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nervous-system

nervous-system

nervous-system Sentence Examples

  • Exposure to pesticides has been linked to cancer, nervous-system and lung damage, reproductive dysfunction, and possibly dysfunction of the endocrine and immune systems.

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  • materia, matter), in philosophy, the theory which regards all the facts of the universe as explainable in terms of matter and motion, and in particular explains all psychical processes by physical and chemical changes in the nervous system.

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  • A nervous system has been shown to exist in many species, and consists of a perioesophageal ring giving off usually six nerves which run forwards and backwards along the lateral and median lines; these are connected by numerous fine, circular threads in the sub-cuticle.

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  • In the polyp the nervous tissue is always in the form of a scattered plexus, never concentrated to form a definite nervous system as in the medusa.

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  • The ectoderm furnishes the general epithelial covering of the body, and the muscular tissue, nervous system and sense-organs.

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  • The nervous system of the medusa consists of sub-epithelial ganglion-cells, which form, in the first place, a diffuse plexus of nervous tissue, as in the polyp, but developed chiefly on the subumbral surface; and which are concentrated, in the second place, to form a definite central nervous system, never found in the polyp. In Hydromedusae the central nervous system forms two concentric nerverings at the margin of the umbrella, near the base of the velum.

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  • By means of vibrations or shocks transmitted through the - Sub water, or by displacements in the balance or position of the animal, the otoliths are caused to impinge against the bristles of the sensory cells, now on one side, now on the other, causing shocks or stimuli which are transmitted by the basal nerve-fibre to the central nervous system.

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  • n.s, Nervous system.

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  • He defined them as possessing radial instead of bilateral symmetry, and as apparently destitute of nervous system and sense organs, as having the circulatory system rudimentary or absent, and the respiratory organs on or coextensive with the surface of the body; he included under this title and definition five classes, - Echinodermata, Acalepha, Entozoa, Polypi and Infusoria.

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  • Carbolic acid is distinguished from all other acids so-called - except oxalic acid and hydrocyanic acid - in that it is a neurotic poison, having a marked action directly upon the nervous system.

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  • Nervous System.

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  • The nervous system is remarkably concentrated in some beetles, the abdominal ganglia showing a tendency to become shifted forward and crowded together, and in certain chafers all the thoracic and abdominal ganglia are fused into a single nervecentre situated in the thorax, - a degree of specialization only matched in the insectan class among the Hemiptera and some muscid flies.

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  • The illumination is intermittent, and appears to be under the control of the insect's nervous system.

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  • The plan of the central nervous system is therefore that of the Arthropoda.

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  • Among the Archiannelida, in Aeolosoma and some Polychaetes, the whole central nervous system remains imbedded in the epidermis.

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  • segments are the apertures of the Nervous system rarely atria.C, Perichaeta: the spermathecal pores (Aeolosoma) in continuity are between segments 6 and 7, 7 with epidermis.

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  • The nervous system is embedded in the epidermis, and the pairs of ganglia are separated as in Serpula, &c.; each pair has a longish commissure between its two ganglia.

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  • - Nervous system of Patella; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of Haliotis; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of after Jhering.) Fissurella.

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  • The histology of the nervous system of Mollusca has yet to be seriously inquired into.

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  • - Nervous system of Paludina as a type of the streptoneurous condition.

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  • The nervous system and sense organs are highly developed.

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  • The detorted visceral commissure shows a tendency to the concentration of all its elements round the oesophagus, so that except in the Bullomorpha and in Aplysia the whole nervous system is aggregated in the cephalic region, either dorsally or ventrally.

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  • In the nervous system of Aplysia the great ganglion-pairs are well developed and distinct.

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  • Our figure of the nervous system of Aplysia does not give the small pair of buccal ganglia which are, as in all glossophorous Molluscs, present upon the nerves passing from the cerebral region to the odontophore.

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  • - Nervous system of Aplysia, as a type of the longlooped Euthyneurous condition.

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  • - Central Nervous System of Fiona (one of the Nudibranchia), showing a tendency to fusion of the great ganglia.

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  • Visceral commissure reduced; nervous system concentrated on dorsal side of oesophagus.

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  • - Nervous System of the Pond knob - like particle Snail, Limnaeus stagnalis, as a type of the (Neritina and Palu- short-looped euthyneurous condition.

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  • Internal Organs Nervous System.

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  • In connexion with the central nervous system there are usually numerous organs of special sense.

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  • - The nervous system is ectodermal in origin, and is developed and segmented to a large extent in connexion with the outer part of the body, so that it affords important evidence as to the segmentation thereof.

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  • The continuous layer of cells from which the nervous system is developed undergoes a segmentation analogous with that we have described as occurring in the ventral plate; there is thus formed a pair of contiguous ganglia for each segment of the body, but there is no ganglion for the telson.

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  • The nervous system of the embryonic head exhibits three ganglionic masses, anterior to the thoracic ganglionic masses; these three masses subsequently amalgamate and form the sub-oesophageal ganglion, which supplies the trophal segments.

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  • In front of the three masses that will form the sub-oesophageal ganglion the mass of cells that is to form the nervous system is very large, and projects on each side; this anterior or " brain " mass consists of three lobes (the prot-, deut-, and tritencephalon of Viallanes and others), each of which might be thought to represent a segmental ganglion.

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  • - Morphology of an Insect: the embryo of Gryllotalpa, somewhat diagrammatic. The longitudinal segmented band along the middle line represents the early segmentation of the nervous system and the subsequent median field of each sternite; the lateral transverse unshaded bands are the lateral fields of each segment; the shaded areas indicate the more internally placed mesoderm layer.

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  • Protonemertini, in which there are two layers of dermal muscles, external circular and internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies external to the circular muscles; the mouth lies behind the level of the brain; the proboscis has no stylet; there is no caecum to the intestine.

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  • Mesonemertini, in which the nervous system has passed into the dermal muscles and lies amongst them; other characters as in Protonemertini.

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  • Metanemertini, in which the nervous system lies inside the dermal muscles in the parenchyma; the mouth lies in front of the level of the brain; the proboscis as a ru'e bears stylets; the intestine nearly always has a caecum.

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  • Heteronemertini, in which the dermal musculature is in three layers, an external longitudinal, a middle circular, an internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies between the first and second of these layers; the outer layer of longitudinal muscles is a new development; there is no intestinal caecum; no stylets on the proboscis and the mouth is behind the level of the brain.

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  • The nervous system of Nemertines presents several interesting peculiarities.

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  • In addition to the nerves starting from the brain-lobes just now especially mentioned, there is a double apparatus which can hardly be treated of in conjunction with the sense organs, because its sensory functions have not been sufficiently made out, and which will therefore rather be considered along with the brain and central nervous system.

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  • xx.; Id., " The Peripheral Nervous System of the Palaeoand Schizonemertini, one of the layers of the Body-wall," Quart.

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  • The nervous system is represented by an oesophageal collar and a suboesophageal ganglion, whence paired nerves pass outwards to innervate the anterior extremity and backwards towards its posterior end.

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  • The central ganglion of the nervous system lies in the proboscissheath or -septum.

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  • Instinctive behaviour thus depends solely on how the nervous system has been built through heredity; while intelligent behaviour depends also on those characters of the nervous system which have been acquired under the modifying influence of individual relation to the environment.

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  • Do they originate through the natural selection of those variations which are the more adaptive; or do they originate through the inheritance of those acquired modifications which are impressed on the nervous system in the course of individual and intelligent use ?

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  • 3) Nervous System.

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  • The nervous system is thus essentially epidermal in position and diffuse in distribution; but an interesting concentration of nerve-cells and fibres has taken place in the collar-region, where a medullary tube, closed in from the outside, opens in front and behind by anterior and posterior neuropores.

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  • The nervous system of BrachioDiagram showing the muscular pods has, as a rule: maintained system.

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  • There is a special marginal nerve running round the edge of the mantle, but the connexion of this with the rest of the nervous system is not clear; probably it is merely another concentration of the diffused sub-ectodermal nervous fibrils.

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  • - Diagram of nervous system of Crania; from the dorsal side.

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  • Taken internally aconite acts very notably on the circulation, the respiration and the nervous system.

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  • Intense application during early youth had weakened a constitution never robust, and led to accesses of feverish exaltation culminating, in the spring of 1761, in an attack of bilious hypochondria, which permanently lowered the tone of his nervous system.

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  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

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  • At no time has so much been done to advance our knowledge of diseases of the nervous system as during the last thirty years of the 19th century.

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  • IV.), that of " sclerosis " is used when such a deposition of fibrous tissue occurs within the central nervous system.

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  • When, leaving the infections, we look for evidence of progress in our knowledge of more or less local diseases, we may begin with the nervous system.

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  • Not, however, all diseases of the nervous system conduct themselves on these definite paths, for some of them pay no attention to the geography of structure, but, as one may say, blunder indiscriminately among the several parts; others, again, pick out particular parts definitely enough, but not parts immediately continuous, or even contiguous.

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  • Thus, arguing inversely, we may learn something of the respective natures of these influences and of the way in which the nervous system is affected secondarily.

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  • Many other diseases formerly regarded as primarily diseases of the nervous system are not such; but, by means of agents either introduced into the body or modified there, establish themselves after the affinities of these in contiguous associated parts of the structure, as in vascular, membranous or connective elements, or again in distant and peripheral parts; the perturbations of nervous function being secondary and consequential.

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  • Outline of the ventral surface to show the external apertures and nervous system; a, rosette-organ; b, uterine pore; c, terminal sucker; e, vaginal pore; g, male gonopore; n, o, p, nervous system.

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  • The nervous system consists of a ring below the suckers and of a large number of radially arranged tracts running forwards and backwards.

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  • The nervous system is, however, not segmented, and the excretory system is continuous throughout the worm.

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  • It appears to be primarily related to the organs of attachment and to have attained greater elaboration than the rest of the nervous system because the proximal end is the most specialized and most stimulated portion of the worm.

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  • Lastly the nervous system is well developed and consists of a pair of well-marked and interconnected ganglia placed near the anterior end and dorsal to the oesophagus.

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  • Eye-spots are general and the nervous system maintains a primitive diffused condition.

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  • A, Dorsal view showing the nervous system and digestive system; a, mouth; b, pharynx; c, d, e, gut; E, post-genital union of two limbs of gut; f, excretory pore; g, vaginal pore; h, j, k, brain and nerves; 1, dorsal nerves; m, ventral nerves; n, adoral sucker; o, posterior sucker; p, hooks on posterior sucker; r, vitello-intestinal duct.

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  • They are usually found in the alimentary canal or its appendages but occasionally work their way into the serous cavities, nervous system and blood vessels.

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  • The polypide consists of a "lophophore" bearing a series of ciliated tentacles by which Diatoms and other microscopic bodies are collected as food, of a U-shaped alimentary canal, and of a central nervous system.

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  • The nervous system is represented by a ganglion situated between the mouth and the anus.

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  • The central nervous system (x) is highly developed, and in Loxosoma bears a pair o` eyes.

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  • According to Sir Thomas Fraser nothing else can compete with alcohol as a food in desperate febrile cases, and to this use must be added its antipyretic power already explained and its action as a soporific. During its administration in febrile cases the drug must be most carefully watched, as its action may prove deleterious to the nervous system and the circulation in certain classes of patient.

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  • intoxication), chronic alcoholism, delirium tremens, and all the countless pathological changes - extending to every tissue but the bones, and especially marked in the nervous system - which alcohol produces.

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  • Its especial affinity for the nervous system is indicated by the fact that, when all traces of it have disappeared elsewhere, it can still be detected with ease in the cerebro-spinal fluid.

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  • The nervous system consists of a ganglion or brain, which lies dorsally about the level of the junction of the pharynx and the stomach, a nerve ring and a segmented neutral cord.

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  • For nervous system H.

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  • In the nervous system the concentration of the trunk ganglia After Marlatt, Bull.

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  • No organs of circulation or respiration are known; but the nervous system is well developed, and consists of a pair of ganglia corresponding with the limbs and connected by longitudinal commissural chords.

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  • Death is due either to weakness and emaciation (in chronic cases), or to blocking of the cerebral capillaries by the parasites (where these are abundant), or to disorganization of the nervous system (paraplegic and sleepingsickness cases).

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  • Such a cough is relieved by the sedative action on the central nervous system.

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  • During an attack of fever he made observations on himself with reference to the action of quickened circulation upon thought, which led him to the conclusion that psychical phenomena were to be accounted for as the effects of organic changes in the brain and nervous system.

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  • A typical nervous system is present (fig.

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  • Intelligence does not differ from sense by having no bodily organ, but the nervous system is the bodily organ of both.

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  • The central nervous system may be described as consisting of a collar surrounding the oesophagus, and two pairs of cords arising from the collar and passing backwards.

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  • This is the condition of the nervous system found in Chiton and the other Amphineura, but may not be in all respects the ancestral condition.

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  • One end of the body, through contact, during locomotion, with fresh tracts of medium and other forms of stimuli, has become more specialized than the rest, and here the nervous system and sense-organs are more densely aggregated than elsewhere, forming a means of controlling locomotion and of correlating the activities of the inner organs with the varying stimuli that impinge upon the body.

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  • This answer supposed that the whole physical process from the action of the external stimulus on the nervous system to the reaction of the organism on the external world is one series, while the conscious process beginning with sensation is only parallel and as it were left high and dry.

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  • The difference is that Clifford considers " mind-stuff " to be unconscious, and denies that there is any evidence of consciousness apart from a nervous system.

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  • The nervous system consists of a cerebral ganglion in the head, a conspicuous ventral ganglion in the trunk, and of lateral cornmissures uniting these ganglia on each side.

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  • The specific effects of the drug, however, are upon the central nervous system.

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  • In a complete albino not only is all pigment absent in the skin, but also that which is normally present in deeper organs, such as the sympathetic nervous system and in the substantia nigra of the brain.

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  • There is some reason to believe that a peculiar condition found in the majority of human albinoes, and known as nystagmus, is correlated with the absence of pigment in the central nervous system.

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  • - Anterior part of the nervous system of Chiton cinereus, in more detail.

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  • - Diagrams of the nervous system of Amphineura.

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  • Their bilateral symmetry is obviously to be regarded as primitive, and the nervous system shows an original condition from which that of the asymmetrical twisted Gastropods can be derived.

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  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.

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  • Among the properties of living material there is one, widely though not universally present in it, which forms the pre-eminent characteristic of 1 The anatomy of the muscles is dealt with under Muscular System, and of the nerves under Nerve and Nervous System.

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  • This is manifested by the muscular walls of the hollow viscera and of the heart, where it is the expression of a continuous liberation of energy in process in the muscular tissue, the outcome of the latter's own intrinsic life, and largely independent of any connexion with the nervous system.

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  • The work of Camillo Golgi (Pavia, 1885 and onwards) on the minute structure of the nervous system has led to great alteration of doctrine in neural physi nerve cells, that is to say, the fine nerve fibres - since all nerve fibres are nerve cell branches, and all nerve cell branches are nerve fibres - which form a close felt-work in the nervous centres, there combined into a network actually continuous throughout.

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  • This continuum was held to render possible conduction in all directions throughout the grey matter of the whole nervous system.

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  • Certain it is that in the course of the waking day a great number of stimuli play on the sense organs, and through these produce disintegration of the living molecules of the central nervous system.

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  • The second factor inducing the assimilative change is the withdrawal of the nervous system from sensual, stimulation.

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  • Symptoms attendant on the hypnotic state are closure of the eyelids by the hypnotizer without subsequent attempt to open them by the hypnotized subject; the pupils, instead of being constricted, as for near vision, dilate, and there sets in a condition superficially resembling sleep. But in natural sleep the action of all parts of the nervous system is subdued, whereas in the hypnotic the reactions of the lower, and some even of the higher, parts are exalted.

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  • The peripheral nervous system is minutely described by T.

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  • Apparently there is an influence on the afferent nerves of the part which causes a reflex contraction - some authors say dilatation - of the vessels in the internal organs that are under the control of the same segment of the nervous system as that supplying the area of skin from which the exciting impulse comes.

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  • Herbert Spencer, again, before the decline in question set in, put forward the hypothesis that "the ability to maintain individual life and the ability to multiply vary inversely"; in other words, the strain upon the nervous system involved in the struggle for life under the conditions of modern civilization, by reacting on the reproductive powers, tends towards comparative sterility.

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  • He seems in this way to have educated in himself a very precise " electrical sense," making use of his own nervous system as a kind of physiological galvanometer.

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  • A large population is temporarily attracted to Cannstatt by the fame of its mineral springs, which are valuabl e for diseases of the throat and weaknesses of the nervous system.

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  • The pedal ganglia and auditory organs have disappeared with the foot, at all events have never been detected; the cerebral ganglia are very minute, while the parieto-splanchnic are well developed, and constitute the principal part of the nervous system.

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  • When this gland becomes enlarged, and its secretion consequently increases, the vessels dilate, the heart beats more rapidly, the skin becomes too hot, the nervous system becomes irritable, and tremors occur in the limbs.

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  • When the nervous system is below par, and both secretion and movements are deficient in the stomach, nervine tonics, such as nux vomica or strychnine, are most useful.

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  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.

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  • Wassermann and Takaki in the case of tetanus, that there do exist in the nervous system molecules with combining affinity for the tetanus toxin.

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  • Further, these molecules in the nervous system present the same susceptibility to heat and other physical agencies as does tetanus antitoxin.

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  • Natural immunity against toxins must be taken into account, and, if Ehrlich's view with regard to toxic action be correct, this may depend upon either the absence of chemical affinity of the living molecules of the tissues for the toxic molecule, or upon insensitiveness to the action of the toxophorous group. It has been shown with regard to the former, for example, that the nervous system of the fowl, which possesses immunity against tetanus toxin, has little combining affinity for it.

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  • Ten grains taken at bedtime will often give sleep, cause free diaphoresis and quieten the entire nervous system in such cases.

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  • The nervous system consists as in Hydromedusae of a diffuse plexus beneath the ectoderm, concentrated in certain places to form a central nervous system.

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  • In these medusae, however, the central nervous system does not form continuous rings, but occurs as four or eight separate con centrations at the margin of the umbrella, centred each round one of the sense-organs (tentaculocysts).

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  • The central nervous system is constructed on the same general plan as in the other Arthropoda, consisting of a supra-oesophageal ganglionic mass or brain, united by circumoesophageal connectives with a double ventral chain of segmentally arranged ganglia.

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  • The resemblances between the Crustacea and the Annelid worms, in such characters as the structure of the nervous system and the mode of growth of the somites, can hardly be ignored.

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  • The large number and the uniformity of the trunk somites and their appendages, and the structure of the nervous system and of the heart in A pus, are Annelidan characters which can hardly be without significance.

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  • The nervous system resembles that of Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia.

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  • The nervous system consists of a circumoesophageal nerve, with scarcely differ entiated brain, joining below a large ganglionic mass no doubt representing many fused ganglia (B).

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  • To regard the intellectual functions of the brain and nervous system as alone to be considered in the psychological comparison of man with the lower animals, is a view satisfactory to those thinkers who hold materialistic views.

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  • - Bromide of potassium is the safest and most generally applicable sedative of the nervous system.

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  • Whilst very weak, its action is perfectly balanced throughout all nervous tissue, so much so that Sir Thomas Lauder Brunton has suggested its action to be due to its replacement of sodium chloride (common salt) in the fluids of the nervous system.

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  • All the intellectual processes are evolved from sensibility, and sensibility itself is a property of the nervous system.

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  • In 1802 he published a series of engravings of original drawings, showing the anatomy of the brain and nervous system.

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  • These drawings, which are remarkable for artistic skill and finish, were taken from dissections made by Bell for the lectures or demonstrations he gave on the nervous system as part of the course of anatomical instruction of his brother.

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  • In 1804 he wrote the third volume, containing the anatomy of the nervous system and of the organs of special sense, of The Anatomy of the Human Body, by John and Charles Bell.

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  • This work, apart from its value to artists and psychologists, is of interest historically, as there is no doubt the investigations of the author into the nervous supply of the muscles of expression induced him to prosecute inquiries which led to his great discoveries in the physiology of the nervous system.

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  • In 1811 Bell published his New Idea of the Anatomy of the Brain, in which he announced the discovery of the different functions of the nerves corresponding with their relations to different parts of the brain; his latest researches were described in The Nervous System of the Human Body (1830), a collection of papers read by him before the Royal Society.

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  • At last a quinqueradiate symmetry influenced the plates of the theca, partly through the development of a plate at the end of each groove (terminal), partly through plates at the aboral pole of the theca (basals and infrabasals) arising in response to mechanical pressure, but soon intimately connected with the cords of an aboral nervous system.

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  • Lankester, " Observations and Reflections on the Appendages and Nervous System of Apus Cancriformis," Quart.

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  • The nervous system lies in the epidermis, externally to the basementmembrane.

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  • k, the hollow central nervous system of some Enteropneusta and of Vertebrates.

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  • The mouth (o) is in front of the tentacles, on the ventral side, and is overhung by a mobile praeoral hood, in which is the principal part of the nervous system.

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  • The nervous system is formed as an annular thickening of ectoderm passing in front of the mouth and behind the anus, and lying on each side of the blastopore along the lines of the somites.

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  • There are exceptions to this, however, as children are more affected in proportion by opium and some other substances, and less by mercury and arsenic. In old age also the nervous system and the tissues generally do not react so readily as in youth.

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  • Soluble salts of manganese, aluminium, zinc, copper, gold, platinum and bismuth have, when given by the mouth, little action beyond their local astringent or irritating effects; but when injected into a blood vessel they all exert much the same depressing effect upon the heart and nervous system.

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  • Arsenic and antimony do not form combinations with albumen, but they both greatly depress the central nervous system and circulation; and, if their action be long continued in large doses, they cause fatty degeneration of the viscera and disappearance of glycogen from the liver.

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  • When taken by the mouth phosphorus is an irritant poison in large doses; in small doses the only effects noticeable consist in an increased formation of bony and connective tissue, although it is also supposed to exert a gently stimulating effect upon the nervous system.

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  • In addition they have a stimulating action on the central nervous system.

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  • In large doses they are powerful nerve poisons, but as usually taken they exercise a gently stimulant effect upon the nervous system.

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  • Emetine acts as a gradual depressant to the nervous system in animals.

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  • Drugs acting on the nervous system.

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  • Babies know how to cry when they are born, so using the vocal cords is autonomic – part of the autonomic nervous system.

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  • The process may enable doctors to give amputees fully functioning bionic limbs which are linked to the patient's nervous system within five years.

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  • antispasmodic drug that works directly on the muscles rather than on the central nervous system.

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  • The motor nerve cell body has a long fiber called an axon, which extends from the central nervous system to the muscles.

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  • bionic limbs which are linked to the patient's nervous system within five years.

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  • bronchusct on the B2 receptors of the sympathetic nervous system relaxing bronchial smooth muscle thereby dilating the bronchi.

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  • carminative effect on the nervous system promoting relaxation whilst also tonifying and strengthening the nerves.

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  • Temporal central nervous system remission was induced by intrathecal chemotherapy only.

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  • One of the most important nutrients associated with the brain and nervous system is phosphatidyl choline.

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  • They are nerve poisons, inhibiting the enzyme cholinesterase, which can have severe effects on the central nervous system.

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  • Measurement of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity is the primary method for measuring the effect of these pesticides on the nervous system.

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  • cleanup crew ' for the central nervous system and retina.

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  • cocaine is a short acting powerful, central nervous system stimulant that comes from the coca bush which grows widely in South America.

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  • craniosacral Therapy works by helping the body's natural healing mechanisms dissipate the negative effects of stress on the central nervous system.

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  • Degenerative brain diseases are marked by progressive, irreversible damage to cells of the central nervous system.

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  • All these are progressively degenerative diseases of the central nervous system that prove ultimately fatal.

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  • Special note should be made of central nervous system depressants.

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  • Sedation due to the drug may be increased by the concomitant use of other central nervous system depressants.

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  • depressant effect on the central nervous system.

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  • depressant actions on various central and peripheral nervous system pathways.

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  • Carbon monoxide related cerebral edema can cause irreversible damage to the brain which in turn can effect the nervous system.

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  • efferent nerves C. To the central nervous system D. Motor neurones 3. Which of the following statements are true?

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  • enterovirus infection of the central nervous system of humans: lack of association with chronic neurological disease.

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  • Older medications often included ephedrine or related compounds which are banned because they are considered as central nervous system stimulants.

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  • excitatory transmitter in the central nervous system.

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  • Looking at possible relationships between emotional expressivity and autonomic nervous system activity.

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  • These can include: heart problems eyesight problems problems with the nervous system.

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  • This indicates that folic acid can modulate key mechanisms for growth and differential in the central nervous system.

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  • The most dramatic difference between humans and any other species, including the great apes, is found in the central nervous system.

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  • high-grade lymphoma that often involves the nervous system.

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  • Click Here Further Details histology of the Nervous System This page contains 40 different slides showing the histology of the nervous system.

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  • Intention is a powerful force; it begins to activate the nervous system and triggers nerve impulses into muscles.

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  • It damages the central nervous system and skin, and causes respiratory irritation.

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  • leavet unchecked, a lack of this vitamin can lead to anemia and irreversible damage to the nervous system.

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  • What allows a leech to regenerate its nervous system?

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  • Tetanus (sometimes called lockjaw) is a bacterial disease that affects the nervous system.

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  • Perry, V.H. (1998) A revised view of the central nervous system microenvironment and major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation.

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  • Brain cells can give rise to all previous cells types including the peripheral nervous system and smooth muscle.

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  • Schwann cell - produces myelin in the peripheral nervous system.

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  • Kinney HC, Brody BA, Kloman AS, Gilles FH: Sequence of central nervous system myelination in human infancy.

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  • The autonomic nerve fibers which radiate from the central nervous system to the ganglia of the autonomic nervous system are called preganglionic nerves.

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  • Intention is a powerful force; it begins to activate the nervous system and triggers nerve impulses into muscles.

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  • The nervous system of the body is mainly categorized into the Central nervous system of the body is mainly categorized into the Central Nervous system, the peripheral, somatic, autonomic and enteric systems.

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  • A tiny embryo is aware, even before the central nervous system is formed.

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  • The enteric nervous system controls the gut functions and sensory neuron transmitters all over the body relay message back to these systems.

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  • First there is the complexity of the human nervous system.

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  • The brain and its reaction controls every function of the body, triggered by the sensory nervous system.

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  • functional neuroanatomy of nitric oxide signaling in the thoracic nervous system of the locust L. Owens, Q.

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  • neurogenic pain Pain due to damage to the nervous system itself.

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  • By designing drugs to affect specific neurotransmitters or neuroreceptors, drugs can be targeted at different parts of the nervous system.

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  • noradrenaline receptors in the sympathetic nervous system.

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  • Activation of the autonomic nervous system also delays gastric emptying and reduces intestinal peristalsis.

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  • It also prevents pernicious anemia and is necessary to a healthy nervous system.

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  • predisposes of predisposing factors outlined above all have a powerful effect on the human nervous system.

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  • AB - PURPOSE: Children with recurrent or progressive central nervous system (CNS) tumors have an unfavorable prognosis.

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  • proprioceptive information is fed into the central nervous system.

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  • Extrapyramidal Nervous System Refers to the caudate, putamen, and Substantia Nigra.

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  • Pronounced central nervous system depression requires airway maintenance or, in extreme circumstances, assisted respiration.

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  • sensory neurones: Nerve cells within the nervous system responsible for converting external stimuli from the organism's environment into internal electrical impulses.

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  • Cocaine is a short acting powerful, central nervous system stimulant that comes from the coca bush which grows widely in South America.

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  • studentship information principal interests: Regulation of gene expression with particular emphasis on the nervous system.

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  • Neurological surgery is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment, usually surgical, of disorders involving the brain and nervous system.

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  • synapses in the central nervous system.

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  • synthesis of prostaglandins, it acts within the damaged tissue itself rather than on the nervous system.

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  • He's had syphilis of the central nervous system.

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  • First there is the complexity of the human nervous system.

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  • third ventriclepeptides reduce food intake when injected into the third cerebral ventricle, and probably have several other functions within the central nervous system.

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  • uncommon complication of the disorder is central nervous system invasion.

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  • Mr Z was uncooperative with an examination of his nervous system and seemed unsteady to the staff grade doctor.

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  • upswings in strength are actually the result of alterations in the way the muscle is controlled by the NERVOUS SYSTEM.

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  • other vasodilators There are still many alternative treatments available, for example, drugs acting on the central nervous system.

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  • lifting free weights improves your coordination by improving the neuromuscular pathways that connect your muscles to the central nervous system.

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  • n.s., Central nervous system.

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  • tion of the nervous system and in the a, Anterior; b, pof presence of four Malpighian (excretory) terior process of tubes the Thysanoptera resemble the ovipositor.

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  • materia, matter), in philosophy, the theory which regards all the facts of the universe as explainable in terms of matter and motion, and in particular explains all psychical processes by physical and chemical changes in the nervous system.

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  • A nervous system has been shown to exist in many species, and consists of a perioesophageal ring giving off usually six nerves which run forwards and backwards along the lateral and median lines; these are connected by numerous fine, circular threads in the sub-cuticle.

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  • (I) The polyp, when present, is without the strongly developed longitudinal retractor muscles, forming ridges (taeniolae) projecting into the digestive cavity, seen in the scyphistoma or scyphopolyp. (2) The medusa, when' present, has a velum and is hence said to be craspedote; the nervous system forms two continuous rings running above and below the velum; the margin of the umbrella is not lobed (except in Narcomedusae) but entire; there are characteristic differences in the sense-organs (see below, and Scyphomedusae); and gastral filaments (phacellae), subgenital pits, &c., are absent.

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  • In the polyp the nervous tissue is always in the form of a scattered plexus, never concentrated to form a definite nervous system as in the medusa.

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  • The ectoderm furnishes the general epithelial covering of the body, and the muscular tissue, nervous system and sense-organs.

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  • The nervous system of the medusa consists of sub-epithelial ganglion-cells, which form, in the first place, a diffuse plexus of nervous tissue, as in the polyp, but developed chiefly on the subumbral surface; and which are concentrated, in the second place, to form a definite central nervous system, never found in the polyp. In Hydromedusae the central nervous system forms two concentric nerverings at the margin of the umbrella, near the base of the velum.

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  • By means of vibrations or shocks transmitted through the - Sub water, or by displacements in the balance or position of the animal, the otoliths are caused to impinge against the bristles of the sensory cells, now on one side, now on the other, causing shocks or stimuli which are transmitted by the basal nerve-fibre to the central nervous system.

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  • n.s, Nervous system.

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  • He defined them as possessing radial instead of bilateral symmetry, and as apparently destitute of nervous system and sense organs, as having the circulatory system rudimentary or absent, and the respiratory organs on or coextensive with the surface of the body; he included under this title and definition five classes, - Echinodermata, Acalepha, Entozoa, Polypi and Infusoria.

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  • Carbolic acid is distinguished from all other acids so-called - except oxalic acid and hydrocyanic acid - in that it is a neurotic poison, having a marked action directly upon the nervous system.

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  • Nervous System.

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  • Several futile attempts have been made to draw conclusions as to the intelligence of various birds, from comparison of the weight of the whole brain with that of the body, or the weight of the hemispheres with that of other parts of the central nervous system.

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  • Swan, Illustrations of the Comparative Anatomy of the Nervous System (London, 1835, 4to, with plates).

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  • The nervous system is remarkably concentrated in some beetles, the abdominal ganglia showing a tendency to become shifted forward and crowded together, and in certain chafers all the thoracic and abdominal ganglia are fused into a single nervecentre situated in the thorax, - a degree of specialization only matched in the insectan class among the Hemiptera and some muscid flies.

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  • The illumination is intermittent, and appears to be under the control of the insect's nervous system.

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  • The plan of the central nervous system is therefore that of the Arthropoda.

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  • Among the Archiannelida, in Aeolosoma and some Polychaetes, the whole central nervous system remains imbedded in the epidermis.

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  • segments are the apertures of the Nervous system rarely atria.C, Perichaeta: the spermathecal pores (Aeolosoma) in continuity are between segments 6 and 7, 7 with epidermis.

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  • The nervous system is embedded in the epidermis, and the pairs of ganglia are separated as in Serpula, &c.; each pair has a longish commissure between its two ganglia.

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  • - Nervous system of Patella; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of Haliotis; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of after Jhering.) Fissurella.

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  • The histology of the nervous system of Mollusca has yet to be seriously inquired into.

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  • - Nervous system of Paludina as a type of the streptoneurous condition.

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  • The nervous system and sense organs are highly developed.

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  • Stylifer, the operculum is lost, animal fixed by a large proboscis which forms a pseudopallium covering the whole shell except the extremity of the spire, parasitic on all groups of Echinoderms. Entosiphon, visceral mass still coiled; shell much reduced, proboscis very long forming a pseudopallium which covers the whole body and projects beyond in the form of a siphon, foot and nervous system present, eyes, branchia and anus absent, parasite in the Holothurian Deima blakei in the Indian Ocean.

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  • The detorted visceral commissure shows a tendency to the concentration of all its elements round the oesophagus, so that except in the Bullomorpha and in Aplysia the whole nervous system is aggregated in the cephalic region, either dorsally or ventrally.

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  • In the nervous system of Aplysia the great ganglion-pairs are well developed and distinct.

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