How to use Nervous in a sentence

nervous
  • She was nervous about her daughter.

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  • I was nearly as nervous as my first call.

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  • I was nervous so I forgot his name.

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  • He looked nervous and uncomfortable.

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  • She was as nervous as a cat in a dog pound.

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  • The call caused Cynthia to tremble with nervous frustration to the point of dropping a favorite sugar bowl, snowing the kitchen floor in white.

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  • I was as nervous tonight as usual making the tip call.

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  • I'm too nervous to stop in this horrid state where it never ceases raining.

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  • As the group pulled into the parking lot at Mountain Village, the upper portion of the ski area, Donnie began to look nervous for the first time.

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  • Yes, she was fine, though her tone sounded nervous and tentative.

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  • Pierre met the old count, who seemed nervous and upset.

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  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.

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  • The healer's nervous gaze flickered to Rhyn.

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  • Betsy chatted away while Howie, as nervous as a groom, simply listened.

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  • One chore remained before I'd do so though I was as nervous as a fly on a fry pan about it.

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  • He's as nervous as when he first received the notice to serve.

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  • Nervous fingers necessitated three tries.

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  • Eye-spots are general and the nervous system maintains a primitive diffused condition.

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  • During an attack of fever he made observations on himself with reference to the action of quickened circulation upon thought, which led him to the conclusion that psychical phenomena were to be accounted for as the effects of organic changes in the brain and nervous system.

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  • The central ganglion of the nervous system lies in the proboscissheath or -septum.

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  • Instinctive behaviour thus depends solely on how the nervous system has been built through heredity; while intelligent behaviour depends also on those characters of the nervous system which have been acquired under the modifying influence of individual relation to the environment.

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  • The terrible nervous sequels of some forms of inflammation of the membranes of the brain, again, are due primarily to microbic invasion rather of the membranes than of their nervous contents; and many other diseases may be added to this list.

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  • Those Cestodes which possess no very distinct organ of attachment (such, for example, as Gyrocotyle) have no distinct ganglionic thickening more pronounced at one end of the body than at the other; and as these are forms which have retained more primitive features than the rest, and show closer affinity to the Trematodes, it seems highly probable that the complicated nervous thickening found in the scolex, and often compared with the " brain " of other Platyelmia, is a structure sui generis developed within the limits of the sub-class.

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  • The excretory tubes, the nervous system, and the parenchyma and integument are continuous from one end of the worm to the other.

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  • The knowledge of the presence of the parasite adversely affects nervous people and may lead to mental depression and hypochondria.

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  • Nervous phenomena, such as chorea and epileptic seizures, have been attributed to the presence of the tapeworm.

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  • These salts have been extensively employed internally, and indeed they are still largely employed in the treatment of the more severe and difficult cases of nervous disease.

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  • A, Fasciola hepatica, from the ventral surface (X 2); the alimentary and nervous systems only shown on the left side of the figure, the excretory only on the right; a, right main branch of the intestine; c, a diverticulum; g, lateral ganglion; n, lateral nerve; o, mouth; p, pharynx; s, ventral sucker; cs, cirrus sac; d, left anterior dorsal excretory vessel; m, main vessel; v, left anterior ventral trunk; x, excretory pore.

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  • Lastly the nervous system is well developed and consists of a pair of well-marked and interconnected ganglia placed near the anterior end and dorsal to the oesophagus.

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  • A, Dorsal view showing the nervous system and digestive system; a, mouth; b, pharynx; c, d, e, gut; E, post-genital union of two limbs of gut; f, excretory pore; g, vaginal pore; h, j, k, brain and nerves; 1, dorsal nerves; m, ventral nerves; n, adoral sucker; o, posterior sucker; p, hooks on posterior sucker; r, vitello-intestinal duct.

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  • They are usually found in the alimentary canal or its appendages but occasionally work their way into the serous cavities, nervous system and blood vessels.

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  • The polypide consists of a "lophophore" bearing a series of ciliated tentacles by which Diatoms and other microscopic bodies are collected as food, of a U-shaped alimentary canal, and of a central nervous system.

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  • The central nervous system (x) is highly developed, and in Loxosoma bears a pair o` eyes.

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  • One is lost in astonishment at the nervous yet perfectly regulated force and the unerring fidelity of every trace of the chisel.

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  • On the one hand, his whole formulation of Evolution in mechanical terms urges him in the direction of materialism, and he attempts to compose the mind out of homogeneous units of consciousness (or" feeling ")" similar in nature to those which we know as nervous shocks; each of which is the correlative of a rhythmical motion of a material unit or group of such units "(§ 62).

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  • According to Sir Thomas Fraser nothing else can compete with alcohol as a food in desperate febrile cases, and to this use must be added its antipyretic power already explained and its action as a soporific. During its administration in febrile cases the drug must be most carefully watched, as its action may prove deleterious to the nervous system and the circulation in certain classes of patient.

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  • Its especial affinity for the nervous system is indicated by the fact that, when all traces of it have disappeared elsewhere, it can still be detected with ease in the cerebro-spinal fluid.

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  • The trouble seems to have been some form of nervous exhaustion, accompanied with such hypersensitiveness of the eyes that it was impossible to keep them open except in a dark room.

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  • Escaping by way of Strassburg he found an asylum in England, where he was made a prebendary of Canterbury, received a pension from Edward VI.'s privy purse, and composed his chief work, A Trajedy or Dialogue of the unjust usurped Primacy of the Bishop of Rome (1549) This remarkable performance, originally written in Latin, is extant only in the translation of John Ponet, bishop of Winchester, a splendid specimen of nervous English.

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  • The style of the whole book is nervous, vivid, free from artifice and rhetoric, obeying the writer's thought with absolute plasticity.

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  • No organs of circulation or respiration are known; but the nervous system is well developed, and consists of a pair of ganglia corresponding with the limbs and connected by longitudinal commissural chords.

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  • These last characteristics also separate them essentially from the Pycnogonida, some members of which resemble them to a certain extent in having only four pairs of limbs, no gnathites, no respiratory organs, a ganglionated ventral nervous system, and the abdomen reduced to a mere rudiment projecting between the last pair of legs.

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  • Both these farms were strengthened; but, still nervous about his right flank, the duke occupied Hougoumont in much greater force than La Haye Sainte, and massed the bulk of his troops on his right.

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  • His chief works were First Lines of the Practice of Physic (1774); Institutions of Medicine (1770); and Synopsis Nosologicae Medicae (1785), which contained his classification of diseases into four great classes - (t) Pyrexiae, or febrile diseases, as typhus fever; (2) Neuroses, or nervous diseases, as epilepsy; (3) Cachexiae, or diseases resulting from bad habit of body, as scurvy; L and (4) Locales, or local diseases, as cancer.

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  • In his later years he became subject to attacks of nervous apoplexy.

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  • It has a Carnegie library, and is the seat of an Evangelical Lutheran theological seminary (1865), of Lutheran homes for the aged and orphan, of the Milwaukee county hospital for the insane, of the Milwaukee sanatorium for nervous diseases, and of the north-western branch of the national soldiers' home, which has grounds covering 385 acres and with main building and barracks affording quarters for over 2000 disabled veterans, and has a hospital, a theatre, and a library of 15,000 volumes.

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  • Marat declares that physiology alone can solve the problems of the connexion between soul and body, and proposes the existence of a nervous fluid as the true solution.

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  • His highly nervous organization made his feelings acute, and his brain incessantly active..

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  • All potassium salts if taken in large doses are cardiac depressants, they also depress the nervous system, especially the brain and spinal cord.

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  • Its adhesive foot is paralleled by a cup-shaped ciliated depression, possibly nervous, found in all the larvae cited, except some Echinoderms, and which in Asterids and Crinoids actually serves as an organ of attachment.

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  • Death is due either to weakness and emaciation (in chronic cases), or to blocking of the cerebral capillaries by the parasites (where these are abundant), or to disorganization of the nervous system (paraplegic and sleepingsickness cases).

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  • Such a cough is relieved by the sedative action on the central nervous system.

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  • The drug kills by paralysing the nervous arrangements of the heart and respiratioh.

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  • It must, however, be distinctly borne in mind that there is a fundamental difference between the eye of Vertebrates and of all other groups in the fact that in the Vertebrata the retinal body is itself a part of the central nervous system, and not a separate C E k e FIG.

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  • Intelligence does not differ from sense by having no bodily organ, but the nervous system is the bodily organ of both.

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  • Intelligence is not active intellect propagating universal essence in passive intellect, but only logical inference starting from sense, and both requiring nervous body and conscious soul.

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  • The central nervous system may be described as consisting of a collar surrounding the oesophagus, and two pairs of cords arising from the collar and passing backwards.

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  • This is the condition of the nervous system found in Chiton and the other Amphineura, but may not be in all respects the ancestral condition.

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  • One end of the body, through contact, during locomotion, with fresh tracts of medium and other forms of stimuli, has become more specialized than the rest, and here the nervous system and sense-organs are more densely aggregated than elsewhere, forming a means of controlling locomotion and of correlating the activities of the inner organs with the varying stimuli that impinge upon the body.

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  • The nervous system, though centralized at one end of the body, contains diffused nerve-cells in the course of its tracts, which are disposed in two or more longitudinal bundles interconnected by transverse bands.

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  • That this action is a direct and not a nervous one is shown by the fact that if the eye be suddenly shaded the pupil will dilate a little, showing that the nerves which cause dilatation are still competent after the administration of physostigmine.

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  • He holds indeed that, in accordance with the law of substance, consciousness must be evolved from unconsciousness with the development of sense organs and a central nervous organ.

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  • So Avenarius (q.v.) was no materialist, but only an empiricist anxious to reclaim man's natural view of the world from philosophic incrustations; yet when his Empiriokriticismus ends in nothing but environment, nervous system, and statements dependent on them, without soul, though within experience, he comes near to materialism, as Wundt has remarked.

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  • Matter, according to him, impresses the afferent nervous system, this the brain, this the efferent nervous system, while consciousness remains a mere spectator.

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  • Having satisfied himself in what he called " outer psychophysics," that the stimulus causes only the nervous process and not sensation, he passed to what he called " inner psychophysics," or the theory of the relation between nervous and psychical processes.

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  • The first question he answered from his imagination by supposing that, while the external world is stimulus of the nervous process, the nervous process is the immediate stimulus of the sensation, and that the sensation increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the nervous system, when Weber's law proves only that it increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the external world.

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  • The second question he answered from his parallelistic metaphysics by deducing that even within the organism there is only a constant dependency of sensation on nervous process without causation, because the nervous process is physical but the sensation psychical.

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  • This answer supposed that the whole physical process from the action of the external stimulus on the nervous system to the reaction of the organism on the external world is one series, while the conscious process beginning with sensation is only parallel and as it were left high and dry.

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  • At the same time Fechner would not have us suppose that the two sides are equal; according to him, the psychical, being the psychophysical as viewed from within, is real, the physical, being the psychophysical viewed from without, is apparent; so in oneself, though nervous process and psychical process are the same, it is the psychical which is the reality of which the nervous is mere appearance; and so everywhere, spirit is the reality, body the appearance of spirit to spirit.

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  • He considered that the whole hypothesis that an outer physical thing causes a change in one's central nervous system, which again causes another change in one's inner psychical system or soul, is a departure from the natural view of the universe, and is due to what he called " introjection," or the hypothesis which encloses soul and its faculties in the body, and then, having created a false antithesis between outer and inner, gets into the difficulty of explaining how an outer physical stimulus can impart something into an inner psychical soul.

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  • The difference is that Clifford considers " mind-stuff " to be unconscious, and denies that there is any evidence of consciousness apart from a nervous system.

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  • The nervous system consists of a cerebral ganglion in the head, a conspicuous ventral ganglion in the trunk, and of lateral cornmissures uniting these ganglia on each side.

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  • As in other animals there is a minute but extensive nervous plexus, which permeates the whole body and takes its origin from the chief ganglia.

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  • The specific effects of the drug, however, are upon the central nervous system.

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  • In a complete albino not only is all pigment absent in the skin, but also that which is normally present in deeper organs, such as the sympathetic nervous system and in the substantia nigra of the brain.

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  • There is some reason to believe that a peculiar condition found in the majority of human albinoes, and known as nystagmus, is correlated with the absence of pigment in the central nervous system.

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  • Casa is chiefly remarkable as the leader of a reaction in lyric poetry against the universal imitation of Petrarch, and as the originator of a style, which, if less soft and elegant, was more nervous and majestic than that which it replaced.

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  • There are twenty-eight other springs of nearly identical composition, many of which are used for bathing, and are efficacious in cases of rheumatism, gout, nervous and female disorders and skin diseases.

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  • Their bilateral symmetry is obviously to be regarded as primitive, and the nervous system shows an original condition from which that of the asymmetrical twisted Gastropods can be derived.

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  • He published over fifty volumes containing his researches on muscular and nervous diseases, and on the applications of electricity both for diagnostic purposes and for treatment.

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  • His name is especially connected with the first description of locomotor ataxy, progressive muscular atrophy, pseudo-hypertrophic paralysis, glosso-labio laryngeal paralysis and other nervous troubles.

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  • He has been represented as a determined apologist of intellectual orthodoxy animated by an almost fanatical "hatred of reason," and possessed with a purpose to overthrow the appeal to reason; as a sceptic and pessimist of a far deeper dye than Montaigne, anxious chiefly to show how any positive decision on matters beyond the range of experience is impossible; as a nervous believer clinging to conclusions which his clearer and better sense showed to be indefensible; as an almost ferocious ascetic and paradoxer affecting the credo quia impossibile in intellectual matters and the odi quia amabile in matters moral and sensuous; as a wanderer in the regions of doubt and belief, alternately bringing a vast though vague power of thought and an unequalled power of expression to the expression of ideas incompatible and irreconcilable.

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  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.

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  • Mr Aldis described him as a slender, modest young gentleman, who surprised him by his intelligence and thoughtfulness, but who seemed nervous as they walked to the meeting together.

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  • We must bear in mind that he was no cold systematic thinker, but an Oriental visionary, brought up in crass superstition, and without intellectual discipline; a man whose nervous temperament had been powerfully worked on by ascetic austerities, and who was all the more irritated by the opposition he encountered, because he had little of the heroic in his nature.

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  • The language is generally nervous and vigorous, occasionally vivified with imaginative energy.

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  • Among the properties of living material there is one, widely though not universally present in it, which forms the pre-eminent characteristic of 1 The anatomy of the muscles is dealt with under Muscular System, and of the nerves under Nerve and Nervous System.

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  • This is manifested by the muscular walls of the hollow viscera and of the heart, where it is the expression of a continuous liberation of energy in process in the muscular tissue, the outcome of the latter's own intrinsic life, and largely independent of any connexion with the nervous system.

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  • The muscular wall of the blood-vessels also exhibits tonic contraction, which, however, seems to be mainly traceable to a continual excitation of the muscle cells by nervous influence conveyed to them along their nerves, and originating in the great vaso motor centre in the bulb.

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  • Muscles when active seem to pour into the circulation substances which, of unknown chemical composition, are physiologically recognizable by their stimulant action on the respiratory nervous centre.

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  • The work of Camillo Golgi (Pavia, 1885 and onwards) on the minute structure of the nervous system has led to great alteration of doctrine in neural physi nerve cells, that is to say, the fine nerve fibres - since all nerve fibres are nerve cell branches, and all nerve cell branches are nerve fibres - which form a close felt-work in the nervous centres, there combined into a network actually continuous throughout.

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  • This continuum was held to render possible conduction in all directions throughout the grey matter of the whole nervous system.

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  • But when neurons are linked together it is found that nerve impulses will only pass from neuron A to neuron B, and not from neuron B to neuron A; that is, the transmission of the excited state or nervous impulse, although possible in each neuron both up and down its own cell branches, is possible from one nerve cell to another in one direction only.

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  • It seems, especially in the case of the nexus between certain neurons, that the influence, loss of which endangers nutrition, is associated with the occurrence of something more than merely the nervous impulses awakened from time to time in the leading nerve cell.

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  • The wave of change (nervous impulse) induced in a neuron by advent of a stimulus is after all only a sudden augmentation of an activity continuous within the neuron - a transient accentuation of one (the disintegrative) phase of the metabolism inherent in and inseparable from its life.

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  • The nervous impulse is, so to say, the sudden evanescent glow of an ember continuously black-hot.

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  • Wide departures from the normal standard are met with and are symptomatic of certain nervous conditions.

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  • Stretching of the muscles antagonistic to the extensors - namely, of the flexor muscles - reduces the jerk by inhibiting the extensor spinal nerve cells through the nervous impulses generated by the tense flexor muscles.

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  • Whether examined by functional or by structural features, the conducting paths of the nervous system, traced from beginning to end, never terminate in the centres of that system, but pass through them.

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  • Every efferent channel, after entrance in the central nervous system, subdivides; of its subdivisions some pass to efferent channels soon, others pass further and further within the cord and brain before they finally reach channels of outlet.

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  • In the lower animal forms there is no such nervous structure at all as the cortex cerebri.

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  • The nervous paths in the brain and cord, as they attain completion, Toes Ank,e Knee

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  • The more obvious of the characters of sleep (q.v.) are essentially nervous.

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  • Certain it is that in the course of the waking day a great number of stimuli play on the sense organs, and through these produce disintegration of the living molecules of the central nervous system.

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  • The second factor inducing the assimilative change is the withdrawal of the nervous system from sensual, stimulation.

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  • If natural sleep is the expression of a phase of decreased excitability due to the setting in of a tide of anabolism in the cells of the nervous system, what is the action of narcotics ?

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  • Symptoms attendant on the hypnotic state are closure of the eyelids by the hypnotizer without subsequent attempt to open them by the hypnotized subject; the pupils, instead of being constricted, as for near vision, dilate, and there sets in a condition superficially resembling sleep. But in natural sleep the action of all parts of the nervous system is subdued, whereas in the hypnotic the reactions of the lower, and some even of the higher, parts are exalted.

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  • Hypnotic somnambulism and hypnotic catalepsy are not the only or the most profound changes of nervous condition that hypnosis can induce.

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  • Certain nerve fibres from the sympathetic nervous system, which can also cause the secretion of a (specially viscous) saliva, are entirely unaffected by atropine.

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  • These are paralysed by atropine, and intestinal peristalsis is consequently made more active, the muscles being released from nervous control.

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  • The motor nerves of the arteries, of the bladder and rectal sphincters, and also of the bronchi, are paralysed by atropine, but the nervous arrangements of those organs are highly complex and until they are further unravelled by physiologists, pharmacology will be unable to give much information which might be of great value in the employment of atropine.

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  • The action is probably nervous, but in the present state of our knowledge regarding the control of the temperature by the nervous system, it cannot be further defined.

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  • The action of atropine in dilating the pupil is also aided by a stimulation of the fibres from the sympathetic nervous system, which innervate the remaining muscle of the iris - the dilator pupillae.

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  • Omissions of a few passages written from memory at a time of profound nervous depression would have altered the whole character of the book.

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  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).

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  • Reason convinced that the world and the soul are alike rational observes the external world, mental phenomena, and specially the nervous organism, as the meeting ground of body and mind.

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  • Its waters - hot alkaline springs about twenty in number - are used both for drinking and bathing, and are efficacious in chronic nervous disorders, feminine complaints and affections of the liver and respiratory organs.

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  • He was not an agreeable companion, violent in his passions, nervous, restless, and in old age extremely irascible.

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  • It is the central nervous system, and contains within itself the elements of the brain and spinal marrow of higher forms. The neurochord tapers towards its posterior end, where it is coextensive with the notochord, but ends abruptly in front, some distance behind the tip of the snout.

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  • Apparently there is an influence on the afferent nerves of the part which causes a reflex contraction - some authors say dilatation - of the vessels in the internal organs that are under the control of the same segment of the nervous system as that supplying the area of skin from which the exciting impulse comes.

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  • Herbert Spencer, again, before the decline in question set in, put forward the hypothesis that "the ability to maintain individual life and the ability to multiply vary inversely"; in other words, the strain upon the nervous system involved in the struggle for life under the conditions of modern civilization, by reacting on the reproductive powers, tends towards comparative sterility.

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  • At each of the great festivals, which to please him were for once crowded into a single year, he entered in regular form for the various competitions, scrupulously conformed to the tradition and rules of the arena, and awaited in nervous suspense the verdict of the umpires.

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  • While resident in Italy for his health from 1845 to 1847, he occupied himself with researches on the electrical organ of the torpedo and on nervous organization generally; these he published in1853-1854(Neurologische Untersuchungen, Gottingen), and therewith his physiological period may be said to end.

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  • In public he was of magnificent bearing, possessing the true oratorical temperament, the nervous exaltation that makes the orator feel and appear a superior being, transfusing his thought, passion and will into the mind and heart of the listener; but his imagination frequently ran away with his understanding, while his imperious temper and ardent combativeness hurried him and his party into disadvantageous positions.

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  • He seems in this way to have educated in himself a very precise " electrical sense," making use of his own nervous system as a kind of physiological galvanometer.

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  • He studied the nature of muscular contraction, causing a muscle to record its movements on a smoked glass plate, and he worked out the problem of the velocity of the nervous impulse both in the motor nerves of the frog and in the sensory nerves of man.

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  • A large population is temporarily attracted to Cannstatt by the fame of its mineral springs, which are valuabl e for diseases of the throat and weaknesses of the nervous system.

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  • The pedal ganglia and auditory organs have disappeared with the foot, at all events have never been detected; the cerebral ganglia are very minute, while the parieto-splanchnic are well developed, and constitute the principal part of the nervous system.

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  • When this gland becomes enlarged, and its secretion consequently increases, the vessels dilate, the heart beats more rapidly, the skin becomes too hot, the nervous system becomes irritable, and tremors occur in the limbs.

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  • Every one has noticed after prolonged fever how thin and weak the patient is, and both the muscular and nervous power throughout the whole body are sadly in want of repair.

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  • The pulse-rate becomes very rapid, the extremities become warm, so that the patient is obliged to wear few clothes, the temper becomes irritable, the patient nervous, and a fine tremor is observed in the hands.

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  • When the nervous system is below par, and both secretion and movements are deficient in the stomach, nervine tonics, such as nux vomica or strychnine, are most useful.

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  • Deficient nervous action also leads to defective secretion and movement in the intestine, sometimes with flatulent accumula tion and sometimes with constipation.

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  • In true diabetes, which probably originates in the central nervous system, or in disease of the pancreas, as well as in the glycosuria common in gouty patients, sugar in every form should be entirely forbidden, and starchy food restricted to within narrow limits.

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  • Douches to the spine are much employed for nervous debility, and good effects are also obtained in such cases from the so-called needle-bath, where small streams of water at high pressure are driven against the whole surface of the body.

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  • For those who suffer from nervous depression, exercise in the Swiss mountains is useful, and even living at a height of about 6000 ft.

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  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.

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  • While this treament by itself would aid recovery from nervous exhaustion, it would lessen appetite and thus interfere with nervous repair; but the want of exertion is supplied by means of massage, which stimulates the circulation and increases the appetite, so that the patient gets all the benefit of exercise without any exhaustion.

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  • Where nervous exhaustion is less marked and the Weir Mitchell treatment is not appropriate - for example, in men who are simply overworked or broken down by anxiety or sorrow - a sea voyage is often a satisfactory form of "rest" cure.

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  • Any strain upon the nervous system, such as mental overwork or anxiety, is a potent cause; or exposure to cold and damp, which seems to excite irritation in a nerve already predisposed to suffer.

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  • It depresses the nervous system, especially the spinal cord.

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  • Summed up, its action is that of an irritant, and a cardiac and nervous depressant.

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  • Wassermann and Takaki in the case of tetanus, that there do exist in the nervous system molecules with combining affinity for the tetanus toxin.

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  • Further, these molecules in the nervous system present the same susceptibility to heat and other physical agencies as does tetanus antitoxin.

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  • Natural immunity against toxins must be taken into account, and, if Ehrlich's view with regard to toxic action be correct, this may depend upon either the absence of chemical affinity of the living molecules of the tissues for the toxic molecule, or upon insensitiveness to the action of the toxophorous group. It has been shown with regard to the former, for example, that the nervous system of the fowl, which possesses immunity against tetanus toxin, has little combining affinity for it.

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  • Ten grains taken at bedtime will often give sleep, cause free diaphoresis and quieten the entire nervous system in such cases.

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  • The nervous system consists as in Hydromedusae of a diffuse plexus beneath the ectoderm, concentrated in certain places to form a central nervous system.

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  • In these medusae, however, the central nervous system does not form continuous rings, but occurs as four or eight separate con centrations at the margin of the umbrella, centred each round one of the sense-organs (tentaculocysts).

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  • Each rhopalium is a centre round which, as already stated, nervous tissue is concentrated.

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  • The central nervous system is constructed on the same general plan as in the other Arthropoda, consisting of a supra-oesophageal ganglionic mass or brain, united by circumoesophageal connectives with a double ventral chain of segmentally arranged ganglia.

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  • The resemblances between the Crustacea and the Annelid worms, in such characters as the structure of the nervous system and the mode of growth of the somites, can hardly be ignored.

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  • The large number and the uniformity of the trunk somites and their appendages, and the structure of the nervous system and of the heart in A pus, are Annelidan characters which can hardly be without significance.

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  • The nervous system resembles that of Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia.

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  • Instability, again, which lies at the root of Spencer's definition "continuous adjustment of internal relations to external relations" is displayed by living matter in very varying degrees from the apparent absolute quiescence of frozen seeds to the activity of the central nervous system, whilst there is a similar range amongst inorganic substances.

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  • It is only in very large doses that it weakens the intracardiac nervous ganglia, slows and weakens the pulse, and dangerously lowers the blood pressure.

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  • The conditions in which bromides are most frequently used are insomnia, epilepsy, whooping-cough, delirium tremens, asthma, migraine, laryngismus stridulus, the symptoms often attendant upon the climacteric in women, hysteria, neuralgia, certain nervous disorders of the heart, strychnine poisoning, nymphomania and spermatorrhoea.

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  • In 1804 he wrote the third volume, containing the anatomy of the nervous system and of the organs of special sense, of The Anatomy of the Human Body, by John and Charles Bell.

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  • This work, apart from its value to artists and psychologists, is of interest historically, as there is no doubt the investigations of the author into the nervous supply of the muscles of expression induced him to prosecute inquiries which led to his great discoveries in the physiology of the nervous system.

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  • There was probably a nervous area, with a tuft of cilia, at the anterior end; while, at all events in forms that remained pelagic, the ciliated nervous tracts of the rest of the body may be supposed to have become arranged in bands around the body-segments.

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  • At last a quinqueradiate symmetry influenced the plates of the theca, partly through the development of a plate at the end of each groove (terminal), partly through plates at the aboral pole of the theca (basals and infrabasals) arising in response to mechanical pressure, but soon intimately connected with the cords of an aboral nervous system.

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  • These last structures formed a nervous sheath around the axial sinus with its bloodvessels, and became divided into five lobes correlated with the five basals (the "chambered organ") and forming the aboral nerve-centre.

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  • Pelmatozoa in which epithecal extensions of the food-grooves, ambulacrals, superficial oral nervous system, blood-vascular and water-vascular systems, coelom and genital system are continued exothecally upon jointed outgrowths of the abactinal thecal plates (brachia), carrying with them extensions of the abactinal nerve-system.

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  • The mouth (o) is in front of the tentacles, on the ventral side, and is overhung by a mobile praeoral hood, in which is the principal part of the nervous system.

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  • In it, for the first time, the results of human and comparative anatomy, as well as of chemistry and other departments of physical science, were brought to bear on the investigation of physiological problems. The most important portion of the work was that dealing with nervous action and the mechanism of the senses.

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  • Its waters, which are ferruginous and largely charged with carbonic acid gas, are of use in nervous and rheumatic disorders.

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  • Since in his mission to Normandy he had been very moderate, it is possible that, as he was nervous and ill when sent to Nantes, his mind had become unbalanced by the atrocities committed by the Vendean and royalist armies.

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  • The man who is hasty and nervous in temperament, who fears an occasional sting, and resents the same by viciously killing the bee that inflicts it will rarely make a good apiarist.

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  • His days at Westminster, Southey thinks, were " probably the happiest in his life," but a boy of nervous temperament is always unhappy at school.

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  • Between the mucous membrane and the bone of the hard palate is a dense vascular and nervous plexus.

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  • The thoroughbred is apt to be nervous and excitable, and impatient of common work, but its speed, resolution and endurance, as tested on the race-course, are beyond praise.

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  • The central nervous system, the anterior part of which is shown in fig.

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  • He himself fell into a nervous state in his "prison," but he was sustained by the devotion and intelligence of his wife and her mother.

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  • When we come to consider more in detail the results of these actions we find that the various secretions of the body, such as the sweat, gastric juice, bile, milk, urine, &c., may be increased or diminished; that the heart may have its muscular or nervous apparatus stimulated or depressed; that the nerve-centres in the brain, medulla and spinal cord may be rendered more sensitive or the reverse; and that the general metabolism of the body may be altered in various ways.

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  • There are exceptions to this, however, as children are more affected in proportion by opium and some other substances, and less by mercury and arsenic. In old age also the nervous system and the tissues generally do not react so readily as in youth.

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  • A physiological classification according to an action on the brain, heart, kidney or other important organ becomes still more bewildering, as many substances produce the same effects by different agencies, as, for instance, the kidneys may be acted upon directly or through the circulation, while the heart may be affected either through its muscular substance or its nervous apparatus.

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  • Potassium and lithium have a depressing action upon the nervous system, ammonium salts have a stimulating action, while sodium practically speaking is indifferent.

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  • When iron is injected directly into a vein it depresses the heart's action, the blood pressure and the nervous system, and during its excretion greatly irritates the bowel and the kidneys.

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  • Soluble salts of manganese, aluminium, zinc, copper, gold, platinum and bismuth have, when given by the mouth, little action beyond their local astringent or irritating effects; but when injected into a blood vessel they all exert much the same depressing effect upon the heart and nervous system.

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  • Lead poisons the muscular and nervous systems, and gives rise to paralysis, wasting, colic and other symptoms, while in the case of mercury, tremors, salivation, anaemia and very marked cachexia are induced.

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  • Arsenic and antimony do not form combinations with albumen, but they both greatly depress the central nervous system and circulation; and, if their action be long continued in large doses, they cause fatty degeneration of the viscera and disappearance of glycogen from the liver.

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  • Alkaline bromides, in addition to their saline action, have in sufficient doses a depressing effect upon the central nervous system, and less markedly upon the heart.

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  • Phosphorus is present in all cells, in considerable quantity in the nervous tissue, and in the bones as phosphates.

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  • When taken by the mouth phosphorus is an irritant poison in large doses; in small doses the only effects noticeable consist in an increased formation of bony and connective tissue, although it is also supposed to exert a gently stimulating effect upon the nervous system.

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  • Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was at one time believed to act simply by cutting off the supply of oxygen to the tissues, but it also has a specific effect in producing paralysis of certain parts of the central nervous system, and hence its value as an anaesthetic; when given in small amounts mixed with air it produces a condition of exhilaration.

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  • Locally their destructive and irritating effects vary a good deal, but even when very dilute they all have a marked poisonous action on bacteria, white blood corpuscles, yeast and similar organisms. After absorption most of them exercise a depressing effect upon the nervous system, and are capable of reducing high temperature.

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  • Some of them are so volatile that they produce their effects when inhaled, others when sprayed upon the skin cause intense cold and then anaesthesia; but taken in the broadest sense the action of all of them after absorption into the blood is very similar, and is exerted upon the central nervous system, more especially the cerebrum.

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  • Some of them affect only certain portions of the nervous system, others have a much wider range of action; they may act in either case as stimulants or as depressants, and hence the symptoms produced by them vary very greatly.

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  • Small doses excite the nervous system, while larger doses are depressing.

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  • In addition they have a stimulating action on the central nervous system.

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  • In large doses they are powerful nerve poisons, but as usually taken they exercise a gently stimulant effect upon the nervous system.

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  • They all act as local irritants in the alimentary canal, and after absorption are more or less depressing to the muscular and nervous systems. They produce slight nausea and increased secretion of mucus.

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  • Drugs acting on the nervous system.

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  • It has been suggested that the incoordination of nervous action under the influence of Indian hemp may be due to independent and non-concerted action on the part of the two halves of the cerebrum.

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  • She twisted her apron with nervous fingers.

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  • I was nervous so it took me longer to fall asleep.

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  • Howie was as nervous as the first night of his dreams.

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  • To do so, required my thinking like this fool; no easy chore for a person as intelligent as I. How would I, this nervous average person convey an important tip without being found out?

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  • Babies know how to cry when they are born, so using the vocal cords is autonomic – part of the autonomic nervous system.

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  • Her friend was sure-footed and confident, but Kiera knew she was nervous.

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  • In spite of his admonition the door opened, not to Fred O'Connor, but to Claire Quincy who closed the door behind her and stood with nervous defiance at the foot of his bed.

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  • That this one was in the middle of a town—even a tiny one—made her nervous.

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  • Dean poured the coffee while Cynthia Byrne rubbed her hands on her skirt as if to smooth out the nervous quiver she couldn't seem to shake.

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  • The bison were accustomed to having the horses graze around them, but the scent of strangers might make them nervous.

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  • I was extremely nervous for my first lesson; but, Anne's calm demeanor immediately put me at ease.

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  • But all indications are that the effects of the nervous trauma of battle vis à vis shell shock was equally prevalent in all ranks.

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  • Frank is a very nervous dog who isn't used to being left alone. 

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  • The process may enable doctors to give amputees fully functioning bionic limbs which are linked to the patient's nervous system within five years.

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  • The group photo shows the nervous anticipation on their faces.

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  • The motor nerve cell body has a long fiber called an axon, which extends from the central nervous system to the muscles.

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  • There are runs to suit everyone from the nervous beginner to the powder hound.

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  • Part of the reason for the popularity of caffeine-containing beverages is that caffeine is a central nervous stimulant.

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  • There was lots of nervous giggles, and false bravado, as we ventured south at a stately 50 miles per hour.

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  • Then her eldest daughter Angel has suffered a nervous breakdown, the true cause of which Angel has confided only to Kath Arnold.

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  • On induction there is a marked rise in heart rate and blood pressure caused by central nervous stimulation and an increase in circulating catecholamines.

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  • No. Trouble is, I'll probably do the other thing I do when nervous, and get really chatty.

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  • She sleeps very badly at night, & is very nervous at times, but wonderfully cheerful in general.

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  • Temporal central nervous system remission was induced by intrathecal chemotherapy only.

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  • One of the most important nutrients associated with the brain and nervous system is phosphatidyl choline.

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  • They are nerve poisons, inhibiting the enzyme cholinesterase, which can have severe effects on the central nervous system.

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  • Measurement of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity is the primary method for measuring the effect of these pesticides on the nervous system.

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  • Nervous laughter spread through the cabin, but the men entered the cockpit, the door closed, and the engines started up.

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  • I was also nervous of the rather stuffy terminology and arty jargon, which I had seen, used sometimes in art criticism.

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  • Degenerative brain diseases are marked by progressive, irreversible damage to cells of the central nervous system.

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  • In 1954 Mr P S Palmer was admitted to hospital with nervous debility.

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  • All these are progressively degenerative diseases of the central nervous system that prove ultimately fatal.

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  • Special note should be made of central nervous system depressants.

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  • Sedation due to the drug may be increased by the concomitant use of other central nervous system depressants.

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  • Visitors with a nervous disposition can view the results of the meditation from a safe distance on a monitor.

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  • Just then David read the 'Life of John Keats, ' a book which impressed him with a nervous fear of impending dissolution.

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  • Indeed, I am fighting down my nervous dyspepsia fast.

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  • Carbon monoxide related cerebral edema can cause irreversible damage to the brain which in turn can effect the nervous system.

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  • Older medications often included ephedrine or related compounds which are banned because they are considered as central nervous system stimulants.

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  • At the start of the season there was a nervous excitement at Anfield.

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  • Men are being evacuated in considerable numbers in a state of nervous exhaustion.

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  • Looking at possible relationships between emotional expressivity and autonomic nervous system activity.

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  • We have over twenty years of experience and we have seen over 40,000 nervous flyers on the course, so you are not alone.

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  • This indicates that folic acid can modulate key mechanisms for growth and differential in the central nervous system.

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  • She laughs nervously, I probably shouldn't say that. There should flat silence, the flutter of nervous giggles.

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  • Instead, they suggest that ginseng may act on the nervous system, which is known to influence sexual function.

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  • The most dramatic difference between humans and any other species, including the great apes, is found in the central nervous system.

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  • She is a bit nervous and can get a bit grumpy so needs to be in a home without young children or other cats.

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  • Click Here Further Details histology of the Nervous System This page contains 40 different slides showing the histology of the nervous system.

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  • Unwelcome visits from the landlord only increase the nervous hysteria already developing in the small flat fueling dreadful consequences.

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  • Intention is a powerful force; it begins to activate the nervous system and triggers nerve impulses into muscles.

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  • The basis remains that no cell or organ can function correctly without its full supply of nervous impulses.

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  • It damages the central nervous system and skin, and causes respiratory irritation.

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  • To swirled and nervous about I didnt large kitchen. his hand soft laughter diet Jessica plan simpson jenny show up poured over her.

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  • Two young women left before the end and during the rest of the film there were what I took to be occasional nervous laughs.

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  • What allows a leech to regenerate its nervous system?

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  • Tetanus (sometimes called lockjaw) is a bacterial disease that affects the nervous system.

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  • Accordingly, obvious lymphatic and nervous tissue were not included in the definition of SBO.

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  • They migrate to form the dental mesenchyme, supportive cells of the nervous system, the adrenal cortex and melanocytes of the skin.

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  • For menstrual and menopause symptoms motherwort is good for the nervous and endocrine system and may help with hormonal problems says Trudy Norris.

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  • Brain cells can give rise to all previous cells types including the peripheral nervous system and smooth muscle.

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  • Schwann cell - produces myelin in the peripheral nervous system.

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  • The autonomic nerve fibers which radiate from the central nervous system to the ganglia of the autonomic nervous system are called preganglionic nerves.

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  • I was feeling a bit nervous about going kayaking in case I tipped over.

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  • Staff from both services are understandably nervous about the future.

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  • Naturally we were incredibly nervous, feeling that his visit could make or break us.

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  • I was decidedly nervous, squirming in my chair while the head went through the statement we had prepared.

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  • Would you feel nervous waking up each morning to find a police car outside your house?

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  • Pattern of how equality in this appears nervous that.

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  • Was he behaving strange or did he seem nervous about anything?

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  • Yes, I get rather nervous around large spiders.

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  • Any farmer reliant on my advice for the health of his potatoes would be well justified in looking nervous.

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  • I think it is a release valve that keeps people from blowing their brains out or having nervous breakdowns.

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  • At this point I was at the point of feeling as tho I was going to have a complete nervous breakdown.

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  • I first began to encounter difficulties when the pressure and workload associated with revising for exams caused me to have a severe nervous breakdown.

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  • After suffering a second nervous breakdown in 1693, Newton retired from research.

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  • It brings spiritual poverty, obesity, social isolation, covert competition, satiation, heartlessness and periodic nervous breakdown.

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  • The nervous system of the body is mainly categorized into the Central nervous system of the body is mainly categorized into the Central Nervous system, the peripheral, somatic, autonomic and enteric systems.

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  • A tiny embryo is aware, even before the central nervous system is formed.

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  • The enteric nervous system controls the gut functions and sensory neuron transmitters all over the body relay message back to these systems.

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  • First there is the complexity of the human nervous system.

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  • The brain and its reaction controls every function of the body, triggered by the sensory nervous system.

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  • The physicians were therefore led to regard war neurotics in a similar light to the nervous subjects of peace-time.

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  • By designing drugs to affect specific neurotransmitters or neuroreceptors, drugs can be targeted at different parts of the nervous system.

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  • We cater for everyone from nervous novices to advanced riders.

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  • Activation of the autonomic nervous system also delays gastric emptying and reduces intestinal peristalsis.

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  • It also prevents pernicious anemia and is necessary to a healthy nervous system.

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  • Owing to an attack of nervous prostration, he was unable to fulfill his engagement at Nelson on Friday.

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  • In the past few months, the Japanese public had grown increasingly nervous about the possibility of a large quake.

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  • Pronounced central nervous system depression requires airway maintenance or, in extreme circumstances, assisted respiration.

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  • Actor Michael Sheard stayed in character for the whole link, with Andy playing the nervous schoolboy.

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  • It is a bad sign if the puppy is very nervous or appears sleepy all the time.

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  • Reverend Neville Greystone was a young chap with a slight nervous stammer.

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  • Cocaine is a short acting powerful, central nervous system stimulant that comes from the coca bush which grows widely in South America.

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  • Neurological surgery is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment, usually surgical, of disorders involving the brain and nervous system.

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  • He's had syphilis of the central nervous system.

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  • The drug has a similar effect to decreasing the tone of the parasympathetic nervous system, causing tachycardia.

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  • It is not unusual for couples to feel tense, nervous, excited or even tearful during the planning of their wedding.

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  • Mr. Soames was a tall, spare man, of a nervous and excitable temperament.

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  • Up and coming student, Peter Abelard, leads his teacher to the verge of a nervous breakdown with his philosophical tenets.

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  • I suffered a lot of nervous tension at the back of my head, with slight paranoia.

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  • The suggestion draws a nervous titter from Airey, who is clearly aware of the threat.

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  • Not even the cameras detected the nervous twitch in the leg.

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  • It was nervous at the rear and very twitchy even in a straight line.

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  • Mr Z was uncooperative with an examination of his nervous system and seemed unsteady to the staff grade doctor.

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  • We had to cross a very steep wadi - Hassan looked nervous but the Land Rover didn't falter.

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  • Nick Read 7/10 Overcame a nervous start (24 off his first four overs) to bowl with control, grabbing two wickets.

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  • I'm a nervous wreck by the time I finish the trip.

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  • The consequence was a nervous illness with some of the symptoms of delirium tremens, through which George Sand nursed him with tenderness and care.

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  • Ovi ositor gullet and a highly concentrated nervous 4' p system; in addition to the suboesophageal (side view) of Physo- ganglion, there are two thoracic ganglia pus.

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  • He was throughout these debates celebrated for the "nervous and subtle oratory" which made him so formidable in after days.

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  • On one hand the animal spirits " reflected " 2 from the image formed on the pineal gland proceed through the nervous tubes to make the muscles turn the back and lift the feet, so as to escape the cause of the terror.

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  • Conscious life is viewed as conditioned by physical (organic and more especially nervous) processes, and as evolving itself in close correlation with organic evolution.

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  • Nervous System of Planls.So far we have considered the plant almost exclusively as an individual organism, carrying out its own vital processes, and unaffected by its surroundings except in so far as these supply it with the materials for its well-being.

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  • Several futile attempts have been made to draw conclusions as to the intelligence of various birds, from comparison of the weight of the whole brain with that of the body, or the weight of the hemispheres with that of other parts of the central nervous system.

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  • The nervous system of Helix is not favourable as an example on account of the fusion of the ganglia to form an almost uniform ring of nervous matter around the oesophagus.

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  • There is great probability that the central stems, together with the brain, must be looked upon as local longitudinal accumulations of ner vous tissue in what was in more primitive ancestors a less highly differentiated nervous plexus, situated in the body-wall in a similar way to that which still is found in the less highly o rga n ized C oelenterates.

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  • The nervous affliction called latah, to which many Malays are subject, is also a curious trait of the people.

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  • Calder, who had only 15 ships to his opponent's 20 and was nervous lest he should be overpowered, did not act with energy.

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  • The gland evidently excretes, or at any rate gets rid of, a certain waste product of a proteid nature, which otherwise tends to accumulate in the tissues and to excite certain nervous and tissue phenomena.

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  • Thus, for example, as generations succeed one another, nervous disorders appear in various guise; epilepsy, megrim, insanity, asthma, hysteria, neurasthenia, a motley array at first sight, seemed to reveal themselves as terms of a morbid series; not only so, but certain disorders of other systems also might be members of the series, such as certain diseases of the skin, and even peculiar susceptibilities or immunities in respect of infections from without.

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  • On the other hand, not a few disorders proved to be alien to classes to which narrower views of causation had referred them; of such are tabes dorsalis, neuritis, infantile palsy or tetanus, now removed from the category of primary nervous diseases and placed in one or other of the class of infections; or, conversely, certain forms of disease of the joints are now regarded with some certainty as members of more than one series of diseases chiefly manifest in the nervous system.

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  • Charcot (1825-1893) in that great asylum for the wreckage of humanity - the Salpetriere - discovered an unworked mine of chronic nervous disease.

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  • Among diseases not primarily nervous, but exhibited in certain phenomena of nervous disorder, are diseases of the blood-vessels.

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  • In addition, some show duplication of the gonads and of their ducts, so that we find both transverse and longitudinal repetition of these organs, without corresponding multiplication of the nervous ganglia mesenchyma, or excretory opening.

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  • The knowledge of the presence of the parasiteadversely affects nervous people and may lead to mental depression and hypochondria.

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  • It is the seat of the Baker School for Nervous and Backward Children, a private institution; of St Olaf College (Norwegian Lutheran), founded in 1874; and of Carleton College (founded in 1866 by Congregationalists but now non-sectarian, opened in 1870), one of the highest grade small colleges in the West, and the first in the North-west to abolish its preparatory academy.

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  • This universality of fame led to considerable practical discomfort; he was besieged by sightseers, and his nervous trepidation led him perhaps to exaggerate the intensity of the infliction.

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  • Emphasizing the many real analogies between physical and mental agency, but underrating the much stronger evidences that all the mental operations of men and animals require a nervous system, he flew to the paradox that soul is not limited to men and animals, but extends to plants, to the earth and other planets, to the sun, to the world itself, of which, according to him, God P y is the world-soul.

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  • It acts similarly, though less markedly, upon the nerves which determine the secretion of the perspiration, and is therefore a local anaesthetic or anodyne and an anhidrotic. Being rapidly absorbed into the blood, it exercises a long and highly important series of actions on nearly every part and function of the nervous system.

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  • Not without nervous dread - witness the special taboo to which the leader of society is subject - he draws near and strives to constrain, conciliate or cajole the awful forces with which the life of the group is set about.

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  • Amongst these, the most important is fever with increased protein metabolism, attended with disturbances of the circulatory and respiratory systems. Nervous symptoms, somnolence, coma, spasms, convulsions and paralysis are of common occurrence.

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  • The Pentactaea again suggested a search for some primitive type in which quinqueradiate symmetry was exhibited in circumoral appendages, but had not affected the nervous, water-vascular, muscular or skeletal systems to any great extent, and the generative organs not at all.

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  • This nervous excitability was inherited, though' not to the same excess, by Octave, whose mother died in his infancy and left him to the care of the hypersensitive invalid.

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  • His Scotch and Gallic strains of ancestry are evident; his countenance was decidedly Scotch; his nervous speech and bearing and vehement temperament rather French; in his mind, agility, clarity and penetration were matched with logical solidity.

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  • Then she looked at Zeb, whose face was blue and whose hair was pink, and gave a little laugh that sounded a bit nervous.

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  • Dorothy was a little anxious about the success of their trip, for the way Jim arched his long neck and spread out his bony legs as he fluttered and floundered through the air was enough to make anybody nervous.

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  • This is the part that makes some people even more nervous.

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  • He has become thinner and more nervous.

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  • He reclined back in his chair, content, nervous energy spent, looking at me from under those half closed lids.

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  • Orphenadrine acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to produce its muscle relaxant effects.

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  • Most zeros revel in asset cover high enough to satisfy even the most ner