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nervous

nervous

nervous Sentence Examples

  • She was nervous about her daughter.

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  • I was nearly as nervous as my first call.

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  • I was nervous so I forgot his name.

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  • Are you nervous about it?

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  • She was as nervous as a cat in a dog pound.

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  • He looked nervous and uncomfortable.

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  • "Excuse me, ma'am," the boy called out in a quiet, nervous voice.

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  • I was as nervous tonight as usual making the tip call.

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  • The call caused Cynthia to tremble with nervous frustration to the point of dropping a favorite sugar bowl, snowing the kitchen floor in white.

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  • Pierre met the old count, who seemed nervous and upset.

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  • Yes, she was fine, though her tone sounded nervous and tentative.

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  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.

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  • As the group pulled into the parking lot at Mountain Village, the upper portion of the ski area, Donnie began to look nervous for the first time.

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  • The healer's nervous gaze flickered to Rhyn.

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  • I'm too nervous to stop in this horrid state where it never ceases raining.

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  • Betsy chatted away while Howie, as nervous as a groom, simply listened.

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  • One chore remained before I'd do so though I was as nervous as a fly on a fry pan about it.

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  • The two days were longer than any other two days had been in her life, and she grew more and more nervous, afraid the connection she had to A'Ran wouldn't be enough to make him want her again.

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  • She gave a nervous wave, watching for his reaction and relieved when he offered a warm smile.

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  • He's as nervous as when he first received the notice to serve.

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  • More nervous, I'd say.

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  • Excited and nervous, Kiera crossed to it and waved her armband over the access pad.

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  • Excited and nervous, Kiera crossed to it and waved her armband over the access pad.

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  • "Of course I need blood to live," she said with a nervous laugh.

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  • Edith Shipton appeared, as Cynthia had described, to be more nervous than a fifth-grader on speech day.

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  • She was more nervous than he'd ever seen her.

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  • We were all as nervous as cats at a dog pound.

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  • She is very nervous and excitable.

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  • "We're all a bit upset about this business," Groucho said, as nervous as a speech class drop out.

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  • The king waved his right arm and, evidently nervous, sang something badly and sat down on a crimson throne.

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  • "I've been doing a lot of soul searching and am just trying to … be a better person," he said with a nervous chuckle and rubbed his mouth again.

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  • Standing there, a nervous smile on her face, stood Martha Boyd.

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  • I was a nervous wreck as we pulled up to a large vehicle that operated as some sort of command center.

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  • While Molly was her usual quiet self, and perhaps a little nervous, it was obvious she was excited.

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  • Nervous fingers necessitated three tries.

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  • "He is a nervous, bilious subject," said Larrey, "and will not recover."

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  • Yes, I'm nervous and jealous when you're around her, but I do trust you.

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  • She pulled her hair back in a scrunchie at the base of her neck, growing nervous once again.

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  • Nervous, she stabbed him harder than she intended to, and Jule groaned, closing his eyes.

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  • Every muscle of his thin face was now quivering with nervous excitement; his eyes, in which the fire of life had seemed extinguished, now flashed with brilliant light.

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  • "I appreciate you trying to make me feel less nervous, but you shouldn't lie to me," she snapped.

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  • Every word of Pierre's burned into his heart, and with a nervous movement of his fingers he unconsciously broke the sealing wax and quill pens his hands came upon on his uncle's table.

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  • She has none of those nervous habits that are so noticeable and so distressing in blind children.

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  • Nervous about proposing a deal, she also feared doing it wrong.

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  • Nervous about proposing a deal, she also feared doing it wrong.

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  • Skin clammy with nervous sweat, Deidre concentrated on taking deep breaths.

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  • She seems to be more nervous than she really is, because she expresses more with her hands than do most English-speaking people.

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  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.

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  • "Do you like the forest?" she asked, suddenly nervous under his scrutiny.

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  • Running a hand through his hair in a way that Carmen had grown to recognize as a nervous habit, he addressed Lori in a tone that was both stern and conversational.

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  • Actually, he probably detected that she was nervous about something and probably wondered what it was.

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  • Our nervous quintet settled in, ordered wine for the drinkers and waited for one of us to start the conversation.

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  • By the time he'd nibbled at a salad for lunch and changed into a suit, he was a nervous wreck.

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  • Dean couldn't recall the last time he'd seen someone so nervous and obviously uncomfortable.

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  • I've been as nervous as a thumb sucking toddler.

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  • "Let's do this sensibly," Cynthia said, taking a deep breath, as nervous as her husband at the prospect of entering the cavern.

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  • Fred O'Connor was nearest and talked in subdued and nervous conversation, reaching for a paper and pencil to take down a number.

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  • Weren't you nervous when the trunks were opened?

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  • "Let's do this sensibly," Cynthia said, taking a deep breath, as nervous as her husband at the prospect of entering the cavern.

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  • She sat down on the edge of the bed and patted the spot beside her, nervous about showing him her art.

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  • I would have been as nervous as a mouse on a cheese hunt at her age but Molly is raring to go.

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  • After she felt herself deserted by Princes Mary and alone in her grief, Natasha spent most of the time in her room by herself, sitting huddled up feet and all in the corner of the sofa, tearing and twisting something with her slender nervous fingers and gazing intently and fixedly at whatever her eyes chanced to fall on.

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  • "I don't know which of you is more nervous," Cynthia said, elbow-deep in a sink full of breakfast dishes.

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  • "There are many things to do," Talal said with a nervous giggle.

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  • The rest of us waited in nervous anticipation for her Friday arrival, not knowing if we'd even see her when she returned.

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  • Donnie gave a nervous smile.

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  • Cynthia was concerned how nervous the woman acted.

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  • She seemed nervous and her open smile was less in evidence, unless speaking of her daughter.

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  • Nervous, uneasy, she made her way down the wall toward the Council members, who held court with themselves.

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  • While he didn't want to hold back important information, neither did he wish to unduly upset the nervous woman any further.

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  • The nervous irritation aroused by the appearance of Mack, the news of his defeat, and the thought of what lay before the Russian army found vent in anger at Zherkov's untimely jest.

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  • She glided over to Howie's side and grasped his hand while he maintained a nervous smile.

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  • His voice had the ring of a nervous third-grader giving his first speech.

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  • Since the ball he had felt the approach of a fit of nervous depression and had made desperate efforts to combat it.

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  • So Boris was full of nervous vivacity all day.

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  • Edith was as nervous as the prior evening, glancing across the hall at her son, as if danger lurked in every corner of Bird Song.

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  • We were tip toeing toward something impossible and it made me nervous.

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  • I was becoming nervous.

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  • I don't know who among us was the most nervous.

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  • I'm far too nervous.

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  • We were ecstatic, but increasingly nervous.

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  • Itching to relieve some of her own nervous energy after the run-in with the vamps, she'd reached the door when Jonny spoke again.

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  • That alone makes me nervous.

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  • In fact, she glowed with health, even if she seemed shy or nervous.

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  • His gaze searched the woods behind them in a way that made her nervous.

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  • We didn't even do that at first but some of the guests were nervous.

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  • Cynthia didn't press him on the point but continued to act very nervous.

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  • He couldn't remember ever feeling this nervous.

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  • As she started the car, it was plain to see she felt nervous, yet excited.

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  • Jackson asked, "Do you get nervous before your lectures?"

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  • Today I'll probably be more nervous with you there.

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  • Completely. Did I make you nervous?

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  • Thank you, I'm so nervous.

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  • You're making me nervous.

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  • She giggled, thinking him a nervous flier.

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  • Connor mostly paced, nervous as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.

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  • She pushed his hand away and her laugh sounded nervous.

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  • Her laugh sounded nervous.

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  • "Carmen," he whispered huskily with a nervous laugh.

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  • That this one was in the middle of a town—even a tiny one—made her nervous.

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  • Lana said nothing but touched Jack's scruff, nervous around all the people.

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  • Cynthia Byrne explained, in nervous little spurts, how she had heard the news of her husband's disappearance.

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  • Shakey Jake, named for a nervous tic, looked less nervous than he should have for someone facing heavy time.

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  • The voice sound­ed nervous to Dean's ear.

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  • He was frighteningly nervous, but in Dean's mind his sincerity buried the flowery words of the Philadelphia insurance executive.

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  • I was nervous as a cat that you'd wake up but I had to do something.

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  • Winston explained that Arthur had recently contacted the government about supplying information on his Philadelphia clients because, he claimed, he was beginning to get nervous.

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  • Everyone was exceptionally friendly as hundreds of bicyclists wandered about, chatting and smiling, with a hint of nervous excitement in their voices.

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  • Sunday morning broke with a surge of nervous excitement as 2,000 cyclists oozed out of Cortez, Colorado, bound for their first day's destination 46 miles distant.

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  • The voice sounded nervous to Dean, and perhaps disguised.

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  • Are you nervous about the first night?

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  • Are you nervous about getting married?

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  • Actually, all she wanted to do was alert him that she was nervous about it, but if it made him feel better to know she was willing to discuss intimacy with him now, then she would listen.

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  • Any time Alex didn't mind when she brought up Josh, it left her a little nervous.

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  • What's to be nervous about?

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  • Everyone is nervous about their wedding, Carmen.

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  • Maybe he was getting nervous because he had been this close to getting married once before and she simply didn't show up for the wedding.

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  • I wondered if you were ever going to get nervous.

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  • If I had his history, I'd be nervous about the bride's intentions on this day too.

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  • I know the twins make you nervous, but they are my nephews.

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  • They don't make me nervous, and I don't mind watching them.

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  • The presence of so many horses would only make the cow nervous.

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  • By the time he came in for supper, she had worked herself into a nervous state.

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  • Then why was she so nervous?

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  • What difference did it make whether there was a snake or Ed got nervous and threw her?

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  • Felipa shot a nervous look at Senor Medena and then Carmen.

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  • Everybody gets a little nervous as the wedding date approaches.

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  • Sorry. I tend to talk too much when I'm nervous.

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  • "I don't get the nervous vibe from you," he said.

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  • She failed her task and managed to piss off the new boss, all because she got nervous seeing a half-naked man.

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  • "You're nervous right now?" he asked when she didn't continue.

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  • There was an unguarded sweetness to her and her nervous chatter.

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  • Nervous energy fluttered through her.

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  • She was too nervous around him to be hungry.

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  • Jessi studied her, nervous around the woman who read her entire life the last time they interacted.

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  • Too nervous, Jessi instinctively knelt on the floor beside the overturned box and began collecting the small treasures.

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  • With a nervous glance at the locked door, she began to realize this was probably not a day she'd live to see the end of.

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  • The mineral waters of Mount Clemens are beneficial to patients suffering from rheumatism, blood diseases and nervous disorders.

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  • A likeness of him has possibly been preserved in a double Hermes in the Villa Albani and the Vatican, which represents a young beardless Roman, of a nervous and somewhat sickly appearance, together with a Greek poet (Visconti, Iconograph.

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  • materia, matter), in philosophy, the theory which regards all the facts of the universe as explainable in terms of matter and motion, and in particular explains all psychical processes by physical and chemical changes in the nervous system.

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  • A nervous system has been shown to exist in many species, and consists of a perioesophageal ring giving off usually six nerves which run forwards and backwards along the lateral and median lines; these are connected by numerous fine, circular threads in the sub-cuticle.

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  • Schulze.) elements, more especially by nervous (ganglion) cells and musclecells derived from the epithelial layer.

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  • A further stage in evolution is that the muscle-cells lose their connexion with the epithelium and come to lie entirely beneath it, forming a sub-epithelial contractile layer, developed chiefly in the tentacles of the polyp. The of the evolution of the ganglioncells is probably similar; an epithelial cell develops processes of nervous nature from the base, which come into connexion with the bases of the sensory cells, with the muscular cells, and with the similar processes of other nerve-cells; next the nerve-cell loses its connexion with the outer epithelium and becomes a sub-epithelial ganglion-cell which is closely connected with the muscular layer, conveying stimuli from the sensory cells to the contractile elements.

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  • In the polyp the nervous tissue is always in the form of a scattered plexus, never concentrated to form a definite nervous system as in the medusa.

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  • The ectoderm furnishes the general epithelial covering of the body, and the muscular tissue, nervous system and sense-organs.

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  • The nervous system of the medusa consists of sub-epithelial ganglion-cells, which form, in the first place, a diffuse plexus of nervous tissue, as in the polyp, but developed chiefly on the subumbral surface; and which are concentrated, in the second place, to form a definite central nervous system, never found in the polyp. In Hydromedusae the central nervous system forms two concentric nerverings at the margin of the umbrella, near the base of the velum.

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  • By means of vibrations or shocks transmitted through the - Sub water, or by displacements in the balance or position of the animal, the otoliths are caused to impinge against the bristles of the sensory cells, now on one side, now on the other, causing shocks or stimuli which are transmitted by the basal nerve-fibre to the central nervous system.

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  • n.s, Nervous system.

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  • He defined them as possessing radial instead of bilateral symmetry, and as apparently destitute of nervous system and sense organs, as having the circulatory system rudimentary or absent, and the respiratory organs on or coextensive with the surface of the body; he included under this title and definition five classes, - Echinodermata, Acalepha, Entozoa, Polypi and Infusoria.

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  • We may speak, indeed, of the plant as possessed of a rudimentary nervous system, by the aid of which necessary adjustments are brought about.

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  • The purposeful character of all these movements or changes of position indicates that they are of nervous origin.

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  • We find thus three factors of a nervous mechanism present, a receptive, a conducting, and a responding part.

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  • The conduction of such stimulation to parts removed some distance from the sense organ suggests paths of transmission comparable to those which transmit nervous impulses in animals.

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  • These may well serve as conductors of nervous impulses.

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  • The nervous mechanism thus formed is very rudimentary, but in.

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  • Carbolic acid is distinguished from all other acids so-called - except oxalic acid and hydrocyanic acid - in that it is a neurotic poison, having a marked action directly upon the nervous system.

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  • In all cases of carbolic acid poisoning the nervous influence is seen.

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  • But for a tendency to paradox, his intellectual powers were of the highest order, and as a master of nervous idiomatic English he is second to Cobbett alone.

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  • Nervous System.

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  • Large doses also depress the nervous system, weakening the anterior horns of grey matter in the spinal cord so as ultimately to cause complete paralysis, and also causing a partial insensibility of the cutaneous nerves of touch and pain.

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  • The nervous system is remarkably concentrated in some beetles, the abdominal ganglia showing a tendency to become shifted forward and crowded together, and in certain chafers all the thoracic and abdominal ganglia are fused into a single nervecentre situated in the thorax, - a degree of specialization only matched in the insectan class among the Hemiptera and some muscid flies.

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  • The illumination is intermittent, and appears to be under the control of the insect's nervous system.

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  • Partly from disappointment and nervous exhaustion, and partly from a conviction that the country required rest in order to judge the practical results of the reforms already accomplished, the tsar refrained from further initiating new legislation, and the government gave it to be understood that the epoch of the great reforms was closed.

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  • The plan of the central nervous system is therefore that of the Arthropoda.

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  • Among the Archiannelida, in Aeolosoma and some Polychaetes, the whole central nervous system remains imbedded in the epidermis.

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  • The principal trunks consist of a dorsal vessel lying above the gut, and a ventral vessel below the gut but above the nervous cord.

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  • Nervous system often imbedded in the epidermis.

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  • segments are the apertures of the Nervous system rarely atria.C, Perichaeta: the spermathecal pores (Aeolosoma) in continuity are between segments 6 and 7, 7 with epidermis.

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  • The nervous system is embedded in the epidermis, and the pairs of ganglia are separated as in Serpula, &c.; each pair has a longish commissure between its two ganglia.

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  • Nervous system always in coelom.

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  • 15 and 16) show the gut, the nervous system, &c., lying in a spacious chamber which is the coelom.

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  • and the nervous cord.

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  • But he did not remain long in Paris, for, being a nervous and excitable boy, his health broke down, and he yearned for his home in Franche-Comte.

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  • This is shown by the labial commissure and pedal cords of the nervous system, by the opening of the gonad into the right kidney, and by other points.

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  • 9, 10) of _ the nervous systems of ` Patella and of Haliotis, e as determined by Spengel, show the identity in the origin of the nerves passing from the visceral loop to Spengel's olfactory ganglion of the fig..

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  • - Nervous system of Patella; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of Haliotis; the visceral loop is lightly shaded; the buccal ganglia are omitted.

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  • - Nervous system of after Jhering.) Fissurella.

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  • As an excellent general type of the nervous system, attention may be directed to that of Paludina drawn in fig.

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  • The histology of the nervous system of Mollusca has yet to be seriously inquired into.

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  • - Nervous system of Paludina as a type of the streptoneurous condition.

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  • The nervous system and sense organs are highly developed.

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  • The detorted visceral commissure shows a tendency to the concentration of all its elements round the oesophagus, so that except in the Bullomorpha and in Aplysia the whole nervous system is aggregated in the cephalic region, either dorsally or ventrally.

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  • In the nervous system of Aplysia the great ganglion-pairs are well developed and distinct.

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  • Our figure of the nervous system of Aplysia does not give the small pair of buccal ganglia which are, as in all glossophorous Molluscs, present upon the nerves passing from the cerebral region to the odontophore.

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  • - Nervous system of Aplysia, as a type of the longlooped Euthyneurous condition.

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  • - Central Nervous System of Fiona (one of the Nudibranchia), showing a tendency to fusion of the great ganglia.

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  • Visceral commissure reduced; nervous system concentrated on dorsal side of oesophagus.

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  • The demonstration which it affords of the extreme shortening of the Euthyneurous visceral nerve-loop is most instructive and valuable for comparison with and explanation of the condition of the nervous centres in Cephalopoda, as also of some Opisthobranchia.

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  • - Nervous System of the Pond knob - like particle Snail, Limnaeus stagnalis, as a type of the (Neritina and Palu- short-looped euthyneurous condition.

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  • Internal Organs Nervous System.

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  • In connexion with the central nervous system there are usually numerous organs of special sense.

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  • A The ganglia of the nervous _ Tre system offer some important evidence as to the morphology of the head, and are alluded to below.

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  • - The nervous system is ectodermal in origin, and is developed and segmented to a large extent in connexion with the outer part of the body, so that it affords important evidence as to the segmentation thereof.

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  • The continuous layer of cells from which the nervous system is developed undergoes a segmentation analogous with that we have described as occurring in the ventral plate; there is thus formed a pair of contiguous ganglia for each segment of the body, but there is no ganglion for the telson.

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  • The nervous system of the embryonic head exhibits three ganglionic masses, anterior to the thoracic ganglionic masses; these three masses subsequently amalgamate and form the sub-oesophageal ganglion, which supplies the trophal segments.

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  • In front of the three masses that will form the sub-oesophageal ganglion the mass of cells that is to form the nervous system is very large, and projects on each side; this anterior or " brain " mass consists of three lobes (the prot-, deut-, and tritencephalon of Viallanes and others), each of which might be thought to represent a segmental ganglion.

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  • - Morphology of an Insect: the embryo of Gryllotalpa, somewhat diagrammatic. The longitudinal segmented band along the middle line represents the early segmentation of the nervous system and the subsequent median field of each sternite; the lateral transverse unshaded bands are the lateral fields of each segment; the shaded areas indicate the more internally placed mesoderm layer.

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  • The timidity of the Danish admiral Ulrik C. Gyldenldve, and the daring of Charles, who forced his nervous and protesting admiral to attempt the passage of the eastern channel of the Sound, the dangerous flinterend, hitherto reputed to be unnavigable, enabled the Swedish king to effect a landing at Humleback in Sjaelland (Zealand), a few miles north of Copenhagen (Aug.

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  • The Massachusetts general hospital (1811-1821) - with a branch for mental and nervous diseases, McLean hospital (1816), in the township of Belmont (post-office, Waverley) about 6 m.

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  • The excitement communicated itself to the whole army; and the nervous strength which it gave enabled the crusaders to meet and defeat Crusade, and above all on the - Sixth, this path was still more seriously attempted.

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  • Protonemertini, in which there are two layers of dermal muscles, external circular and internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies external to the circular muscles; the mouth lies behind the level of the brain; the proboscis has no stylet; there is no caecum to the intestine.

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  • Mesonemertini, in which the nervous system has passed into the dermal muscles and lies amongst them; other characters as in Protonemertini.

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  • Metanemertini, in which the nervous system lies inside the dermal muscles in the parenchyma; the mouth lies in front of the level of the brain; the proboscis as a ru'e bears stylets; the intestine nearly always has a caecum.

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  • Heteronemertini, in which the dermal musculature is in three layers, an external longitudinal, a middle circular, an internal longitudinal; the nervous system lies between the first and second of these layers; the outer layer of longitudinal muscles is a new development; there is no intestinal caecum; no stylets on the proboscis and the mouth is behind the level of the brain.

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  • It then often retains its vitality for a long time, apparently crawling as if it were itself a worm, a phenomenon which is at least partially explained by the extraordinary development of nervous tissue, equally distributed all through the walls of the proboscis, and either united into numerous longitudinal nerve-stems (Drepanophorus, Amphiporus) or spread out into a uniform and comparatively thick layer (Cerebratulus, sp.).

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  • I, additional circular and longitudinal layers of the same; g al, nervous layer.

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  • The nervous system of Nemertines presents several interesting peculiarities.

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  • It stretches forward as far as the brain, and in Carinella is again continued in front of it, whereas in the Heteronemertines the innervation of the anterior extremity of the head, in front of the brain, takes the form of more definite and less numerous branching stems. The presence of this plexus in connexion with the central stems, sending out nervous filaments amongst the muscles, explains the absence, in Pro-, Mesoand Heteronemertines, of separate and distinct peripheral nerve stems springing from the central stems innervating the different organs and body-regions, the only exceptions being the L.N.

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  • In addition to the nerves starting from the brain-lobes just now especially mentioned, there is a double apparatus which can hardly be treated of in conjunction with the sense organs, because its sensory functions have not been sufficiently made out, and which will therefore rather be considered along with the brain and central nervous system.

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  • To it belong (a) superficial grooves or deeper slits situated on the integument near the tip of the head, (b) nerve lobes in immediate connexion with the nervous tissue of the brain, and (c) ciliated ducts penetrating into the latter and communicating with the former.

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  • These posterior brain-lobes, which in all Heteronemertines are in direct continuity of tissue with the upper pair of principal lobes, cease to have this intimate connexion in the Metanemertini; and, although still constituted of (I) a ciliated duct, opening out externally, (2) nervous tissue surrounding it, and (3) histological elements distinctly different from the nervous, and most probably directly derived from the oesophageal outgrowths, they are nevertheless here no longer constantly situated behind the upper brain-lobes and directly connected with them, but are found sometimes behind, sometimes beside and sometimes before the brain-lobes.

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  • In some cases, especially when the lobes lie before the brain, their distance from it, as well as the length of these nervous connexions, has considerably increased.

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  • Here the pits split into two, one part ending in a sac lined with sensory epithelium, and embedded in nervous tissue, the other projecting backwards as a long, glandular, blind canal.

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  • For the Heteronemertines arguments have been adduced to prove that here they have the physiological significance of a special respiratory apparatus for the central nervous tissue, which in all these forms is strongly charged with haemoglobin.

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  • N, Nervous layer.

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  • xx.; Id., " The Peripheral Nervous System of the Palaeoand Schizonemertini, one of the layers of the Body-wall," Quart.

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  • The nervous system, composed of a ring and a ventral cord, retains its primitive connexion with the ectoderm.

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  • The nervous system is represented by an oesophageal collar and a suboesophageal ganglion, whence paired nerves pass outwards to innervate the anterior extremity and backwards towards its posterior end.

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  • There are pine-needle baths and a hospital for nervous diseases.

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  • The central ganglion of the nervous system lies in the proboscissheath or -septum.

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  • In rheumatic hyperpyrexia, where the poison has attacked the central nervous system, salicylates almost always fail.

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  • Instinctive behaviour thus depends solely on how the nervous system has been built through heredity; while intelligent behaviour depends also on those characters of the nervous system which have been acquired under the modifying influence of individual relation to the environment.

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  • Do they originate through the natural selection of those variations which are the more adaptive; or do they originate through the inheritance of those acquired modifications which are impressed on the nervous system in the course of individual and intelligent use ?

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  • With these numbers it was impossible to attain the high degree of individual efficiency required for the old line tactics, hence they were compelled to adopt the French methods of skirmishers and columns, but as yet they had hardly realized the increased density necessary to be given to a line of battle to enable it to endure the prolonged nervous strain the new system of tactics entailed.

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  • A partial explanation of this phenomenon may perhaps be found in the economy of nervous energy his strategical method ensured to him.

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  • In 1883-1886 Bateson showed by his embryological researches that the Enteropneusta exhibit chordate (vertebrate) affinities in respect of the coelomic, skeletal and nervous systems as well as in regard to the respiratory system, and, further, that the gill-slits are formed upon a plan similar to that of the gillslits of Amphioxus, being subdivided by tongue-bars which depend from the dorsal borders of the slits.

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  • 3) Nervous System.

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  • The nervous system is thus essentially epidermal in position and diffuse in distribution; but an interesting concentration of nerve-cells and fibres has taken place in the collar-region, where a medullary tube, closed in from the outside, opens in front and behind by anterior and posterior neuropores.

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  • These hollow roots terminate blindly in the dorsal epidermis of the collar, and place the nervous layer of the latter in direct connexion with the fibres of the nerve-tube.

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  • Special thickenings of the diffuse nervous layer of the epidermis occur in certain regions and along certain lines.

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  • Nietzsche's writings must be understood in their relation to these circumstances of his life, and as the outcome of a violent revolt against them on the part of an intensely emotional and nervous temperament.

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  • The nervous system of BrachioDiagram showing the muscular pods has, as a rule: maintained system.

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  • There is a special marginal nerve running round the edge of the mantle, but the connexion of this with the rest of the nervous system is not clear; probably it is merely another concentration of the diffused sub-ectodermal nervous fibrils.

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  • - Diagram of nervous system of Crania; from the dorsal side.

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  • Taken internally aconite acts very notably on the circulation, the respiration and the nervous system.

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  • 1 with the addition of NF, neural fossa protecting the aggregated ganglia of the central nervous system; PVP, left posterior ventral process; PMP, posterior median process.

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  • It is possible, as maintained by some writers (Patten and others), that the lobes of the cerebral nervous mass in Arach nids indicate a larger number of prosthomeres as having fused in this region, but there is no embryological evidence at present which justifies us in assuming the existence in Arachnids of more than two prosthomeres.

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  • The central nervous systems of Limulus and of Scorpio present closer agreement in structure than can be found when a Crustacean is compared with either.

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  • Newport, George, " Nervous and Circulatory Systems in Myriapoda and Macrourous Arachnids," Phil.

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  • Intense application during early youth had weakened a constitution never robust, and led to accesses of feverish exaltation culminating, in the spring of 1761, in an attack of bilious hypochondria, which permanently lowered the tone of his nervous system.

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  • The Michigan school for the deaf, established in 1854, and the Oak Grove hospital (private) for the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, are here.

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  • It has been argued that the elaborate structural adaptations of the nervous system which are the corporeal correlatives of Theory complicated instincts must have been slowly built up by the transmission to offspring of acquired ex perience, that is to say, of acquired brain structure.

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  • Instincts, or the inherited structural mechanisms. of the nervous centres, are in antagonism to the results of the reasoning process, which are not capable of hereditary transmission.

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  • At no time has so much been done to advance our knowledge of diseases of the nervous system as during the last thirty years of the 19th century.

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  • If, on the other hand, any pathogenic organisms be present the results are disastrous because the tissue, deprived of its nervous trophic supply, has greatly lessened resistance.

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  • IV.), that of " sclerosis " is used when such a deposition of fibrous tissue occurs within the central nervous system.

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  • Trophic and nervous conditions sometimes cause localized deficiency of pigment which produces white areas in the skin.

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  • These are peculiar bodies which are found in the prostate, in the central nervous system, in the lung, and in other localities, and which get their name from being very like starch-corpuscles, and from giving certain colour reactions closely resembling those of vegetable cellulose or even starch itself.

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  • This reaction is carried out by the mobile phagocytes sometimes alone, sometimes with the aid of the vascular phagocytes, or of the nervous system."

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