Nervous sentence example

nervous
  • She was nervous about her daughter.
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  • I was nearly as nervous as my first call.
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  • Are you nervous about it?
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  • I was nervous so I forgot his name.
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  • He looked nervous and uncomfortable.
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  • She was as nervous as a cat in a dog pound.
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  • The call caused Cynthia to tremble with nervous frustration to the point of dropping a favorite sugar bowl, snowing the kitchen floor in white.
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  • I was as nervous tonight as usual making the tip call.
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  • As the group pulled into the parking lot at Mountain Village, the upper portion of the ski area, Donnie began to look nervous for the first time.
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  • I'm too nervous to stop in this horrid state where it never ceases raining.
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  • "Excuse me, ma'am," the boy called out in a quiet, nervous voice.
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  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.
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  • Pierre met the old count, who seemed nervous and upset.
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  • The healer's nervous gaze flickered to Rhyn.
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  • Yes, she was fine, though her tone sounded nervous and tentative.
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  • Betsy chatted away while Howie, as nervous as a groom, simply listened.
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  • One chore remained before I'd do so though I was as nervous as a fly on a fry pan about it.
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  • He's as nervous as when he first received the notice to serve.
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  • "We're all a bit upset about this business," Groucho said, as nervous as a speech class drop out.
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  • The two days were longer than any other two days had been in her life, and she grew more and more nervous, afraid the connection she had to A'Ran wouldn't be enough to make him want her again.
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  • Nervous fingers necessitated three tries.
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  • More nervous, I'd say.
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  • Edith Shipton appeared, as Cynthia had described, to be more nervous than a fifth-grader on speech day.
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  • In large doses it has a depressant action on the nervous system, leading even to coma and total abolition of reflex action.
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  • The nervous irritation aroused by the appearance of Mack, the news of his defeat, and the thought of what lay before the Russian army found vent in anger at Zherkov's untimely jest.
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  • She pulled her hair back in a scrunchie at the base of her neck, growing nervous once again.
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  • She gave a nervous wave, watching for his reaction and relieved when he offered a warm smile.
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  • What is the relation between nervous process and sensation?
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  • Jak Upland put all this into rude nervous English verse: "Freer, what charitie is this To fain that whoso liveth after your order Liveth most perfectlie, And next followeth the state of the Apostles In povertie and pennance: And yet the wisest and greatest clerkes of you Wend or send or procure to the court of Rome,.
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  • Lankester, " Observations and Reflections on the Appendages and Nervous System of Apus Cancriformis," Quart.
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  • "He is a nervous, bilious subject," said Larrey, "and will not recover."
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  • I was becoming nervous.
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  • I don't know who among us was the most nervous.
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  • I'm far too nervous.
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  • "I've been doing a lot of soul searching and am just trying to … be a better person," he said with a nervous chuckle and rubbed his mouth again.
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  • Yes, I'm nervous and jealous when you're around her, but I do trust you.
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  • Nervous, uneasy, she made her way down the wall toward the Council members, who held court with themselves.
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  • Edith was as nervous as the prior evening, glancing across the hall at her son, as if danger lurked in every corner of Bird Song.
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  • While he didn't want to hold back important information, neither did he wish to unduly upset the nervous woman any further.
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  • Today I'll probably be more nervous with you there.
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  • He died on the 7th of June 1880 in an asylum after a short period of nervous prostration.
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  • My wife was as nervous as a hangman's customer.
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  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.
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  • Jackson asked, "Do you get nervous before your lectures?"
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  • Completely. Did I make you nervous?
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  • Thank you, I'm so nervous.
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  • You're making me nervous.
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  • She giggled, thinking him a nervous flier.
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  • Connor mostly paced, nervous as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.
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  • She pushed his hand away and her laugh sounded nervous.
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  • "Carmen," he whispered huskily with a nervous laugh.
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  • That this one was in the middle of a town—even a tiny one—made her nervous.
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  • Lana said nothing but touched Jack's scruff, nervous around all the people.
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  • Cynthia Byrne explained, in nervous little spurts, how she had heard the news of her husband's disappearance.
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  • Shakey Jake, named for a nervous tic, looked less nervous than he should have for someone facing heavy time.
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  • The voice sound­ed nervous to Dean's ear.
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  • He was frighteningly nervous, but in Dean's mind his sincerity buried the flowery words of the Philadelphia insurance executive.
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  • I was nervous as a cat that you'd wake up but I had to do something.
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  • Winston explained that Arthur had recently contacted the government about supplying information on his Philadelphia clients because, he claimed, he was beginning to get nervous.
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  • Everyone was exceptionally friendly as hundreds of bicyclists wandered about, chatting and smiling, with a hint of nervous excitement in their voices.
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  • Sunday morning broke with a surge of nervous excitement as 2,000 cyclists oozed out of Cortez, Colorado, bound for their first day's destination 46 miles distant.
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  • The voice sounded nervous to Dean, and perhaps disguised.
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  • Are you nervous about the first night?
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  • Are you nervous about getting married?
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  • Actually, all she wanted to do was alert him that she was nervous about it, but if it made him feel better to know she was willing to discuss intimacy with him now, then she would listen.
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  • Any time Alex didn't mind when she brought up Josh, it left her a little nervous.
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  • What's to be nervous about?
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  • Everyone is nervous about their wedding, Carmen.
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  • Maybe he was getting nervous because he had been this close to getting married once before and she simply didn't show up for the wedding.
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  • I wondered if you were ever going to get nervous.
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  • If I had his history, I'd be nervous about the bride's intentions on this day too.
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  • I know the twins make you nervous, but they are my nephews.
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  • They don't make me nervous, and I don't mind watching them.
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  • The presence of so many horses would only make the cow nervous.
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  • By the time he came in for supper, she had worked herself into a nervous state.
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  • Then why was she so nervous?
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  • What difference did it make whether there was a snake or Ed got nervous and threw her?
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  • Felipa shot a nervous look at Senor Medena and then Carmen.
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  • Everybody gets a little nervous as the wedding date approaches.
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  • Sorry. I tend to talk too much when I'm nervous.
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  • "I don't get the nervous vibe from you," he said.
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  • She failed her task and managed to piss off the new boss, all because she got nervous seeing a half-naked man.
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  • "You're nervous right now?" he asked when she didn't continue.
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  • There was an unguarded sweetness to her and her nervous chatter.
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  • Nervous energy fluttered through her.
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  • She was too nervous around him to be hungry.
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  • Jessi studied her, nervous around the woman who read her entire life the last time they interacted.
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  • Too nervous, Jessi instinctively knelt on the floor beside the overturned box and began collecting the small treasures.
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  • With a nervous glance at the locked door, she began to realize this was probably not a day she'd live to see the end of.
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  • The mineral waters of Mount Clemens are beneficial to patients suffering from rheumatism, blood diseases and nervous disorders.
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  • materia, matter), in philosophy, the theory which regards all the facts of the universe as explainable in terms of matter and motion, and in particular explains all psychical processes by physical and chemical changes in the nervous system.
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  • A nervous system has been shown to exist in many species, and consists of a perioesophageal ring giving off usually six nerves which run forwards and backwards along the lateral and median lines; these are connected by numerous fine, circular threads in the sub-cuticle.
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  • Schulze.) elements, more especially by nervous (ganglion) cells and musclecells derived from the epithelial layer.
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  • A further stage in evolution is that the muscle-cells lose their connexion with the epithelium and come to lie entirely beneath it, forming a sub-epithelial contractile layer, developed chiefly in the tentacles of the polyp. The of the evolution of the ganglioncells is probably similar; an epithelial cell develops processes of nervous nature from the base, which come into connexion with the bases of the sensory cells, with the muscular cells, and with the similar processes of other nerve-cells; next the nerve-cell loses its connexion with the outer epithelium and becomes a sub-epithelial ganglion-cell which is closely connected with the muscular layer, conveying stimuli from the sensory cells to the contractile elements.
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  • In the polyp the nervous tissue is always in the form of a scattered plexus, never concentrated to form a definite nervous system as in the medusa.
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  • The ectoderm furnishes the general epithelial covering of the body, and the muscular tissue, nervous system and sense-organs.
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  • The nervous system of the medusa consists of sub-epithelial ganglion-cells, which form, in the first place, a diffuse plexus of nervous tissue, as in the polyp, but developed chiefly on the subumbral surface; and which are concentrated, in the second place, to form a definite central nervous system, never found in the polyp. In Hydromedusae the central nervous system forms two concentric nerverings at the margin of the umbrella, near the base of the velum.
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  • By means of vibrations or shocks transmitted through the - Sub water, or by displacements in the balance or position of the animal, the otoliths are caused to impinge against the bristles of the sensory cells, now on one side, now on the other, causing shocks or stimuli which are transmitted by the basal nerve-fibre to the central nervous system.
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  • n.s, Nervous system.
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  • He defined them as possessing radial instead of bilateral symmetry, and as apparently destitute of nervous system and sense organs, as having the circulatory system rudimentary or absent, and the respiratory organs on or coextensive with the surface of the body; he included under this title and definition five classes, - Echinodermata, Acalepha, Entozoa, Polypi and Infusoria.
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  • We may speak, indeed, of the plant as possessed of a rudimentary nervous system, by the aid of which necessary adjustments are brought about.
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  • The purposeful character of all these movements or changes of position indicates that they are of nervous origin.
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  • We find thus three factors of a nervous mechanism present, a receptive, a conducting, and a responding part.
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  • The conduction of such stimulation to parts removed some distance from the sense organ suggests paths of transmission comparable to those which transmit nervous impulses in animals.
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  • These may well serve as conductors of nervous impulses.
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  • The nervous mechanism thus formed is very rudimentary, but in.
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  • Carbolic acid is distinguished from all other acids so-called - except oxalic acid and hydrocyanic acid - in that it is a neurotic poison, having a marked action directly upon the nervous system.
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  • In all cases of carbolic acid poisoning the nervous influence is seen.
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  • But for a tendency to paradox, his intellectual powers were of the highest order, and as a master of nervous idiomatic English he is second to Cobbett alone.
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  • Nervous System.
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  • Large doses also depress the nervous system, weakening the anterior horns of grey matter in the spinal cord so as ultimately to cause complete paralysis, and also causing a partial insensibility of the cutaneous nerves of touch and pain.
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  • Among the Archiannelida, in Aeolosoma and some Polychaetes, the whole central nervous system remains imbedded in the epidermis.
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  • The principal trunks consist of a dorsal vessel lying above the gut, and a ventral vessel below the gut but above the nervous cord.
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  • Nervous system often imbedded in the epidermis.
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  • segments are the apertures of the Nervous system rarely atria.C, Perichaeta: the spermathecal pores (Aeolosoma) in continuity are between segments 6 and 7, 7 with epidermis.
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  • The nervous system is embedded in the epidermis, and the pairs of ganglia are separated as in Serpula, &c.; each pair has a longish commissure between its two ganglia.
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  • Nervous system always in coelom.
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  • 15 and 16) show the gut, the nervous system, &c., lying in a spacious chamber which is the coelom.
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  • But he did not remain long in Paris, for, being a nervous and excitable boy, his health broke down, and he yearned for his home in Franche-Comte.
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  • This is shown by the labial commissure and pedal cords of the nervous system, by the opening of the gonad into the right kidney, and by other points.
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  • 9, 10) of _ the nervous systems of ` Patella and of Haliotis, e as determined by Spengel, show the identity in the origin of the nerves passing from the visceral loop to Spengel's olfactory ganglion of the fig..
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  • - Nervous system of Patella; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.
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  • - Nervous system of Haliotis; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.
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  • - Nervous system of after Jhering.) Fissurella.
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  • As an excellent general type of the nervous system, attention may be directed to that of Paludina drawn in fig.
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  • The histology of the nervous system of Mollusca has yet to be seriously inquired into.
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  • - Nervous system of Paludina as a type of the streptoneurous condition.
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  • The nervous system and sense organs are highly developed.
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  • The detorted visceral commissure shows a tendency to the concentration of all its elements round the oesophagus, so that except in the Bullomorpha and in Aplysia the whole nervous system is aggregated in the cephalic region, either dorsally or ventrally.
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  • In the nervous system of Aplysia the great ganglion-pairs are well developed and distinct.
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  • Our figure of the nervous system of Aplysia does not give the small pair of buccal ganglia which are, as in all glossophorous Molluscs, present upon the nerves passing from the cerebral region to the odontophore.
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  • - Nervous system of Aplysia, as a type of the longlooped Euthyneurous condition.
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  • - Central Nervous System of Fiona (one of the Nudibranchia), showing a tendency to fusion of the great ganglia.
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  • Visceral commissure reduced; nervous system concentrated on dorsal side of oesophagus.
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  • The demonstration which it affords of the extreme shortening of the Euthyneurous visceral nerve-loop is most instructive and valuable for comparison with and explanation of the condition of the nervous centres in Cephalopoda, as also of some Opisthobranchia.
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  • - Nervous System of the Pond knob - like particle Snail, Limnaeus stagnalis, as a type of the (Neritina and Palu- short-looped euthyneurous condition.
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  • Internal Organs Nervous System.
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  • In connexion with the central nervous system there are usually numerous organs of special sense.
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  • A The ganglia of the nervous _ Tre system offer some important evidence as to the morphology of the head, and are alluded to below.
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  • - The nervous system is ectodermal in origin, and is developed and segmented to a large extent in connexion with the outer part of the body, so that it affords important evidence as to the segmentation thereof.
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  • The continuous layer of cells from which the nervous system is developed undergoes a segmentation analogous with that we have described as occurring in the ventral plate; there is thus formed a pair of contiguous ganglia for each segment of the body, but there is no ganglion for the telson.
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  • The nervous system of the embryonic head exhibits three ganglionic masses, anterior to the thoracic ganglionic masses; these three masses subsequently amalgamate and form the sub-oesophageal ganglion, which supplies the trophal segments.
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  • In front of the three masses that will form the sub-oesophageal ganglion the mass of cells that is to form the nervous system is very large, and projects on each side; this anterior or " brain " mass consists of three lobes (the prot-, deut-, and tritencephalon of Viallanes and others), each of which might be thought to represent a segmental ganglion.
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  • - Morphology of an Insect: the embryo of Gryllotalpa, somewhat diagrammatic. The longitudinal segmented band along the middle line represents the early segmentation of the nervous system and the subsequent median field of each sternite; the lateral transverse unshaded bands are the lateral fields of each segment; the shaded areas indicate the more internally placed mesoderm layer.
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  • The timidity of the Danish admiral Ulrik C. Gyldenldve, and the daring of Charles, who forced his nervous and protesting admiral to attempt the passage of the eastern channel of the Sound, the dangerous flinterend, hitherto reputed to be unnavigable, enabled the Swedish king to effect a landing at Humleback in Sjaelland (Zealand), a few miles north of Copenhagen (Aug.
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  • The Massachusetts general hospital (1811-1821) - with a branch for mental and nervous diseases, McLean hospital (1816), in the township of Belmont (post-office, Waverley) about 6 m.
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  • The excitement communicated itself to the whole army; and the nervous strength which it gave enabled the crusaders to meet and defeat Crusade, and above all on the - Sixth, this path was still more seriously attempted.
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  • Protonemertini, in which there are two layers of dermal muscles, external circular and internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies external to the circular muscles; the mouth lies behind the level of the brain; the proboscis has no stylet; there is no caecum to the intestine.
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  • Mesonemertini, in which the nervous system has passed into the dermal muscles and lies amongst them; other characters as in Protonemertini.
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  • Metanemertini, in which the nervous system lies inside the dermal muscles in the parenchyma; the mouth lies in front of the level of the brain; the proboscis as a ru'e bears stylets; the intestine nearly always has a caecum.
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  • Heteronemertini, in which the dermal musculature is in three layers, an external longitudinal, a middle circular, an internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies between the first and second of these layers; the outer layer of longitudinal muscles is a new development; there is no intestinal caecum; no stylets on the proboscis and the mouth is behind the level of the brain.
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  • It then often retains its vitality for a long time, apparently crawling as if it were itself a worm, a phenomenon which is at least partially explained by the extraordinary development of nervous tissue, equally distributed all through the walls of the proboscis, and either united into numerous longitudinal nerve-stems (Drepanophorus, Amphiporus) or spread out into a uniform and comparatively thick layer (Cerebratulus, sp.).
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  • I, additional circular and longitudinal layers of the same; g al, nervous layer.
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  • The nervous system of Nemertines presents several interesting peculiarities.
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  • It stretches forward as far as the brain, and in Carinella is again continued in front of it, whereas in the Heteronemertines the innervation of the anterior extremity of the head, in front of the brain, takes the form of more definite and less numerous branching stems. The presence of this plexus in connexion with the central stems, sending out nervous filaments amongst the muscles, explains the absence, in Pro-, Mesoand Heteronemertines, of separate and distinct peripheral nerve stems springing from the central stems innervating the different organs and body-regions, the only exceptions being the L.N.
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  • In addition to the nerves starting from the brain-lobes just now especially mentioned, there is a double apparatus which can hardly be treated of in conjunction with the sense organs, because its sensory functions have not been sufficiently made out, and which will therefore rather be considered along with the brain and central nervous system.
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  • To it belong (a) superficial grooves or deeper slits situated on the integument near the tip of the head, (b) nerve lobes in immediate connexion with the nervous tissue of the brain, and (c) ciliated ducts penetrating into the latter and communicating with the former.
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  • These posterior brain-lobes, which in all Heteronemertines are in direct continuity of tissue with the upper pair of principal lobes, cease to have this intimate connexion in the Metanemertini; and, although still constituted of (I) a ciliated duct, opening out externally, (2) nervous tissue surrounding it, and (3) histological elements distinctly different from the nervous, and most probably directly derived from the oesophageal outgrowths, they are nevertheless here no longer constantly situated behind the upper brain-lobes and directly connected with them, but are found sometimes behind, sometimes beside and sometimes before the brain-lobes.
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  • In some cases, especially when the lobes lie before the brain, their distance from it, as well as the length of these nervous connexions, has considerably increased.
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  • Here the pits split into two, one part ending in a sac lined with sensory epithelium, and embedded in nervous tissue, the other projecting backwards as a long, glandular, blind canal.
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  • For the Heteronemertines arguments have been adduced to prove that here they have the physiological significance of a special respiratory apparatus for the central nervous tissue, which in all these forms is strongly charged with haemoglobin.
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  • N, Nervous layer.
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  • xx.; Id., " The Peripheral Nervous System of the Palaeoand Schizonemertini, one of the layers of the Body-wall," Quart.
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  • The nervous system, composed of a ring and a ventral cord, retains its primitive connexion with the ectoderm.
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  • The nervous system is represented by an oesophageal collar and a suboesophageal ganglion, whence paired nerves pass outwards to innervate the anterior extremity and backwards towards its posterior end.
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  • There are pine-needle baths and a hospital for nervous diseases.
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  • The central ganglion of the nervous system lies in the proboscissheath or -septum.
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  • In rheumatic hyperpyrexia, where the poison has attacked the central nervous system, salicylates almost always fail.
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  • Instinctive behaviour thus depends solely on how the nervous system has been built through heredity; while intelligent behaviour depends also on those characters of the nervous system which have been acquired under the modifying influence of individual relation to the environment.
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  • Do they originate through the natural selection of those variations which are the more adaptive; or do they originate through the inheritance of those acquired modifications which are impressed on the nervous system in the course of individual and intelligent use ?
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  • With these numbers it was impossible to attain the high degree of individual efficiency required for the old line tactics, hence they were compelled to adopt the French methods of skirmishers and columns, but as yet they had hardly realized the increased density necessary to be given to a line of battle to enable it to endure the prolonged nervous strain the new system of tactics entailed.
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  • A partial explanation of this phenomenon may perhaps be found in the economy of nervous energy his strategical method ensured to him.
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  • In 1883-1886 Bateson showed by his embryological researches that the Enteropneusta exhibit chordate (vertebrate) affinities in respect of the coelomic, skeletal and nervous systems as well as in regard to the respiratory system, and, further, that the gill-slits are formed upon a plan similar to that of the gillslits of Amphioxus, being subdivided by tongue-bars which depend from the dorsal borders of the slits.
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  • 3) Nervous System.
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  • The nervous system is thus essentially epidermal in position and diffuse in distribution; but an interesting concentration of nerve-cells and fibres has taken place in the collar-region, where a medullary tube, closed in from the outside, opens in front and behind by anterior and posterior neuropores.
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  • These hollow roots terminate blindly in the dorsal epidermis of the collar, and place the nervous layer of the latter in direct connexion with the fibres of the nerve-tube.
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  • Special thickenings of the diffuse nervous layer of the epidermis occur in certain regions and along certain lines.
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  • Nietzsche's writings must be understood in their relation to these circumstances of his life, and as the outcome of a violent revolt against them on the part of an intensely emotional and nervous temperament.
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  • The nervous system of BrachioDiagram showing the muscular pods has, as a rule: maintained system.
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  • There is a special marginal nerve running round the edge of the mantle, but the connexion of this with the rest of the nervous system is not clear; probably it is merely another concentration of the diffused sub-ectodermal nervous fibrils.
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  • - Diagram of nervous system of Crania; from the dorsal side.
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  • Taken internally aconite acts very notably on the circulation, the respiration and the nervous system.
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  • 1 with the addition of NF, neural fossa protecting the aggregated ganglia of the central nervous system; PVP, left posterior ventral process; PMP, posterior median process.
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  • It is possible, as maintained by some writers (Patten and others), that the lobes of the cerebral nervous mass in Arach nids indicate a larger number of prosthomeres as having fused in this region, but there is no embryological evidence at present which justifies us in assuming the existence in Arachnids of more than two prosthomeres.
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  • The central nervous systems of Limulus and of Scorpio present closer agreement in structure than can be found when a Crustacean is compared with either.
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  • Newport, George, " Nervous and Circulatory Systems in Myriapoda and Macrourous Arachnids," Phil.
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  • Intense application during early youth had weakened a constitution never robust, and led to accesses of feverish exaltation culminating, in the spring of 1761, in an attack of bilious hypochondria, which permanently lowered the tone of his nervous system.
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  • The Michigan school for the deaf, established in 1854, and the Oak Grove hospital (private) for the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, are here.
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  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.
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  • Instincts, or the inherited structural mechanisms. of the nervous centres, are in antagonism to the results of the reasoning process, which are not capable of hereditary transmission.
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  • At no time has so much been done to advance our knowledge of diseases of the nervous system as during the last thirty years of the 19th century.
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  • If, on the other hand, any pathogenic organisms be present the results are disastrous because the tissue, deprived of its nervous trophic supply, has greatly lessened resistance.
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  • IV.), that of " sclerosis " is used when such a deposition of fibrous tissue occurs within the central nervous system.
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  • Trophic and nervous conditions sometimes cause localized deficiency of pigment which produces white areas in the skin.
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  • These are peculiar bodies which are found in the prostate, in the central nervous system, in the lung, and in other localities, and which get their name from being very like starch-corpuscles, and from giving certain colour reactions closely resembling those of vegetable cellulose or even starch itself.
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  • This reaction is carried out by the mobile phagocytes sometimes alone, sometimes with the aid of the vascular phagocytes, or of the nervous system."
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  • The local oedema seen in some nervous affections might be explained on the hypothesis of increased metabolic activity in these areas due to some local nervous stimulation.
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  • In nervous diseases disturbances of the vital "spirits" were most important.
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  • But some parts of Willis's works, such as his descriptions of nervous diseases, and his account (the earliest) of diabetes, are classical contributions to scientific medicine.
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  • Afterwards he modified his hypothesis, and referred the disturbances produced to the "nervous liquor," which he supposed to be a quantity of the "universal elastic matter" diffused through the universe, by which Newton explained the phenomena of light - i.e.
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  • It accumulates in the brain, and there generates the" nervous fluid "or pneuma - a theory closely resembling that of Mead on the" nervous liquor,"unless indeed Mead borrowed it from Hoffmann.
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  • Cullen's system was largely based on the new physiological doctrine of irritability, but is especially noticeable for the importance attached to nervous action.
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  • A number of other maladies, especially general diseases and those commonly regarded as nervous, were attributed to the same cause.
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  • In the other German schools, though some great names might be found, as Moritz Heinrich Romberg (1795-1873), the founder of the modern era in the study of nervous diseases, the general spirit was scholastic and the result barren till the teaching of one man, whom the modern German physicians generally regard as the regenerator of scientific medicine in their country, made itself felt.
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  • When, leaving the infections, we look for evidence of progress in our knowledge of more or less local diseases, we may begin with the nervous system.
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  • Lockhart Clarke (1817-1880), one of the earliest investigators of nervous pathology, the improvement of the compound microscope had not attained the achromatism, the penetration and the magnification which have since enabled J.
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  • 1844) and others to reveal the minute anatomy of the nervous centres; while the discrimination of tissues and morbid products by stains, as in the silver and osmic acid methods, and in those known by the names of Carl Weigert or Marchi, had scarcely begun.
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  • In France, in the wards of the Hotel Dieu, Guillaume Benjamin Duchenne (1806-1875), in association with Trousseau and in his private clinic, pursued his memorable clinical and therapeutical researches into the diseases of the nervous system; and Jean M.
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  • Romberg (1795-1873) and Theodor Meynert (1833-1892) also were pioneers in the study of nervous diseases, but it was not till later in the century that Germany took a high place in this department of medicine.
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  • The discoveries of the separate paths of sensory and motor impulses in the spinal cord, and consequently of the laws of reflex action, by Charles Bell and Marshall Hall respectively, in their illumination of the phenomena of nervous function, may be compared with the discovery in the region of the vascular system of the circulation of the blood; for therein a key to large classes of normal and aberrant functions and a fertile principle of interpretation were obtained.
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  • Waller (1816-1870), who tracked the line of nervous strands by experimental sections, and showed that when particular strands are cut off from their nutritive centres the consequent degeneration follows the line of the separated strands.
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  • By similar methods nature, unassisted, betrays herself but too often; in many instances - probably originating primarily in the nervous tissues themselves - the course of disease is observed to follow certain paths with remarkable consistency, as for instance in diseases of particular tracts of the spinal cord.
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  • Not, however, all diseases of the nervous system conduct themselves on these definite paths, for some of them pay no attention to the geography of structure, but, as one may say, blunder indiscriminately among the several parts; others, again, pick out particular parts definitely enough, but not parts immediately continuous, or even contiguous.
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  • Diseases of the latter kind are especially interesting, as in them we see that parts of the nervous structure, separated in space, may nevertheless be associated in function; for instance, wasting of a group of muscles associated in function may depend on a set of central degenerations concurring in parts whose connexion, in spite of dissociation in space, we thus perceive.
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  • The undiscriminating diseases, on the other hand, we suspect not to be primarily of nervous origin, but to depend rather on the agency of other constituent tissues of this system, as of the blood-vessels or the connective elements.
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  • Thus, arguing inversely, we may learn something of the respective natures of these influences and of the way in which the nervous system is affected secondarily.
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  • Yet even the distribution of toxic matters by the blood is not necessarily followed by general and indiscriminate injury to the nervous elements.
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  • In infantile palsy, for example, and in tabes dorsalis, there is good reason to believe of that, definitely as the traces of the disease are found in certain physiologically distinct nervous elements, they are due nevertheless to toxic agents arriving by way of the blood.
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  • It is convenient here to add that such reactions and modifications, if more conspicuous in the nervous system, are of course not confined to it, but are concerned in their degree in all the processes of metabolism, being most readily traced by us in the blood.
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  • Many other diseases formerly regarded as primarily diseases of the nervous system are not such; but, by means of agents either introduced into the body or modified there, establish themselves after the affinities of these in contiguous associated parts of the structure, as in vascular, membranous or connective elements, or again in distant and peripheral parts; the perturbations of nervous function being secondary and consequential.
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  • Of such are tetanus and diphtheria, now known to be due to the establishment from without of a local microbic infection, from which focus a toxin is diffused to the nervous matter.
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  • The terrible nervous sequels of some forms of inflammation of the membranes of the brain, again, are due primarily to microbic invasion rather of the membranes than of their nervous contents; and many other diseases may be added to this list.
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  • Syphilitic lesion of the arteries, and likewise of other fibrous tissues, often involves grave consequential damage to nervous structures fed or supported by such parts.
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  • Some of the most successful of the advances of medicine as a healing art have followed the detection of syphilitic disease of the vessels, or of the supporting tissues of nervous centres and of the peripheral nerves; so that, by specific medication, the treatment of paralytic, convulsive, and other terrible manifestations of nervous disease thus secondarily induced is now undertaken in early stages with definite prospect of cure.
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  • The remarkable discovery of the dual nature of the nervous system, of its duplex development as a lower and upper system of "neurons," has shed much light upon the problems of practical medicine, but this construction is described under Brain; Neuropathology; Muscle And Nerve, &C.
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  • Griesinger (1817-1868), Bevan Lewis - and in the separation from insanity due to primary disease or defect of nerve elements of such diseases as general paralysis of the insane, which probably arise, as we have said, by the action of poisons on contiguous structures - such as blood-vessels and connective elements - and invade the nervous matter secondarily.
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  • A remarkable help to the cure of headaches and wider nervous disorders has come out of the better appreciation and correction of errors of refraction in the eye.
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  • And, apart from their value as historical documents, Gentz's writings are literary monuments, classical examples of nervous and luminous German prose, or of French which is a model for diplomatic style.
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  • In anatomy the word is applied to nervous structures which resemble loops.
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  • Outline of the ventral surface to show the external apertures and nervous system; a, rosette-organ; b, uterine pore; c, terminal sucker; e, vaginal pore; g, male gonopore; n, o, p, nervous system.
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  • The nervous system consists of a ring below the suckers and of a large number of radially arranged tracts running forwards and backwards.
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  • The nervous system is, however, not segmented, and the excretory system is continuous throughout the worm.
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  • The mass of the body consists of richly branched stellate cells - the mesenchyma - and imbedded in this plasmic tissue are the nervous, excretory, muscular and generative organs.
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  • The concentration of nervous matter and ganglionic substance at the oral end of Trematodes is equivalent to the " brain " of the Planarians, but the similar thickening in the scolex of Cestodes is by no means so certainly to be called by that name.
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  • It appears to be primarily related to the organs of attachment and to have attained greater elaboration than the rest of the nervous system because the proximal end is the most specialized and most stimulated portion of the worm.
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  • Those Cestodes which possess no very distinct organ of attachment (such, for example, as Gyrocotyle) have no distinct ganglionic thickening more pronounced at one end of the body than at the other; and as these are forms which have retained more primitive features than the rest, and show closer affinity to the Trematodes, it seems highly probable that the complicated nervous thickening found in the scolex, and often compared with the " brain " of other Platyelmia, is a structure sui generis developed within the limits of the sub-class.
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  • (From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology, part iv.) the base of the tail; nervous and muscular systems arise; and finally the rostellum and suckers become completely enclosed in the sac formed by the lateral extension of the " hind-body."
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  • The excretory tubes, the nervous system, and the parenchyma and integument are continuous from one end of the worm to the other.
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  • The knowledge of the presence of the parasite adversely affects nervous people and may lead to mental depression and hypochondria.
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  • Nervous phenomena, such as chorea and epileptic seizures, have been attributed to the presence of the tapeworm.
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  • These salts have been extensively employed internally, and indeed they are still largely employed in the treatment of the more severe and difficult cases of nervous disease.
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  • A, Fasciola hepatica, from the ventral surface (X 2); the alimentary and nervous systems only shown on the left side of the figure, the excretory only on the right; a, right main branch of the intestine; c, a diverticulum; g, lateral ganglion; n, lateral nerve; o, mouth; p, pharynx; s, ventral sucker; cs, cirrus sac; d, left anterior dorsal excretory vessel; m, main vessel; v, left anterior ventral trunk; x, excretory pore.
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  • Lastly the nervous system is well developed and consists of a pair of well-marked and interconnected ganglia placed near the anterior end and dorsal to the oesophagus.
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  • Eye-spots are general and the nervous system maintains a primitive diffused condition.
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  • A, Dorsal view showing the nervous system and digestive system; a, mouth; b, pharynx; c, d, e, gut; E, post-genital union of two limbs of gut; f, excretory pore; g, vaginal pore; h, j, k, brain and nerves; 1, dorsal nerves; m, ventral nerves; n, adoral sucker; o, posterior sucker; p, hooks on posterior sucker; r, vitello-intestinal duct.
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  • They are usually found in the alimentary canal or its appendages but occasionally work their way into the serous cavities, nervous system and blood vessels.
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  • The polypide consists of a "lophophore" bearing a series of ciliated tentacles by which Diatoms and other microscopic bodies are collected as food, of a U-shaped alimentary canal, and of a central nervous system.
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  • The central nervous system (x) is highly developed, and in Loxosoma bears a pair o` eyes.
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  • In 1847 nervous prostration again obliged him to undergo treatment at Prestbury: "They tell me not to read, not to think; but they might as well tell me not to live."
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  • One is lost in astonishment at the nervous yet perfectly regulated force and the unerring fidelity of every trace of the chisel.
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  • On the one hand, his whole formulation of Evolution in mechanical terms urges him in the direction of materialism, and he attempts to compose the mind out of homogeneous units of consciousness (or" feeling ")" similar in nature to those which we know as nervous shocks; each of which is the correlative of a rhythmical motion of a material unit or group of such units "(§ 62).
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  • p. 444), he is ready to amend nervous into psychical shocks, which is no doubt what he ought to have meant but could not say without ruining the illusory bridge between the psychical and the physiological which is suggested in the phrase nervous shock."
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  • According to Sir Thomas Fraser nothing else can compete with alcohol as a food in desperate febrile cases, and to this use must be added its antipyretic power already explained and its action as a soporific. During its administration in febrile cases the drug must be most carefully watched, as its action may prove deleterious to the nervous system and the circulation in certain classes of patient.
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  • intoxication), chronic alcoholism, delirium tremens, and all the countless pathological changes - extending to every tissue but the bones, and especially marked in the nervous system - which alcohol produces.
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  • Its especial affinity for the nervous system is indicated by the fact that, when all traces of it have disappeared elsewhere, it can still be detected with ease in the cerebro-spinal fluid.
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  • The trouble seems to have been some form of nervous exhaustion, accompanied with such hypersensitiveness of the eyes that it was impossible to keep them open except in a dark room.
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  • Escaping by way of Strassburg he found an asylum in England, where he was made a prebendary of Canterbury, received a pension from Edward VI.'s privy purse, and composed his chief work, A Trajedy or Dialogue of the unjust usurped Primacy of the Bishop of Rome (1549) This remarkable performance, originally written in Latin, is extant only in the translation of John Ponet, bishop of Winchester, a splendid specimen of nervous English.
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  • For nervous system H.
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  • In the nervous system the concentration of the trunk ganglia After Marlatt, Bull.
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  • The style of the whole book is nervous, vivid, free from artifice and rhetoric, obeying the writer's thought with absolute plasticity.
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  • No organs of circulation or respiration are known; but the nervous system is well developed, and consists of a pair of ganglia corresponding with the limbs and connected by longitudinal commissural chords.
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  • These last characteristics also separate them essentially from the Pycnogonida, some members of which resemble them to a certain extent in having only four pairs of limbs, no gnathites, no respiratory organs, a ganglionated ventral nervous system, and the abdomen reduced to a mere rudiment projecting between the last pair of legs.
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  • Both these farms were strengthened; but, still nervous about his right flank, the duke occupied Hougoumont in much greater force than La Haye Sainte, and massed the bulk of his troops on his right.
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  • His chief works were First Lines of the Practice of Physic (1774); Institutions of Medicine (1770); and Synopsis Nosologicae Medicae (1785), which contained his classification of diseases into four great classes - (t) Pyrexiae, or febrile diseases, as typhus fever; (2) Neuroses, or nervous diseases, as epilepsy; (3) Cachexiae, or diseases resulting from bad habit of body, as scurvy; L and (4) Locales, or local diseases, as cancer.
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  • In his later years he became subject to attacks of nervous apoplexy.
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  • It has a Carnegie library, and is the seat of an Evangelical Lutheran theological seminary (1865), of Lutheran homes for the aged and orphan, of the Milwaukee county hospital for the insane, of the Milwaukee sanatorium for nervous diseases, and of the north-western branch of the national soldiers' home, which has grounds covering 385 acres and with main building and barracks affording quarters for over 2000 disabled veterans, and has a hospital, a theatre, and a library of 15,000 volumes.
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  • Marat declares that physiology alone can solve the problems of the connexion between soul and body, and proposes the existence of a nervous fluid as the true solution.
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  • His highly nervous organization made his feelings acute, and his brain incessantly active..
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  • All potassium salts if taken in large doses are cardiac depressants, they also depress the nervous system, especially the brain and spinal cord.
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  • Correlated with the well-developed muscular system and sense-organs of the medusa, we find also a distinct nervous system, either, when there is no velum, in the form of concentrations of nervous matter in the vicinity of each sense-organ, or, when a velum is present, as two continuous rings running round the margin of the umbrella, one external to the velum (exumbral nerve-ring, n.r l, see fig.
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  • Its adhesive foot is paralleled by a cup-shaped ciliated depression, possibly nervous, found in all the larvae cited, except some Echinoderms, and which in Asterids and Crinoids actually serves as an organ of attachment.
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  • Death is due either to weakness and emaciation (in chronic cases), or to blocking of the cerebral capillaries by the parasites (where these are abundant), or to disorganization of the nervous system (paraplegic and sleepingsickness cases).
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  • Such a cough is relieved by the sedative action on the central nervous system.
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  • The drug kills by paralysing the nervous arrangements of the heart and respiratioh.
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  • During an attack of fever he made observations on himself with reference to the action of quickened circulation upon thought, which led him to the conclusion that psychical phenomena were to be accounted for as the effects of organic changes in the brain and nervous system.
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  • A typical nervous system is present (fig.
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  • It must, however, be distinctly borne in mind that there is a fundamental difference between the eye of Vertebrates and of all other groups in the fact that in the Vertebrata the retinal body is itself a part of the central nervous system, and not a separate C E k e FIG.
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  • Intelligence does not differ from sense by having no bodily organ, but the nervous system is the bodily organ of both.
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  • Intelligence is not active intellect propagating universal essence in passive intellect, but only logical inference starting from sense, and both requiring nervous body and conscious soul.
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  • The central nervous system may be described as consisting of a collar surrounding the oesophagus, and two pairs of cords arising from the collar and passing backwards.
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  • This is the condition of the nervous system found in Chiton and the other Amphineura, but may not be in all respects the ancestral condition.
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  • In the Amphineura the nervous system, having no (From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology.
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  • One end of the body, through contact, during locomotion, with fresh tracts of medium and other forms of stimuli, has become more specialized than the rest, and here the nervous system and sense-organs are more densely aggregated than elsewhere, forming a means of controlling locomotion and of correlating the activities of the inner organs with the varying stimuli that impinge upon the body.
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  • The nervous system, though centralized at one end of the body, contains diffused nerve-cells in the course of its tracts, which are disposed in two or more longitudinal bundles interconnected by transverse bands.
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  • That this action is a direct and not a nervous one is shown by the fact that if the eye be suddenly shaded the pupil will dilate a little, showing that the nerves which cause dilatation are still competent after the administration of physostigmine.
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  • He holds indeed that, in accordance with the law of substance, consciousness must be evolved from unconsciousness with the development of sense organs and a central nervous organ.
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  • So Avenarius (q.v.) was no materialist, but only an empiricist anxious to reclaim man's natural view of the world from philosophic incrustations; yet when his Empiriokriticismus ends in nothing but environment, nervous system, and statements dependent on them, without soul, though within experience, he comes near to materialism, as Wundt has remarked.
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  • Matter, according to him, impresses the afferent nervous system, this the brain, this the efferent nervous system, while consciousness remains a mere spectator.
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  • Having satisfied himself in what he called " outer psychophysics," that the stimulus causes only the nervous process and not sensation, he passed to what he called " inner psychophysics," or the theory of the relation between nervous and psychical processes.
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  • He rightly argued against the old theory that the continuity of nervous processes in the brain is interrupted by mental processes of thought and will: there is a nervous process for every mental process.
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  • The first question he answered from his imagination by supposing that, while the external world is stimulus of the nervous process, the nervous process is the immediate stimulus of the sensation, and that the sensation increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the nervous system, when Weber's law proves only that it increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the external world.
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  • The second question he answered from his parallelistic metaphysics by deducing that even within the organism there is only a constant dependency of sensation on nervous process without causation, because the nervous process is physical but the sensation psychical.
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  • This answer supposed that the whole physical process from the action of the external stimulus on the nervous system to the reaction of the organism on the external world is one series, while the conscious process beginning with sensation is only parallel and as it were left high and dry.
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  • At the same time Fechner would not have us suppose that the two sides are equal; according to him, the psychical, being the psychophysical as viewed from within, is real, the physical, being the psychophysical viewed from without, is apparent; so in oneself, though nervous process and psychical process are the same, it is the psychical which is the reality of which the nervous is mere appearance; and so everywhere, spirit is the reality, body the appearance of spirit to spirit.
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  • Within this essential co-ordination he distinguished three values: R-values of the environment as stimulus; C-values of the central nervous system; and E-values of human statements - the latter being characterized by that which at the time of its existence for the individual admits of being named, and including what we call sensations, &c., which depend indirectly on the environment and directly on the central nervous system, but are not, as the materialist supposes, in any way reducible to possessions of the brain or any other part of that system.
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  • He considered that the whole hypothesis that an outer physical thing causes a change in one's central nervous system, which again causes another change in one's inner psychical system or soul, is a departure from the natural view of the universe, and is due to what he called " introjection," or the hypothesis which encloses soul and its faculties in the body, and then, having created a false antithesis between outer and inner, gets into the difficulty of explaining how an outer physical stimulus can impart something into an inner psychical soul.
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  • The difference is that Clifford considers " mind-stuff " to be unconscious, and denies that there is any evidence of consciousness apart from a nervous system.
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  • The nervous system consists of a cerebral ganglion in the head, a conspicuous ventral ganglion in the trunk, and of lateral cornmissures uniting these ganglia on each side.
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  • As in other animals there is a minute but extensive nervous plexus, which permeates the whole body and takes its origin from the chief ganglia.
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  • The specific effects of the drug, however, are upon the central nervous system.
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  • In a complete albino not only is all pigment absent in the skin, but also that which is normally present in deeper organs, such as the sympathetic nervous system and in the substantia nigra of the brain.
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  • There is some reason to believe that a peculiar condition found in the majority of human albinoes, and known as nystagmus, is correlated with the absence of pigment in the central nervous system.
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  • Casa is chiefly remarkable as the leader of a reaction in lyric poetry against the universal imitation of Petrarch, and as the originator of a style, which, if less soft and elegant, was more nervous and majestic than that which it replaced.
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  • There are twenty-eight other springs of nearly identical composition, many of which are used for bathing, and are efficacious in cases of rheumatism, gout, nervous and female disorders and skin diseases.
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  • Their bilateral symmetry is obviously to be regarded as primitive, and the nervous system shows an original condition from which that of the asymmetrical twisted Gastropods can be derived.
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  • He published over fifty volumes containing his researches on muscular and nervous diseases, and on the applications of electricity both for diagnostic purposes and for treatment.
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  • His name is especially connected with the first description of locomotor ataxy, progressive muscular atrophy, pseudo-hypertrophic paralysis, glosso-labio laryngeal paralysis and other nervous troubles.
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  • He has been represented as a determined apologist of intellectual orthodoxy animated by an almost fanatical "hatred of reason," and possessed with a purpose to overthrow the appeal to reason; as a sceptic and pessimist of a far deeper dye than Montaigne, anxious chiefly to show how any positive decision on matters beyond the range of experience is impossible; as a nervous believer clinging to conclusions which his clearer and better sense showed to be indefensible; as an almost ferocious ascetic and paradoxer affecting the credo quia impossibile in intellectual matters and the odi quia amabile in matters moral and sensuous; as a wanderer in the regions of doubt and belief, alternately bringing a vast though vague power of thought and an unequalled power of expression to the expression of ideas incompatible and irreconcilable.
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  • The "faces" that Johnson habitually made (probably nervous.
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  • The suspicions as to the stability of the Triple Alliance ~ produced, indeed, for some years a kind of nervous ness in the attitude of the government, whose deter mination to assert for Germany a leading international role tended to isolate her in Europe.
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  • The body is composed of a large number of segments; the prostomium bears a pair of tentacles; the nervous system consists of a brain and longitudinal ventral nerve cords closely connected with the epidermis (without distinct ganglia), widely separated in Saccocirrus, closely approximated in Protodrilus, fused together in Polygordius; the coelom is well developed, the septa are distinct, and the dorsal and ventral longitudinal mesenteries are complete; the nephridia are simple, and open into the coelom.
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  • Mr Aldis described him as a slender, modest young gentleman, who surprised him by his intelligence and thoughtfulness, but who seemed nervous as they walked to the meeting together.
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  • We must bear in mind that he was no cold systematic thinker, but an Oriental visionary, brought up in crass superstition, and without intellectual discipline; a man whose nervous temperament had been powerfully worked on by ascetic austerities, and who was all the more irritated by the opposition he encountered, because he had little of the heroic in his nature.
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  • The language is generally nervous and vigorous, occasionally vivified with imaginative energy.
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  • Among the properties of living material there is one, widely though not universally present in it, which forms the pre-eminent characteristic of 1 The anatomy of the muscles is dealt with under Muscular System, and of the nerves under Nerve and Nervous System.
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  • This is manifested by the muscular walls of the hollow viscera and of the heart, where it is the expression of a continuous liberation of energy in process in the muscular tissue, the outcome of the latter's own intrinsic life, and largely independent of any connexion with the nervous system.
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  • The muscular wall of the blood-vessels also exhibits tonic contraction, which, however, seems to be mainly traceable to a continual excitation of the muscle cells by nervous influence conveyed to them along their nerves, and originating in the great vaso motor centre in the bulb.
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  • Muscles when active seem to pour into the circulation substances which, of unknown chemical composition, are physiologically recognizable by their stimulant action on the respiratory nervous centre.
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  • The work of Camillo Golgi (Pavia, 1885 and onwards) on the minute structure of the nervous system has led to great alteration of doctrine in neural physi nerve cells, that is to say, the fine nerve fibres - since all nerve fibres are nerve cell branches, and all nerve cell branches are nerve fibres - which form a close felt-work in the nervous centres, there combined into a network actually continuous throughout.
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  • This continuum was held to render possible conduction in all directions throughout the grey matter of the whole nervous system.
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  • But when neurons are linked together it is found that nerve impulses will only pass from neuron A to neuron B, and not from neuron B to neuron A; that is, the transmission of the excited state or nervous impulse, although possible in each neuron both up and down its own cell branches, is possible from one nerve cell to another in one direction only.
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  • It seems, especially in the case of the nexus between certain neurons, that the influence, loss of which endangers nutrition, is associated with the occurrence of something more than merely the nervous impulses awakened from time to time in the leading nerve cell.
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  • The wave of change (nervous impulse) induced in a neuron by advent of a stimulus is after all only a sudden augmentation of an activity continuous within the neuron - a transient accentuation of one (the disintegrative) phase of the metabolism inherent in and inseparable from its life.
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  • The nervous impulse is, so to say, the sudden evanescent glow of an ember continuously black-hot.
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  • Wide departures from the normal standard are met with and are symptomatic of certain nervous conditions.
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  • Stretching of the muscles antagonistic to the extensors - namely, of the flexor muscles - reduces the jerk by inhibiting the extensor spinal nerve cells through the nervous impulses generated by the tense flexor muscles.
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  • The nerve cells of the higher vertebrata, unlike their blood cells, their connective tissue cells, and even their muscle cells, early, and indeed in embryonic life, lose power of Nervous multiplication.
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  • Whether examined by functional or by structural features, the conducting paths of the nervous system, traced from beginning to end, never terminate in the centres of that system, but pass through them.
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  • Every efferent channel, after entrance in the central nervous system, subdivides; of its subdivisions some pass to efferent channels soon, others pass further and further within the cord and brain before they finally reach channels of outlet.
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  • In the lower animal forms there is no such nervous structure at all as the cortex cerebri.
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  • The nervous paths in the brain and cord, as they attain completion, Toes Ank,e Knee
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  • The more obvious of the characters of sleep (q.v.) are essentially nervous.
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  • Certain it is that in the course of the waking day a great number of stimuli play on the sense organs, and through these produce disintegration of the living molecules of the central nervous system.
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  • The second factor inducing the assimilative change is the withdrawal of the nervous system from sensual, stimulation.
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  • If natural sleep is the expression of a phase of decreased excitability due to the setting in of a tide of anabolism in the cells of the nervous system, what is the action of narcotics ?
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  • Symptoms attendant on the hypnotic state are closure of the eyelids by the hypnotizer without subsequent attempt to open them by the hypnotized subject; the pupils, instead of being constricted, as for near vision, dilate, and there sets in a condition superficially resembling sleep. But in natural sleep the action of all parts of the nervous system is subdued, whereas in the hypnotic the reactions of the lower, and some even of the higher, parts are exalted.
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  • Hypnotic somnambulism and hypnotic catalepsy are not the only or the most profound changes of nervous condition that hypnosis can induce.
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  • Certain nerve fibres from the sympathetic nervous system, which can also cause the secretion of a (specially viscous) saliva, are entirely unaffected by atropine.
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  • These are paralysed by atropine, and intestinal peristalsis is consequently made more active, the muscles being released from nervous control.
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  • The motor nerves of the arteries, of the bladder and rectal sphincters, and also of the bronchi, are paralysed by atropine, but the nervous arrangements of those organs are highly complex and until they are further unravelled by physiologists, pharmacology will be unable to give much information which might be of great value in the employment of atropine.
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  • The action is probably nervous, but in the present state of our knowledge regarding the control of the temperature by the nervous system, it cannot be further defined.
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  • The action of atropine in dilating the pupil is also aided by a stimulation of the fibres from the sympathetic nervous system, which innervate the remaining muscle of the iris - the dilator pupillae.
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  • Omissions of a few passages written from memory at a time of profound nervous depression would have altered the whole character of the book.
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  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).
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  • those of the nervous system, suffer most; and nerve-cell fatigue is shown by manifestations of neurasthenia.
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  • The peripheral nervous system is minutely described by T.
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  • Reason convinced that the world and the soul are alike rational observes the external world, mental phenomena, and specially the nervous organism, as the meeting ground of body and mind.
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  • Its waters - hot alkaline springs about twenty in number - are used both for drinking and bathing, and are efficacious in chronic nervous disorders, feminine complaints and affections of the liver and respiratory organs.
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  • He was not an agreeable companion, violent in his passions, nervous, restless, and in old age extremely irascible.
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  • 34, and in the constitution of its digestive, vascular, respiratory (branchial), excretory, skeletal, nervous and muscular systems it exhibits what appears to be a primordial condition of vertebrate organization, a condition which is, in fact, partly recapitulated in the course of the embryonic stages of craniate vertebrates.
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  • It is the central nervous system, and contains within itself the elements of the brain and spinal marrow of higher forms. The neurochord tapers towards its posterior end, where it is coextensive with the notochord, but ends abruptly in front, some distance behind the tip of the snout.
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  • Apparently there is an influence on the afferent nerves of the part which causes a reflex contraction - some authors say dilatation - of the vessels in the internal organs that are under the control of the same segment of the nervous system as that supplying the area of skin from which the exciting impulse comes.
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  • Herbert Spencer, again, before the decline in question set in, put forward the hypothesis that "the ability to maintain individual life and the ability to multiply vary inversely"; in other words, the strain upon the nervous system involved in the struggle for life under the conditions of modern civilization, by reacting on the reproductive powers, tends towards comparative sterility.
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  • At each of the great festivals, which to please him were for once crowded into a single year, he entered in regular form for the various competitions, scrupulously conformed to the tradition and rules of the arena, and awaited in nervous suspense the verdict of the umpires.
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  • While resident in Italy for his health from 1845 to 1847, he occupied himself with researches on the electrical organ of the torpedo and on nervous organization generally; these he published in1853-1854(Neurologische Untersuchungen, Gottingen), and therewith his physiological period may be said to end.
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  • In public he was of magnificent bearing, possessing the true oratorical temperament, the nervous exaltation that makes the orator feel and appear a superior being, transfusing his thought, passion and will into the mind and heart of the listener; but his imagination frequently ran away with his understanding, while his imperious temper and ardent combativeness hurried him and his party into disadvantageous positions.
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  • He seems in this way to have educated in himself a very precise " electrical sense," making use of his own nervous system as a kind of physiological galvanometer.
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  • He studied the nature of muscular contraction, causing a muscle to record its movements on a smoked glass plate, and he worked out the problem of the velocity of the nervous impulse both in the motor nerves of the frog and in the sensory nerves of man.
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  • A large population is temporarily attracted to Cannstatt by the fame of its mineral springs, which are valuabl e for diseases of the throat and weaknesses of the nervous system.
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  • The pedal ganglia and auditory organs have disappeared with the foot, at all events have never been detected; the cerebral ganglia are very minute, while the parieto-splanchnic are well developed, and constitute the principal part of the nervous system.
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  • When this gland becomes enlarged, and its secretion consequently increases, the vessels dilate, the heart beats more rapidly, the skin becomes too hot, the nervous system becomes irritable, and tremors occur in the limbs.
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  • Every one has noticed after prolonged fever how thin and weak the patient is, and both the muscular and nervous power throughout the whole body are sadly in want of repair.
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  • The pulse-rate becomes very rapid, the extremities become warm, so that the patient is obliged to wear few clothes, the temper becomes irritable, the patient nervous, and a fine tremor is observed in the hands.
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  • When the nervous system is below par, and both secretion and movements are deficient in the stomach, nervine tonics, such as nux vomica or strychnine, are most useful.
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  • Deficient nervous action also leads to defective secretion and movement in the intestine, sometimes with flatulent accumula tion and sometimes with constipation.
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  • In true diabetes, which probably originates in the central nervous system, or in disease of the pancreas, as well as in the glycosuria common in gouty patients, sugar in every form should be entirely forbidden, and starchy food restricted to within narrow limits.
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  • Douches to the spine are much employed for nervous debility, and good effects are also obtained in such cases from the so-called needle-bath, where small streams of water at high pressure are driven against the whole surface of the body.
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  • For those who suffer from nervous depression, exercise in the Swiss mountains is useful, and even living at a height of about 6000 ft.
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  • Where the nervous system is exhausted, such warm and moist climates as Malaga, Madeira, Tenerife and Grand Canary are suitable.
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  • While this treament by itself would aid recovery from nervous exhaustion, it would lessen appetite and thus interfere with nervous repair; but the want of exertion is supplied by means of massage, which stimulates the circulation and increases the appetite, so that the patient gets all the benefit of exercise without any exhaustion.
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  • Where nervous exhaustion is less marked and the Weir Mitchell treatment is not appropriate - for example, in men who are simply overworked or broken down by anxiety or sorrow - a sea voyage is often a satisfactory form of "rest" cure.
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  • Any strain upon the nervous system, such as mental overwork or anxiety, is a potent cause; or exposure to cold and damp, which seems to excite irritation in a nerve already predisposed to suffer.
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  • It depresses the nervous system, especially the spinal cord.
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  • Summed up, its action is that of an irritant, and a cardiac and nervous depressant.
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  • Wassermann and Takaki in the case of tetanus, that there do exist in the nervous system molecules with combining affinity for the tetanus toxin.
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  • Further, these molecules in the nervous system present the same susceptibility to heat and other physical agencies as does tetanus antitoxin.
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  • Natural immunity against toxins must be taken into account, and, if Ehrlich's view with regard to toxic action be correct, this may depend upon either the absence of chemical affinity of the living molecules of the tissues for the toxic molecule, or upon insensitiveness to the action of the toxophorous group. It has been shown with regard to the former, for example, that the nervous system of the fowl, which possesses immunity against tetanus toxin, has little combining affinity for it.
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  • The ectoderm rarely consists of more than one layer of cells: these are divisible by structure and function into nervous, muscular and secretory cells, supported by interstitial cells.
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  • Ten grains taken at bedtime will often give sleep, cause free diaphoresis and quieten the entire nervous system in such cases.
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  • In some cases nervous symptoms and delirium supervene.
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  • The nervous system consists as in Hydromedusae of a diffuse plexus beneath the ectoderm, concentrated in certain places to form a central nervous system.
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  • In these medusae, however, the central nervous system does not form continuous rings, but occurs as four or eight separate con centrations at the margin of the umbrella, centred each round one of the sense-organs (tentaculocysts).
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  • Each rhopalium is a centre round which, as already stated, nervous tissue is concentrated.
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  • The central nervous system is constructed on the same general plan as in the other Arthropoda, consisting of a supra-oesophageal ganglionic mass or brain, united by circumoesophageal connectives with a double ventral chain of segmentally arranged ganglia.
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  • The resemblances between the Crustacea and the Annelid worms, in such characters as the structure of the nervous system and the mode of growth of the somites, can hardly be ignored.
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  • The large number and the uniformity of the trunk somites and their appendages, and the structure of the nervous system and of the heart in A pus, are Annelidan characters which can hardly be without significance.
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  • The nervous system resembles that of Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia.
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  • Instability, again, which lies at the root of Spencer's definition "continuous adjustment of internal relations to external relations" is displayed by living matter in very varying degrees from the apparent absolute quiescence of frozen seeds to the activity of the central nervous system, whilst there is a similar range amongst inorganic substances.
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  • It is only in very large doses that it weakens the intracardiac nervous ganglia, slows and weakens the pulse, and dangerously lowers the blood pressure.
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  • - Bromide of potassium is the safest and most generally applicable sedative of the nervous system.
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  • The conditions in which bromides are most frequently used are insomnia, epilepsy, whooping-cough, delirium tremens, asthma, migraine, laryngismus stridulus, the symptoms often attendant upon the climacteric in women, hysteria, neuralgia, certain nervous disorders of the heart, strychnine poisoning, nymphomania and spermatorrhoea.
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  • In 1804 he wrote the third volume, containing the anatomy of the nervous system and of the organs of special sense, of The Anatomy of the Human Body, by John and Charles Bell.
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  • This work, apart from its value to artists and psychologists, is of interest historically, as there is no doubt the investigations of the author into the nervous supply of the muscles of expression induced him to prosecute inquiries which led to his great discoveries in the physiology of the nervous system.
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  • Carpenter's proof of the nervous nature of the chambered organ and axial cords of crinoids (Proc. Roy.
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  • There was probably a nervous area, with a tuft of cilia, at the anterior end; while, at all events in forms that remained pelagic, the ciliated nervous tracts of the rest of the body may be supposed to have become arranged in bands around the body-segments.
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  • At last a quinqueradiate symmetry influenced the plates of the theca, partly through the development of a plate at the end of each groove (terminal), partly through plates at the aboral pole of the theca (basals and infrabasals) arising in response to mechanical pressure, but soon intimately connected with the cords of an aboral nervous system.
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  • These last structures formed a nervous sheath around the axial sinus with its bloodvessels, and became divided into five lobes correlated with the five basals (the "chambered organ") and forming the aboral nerve-centre.
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  • Pelmatozoa in which epithecal extensions of the food-grooves, ambulacrals, superficial oral nervous system, blood-vascular and water-vascular systems, coelom and genital system are continued exothecally upon jointed outgrowths of the abactinal thecal plates (brachia), carrying with them extensions of the abactinal nerve-system.
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  • k, the hollow central nervous system of some Enteropneusta and of Vertebrates.
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  • The mouth (o) is in front of the tentacles, on the ventral side, and is overhung by a mobile praeoral hood, in which is the principal part of the nervous system.
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  • Wirkung des Hyoscyamins, &c., Jena, 1874.) In small and repeated doses henbane has been found to have a tranquillizing effect upon persons affected by severe nervous irritability.
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  • In it, for the first time, the results of human and comparative anatomy, as well as of chemistry and other departments of physical science, were brought to bear on the investigation of physiological problems. The most important portion of the work was that dealing with nervous action and the mechanism of the senses.
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  • His son and successor, Francis II., was but a nervous sickly boy bandied between two women:
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  • Its waters, which are ferruginous and largely charged with carbonic acid gas, are of use in nervous and rheumatic disorders.
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  • Since in his mission to Normandy he had been very moderate, it is possible that, as he was nervous and ill when sent to Nantes, his mind had become unbalanced by the atrocities committed by the Vendean and royalist armies.
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  • The man who is hasty and nervous in temperament, who fears an occasional sting, and resents the same by viciously killing the bee that inflicts it will rarely make a good apiarist.
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  • His days at Westminster, Southey thinks, were " probably the happiest in his life," but a boy of nervous temperament is always unhappy at school.
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  • Between the mucous membrane and the bone of the hard palate is a dense vascular and nervous plexus.
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  • The thoroughbred is apt to be nervous and excitable, and impatient of common work, but its speed, resolution and endurance, as tested on the race-course, are beyond praise.
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  • - Animals to breed from should be of good blood, sound and compactly built, with good pluck and free from nervous excitability and vicious tendency.
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  • The central nervous system, the anterior part of which is shown in fig.
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  • the central nervous system, and the main vascular trunk or heart, they may be considered as indicating affinities in that direction.
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  • He himself fell into a nervous state in his "prison," but he was sustained by the devotion and intelligence of his wife and her mother.
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  • When we come to consider more in detail the results of these actions we find that the various secretions of the body, such as the sweat, gastric juice, bile, milk, urine, &c., may be increased or diminished; that the heart may have its muscular or nervous apparatus stimulated or depressed; that the nerve-centres in the brain, medulla and spinal cord may be rendered more sensitive or the reverse; and that the general metabolism of the body may be altered in various ways.
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  • There are exceptions to this, however, as children are more affected in proportion by opium and some other substances, and less by mercury and arsenic. In old age also the nervous system and the tissues generally do not react so readily as in youth.
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  • A physiological classification according to an action on the brain, heart, kidney or other important organ becomes still more bewildering, as many substances produce the same effects by different agencies, as, for instance, the kidneys may be acted upon directly or through the circulation, while the heart may be affected either through its muscular substance or its nervous apparatus.
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  • Potassium and lithium have a depressing action upon the nervous system, ammonium salts have a stimulating action, while sodium practically speaking is indifferent.
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  • When iron is injected directly into a vein it depresses the heart's action, the blood pressure and the nervous system, and during its excretion greatly irritates the bowel and the kidneys.
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  • Soluble salts of manganese, aluminium, zinc, copper, gold, platinum and bismuth have, when given by the mouth, little action beyond their local astringent or irritating effects; but when injected into a blood vessel they all exert much the same depressing effect upon the heart and nervous system.
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  • Lead poisons the muscular and nervous systems, and gives rise to paralysis, wasting, colic and other symptoms, while in the case of mercury, tremors, salivation, anaemia and very marked cachexia are induced.
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  • Arsenic and antimony do not form combinations with albumen, but they both greatly depress the central nervous system and circulation; and, if their action be long continued in large doses, they cause fatty degeneration of the viscera and disappearance of glycogen from the liver.
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  • Alkaline bromides, in addition to their saline action, have in sufficient doses a depressing effect upon the central nervous system, and less markedly upon the heart.
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  • Phosphorus is present in all cells, in considerable quantity in the nervous tissue, and in the bones as phosphates.
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  • When taken by the mouth phosphorus is an irritant poison in large doses; in small doses the only effects noticeable consist in an increased formation of bony and connective tissue, although it is also supposed to exert a gently stimulating effect upon the nervous system.
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  • Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was at one time believed to act simply by cutting off the supply of oxygen to the tissues, but it also has a specific effect in producing paralysis of certain parts of the central nervous system, and hence its value as an anaesthetic; when given in small amounts mixed with air it produces a condition of exhilaration.
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  • Locally their destructive and irritating effects vary a good deal, but even when very dilute they all have a marked poisonous action on bacteria, white blood corpuscles, yeast and similar organisms. After absorption most of them exercise a depressing effect upon the nervous system, and are capable of reducing high temperature.
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  • Some of them are so volatile that they produce their effects when inhaled, others when sprayed upon the skin cause intense cold and then anaesthesia; but taken in the broadest sense the action of all of them after absorption into the blood is very similar, and is exerted upon the central nervous system, more especially the cerebrum.
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  • Some of them affect only certain portions of the nervous system, others have a much wider range of action; they may act in either case as stimulants or as depressants, and hence the symptoms produced by them vary very greatly.
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  • Small doses excite the nervous system, while larger doses are depressing.
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  • In addition they have a stimulating action on the central nervous system.
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  • In large doses they are powerful nerve poisons, but as usually taken they exercise a gently stimulant effect upon the nervous system.
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  • Emetine acts as a gradual depressant to the nervous system in animals.
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  • They all act as local irritants in the alimentary canal, and after absorption are more or less depressing to the muscular and nervous systems. They produce slight nausea and increased secretion of mucus.
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  • Drugs acting on the nervous system.
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  • It has been suggested that the incoordination of nervous action under the influence of Indian hemp may be due to independent and non-concerted action on the part of the two halves of the cerebrum.
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  • She twisted her apron with nervous fingers.
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  • I was nervous so it took me longer to fall asleep.
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  • Howie was as nervous as the first night of his dreams.
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  • To do so, required my thinking like this fool; no easy chore for a person as intelligent as I. How would I, this nervous average person convey an important tip without being found out?
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  • "I've been doing a lot of soul searching and am just trying to … be a better person," he said with a nervous chuckle and rubbed his mouth again.
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  • Babies know how to cry when they are born, so using the vocal cords is autonomic – part of the autonomic nervous system.
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  • Her friend was sure-footed and confident, but Kiera knew she was nervous.
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  • In spite of his admonition the door opened, not to Fred O'Connor, but to Claire Quincy who closed the door behind her and stood with nervous defiance at the foot of his bed.
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  • That this one was in the middle of a town—even a tiny one—made her nervous.
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  • Dean poured the coffee while Cynthia Byrne rubbed her hands on her skirt as if to smooth out the nervous quiver she couldn't seem to shake.
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  • The bison were accustomed to having the horses graze around them, but the scent of strangers might make them nervous.
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  • I was extremely nervous for my first lesson; but, Anne's calm demeanor immediately put me at ease.
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  • But all indications are that the effects of the nervous trauma of battle vis à vis shell shock was equally prevalent in all ranks.
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  • Frank is a very nervous dog who isn't used to being left alone. 
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  • The process may enable doctors to give amputees fully functioning bionic limbs which are linked to the patient's nervous system within five years.
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  • The group photo shows the nervous anticipation on their faces.
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  • antispasmodic drug that works directly on the muscles rather than on the central nervous system.
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  • The motor nerve cell body has a long fiber called an axon, which extends from the central nervous system to the muscles.
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  • There are runs to suit everyone from the nervous beginner to the powder hound.
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  • Part of the reason for the popularity of caffeine-containing beverages is that caffeine is a central nervous stimulant.
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  • bionic limbs which are linked to the patient's nervous system within five years.
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  • There was lots of nervous giggles, and false bravado, as we ventured south at a stately 50 miles per hour.
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  • Then her eldest daughter Angel has suffered a nervous breakdown, the true cause of which Angel has confided only to Kath Arnold.
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  • breezy days they seem to be much more nervous.
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  • bronchusct on the B2 receptors of the sympathetic nervous system relaxing bronchial smooth muscle thereby dilating the bronchi.
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  • carminative effect on the nervous system promoting relaxation whilst also tonifying and strengthening the nerves.
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  • casting quick nervous glances round me.
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  • On induction there is a marked rise in heart rate and blood pressure caused by central nervous stimulation and an increase in circulating catecholamines.
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  • cater for everyone from nervous novices to advanced riders.
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  • No. Trouble is, I'll probably do the other thing I do when nervous, and get really chatty.
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  • She sleeps very badly at night, & is very nervous at times, but wonderfully cheerful in general.
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  • Temporal central nervous system remission was induced by intrathecal chemotherapy only.
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  • One of the most important nutrients associated with the brain and nervous system is phosphatidyl choline.
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  • They are nerve poisons, inhibiting the enzyme cholinesterase, which can have severe effects on the central nervous system.
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  • Measurement of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity is the primary method for measuring the effect of these pesticides on the nervous system.
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  • cleanup crew ' for the central nervous system and retina.
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  • cocaine is a short acting powerful, central nervous system stimulant that comes from the coca bush which grows widely in South America.
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  • Nervous laughter spread through the cabin, but the men entered the cockpit, the door closed, and the engines started up.
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  • cohereulation, metabolism, muscular and nervous acitivities all go on simultaneously and independently, yet nevertheless cohering into a whole.
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  • complexioned woman of nervous movement and wavy black hair.
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  • craniosacral Therapy works by helping the body's natural healing mechanisms dissipate the negative effects of stress on the central nervous system.
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  • I was also nervous of the rather stuffy terminology and arty jargon, which I had seen, used sometimes in art criticism.
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  • Degenerative brain diseases are marked by progressive, irreversible damage to cells of the central nervous system.
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  • In 1954 Mr P S Palmer was admitted to hospital with nervous debility.
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  • All these are progressively degenerative diseases of the central nervous system that prove ultimately fatal.
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  • Special note should be made of central nervous system depressants.
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  • Sedation due to the drug may be increased by the concomitant use of other central nervous system depressants.
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  • depressant effect on the central nervous system.
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  • depressant actions on various central and peripheral nervous system pathways.
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  • Visitors with a nervous disposition can view the results of the meditation from a safe distance on a monitor.
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  • Just then David read the 'Life of John Keats, ' a book which impressed him with a nervous fear of impending dissolution.
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  • Indeed, I am fighting down my nervous dyspepsia fast.
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  • Carbon monoxide related cerebral edema can cause irreversible damage to the brain which in turn can effect the nervous system.
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  • efferent nerves C. To the central nervous system D. Motor neurones 3. Which of the following statements are true?
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  • embattled minister Geoff Hoon, and comes away a little nervous.
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  • enterovirus infection of the central nervous system of humans: lack of association with chronic neurological disease.
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  • Older medications often included ephedrine or related compounds which are banned because they are considered as central nervous system stimulants.
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  • excitatory transmitter in the central nervous system.
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  • At the start of the season there was a nervous excitement at Anfield.
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  • Men are being evacuated in considerable numbers in a state of nervous exhaustion.
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  • Looking at possible relationships between emotional expressivity and autonomic nervous system activity.
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