightful owners of the nest.

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  • Bees of different genera vary considerably in the site and arrangement of their nests.

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  • Fabre has found that in the nests of some species of Osmia the young bee developed in the first-formed cell, if (as often happens) she emerges from her cocoon before the inmates of the later cells, will try to work her way round these or to bite a lateral hole through the bramble shoot; should she fail to do this, she will wait for the emergence of her sisters and not make her escape at the price of injury to them.

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  • The leaf-cutter bees (Megachile) - which differ from Andrena and Halictus and agree with Osmia, Apis and Bombus in having elongate tongues - cut neat circular disks from leaves, using them for lining the cells of their underground nests.

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  • The nests of Andrena, for example, are haunted by the black and yellow species of Nomada, whose females lay their eggs in the food provided for the larva of the Andrena.

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  • The community is broken up on the approach of winter, the males and workers perish, and the young queens after hibernation start fresh nests in the succeeding year.

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  • They are closely" mimicked "by bees of the genus Psithyrus, which often share their nests.

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  • In the nests of Bombi are found various beetle larvae that live as inquilines or parasites, and also maggots of drone-flies (V olucella), which act as scavengers; the Volucella-fly is usually a" mimic ' vades.

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  • One of the last (Collocalia troglodytes, Gray) constructs the edible nests so highly prized by the Chinese.

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  • The best nests are obtained on the precipitous sides of the Penon de Coron, between Culion and Busuanga.

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  • Eared grebes and ring-billed gulls breed on the sloughs of the plains, and rarely the white pelican nests about the lake shores.

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  • Various hawks and owls are common; the golden eagle nests on the mountain crags and the burrowing owl on the plains.

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  • The Cypselus esculentus, or edible-nest swift, is very common, and the nests, which are built mostly in limestone caves, are esteemed the best in the archipelago.

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  • They generally breed in association, often in the closest proximity - their nests, containing three eggs at most, being made on the shingle or among herbage.

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  • Gold is found in the central part; and sugar, coco-nuts, betel-nuts, birds' nests, and agar agar, or sea vegetable, are among the other products of the island.

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  • The Bandanese pay occasional visits to shoot bears and deer; there are numbers of wild goats and cattle; and among birds are mentioned cassowaries, cockatoos, birds of paradise, and the swallows that furnish edible nests.

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  • Tail long, and sometimes partially prehensile when it is used for carrying bundles of grass with which these animals build their nests.

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  • Thus one treats of "Mimicry" in animals, another on "Instinct," another on "Birds' Nests."

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  • The parliaments or tribunals were nests of faction and of the deepest social incompetence.

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  • Its food consists mainly of termites, to obtain which it opens their nests with its powerful sharp anterior claws, and as the insects swarm to the damaged part of their dwelling, it draws them into its mouth by means of its long, flexible, rapidly moving tongue covered with glutinous saliva.

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  • The catching of the numerous sea-birds which build their nests upon the face of the cliffs forms an important source of subsistence to the inhabitants.

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  • The birds and the contents of the nests are taken in nets mounted on poles; shooting is not practised, lest it should permanently scare the birds away.

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  • Where a large number of them were bred, nests were constructed for them one above another; they were daily taken down by the gooseherd, driven to the water, and then reinstated in their nests, without a single bird being misplaced.

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  • Wallace), whilst others have been observed to make aerial nests between leaves overhanging water, a habit which is shared by their near allies the Chiromantis of tropical Africa.

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  • Protection by means of nests or nurseries.

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  • In nests in holes near the water.-Rhacophorus, Leptodactylus.

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  • C. In nests overhanging the water.-Rhacophorus, Chiromantis, Phyllomedusa.

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  • ants nests to get rid of them.

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  • Swarming is not the only means for carpenter ants to produce new nests.

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  • barbet nests.

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  • blackbird nests across Britain.

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  • bumblebee nests.

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  • Food is stored in underground burrows or occasionally in disused bird nests.

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  • cacique nests.

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  • cagey nests, to meet where lines converge.

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  • carpenter ants to produce new nests.

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  • You can also explore caverns where locals collect swallow nests to make their bird's nest soup.

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  • Here are a few types of swifts: The chimney swift nests in walls, unused chimneys, around towns.

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  • During the third month, these break up forming cell nests surrounded by young vascular connective tissue.

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  • coots nests and their occupants have been wiped out.

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  • Tinbergen's experiment on home location by digger wasps Adult female digger wasps, Philanthus triangulum, build nests in sand.

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  • Often they will use holes in trees as nests rather than building their own, sometimes using old squirrel drays.

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  • Nests are frequently located in loft spaces, cavity walls, flower beds, garden sheds, rockeries and roof eaves.

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  • The red-billed buffalo weaver nests on the track into the Lodge had some Pygmy falcons in residence.

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  • fire ant nests.

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  • fledged from two nests.

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  • fledglings from 12 nests was monitored.

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  • Gentoo penguin nests on the island.

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  • BBC Nature notes The eggs have hatched in the nests of the Canada geese, and the little goslings are out with their parents.

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  • The breeding season starts with the male birds coming ashore in September to build their nests of stones among the tussock grass.

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  • harrier nests, which produced a total of 36 birds.

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  • harvest mouse is the only British mouse to build nests of woven grass well above ground.

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  • The volunteers assist in releasing the hatchings and excavating the nests to determine the hatching success rate.

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  • They also have around 50 heron nesting here, I have seen young hatched in February but others still building their nests in March.

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  • heron bird nests nearby.

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  • heronrypan>have several heronries in our area and these are visited annually to count the number of occupied nests.

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  • heronryur known heronries are visited annually to count the number of occupied nests.

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  • heronryve several heronries in our area and these are visited annually to count the number of occupied nests.

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  • hornets nests are much larger than wasps nests.

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  • Thus in winter they lie inactive in their nests; in summer, they grow lively again.

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  • She checked a number of nests in the breeding season when the females lay, and then incubate, eggs.

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  • machine gun nests and mounted guns on vehicles.

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  • mare's nests.

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  • It has house martin 's nests under the eaves.

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  • meringue nests into small chunks and fold into the cream using a large spoon, stirring in a figure of eight.

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  • important microhabitats include flowers and fruits, fungi, carrion, dung and nests.

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  • moorhens nests and wild ducks.

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  • Today, the outline of a trench is clearly visible, along with machine-gun nests and bunkers.

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  • As well as the artificial nests on the reserve there is much scattered woodland with many suitable trees.

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  • Wood ant nests are a common sight in some parts of the Caledonian Forest.

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  • From there on in, and to this very day, RSPB volunteers guard osprey nests around the clock during the nesting season.

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  • It has taken almost a year to train him to find bumblebee nests.

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  • Now, the two cities thrive like termite nests.

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  • The Council will treat black and red ants ' nests in domestic properties.

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  • osprey nests around the clock during the nesting season.

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  • overwinter adults & eggs in their nests.

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  • Apparently bees like more enclosed spaces for their nests and now I come to think about it, this hive looks pretty papery.

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  • rafters of derelict buildings for owls ' nests.

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  • red ants ' nests in domestic properties.

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  • The Gurkha regiment, based in nearby Brecon, was assigned the work of guarding the nests.

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  • rob brown ants nests to maintain the number of slaves in the colony.

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  • Not to mention the dreadful unhygienic mess that nesting rooks can cause and the difficulty of removing the nests once established!

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  • stork nests.

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  • storks ' nests on the roofs.

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  • taro lo'i, and as such, unfortunately many nests get unnoticed and go unrecorded.

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  • termite nests were filmed.

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  • Titan triggerfish may be seen biting and moving dead coral to build nests in which to lay their eggs.

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  • She may begin building nests around the cage, and may also become more touchy with her rattie friends.

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  • On top of the reef Titan triggerfish may be seen biting and moving dead coral to build nests in which to lay their eggs.

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  • Cages on-site protect turtle nests, and any turtle nests found on nearby Coral bay are transferred to the hatchery on Lara Beach.

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  • wasps Active wasps ' nests in domestic premises can also be treated for a nominal charge.

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  • Nests of this species were found in 1821 by Johana Wilhelm Zetterstedt near Juckasj,rwi in Swedish Lapland, but little was known concerning its nidification until 1855, when John Wolley, after two years' ineffectual search, succeeded in obtaining near the Finnish village Muonioniska, on the Swedish frontier, well-authenticated specimens with the eggs, both of which are like exaggerated bullfinches'.

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  • In the Spanish plains, however, the young are often produced in nests built in trees, or among tall bamboos in FIG.

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  • The true love-birds (Agapornis) may also be said to build nests, for they line their nest-hole with strips of pliant bark.

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  • It constructs large ball-like nests of dried leaves, lodged in a fork of the branches of a large tree, and with the opening on one side.

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  • Witches-brooms are the tufted bunches of twigs found on silver firs, birches and other trees, and often present resemblances to birds nests or clumps of mistletoe if only seen from a distance.

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  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.

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  • A large number of beetles inhabit the deep limestone caves of Europe and North America, while many genera and some whole families are at home nowhere but in ants' nests.

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  • The Paussidae are a very remarkable family of small beetles, mostly tropical, found only in ants' nests, or flying by night, and apparently migrating from one nest to another.

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  • the curious little Pselaphidae, with three-segmented tarsi, elongate palpi, and shortened abdomen; the latter are usually found in ants' nests, where they are tended by the ants, which take a sweet fluid secreted among little tufts of hair on the beetles' bodies; these beetles, which are carried about by the ants, sometimes devour their larvae.

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  • Many Staphylinidae are constant inmates of ants' nests.

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  • The nests of different kinds of ants are constructed in very different situations; many species (Lasius, for example) make underground nests; galleries and chambers being hollowed out in the soil, and opening by small holes on the surface, or protected above by a large stone.

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  • These driver ants shelter in temporary nests made in FIG.

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  • The colonies of Aphaenogaster occupy nests extending over an area of fifty to a hundred square yards several feet below the surface of the ground.

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  • There are several forms of worker in these species, some with enormous heads, which remain in the underground nests, while their smaller comrades scour the country in search of suitable trees, which they ascend, biting off small circular pieces from the leaves, and carrying them off to the nests.

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  • The tracks along which the ants carry the leaves to their nests are often in part subterranean.

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  • This consideration leads us to one of the most remarkable and fascinating features of 'ant-communities - the presence in the nests of insects and other small arthropods, which are tended and cared for by the ants as their " guests," rendering to the ants in return the sweet food which they desire.

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  • Lubbock (Lord Avebury) states that the common British yellow ants (Lasius flavus) collect flocks of root-feeding aphids in their underground nests, protect them, build earthen shelters over them, and take the greatest care of their eggs.

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  • The number of species of beetles that inhabit ants' nests is almost incredibly large, and most of these are never found elsewhere, being blind, helpless and dependent on the ants' care for protection and food; these beetles belong for the most part to the families Pselaphidae, Paussidae and Staphylinidae.

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  • Spring-tails and bristle-tails (order Aptera) of several species also frequent ants' nests.

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  • Wasmann, who has compiled a list of nearly 1 50o species of insects, arachnids and crustaceans, inhabiting ants' nests.

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  • Some of the inmates of ants' nests are here for the purpose of preying upon the :ants or their larvae, so that we find all kinds of relations between the owners of the nests and their companions, from mutual benefit to active hostility.

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  • Formica sanguinea is a well-known European slavemaking ant that inhabits England; its workers raid the nests of F.

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  • fusca and other species, and carry off to their own nests pupae from which workers are developed that live contentedly as slaves of their captors.

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  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

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  • Butler's British Birds with their Nests and Eggs (6 vols., 1896), the various -editions of Howard Saunders's Manual of British Birds, and Lord Lilford's beautifully illustrated Coloured Figures of the Birds of the British Islands (1885-1897).

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  • pp. 50-71), was found to be established on a single character of the feet only; though he was careful to point out, immediately after formulating the definition of his subclasses Constrictipedes and Inconstrictipedes, that the former " make, in general, compact and well-built nests, wherein they bring up their very weak, blind, and mostly naked young, which they feed with care, by bringing food to them for many days, until they are fledged and sufficiently strong to leave their nest," observing also that they " are principally monogamous " (pp. 55, 56); while of the latter he says that they " make either a poor and rude nest, in which they lay their eggs, or else none, depositing them on the bare ground.

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  • The earliest churches were built with cemeteries for the dead; and thus we find the nucleus of the city of Venice, little isolated groups of dwellings each on its separate islet, scattered, as Cassiodorus 1 says, like sea-birds' nests over the face of the waters.

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  • Along one line there was a gradual elaboration of the tube until it culminated, so far as structural complexity is concerned, in the so-called trapdoor nests or burrows of various families; along the other line the tubular retreat either retains its primitive simplicity in association with a new structure, the snare or net, or is entirely superseded by the latter.

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  • Trap-door nests are made by spiders belonging to two widely different groups, namely the Lycosidae or wolf-spiders, to which the true tarantula belongs, and the Mygalomorphae, containing the species which construct the best-known types of this style of burrow.

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  • What in popular usage are spoken of as the instincts of animals, for example, the hunting of prey by foxes and wolves, or the procedure of ants in their nests, are generally joint products of hereditary and acquired factors.

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  • But the Peckhams' careful observations and experiments show that, with the American wasps, the victims stored in the nests are quite as often dead as alive; that those which are only paralysed live for a varying number of days, some more, some less; that wasp larvae thrive just as well on dead victims, sometimes dried up, sometimes undergoing decomposition, as on living and paralysed prey; that the nerve-centres are not stung with the supposed uniformity; and that in some cases paralysis, in others death, follows when the victims are stung in parts far removed from any nerve-centre.

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  • A considerable trade is carried on in the export of horses, buffaloes, goats, dinding (dried flesh), skins, birds' nests, wax, rice, katyang, sappanwood, &c. Sumbawa entered into treaty relations with the Dutch East India Company in 1674.

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  • Galena occurs in veins in the Cambrian clay-slate, accompanied by copper and iron pyrites, zinc-blende, quartz, calcspar, iron-spar, &c.; also in beds or nests within sandstones and rudimentary limestones, and in a great many other geological formations.

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  • Scorpions do not possess spinning organs nor form either snares or nests, so far as is known.

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  • Spiders form at least two kinds of constructions - snares for the capture of prey and nests for the preservation of the young.

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  • For an account of the courtship and dancing of spiders, of their webs and floating lines, the reader is referred to the works of M'Cook (30) and the Peckhams (31), whilst an excellent account of the nests of trap-door spiders is given by Moggridge (32).

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  • Such are Victor Rakosi (Sipulus tdredi, " The y Essas of Sipulus "; Rejtett feszkek, " Hidden Nests "); Stephen Mora (A J tyankfiai, " Our Compatriots "); Alexius Benedek, the author of numerous distinctly sympathetic and truly Magyar tales, fables and novels, one of the most gifted and deserving literary workers of modern Hungary (Huszar Anna, " Anna Huszar "; Egy szalmaozvegy levelei, " Letters of a grass widow "; A sziv konyve, " The Book of the Heart "; Katalin, " Catherine "; Csendes ordk, " Quiet Hours "; Testamentum es hat level, " Last Will and Six Letters," translated into German by Dr W.

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  • A bird known locally as Hangi, not met elsewhere in Europe, nests at Filfla.

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  • The eggs are laid in the nests of various bees and wasps, the chrysid larva living as a " cuckoo " parasite.

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  • The Trigonalidae, a small family whose larvae are parasitic in wasps' nests, also probably belong here.

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  • In two of the families - the Mutillidae and Thynnidae - the females are wingless and the larvae live as parasites in the larvae of other insects; the female Mutilla enters humble-bees' nests and lays her eggs in the bee-grubs.

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  • The chief exports consist of rice, rattans, torches, dried fish, areca-nuts, sesamum seeds, molasses, sea-slugs, edible birds' nests and tin.

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  • Before they are confined to their nests, it is wonderful with what devotion the females are attended by their gay followers, who seem to be each trying to be more attentive than the rest.

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  • the willow, poplar and birch generally take root and shoot up, they by degrees form a kind of regular planted hedge, which I have seen in some places so tall that birds have built their nests among the branches."

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  • 2 The nests of the sun-birds, domed with a penthouse porch, and pensile from the end of a bough or leaf, are very neatly built.

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  • militaris), toucans, trogons, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, boat-bills (Cancroma), ducks, pelicans, cormorants, bitterns, stilts, sandpipers, curlews, grackles, kingfishers, motmots, " Chachalacas " (Ortalida poliocephala), woodpeckers, jays, cuckoos, " garrapateros " (Crotophaga sulcirostris), the ingenious weaver-bird (Icterus), and another species (Cassicus), whose curiously woven, sack-like nests are suspended from the slender limbs of trees, and sometimes even from telegraph-wires, scarlet-crested fly-catchers (Muscivora mexicana), tanagers, mocking-birds (called " zenzontl "), turkeys, partridge, quail (Colinus, Lophortyx, Callipepla and Cyrtonyx), doves, pigeons, eagles, caracara hawks (Polyborus), fishhawks, falcons, crows, and turkey-buzzards (both the red-faced " aura " of North America and the black-faced " zopilote " of the tropics), which are the scavengers of the country.

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  • Some species build their nests in trees - great globular masses sometimes three feet in diameter, supported on the larger branches, and connected with the ground by covered passages on the outside of the tree.

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  • Of other Totaninae,one of the most remarkable is that to which the inappropriate name of Green Sandpiper has been assigned, the Totanus or Helodromas ochropus of ornithologists, which differs (so far as is known) from all others of the group both in its osteology2 and mode of nidification, the hen laying her eggs in the deserted nests of other birds, - Jays, Thrushes or Pigeons, - but nearly always at some height (from 3 to 30 ft.) from the ground (Prot.

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  • A peculiar local industry is the manufacture of so-called "petrified" birds' nests, plants, and other objects.

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  • Deep to these is the ovarian stroma, composed of fibrous tissue, and embedded in it are numerous nests of epithelial cells, the Graafian follicles, in various stages of development.

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  • They are about the size of a pigeon, with orange-coloured plumage, a pronounced crest, and orange-red flesh, and build their nests on rock.

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  • These caves are frequented by a species of night-hawk, called guacharo, which nests in the recesses of the rocks.

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  • The webs and nests, &c., formed by spiders are also of silk.

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  • Wolley in June 1853, when he found several of its nests near Muonioniska in Lapland.

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  • Some cuckoos are singular for their habit of using the nests of smaller birds to lay their eggs in, so that the young may be reared by foster-parents; and it has been suggested that the object of the likeness exhibited to the hawk is to enable the cock cuckoo either to frighten the small birds away from their nests or to lure them in pursuit of him, while the hen bird quietly and without molestation disposes of her egg.

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  • Other flies of the genus Volucella, larger and heavier in build than Eristalis, resemble humble-bees in colour and form, and it was formerly supposed that the purpose of this similarity was to enable the flies to enter with impunity the nests of the humble-bees and to lay their eggs amongst those of the latter insects.

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  • But it has been ascertained that the species of Volucella which behave in this manner also visit for a like purpose the nests of wasps, which they do not resemble.

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  • Preserve the ripening fruits on the wall and other trees from insects, and destroy wasp nests.

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  • By the 15th century in many cases they had utterly sunk in reputation, their obligation to nurse the sick was quite neglected, and they had, rightly or wrongly, acquired the reputation of being mere nests of beggars and women of ill fame.

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  • It is said also to dig up the nests of wasps in order to eat the larvae, as the ratel - a closely allied South African form - is said to rob the bees of their honey.

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  • It is probable that what he had suffered during his first year in London had often reminded him of some parts of the satire in which Juvenal had described the misery and degradation of a needy man of letters, lodged among the pigeons' nests in the tottering garrets which overhung the streets of Rome.

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  • If, as often happens, the water-level sinks, the nests stand out higher.

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  • These floral products which form the food of bees and of their larvae, are in most cases collected and stored by the industrious insects; but some genera of bees act as inquilines or "cuckoo-parasites," laying their eggs in the nests of other bees, so that their larvae may feed at the expense of the rightful owners of the nest.

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  • Such bees, although a number of individuals often make their nests close together, are termed "solitary," their communities differing in nature from those of the "social" bees, among which there are two kinds of females - the normal fertile females or "queens," and those specially modified females with undeveloped ovaries (see fig.

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  • Bees of different genera vary considerably in the site and arrangement of their nests.

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  • Fabre has found that in the nests of some species of Osmia the young bee developed in the first-formed cell, if (as often happens) she emerges from her cocoon before the inmates of the later cells, will try to work her way round these or to bite a lateral hole through the bramble shoot; should she fail to do this, she will wait for the emergence of her sisters and not make her escape at the price of injury to them.

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  • The leaf-cutter bees (Megachile) - which differ from Andrena and Halictus and agree with Osmia, Apis and Bombus in having elongate tongues - cut neat circular disks from leaves, using them for lining the cells of their underground nests.

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  • The carpenter-bees (Xylocopa and allied genera), unrepresented in the British Islands, though widely distributed in warmer countries, make their nests in dry wood.

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  • The nests of Andrena, for example, are haunted by the black and yellow species of Nomada, whose females lay their eggs in the food provided for the larva of the Andrena.

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  • The community is broken up on the approach of winter, the males and workers perish, and the young queens after hibernation start fresh nests in the succeeding year.

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  • They are closely" mimicked "by bees of the genus Psithyrus, which often share their nests.

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  • In the nests of Bombi are found various beetle larvae that live as inquilines or parasites, and also maggots of drone-flies (V olucella), which act as scavengers; the Volucella-fly is usually a" mimic ' vades.

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  • One of the last (Collocalia troglodytes, Gray) constructs the edible nests so highly prized by the Chinese.

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  • The best nests are obtained on the precipitous sides of the Penon de Coron, between Culion and Busuanga.

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  • Eared grebes and ring-billed gulls breed on the sloughs of the plains, and rarely the white pelican nests about the lake shores.

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  • Various hawks and owls are common; the golden eagle nests on the mountain crags and the burrowing owl on the plains.

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  • The Cypselus esculentus, or edible-nest swift, is very common, and the nests, which are built mostly in limestone caves, are esteemed the best in the archipelago.

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  • They generally breed in association, often in the closest proximity - their nests, containing three eggs at most, being made on the shingle or among herbage.

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  • (I I) Qinnim (" nests "), on sacrifices of doves by the poor (cf.

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  • Gold is found in the central part; and sugar, coco-nuts, betel-nuts, birds' nests, and agar agar, or sea vegetable, are among the other products of the island.

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  • The Bandanese pay occasional visits to shoot bears and deer; there are numbers of wild goats and cattle; and among birds are mentioned cassowaries, cockatoos, birds of paradise, and the swallows that furnish edible nests.

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  • Tail long, and sometimes partially prehensile when it is used for carrying bundles of grass with which these animals build their nests.

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  • Thus one treats of "Mimicry" in animals, another on "Instinct," another on "Birds' Nests."

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  • The parliaments or tribunals were nests of faction and of the deepest social incompetence.

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  • Its food consists mainly of termites, to obtain which it opens their nests with its powerful sharp anterior claws, and as the insects swarm to the damaged part of their dwelling, it draws them into its mouth by means of its long, flexible, rapidly moving tongue covered with glutinous saliva.

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  • The catching of the numerous sea-birds which build their nests upon the face of the cliffs forms an important source of subsistence to the inhabitants.

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  • The birds and the contents of the nests are taken in nets mounted on poles; shooting is not practised, lest it should permanently scare the birds away.

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  • Where a large number of them were bred, nests were constructed for them one above another; they were daily taken down by the gooseherd, driven to the water, and then reinstated in their nests, without a single bird being misplaced.

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  • Yet, while these are essential merits of the book, its endearing charm lies deeper, in the sweet and kindly personality of the author, who on his rambles gathers no spoil, but watches the birds and field-mice without disturbing them from their nests, and quietly plants an acorn where he thinks an oak is wanted, or sows beech-nuts in what is now a stately row.

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  • Wallace), whilst others have been observed to make aerial nests between leaves overhanging water, a habit which is shared by their near allies the Chiromantis of tropical Africa.

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  • Protection by means of nests or nurseries.

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  • In nests in holes near the water.-Rhacophorus, Leptodactylus.

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  • C. In nests overhanging the water.-Rhacophorus, Chiromantis, Phyllomedusa.

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  • He gives you the trees in which to build your nests.

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  • The birds flew to their nests.

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  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.

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  • Then they began to wander merrily about searching for nuts, climbing trees, peeping curiously into the empty birds' nests, and playing hide and seek from behind the trees.

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  • When all outside is cold and white, when the little children of the woodland are gone to their nurseries in the warm earth, and the empty nests on the bare trees fill with snow, my window-garden glows and smiles, making summer within while it is winter without.

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  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.

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  • Like his mother, he was keen to look up in the rafters of derelict buildings for owls ' nests.

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  • The Gurkha regiment, based in nearby Brecon, was assigned the work of guarding the nests.

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  • They will constantly rob brown ants nests to maintain the number of slaves in the colony.

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  • Not to mention the dreadful unhygienic mess that nesting rooks can cause and the difficulty of removing the nests once established !

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  • It nests on the ground in some rushy pasture or marsh.

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  • I could n't help noticing all the storks ' nests on the roofs.

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  • The nearby village of El Alam had 8 white stork nests.

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  • Most nests are located in the safety of the taro lo'i, and as such, unfortunately many nests get unnoticed and go unrecorded.

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  • Over six months, 69 group visits to termite nests were filmed.

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  • On top of the reef titan triggerfish may be seen biting and moving dead coral to build nests in which to lay their eggs.

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  • She may begin building nests around the cage, and may also become more touchy with her rattie friends.

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  • Cages on-site protect turtle nests, and any turtle nests found on nearby Coral bay are transferred to the hatchery on Lara Beach.

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  • Wasps Active wasps ' nests in domestic premises can also be treated for a nominal charge.

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  • Petsnap.com offers dog beds, couch covers, dog sofas, nuzzle nests, and doggie hotels for traveling.

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  • Check your Fireplace -- Make sure that your fireplace is clean and safe by inspecting the flue and making sure that the chimney is free from bird nests and other debris.

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  • Colored Easter eggs can be placed inside the round grass nests.

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  • Use streams of green, yellow and pink (purple) ribbons between the grass nests.

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  • Take your camera with you throughout the Easter season so you can include snapshots of the first shoots of spring daffodils, pretty Easter dresses, the cross at your church, or baby birds in their nests.

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  • Remove old empty bird nests, which are a great place for ticks to set up house until another unsuspecting host comes along.

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  • Even birds can become a difficult pest for grape growers as they create nests in the vines or simply pick at the fruit.

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  • Ants, bees, and wasps will sting to defend their nests or if they are disturbed.

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  • Children should avoid the nests of bees, wasps, and ants.

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  • Their nests have a papier-mâché appearance and are usually located underground.

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  • Their nests are also made of a paper-like substance that opens downward, in a circular comb of cells.

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  • Their nests are often located behind shutters, in shrubs or woodpiles, or under eaves.

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  • They build nests of dirt in the ground that may be quite tall.

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  • Hire an exterminator to destroy nests and hives around the home.

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  • There are many ways to remove wasp nests; some methods may involve insecticides.

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  • There are many ways to remove wasp nests; some methods may involve insecticides.

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  • The Paussidae are a very remarkable family of small beetles, mostly tropical, found only in ants' nests, or flying by night, and apparently migrating from one nest to another.

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  • Other flies of the genus Volucella, larger and heavier in build than Eristalis, resemble humble-bees in colour and form, and it was formerly supposed that the purpose of this similarity was to enable the flies to enter with impunity the nests of the humble-bees and to lay their eggs amongst those of the latter insects.

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  • The carpenter-bees (Xylocopa and allied genera), unrepresented in the British Islands, though widely distributed in warmer countries, make their nests in dry wood.

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  • The birds had flown, and their empty nests in the bare trees were filled with snow.

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