Nero sentence example

nero
  • I think it was an Agatha Christie or maybe Nero Wolfe.
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  • Several milestones belonging to it have been discovered, including one of the time of Augustus and one of Claudius near Forum Traiani, and one of Nero near Turris Libisonis, though it was probably not completed right through until a later period (T.
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  • I'm strictly a stay-at-home couch detective, behind the scenes, back-room guy, like Father Brown or Nero Wolfe.
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  • At Rhandea he laid down his diadem at the foot of the emperor's statue, promising not to resume it until he received it from the hand of Nero himself in Rome.
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  • On his arrival at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, messengers from Nero met Corbulo, and ordered him to commit suicide.
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  • Whether he had really given any grounds for suspicion is unknown; but there is no doubt, so great was his popularity with the soldiers and such the hatred felt for Nero, that he could easily have seized the throne.
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  • Schiller, Geschichte des riimischen Kaiserreichs unter der Regierung des Nero (1872); E.
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  • Dill, Roman Society from Nero to M.
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  • The prescription was improved by Damocrates and Andromachus, body physicians to Nero.
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  • It is narrated by Pliny and Seneca that the emperor Nero sent out two centurions on such a mission towards the source of the Nile (probably about A.D.
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  • Tacitus, besides being a man of immense wealth (which he bequeathed to the state), Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius, Bk.
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  • A colony with Latin rights was founded on Pontiae in 313 B.C. Nero, Germanicus's eldest son, and the sisters of Caligula, were confined upon it; while Pandateria was the place of banishment of Julia, daughter of Augustus, of her daughter Agrippina the elder, and of Octavia, the divorced wife of Nero.
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  • By her first husband she was the mother of Marcus Marcellus (q.v.), who died in 23 B.C. (2) Octavia, daughter of the emperor Claudius, was the wife of Nero, by whom she was put to death.
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  • When Felix was recalled by Nero in 60 the nation was divided against itself, the Gentiles within its gates were watching for their opportunity, and the chief priests robbed the lower priests with a high hand.
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  • The quarrel was therefore referred to the emperor Nero, who finally gave his decision in favour of the Syrians or Greeks.
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  • In the spring of 67 Vespasian, who had been appointed by Nero to crush the rebellion, advanced from his winter quarters at Antioch.
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  • So Vespasian obtained possession of Palestine - the country which Nero had given him - and for a time it was purged of revolutionaries.
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  • 16-5 9), daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina the elder, sister of Caligula and mother of Nero, was born at Oppidum Ubiorum on the Rhine, afterwards named in her honour Colonia Agrippinae (mod.
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  • By her first husband, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, she was the mother of the emperor Nero; her second husband was Passienus Crispus, whom she was accused of poisoning.
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  • Assisted by the influential freedman Pallas, she induced her uncle the emperor Claudius to marry her after the death of Messalina, and adopt the future Nero as heir to the throne in place of Britannicus.
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  • Being alarmed at the influence of the freedwoman Acte over Nero, she threatened to support the claims of the rightful heir Britannicus.
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  • Nero thereupon murdered the young prince and decided to get rid of his mother.
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  • Henderson, The Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero (1903); also article Nero.
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  • The oldest stage-building was erected in the time of Lycurgus; it consisted of a rectangular hall with square projections (1rapauKs vca) on either side; in As= front of this was built in late Greek or early Roman times a stage with a row of columns which intruded upon the orchestra space; a later and larger stage, dating from the time of Nero, advanced still farther into the orchestra, and this was finally faced (probably in the 3rd century A.D.) by the " bema " of Phaedrus, a platform-wall decorated with earlier reliefs, the slabs of which were cut down to suit their new position.
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  • Thus, Varro (De rustici) mentions a map of Italy engraved on marble, in the temple of Tellus, Pliny, a map of the seat of war in Armenia, of the time of the emperor Nero, and the more famous map of the Roman Empire which was ordered to be prepared for Julius Caesar (44 B.C.), but only completed in the reign of Augustus, who placed a copy of it, engraved in marble, in the Porticus of his sister Octavia (7 B.C.).
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  • They still believe, as John did, in the return of Nero as the Antichrist; they still expect that after the first resurrection Christ will reign with his saints "in the flesh" for a thousand years.
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  • He went with Nero's suite to Greece, and in 66 was appointed to conduct the war in Judaea, which was threatening general commotion throughout the East, owing to a widely spread notion in those parts that from Judaea were to come the future rulers of the world.
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  • The law under which the slaves of Pedanius were put to death, probably introduced under Augustus and more fully enacted under Nero, is sufficient proof of this anxiety, which indeed is strongly stated by Tacitus in his narrative of the facts.
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  • Under Tiberius, at the death of Caligula, and in the reign of Nero there were threatening movements of the slaves.
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  • Already in the time of Nero the magistrates had been ordered to receive the slave's complaint of ill-treatment; and the lex Petronia, belonging to the same or an earlier period, forbade masters to hand over their slaves to combats with wild beasts.
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  • He accordingly retired into the solitudes of Pietralata, and subsequently founded with some companions under a rule of his own creation the abbey of San Giovanni in Fiore, on Monte Nero, in the massif of La Sila.
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  • The death of Paul by the sentence of Nero at Rome forms the close of the Acts of Paul.
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  • These Acts, which Ficker holds were written as a continuation and completion of the canonical Acts of the Apostles, deal with Peter's victorious conflict with Simon Magus, and his subsequent martyrdom at Rome under Nero.
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  • Making friends with Alityrus, a Jewish actor, who was a favourite of Nero, Josephus obtained an introduction to the empress Poppaea and effected his purpose by her help. His visit to Rome enabled him to speak from personal experience of the power of the Empire, when he expostulated with the revolutionary Jews on his return to Palestine.
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  • it is probable that he lived into the 2nd century; but the date of Agrippa's death has been challenged and, if his patron Epaphroditus may be identified with Nero's freedman, it is possible that Josephus may have been involved in his fall and perished under Domitian in 95.
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  • The ` streets of Rome were sprinkled with saffron when Nero made his entry into the city.
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  • 49), says that permission was granted to the Syracusans under Nero to exceed the prescribed number of gladiators in their shows.
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  • New Medici plots having been discovered, Bernardo del Nero and other prominent citizens were tried and put to death; but the party hostile to Savonarola gained ground and had the support of the Franciscans, who were hostile to the Dominican order.
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  • Among the five leading citizens concerned in the plot was Bernardo del Nero, a very aged man of lofty talents and position.
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  • It is said that at least Bernardo del Nero would have been spared had Savonarola raised his voice, but, although refraining from any active part against the prisoners, the prior would not ask mercy for them.
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  • 38 by Polemon II., grandson of the former king, was annexed by Nero in A.D.
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  • This fourth period is itself subdivided into three divisions: (I) from the accession of Tiberius to the death of Nero, 68 - the most important part of it being the Neronian age, 54 to 68; (2) the Flavian era, from the death of Nero to the death of Domitian, 96; (3) the reigns of Nerva and Trajan and part of the reign of Hadrian.
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  • The class by which litera- 'lo' Nero.
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  • A fresh impulse was given to letters on the accession of Nero, and this was partly due to the theatrical and artistic tastes of the young emperor.
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  • Calpurnius Siculus, written at the beginning of the reign of Nero, which are not without grace and facility of diction.
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  • Cornelius Sulla for the payment of his soldiers; Nero removed no fewer than 500 bronze statues from the sacred precincts; Constantine the Great enriched his new city by the sacred tripod and its support of intertwined snakes dedicated by the Greek cities after the battle of Plataea.
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  • Lugudunum controlled the trade of its two rivers, and that which passed from northern Gaul to the Mediterranean or vice versa; it had a mint; it was the capital of all northern Gaul, despite its position in the south, and its wealth was such that, when Rome was burnt in Nero's reign, its inhabitants subscribed largely to the relief of the Eternal City.
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  • 29), Roman empress, was originally the wife of Tiberius Claudius Nero, by whom she had two sons, Drusus and Tiberius (afterwards emperor).
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  • He was the first in extant literature to interpret certain passages in Revelation of Nero.
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  • With the school of Auberlen and Benson it will find in the Apocalypse a Christian philosophy of history; with the ` continuous-historical ' school it can see 2 The Jesuit Juan Mariana was the first after Victorinus to explain" the wounded head "as referring to Nero.
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  • Thus he refuses to recognize Nero in the beast and its number.
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  • Even Gunkel is obliged to abandon his favourite theory here, though he contests strongly the recognition of any allusion to Nero.
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  • This points, we may here assume, to the Nero redivivus legend, which could not have arisen for a full generation after Nero's death, and the assumption receives large confirmation from the most probable interpretation of the enigmatical words, xiii.
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  • Four continental scholars, Fritzsche, Benary, Hitzig and Reuss, independently recognized that Nero was referred to under the mystical number 666.
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  • 30.1), the commentary of Ticonius, and the uncial C, can be explained from the Latin form of the name Nero, which by its omission of the final n makes the sum total 616 instead of 666.
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  • 12, where there are allusions to Nero's confederacy with the Parthian kings with a view to the destruction of Rome.
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  • Of the later stage, when the myth of Nero redivivus was fused with that of the Antichrist, we have attestation in xvii.
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  • Nero).
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  • According to the different methods pursued, some have concluded that Nero was the sixth emperor, and thus dated the Apocalypse before A.D.
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  • These phenomena belong to a period considerably later than the time of Nero.
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  • Such an expectation of persecution is inexplicable from Nero's time.
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  • Christian persecution under Nero was an imperial caprice.
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  • The earliest form is not attested here, that Nero had not really been slain, but would speedily return and destroy his enemies.
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  • The second stage of this legend was that Nero had taken refuge in the Far East, and would return with the help of his Eastern subjects for the overthrow of Rome.
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  • 16-17, which point to the belief that Rome would be destroyed by Nero and the Parthian kings.
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  • 8, 12-14, we have a later phase of the myth, in which there is a fusion of the Antichrist myth with that of Nero redivivus.
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  • As soon as the hope of the living Nero could no longer be entertained, the way was prepared for this transformation of the myth.
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  • The living Nero was no longer expected to return from the East, but Nero was to be restored to life from the abyss by the dragon, i.e.
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  • 8 the reference to Nero redivivus as the Antichrist is manifest: "The beast that thou sawest was, and is not, and is about to come up out of the abyss and to go into perdition."
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  • Notwithstanding, on various critical grounds, Baur, Hilgenfeld, Lightfoot, Westcott, Hort and Beyschlag assigned the book to the reign of Nero, or to the years immediately following his death, while Weiss, Dusterdieck and AfIommsen assign it to the time of Vespasian.
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  • Verse II, with the exception of the words" which was and is not,"leads to the identification of the eighth with Nero redivivus.
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  • Some scholars are of opinion that this writer identified Domitian with the eighth emperor, the Nero redivivus, the beast from the abyss.
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  • But this is unlikely, notwithstanding the fact that even some pagan writers, such as Juvenal, Pliny and Martial (?), traced a resemblance between Domitian and Nero.
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  • But futhermore, since this new reckoning would exclude Nero, how could the eighth be said to be one of the seven, i.e.
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  • Nero ?
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  • above the sea-level, while the Nero Deep near Guam sinks to 31,600 ft.
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  • " Nero " in 1899 found 5269 fathoms in 12° 43' N., 1 45° 49' E., the greatest depth yet measured.
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  • Till 48, the date of his mother's execution, he was looked upon as the heir presumptive; but Agrippina, the new wife of Claudius, soon persuaded the feeble emperor to adopt Lucius Domitius, known later as Nero, her son by a previous marriage.
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  • 14-16; Suetonius, Nero, 33 Dio Cassius lx.
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  • 32, 34; works quoted under Nero.
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  • The MS. of this work, written in Phoenician characters, was said to have been found in his tomb (enclosed in a leaden box) at the time of an earthquake during the reign of Nero, by whose order it was translated into Greek.
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  • His work, which probably began with the civil wars or the death of Caesar, was continued by the elder Pliny, who, as he himself tells us, carried it down at least as far as the end of Nero's reign.
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  • Nero admitted the old inhabitants to the privileges of the colony, thus uniting in one the two previously distinct communities.
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  • Nero's scheme for the construction of a canal from Lake Avernus to Ostia would have restored the balance in its favour (though it certainly could not have been continuous all the way to Rome with the means of engineering then available).
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  • There was, however, an amphitheatre in the reign of Nero, who himself fought in games given there, and the glass cup of Odemira shows two.
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  • Nero built a huge villa probably on the site now occupied by the castle.
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  • He went to the mountainous districts of the Abruzzi, and at last came to the ruins of Nero's palace and the artificial lake at Subiaco, 40 m.
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  • 64, if we suppose, as it is usual to do, that Peter was martyred in the massacre by Nero after the burning of Rome.
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  • In his early manhood he had been on friendly terms with Nero, by whom he was decorated in 65 (Tacitus, Annals, xv.
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  • GAIUS CESTIUS GALLUS, governor of Syria during the reign of Nero.
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  • The late origin of these representations was established by the detection upon them of the cartouches of Tiberius and Nero.
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  • Dioscorides, a Greek writer, who appears to have flourished about the time of Nero, issued a work on Materia Medica.
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  • On returning to Rome, Felix was accused of having taken advantage of a dispute between the Jews and Syrians of Caesarea to slay and plunder the inhabitants, but through the intercession of his brother, the freedman Pallas, who had great influence with the emperor Nero, he escaped unpunished.
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  • BAREA SORANUS, Roman senator, lived in the reign of Nero.
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  • The upright and considerate manner in which he treated the provincials won him their affection, but at the same time brought upon him the hatred of Nero, who felt specially aggrieved because Soranus had refused to punish a city which had defended the statues of its gods against the Imperial commissioners.
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  • Soranus was accused of intimacy with Rubellius Plautus (another object of Nero's hatred), and of endeavouring to obtain the goodwill of the provincials by treasonable intrigues.
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  • 29) that they were first met with beyond the limits of Upper Egypt by explorers employed by Nero.
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  • Under Nero he regained the imperial favour.
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  • from the preface to the Acts: " Dionysius, bishop of the Corinthians, a very ancient writer, quoted by Eusebius, writes that Peter and Paul obtained the crown of martyrdom by the command of Nero on the same day."
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  • 29 (30) on the one hand, and on the other the persecution of Nero in A.D.
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  • (() Josephus enumerates after the accession of Nero (October 54) a long catalogue of events which all took place under the procuratorship of Felix, including the revolt of " the Egyptian " which was already " before these days " at the time of St Paul's arrest, two years from the end of Felix's tenure.
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  • 56; and it implies certainly that the main or most important part of Felix's governorship fell, in Josephus's view, under Nero.
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  • But as two years only of Felix's rule (52-54) fell under Claudius, this procedure would be quite natural on Josephus's part if his recall were dated in 58 or 59, so that four or five years fell under Nero.
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  • - (a) Eusebius's Chronicle places the arrival of Festus in Nero 2, October 55-56, and Eusebius's chronology of the procurators goes back probably through Julius Africanus (himself a Palestinian) to contemporary authorities like the Jewish kings of Justus of Tiberias.
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  • But (i.) Nero 2 is really September 56-September 57; (ii.) it is doubtful whether Eusebius had any authority to depend on here other than Josephus, who gives no precise year for Festus - Julius Africanus is, hardly probable, since we know that his chronicle was very jejune for the Christian period - and if so, Eusebius had to find a year as best he could.'
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  • 1) attempts to interpret the evidence of Eusebius in favour of the later date for Festus as follows: Eusebius's date for Festus is to be found in Nero 1, by striking a mean between the Armenian, Claudius 12, and the Latin, Nero 2; it is really to be understood as reckoned, not by years of Nero, but by years of Agrippa; and as Eusebius erroneously antedated Agrippa's reign by five years, commencing it with A.D.
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  • 50, his date for Festus is five years too early also, and should be moved to Nero 6, A.D.
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  • but was removed from office in the winter following Nero's accession, 54-55.
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  • Felix must therefore have been tried at the very beginning of Nero's reign.
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  • 57 as that of the recall, while the second will apply to any of the earlier years of Nero's reign.
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  • Thus the point that Josephus catalogues the events of Felix's procuratorship under Nero cannot be pressed to bring down Felix's tenure as far as 60 or 61, but it does seem to exclude as early a termination as 56, or even 57.
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  • Early evidence is unanimous in pointing to St Peter and St Paul as victims of the persecution of Nero (Clem.
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  • 44 down to the martyrdom of St Peter and St Paul in the persecution of Nero, A.D.
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  • The United States telegraph ship " Nero," while surveying for a cable between Hawaii and the Philippines, sounded in 1900 the greatest depth yet known between Midway Islands and Guam (12° 43' N., 1 45° 49' E.) in 5269 fathoms, or almost exactly 6 m.
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  • He fell under the ban of Nero owing to his ethical teachings, and was exiled to the island of Gyarus on a trumped-up charge of participation in Piso's conspiracy.
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  • The earliest in date is a Northumbrian Gloss on the Gospels, contained in a beautiful and highly interesting MS. variously known as the Durham Book, the Lindisfarne Gospels, or the Book of St Cuthbert (MS. Cotton, Nero.
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  • HELVIDIUS PRISCUS, Stoic philosopher and statesman, lived during the reigns of Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian.
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  • He appears first as one of the most reckless and extravagant of the young nobles who surrounded Nero.
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  • But his friendship with Nero was brought to an abrupt close in 58, when Otho refused to divorce his beautiful wife Poppea Sabina at the bidding of Nero, who at once appointed him governor of the remote province of Lusitania.
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  • When in 68 his neighbour Galba, the governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, rose in revolt against Nero, Otho accompanied him to Rome.
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  • Resentment at the treatment he had received from Nero may have impelled him to this course, but to this motive was added before long that of personal ambition.
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  • He accepted,or appeared to accept, the cognomen of Nero conferred upon him by the shouts of the populace, whom his comparative youth and the effeminacy of his appearance reminded of their lost favourite.
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  • Nero's statues were again set up, his freedmen and household officers reinstalled, and the intended completion of the Golden House announced.
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  • Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius, C. 2 and 3 (London, 1904).
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  • Behind is a range of hills, the most conspicuous of which, the Monte Nero, is crowned by a frequented pilgrimage church and also by villas and hotels, to which a funicular railway runs.
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  • Two of her sons, Nero and Drusus, had already fallen victims to the machinations of Sejanus.
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  • Nero Drusus >>
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  • At the end of the Republican period it became a resort of wealthy Romans, and the Julian and Claudian emperors frequently visited it; both Caligula and Nero were born there.
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  • That of Nero cannot be certainly identified, but is generally placed at the so-called Arco Muto, where remains of a theatre (discovered in 1712 and covered up again) also exist.
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  • Peter died there, in 64, without doubt, among the Christians whom Nero had put to death as guilty of the burning of Rome.
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  • Reference is there made to Philostratus as the son of Verus, a rhetorician in Nero's time, who wrote tragedies, comedies and treatises.
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  • Philip of Macedon and Nero are, as we shall see, among those whose names have a record in the Altis.
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  • - The wall bounding the Altis on the west belongs probably to the time of Nero.
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  • - The line of the east wall, running due north and south, can be traced from the north-east corner of the Altis down about three-fifths of the east side, when it breaks off at the remains known as " Nero's house."
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  • It cannot be doubted that the Roman house - from which three doors gave access to the Altis - was that occupied by Nero when he visited Olympia.
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  • The south side, running nearly due east and west, is about equally long, if measured from the end of the west wall to the point which the east wall would touch when produced due south in a straight line from the place at which it was demolished to make way for " Nero's house."
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  • Under Nero he lived mainly in Rome.
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  • He also saw the building of Nero's "golden house" after the fire of 64 (xxxvi.
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  • He completed a History of his Times in thirty-one books, possibly extending from the reign of Nero to that of Vespasian, and deliberately reserved it for publication after his decease (N.
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  • The work had been planned under the rule of Nero.
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  • of the town of Yaroslavl, near Lake Rostov or Nero.
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  • There are references to the legendary escape of Nero to Parthia (119-124) and the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D.
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  • contains a more developed form of the myth of Nero redivivus in which a panegyric on him (137-141) has been brought up to date by some Jew or Christian, and eulogies of Hadrian and his successors (48-51) side by side with the legend of the miserable death of Titus in quittance of his destruction of Jerusalem (411-413) which probably represents the hope of the zealots who survived it.
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  • This is unquestionably the meaning of the statement of Pamphila (temp. Nero), ap. Diog.
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  • Robert Hamerling even identifies Nero with the Wandering Jew.
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  • Adjoining the theatres is a large rectangular enclosure, surrounded by a portico, at first the colonnade connected with the theatres, and converted, about the time of Nero, into the barracks of the gladiators, who were permanently maintained in the city with a view to the shows in the amphitheatre.
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  • The earliest direct witness is Tertullian, who definitely states that Peter suffered under Nero by crucifixion.
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  • 80, but that it may nevertheless be Petrine; therefore he lays stress on the fact that whereas the tradition that Peter was in Rome is early and probably correct, the tradition that he was martyred under Nero is not found until much later.
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  • During the reign of Nero he was resident in Rome and a member of the senate, from which he was expelled for forgery in connexion with a will and was banished from the city.
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  • The Roman prince Nero Claudius Drusus (q.v.) The gamin the year 12 B.C. annexed what is now the kingdom paigns oi of the Netherlands, and constructed a canal (Fossa other Drusiana) between the Rhine and the lake Flevo Ro1fl811 (Lacus Flevus), which partly corresponded to the ea CIS.
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  • in bringing Peter to Rome long before Nero's reign.
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  • The old catchword, " autonomy of the Hellens," was still heard and indeed was solemnly proclaimed by Nero at the Isthmian games of A.D.
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  • The body of the temple is of Ptolemy XIII., and was carved as late as the XVIth (Caesarion), and the great portico was in building from Augustus to Nero.
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  • It is probable that he was banished to Corsica with his brother, and that both returned together to Rome when Agrippina selected Seneca to be tutor to Nero.
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  • He survived his brother Seneca, but was subsequently put to death by order of Nero (in 65) or committed suicide.
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  • The death of Drusus was followed some years later by those of Agrippina (the wife of Germanicus) and her sons Drusus and Nero.
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  • Ancren Riwle was edited for the Camden Society by the Rev. James Morton in 1843 from the Cotton MS. (Nero A xiv.).
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  • of Ancren Riwle in the Cottonian collection in the British Museum, numbered Nero A xiv., Titus D xviii., and Cleopatra C vi.
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  • Nero A xiv.
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  • Later Jewish and Christian writers of Apocalypses saw in Nero the tyrant of the end of time.
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  • But this version of the idea of Antichrist, hostile to the Jews and better expressing the relation of Christianity to the Roman empire, was prevented from obtaining an absolute ascendancy in Christian tradition by the rise of the belief in the ultimate return of Nero, and by the absorption of this outcome of pagan superstition into the Jewish-Christian apocalyptic conceptions.
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  • It is known that soon after the death of Nero rumours were current that he was not dead.
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  • This expectation led to the appearance of several pretenders who posed as Nero; and as late as A.D.
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  • 100 many still held the belief that Nero yet lived.'
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  • This idea of Nero's return was in the first instance taken up by the Jewish apocalyptic writers.
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  • So) still only refers simply to the heathen belief, the author of the (Jewish?) original of the 17th chapter of the Apocalypse of St John expects the return of Nero with the Parthians to take vengeance on Rome, because she had shed the blood of the Saints (destruction of Jerusalem!).
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  • In the fifth Sibylline book, which, with the exception of verses 1-51, was mainly composed by a Jewish writer at the close of the first century, the return of Nero plays a great part.
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  • He sees in the coming again of Nero, whose figure he endows with 1 See Bousset, Kommentar zur Offenbarung Johannis, on these passages.
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  • in whose hand the revivified Nero becomes a rod of chastisement.
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  • Later, the figure of Nero redivivus became, more especially in Christian thought, entirely confused with that of Antichrist.
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  • The less it became possible, as time went on, to believe that Nero yet lived and would return as a living ruler, the greater was the tendency for his figure to develop into one wholly infernal and daemonic. The relation to the Parthians is also gradually lost sight of; and from being the adversary of Rome, Nero becomes the adversary of God and of Christ.
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  • This is the version of the expectation of Nero's second coming preserved in the form given to the prophecy, under Domitian, by the collaborator in' the Apocalypse of John (xiii., xvii.).
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  • Nero is here the beast.
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  • The number of the Beast, 666, points certainly to Nero (lr -op =666, or
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  • form of Nero.
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  • 28-34, Nero and Antichrist are absolutely identical (mostly obscure reminiscences, Sib.
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  • But Victorinus of Pettau, who wrote during the persecution under Diocletian, still knows the relation of the Apocalypse to the legend of Nero; and Commodian, whose Carmen Apologeticum was perhaps not written until the beginning of the 4th century, knows two Antichrist-figures, of which he still identifies the first with Nero redivivus.
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  • In proportion as the figure of Nero again ceased to dominate the imagination of the faithful, the wholly unhistorical, unpolitical and anti-Jewish conception of Antichrist, which based itself more especially on 2 Thess.
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  • For the history of the legend of Nero, see J.
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  • The wresting of Tours from Austrasia and the seizure of ecclesiastical property provoked the bitter hatred of Gregory of Tours, by whom Chilperic was stigmatized as the Nero and the Herod of his time.
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  • SOPHONIUS TIGELLINUS, minister and favourite of the emperor Nero, was a native of Agrigentum, of humble origin and possibly of Greek descent.
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  • In this manner he gained the favour of Nero, whom he aided and abetted in his vices and cr"elties.
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  • In 67 he accompanied Nero on his tour in Greece.
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  • Henderson, Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero (1903).
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  • DOMITIUS AFER, a Roman orator and advocate, born at Nemausus (Nimes) in Gallia Narbonensis, flourished in the reigns of Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius and Nero.
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  • Judicious flattery secured him the consulship under Caligula (39); and under Nero he was superintendent of the water supply.
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  • As a boy he was a slave in the house of Epaphroditus, a freedman and courtier of the emperor Nero.
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  • At the end of the reign of Nero, and perhaps even earlier, the king of the Axumites ruled over the Red Sea coast from Suakin to the strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, and traded constantly with Egypt.
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  • The writer views Paul's death (like the horrors of Nero's Vatican Gardens in 64) as a mere exception to the rule of Roman policy heretofore illustrated.
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  • Not even by the Roman authorities were some of Nero's acts regarded as precedents.
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  • Stein opened his attack with his right wing, the Austrian both Div., at 7:30 A.M., attacking the Italian 46th between Monte Nero and Vodil Vrh.
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  • A gallant detachment (Alpini and details of the Etna brigade), finding retreat impossible, held out for days on Monte Nero till the battle had gone far to the W., and all their food and ammunition were gone.
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  • By Claudius she was the mother of the unfortunate Britannicus, and of Octavia, wife of Nero.
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  • NERO (37-68), Roman emperor 54-68, was born at Antium on the 15th of December 37.
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  • His father died when Nero was scarcely three years old.
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  • In the previous year (39) his mother had been banished by order of her brother Caligula (Gains) on a charge of treasonable conspiracy, and Nero, thus early deprived of both parents, found shelter in the house of his aunt Domitia, where two slaves, a barber and a dancer, began his training.
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  • The emperor Claudius recalled Agrippina, who spent the next thirteen years in the determined struggle to win for Nero the throne which had been predicted for him.
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  • The Roman populace already looked with favour on Nero, as the grandson of Germanicus, but in 50 his claims obtained formal recognition from Claudius himself, who adopted him under the title of Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus.2 Agrippina's next step was to provide a suitable training for her son.
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  • On the 15th of December 51 Nero completed his fourteenth year, and Agrippina, in view of Claudius's failing health, determined to delay no longer his adoption of the toga virilis.
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  • The occasion was celebrated in a manner which seemed to place Nero's prospects of succession beyond doubt.
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  • Nero himself was put prominently forward.
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  • The petitions addressed to the senate by the town of Bononia and by the communities of Rhodes and Ilium were gracefully supported by him in Latin and Greek speeches, and during Claudius's absence in 52 at the Latin festival it was Nero who, as praefect of the city, administered justice in the forum.
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  • 26, 36; see also Schiller, Nero, 67.
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  • On the 13th of October 54 Claudius died, poisoned, as all our authorities declare, by her orders, and Nero was presented to the soldiers on guard as their new sovereign.
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  • Seneca had seen from the first that the real danger with Nero lay in the savage vehemence of his passions, and he made it his chief aim to stave off by every means in his power the dreaded outbreak.
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  • Nero's promises of constitutional moderation were amply fulfilled, and the senate found itself free to discuss and even to decide important administrative questions.
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  • But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.
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  • During the first few months of Nero's reign the chances of such an emancipation seemed remote, for he treated his mother with elaborate respect and consulted her on all affairs of state.
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  • In 55, however, Seneca found a powerful ally in Nero's passion for the beautiful freedwoman Acte, a passion which he deliberately encouraged.
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  • Agrippina's angry remonstrances served only to irritate Nero, and caresses equally failed.
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  • Nero retaliated by poisoning Britannicus.
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  • Agrippina then tried to win over Nero's neglected wife Octavia, and to form a party of her own.
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  • Nero dismissed her guards, and placed her in a sort of honourable confinement (Tac. Ann.
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  • In 58, however, fresh cause for anxiety appeared, when Nero was enslaved by Poppaea Sabina, a woman of a very different stamp from her predecessor.
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  • High-born, wealthy and accomplished, she was resolved to be Nero's wife, and set herself to remove the obstacles which stood in her way.
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  • Her first object was the final ruin of Agrippina, and by rousing Nero's jealousy and fear she induced him to seek her death, with the aid of a freedman Anicetus, praefect of the fleet of Misenum.
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  • Nero, 8.
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  • Nero was horrorstruck at the enormity of the crime and terrified at its possible consequences.
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  • A far more serious result of the death of Agrippina was the growing influence over Nero of Poppaea and her friends.
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  • Their place was filled by Poppaea, and the infamous Tigellinus, whose sympathy with Nero's sensual tastes had gained him the command of the praetorian guards in succession to Burrus.
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  • The haunting fear of conspiracy was skilfully used by them to direct Nero's suspicions against possible opponents.
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  • 2 Nero's taste for blood thus whetted, Octavia was divorced, banished to the island of Pandateria and barbarously murdered.
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  • She was formally married to Nero; her head appeared on the coins side by side with his; and her statues were erected in the public places of Rome.
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  • The conflagration is said by all authorities later than Tacitus to have been deliberately caused by Nero himself.'
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  • 2 By Nero's orders, the open spaces in the Campus Martius were utilized to give shelter to the homeless crowds, provisions were brought from Ostia and the price of corn lowered.
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  • There is, however, no doubt that this great disaster told against Nero in the popular mind.
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  • But Nero proceeded with the congenial work of repairing the damage.
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  • 3 It was the first occasion on which the provincials had suffered from Nero's rule, and the discontent it caused helped to weaken his hold over them at the very moment when the growing dissatisfaction in Rome was gathering to a head.
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  • Early in 65 Nero was panic-stricken by the discovery of a formidable conspiracy involving such men as Faenius Rufus, Tigellinus's colleague in the prefecture of the praetorian guards, Plautius Lateranus, one of the consuls elect, the poet Lucan, and, lastly, not a few of the tribunes and centurions of the praetorian guard itself.
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  • Their chosen leader, whom they destined to succeed Nero, was C. Calpurnius Piso, a handsome, wealthy and popular noble, and a boon companion of Nero himself.
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  • The plan to murder Nero was frustrated by a freedman Milichus, who, in the hope of a large reward, disclosed the whole plot.
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  • Conspicuous among them was Paetus Thrasea, whose unbending virtue had long made him distasteful to Nero, and who was now suspected, possibly with reason, of sympathy with the conspirators.
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  • Nero, 38; Dio Cass.
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  • Nero, 31; cf.
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  • Armenia was rescued and Corbulo proposed that Tiridates should become king of Armenia on condition of his receiving his crown as a gift from Nero.
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  • Tiridates agreed to accept the crown of Armenia from the hands of Nero.
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  • Delighted with this tribute to his greatness, Nero for a moment dreamt of rivalling Alexander.
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  • Expeditions were talked of to the Caspian Sea and Ethiopia, but Nero was no soldier and quickly turned to a more congenial field.
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  • If we may believe report, Nero found time in the intervals of his artistic triumphs for more vicious excesses.
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  • Meanwhile the general dissatisfaction was coming to a head, as we may infer from the urgency with which the imperial freedman Helius insisted upon Nero's return to Italy.
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  • Nero, 19-24; Dio Cass.
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  • At first, however, fortune seemed to favour Nero.
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  • It is very probable that Vindex had other aims in view than the deposition of Nero and the substitution of a fresh emperor in his place, and that the liberation of northern Gaul from Roman rule was part of his plan.'
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  • For it is certain that the latter at any rate were not animated by loyalty to Nero.
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  • Though they defeated Vindex and his Celtic levies at Vesontio (Besancon), their next step was to break the statues of Nero and offer the imperial purple to their own commander Virginius Rufus.
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  • Meanwhile, Nero had reluctantly left Greece, but returned to Italy only to renew his revels.
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  • When finally the palace guards forsook their posts, Nero despairingly stole out of Rome to seek shelter in a freedman's villa some four miles off.
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  • Nero died on the 9th of June 68, in the thirty-first year of his age and the fourteenth of his reign, and his remains were deposited by the faithful hands of Acte in the family tomb of the Domitii on the Pincian Hill.
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  • Roman literature, faithfully reflecting the sentiments of the aristocratic salons of the capital, while it almost canonized those who had been his victims, fully avenged their wrongs by painting Nero as a monster of wickedness.
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  • Even in the middle ages, Nero was still the very incarnation of splendid iniquity, while the belief lingered obstinately that he had only disappeared for a time, and as late as the 11th century his restless spirit was supposed to haunt the slopes of the Pincian Hill.
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  • The chief ancient authorities for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus (Annals, xiii.-xvi., ed.
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  • Henderson, The Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero (London, 1903; see an important notice in 1 Suet.
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  • Nero, 40; Dio Cass.
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  • Schiller's Nero, and Geschichte d.
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  • Kaiserzeit; Lehmann, Claudius and Nero; histories of Rome in general.
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  • When he was condemned to death by Nero, she would have imitated her mother's example, but was dissuaded by her husband, who entreated her to live for the sake of their children.
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  • Tiridates himself visited Rome and was there invested with the diadem by Nero (AD.
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  • Titus drove into exile or reduced to slavery those who had served Nero, of ter they had first been flogged in the amphitheatre.
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  • The third satire, imitated by Samuel Johnson in his London, presents such a picture as Rome may have offered to the satirist at any time in the 1st century of our era; but it was under the worst emperors, Nero and Domitian, that the arts of flatterers and foreign adventurers were most successful, and that such scenes of violence as that described at 2 77 seq.
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  • Thus the satires were published at different intervals, and for the most part composed between loo and 130, but the most powerful in feeling and vivid in conception among them deal with the experience and impressions of the reign of Domitian, occasionally recall the memories or traditions of the times of Nero and Claudius, and reproduce at least one startling page from the annals of Tiberius.
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  • It is true that he finds the most typical examples of lust, cruelty, levity and weakness in the emperors and their wives - in Domitian, Otho, Nero, Claudius and Messalina.
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  • Tiberius Tiberius Claudius Nero >>
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  • May Nero rest from all the torments of the damned, that they may seize on Stilicho; for Nero smote his own mother, but Stilicho the mother of the world!
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  • Thus Alexander of Aegae, the teacher of Nero, commented on the Categories and the De caelo.
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  • Her worship appears to have been promoted in Rome chiefly by the family of the Claudii, whose Sabine origin, together with their use of the name of "Nero," has suggested an identification of Bellona with the Sabine war goddess Nerio, herself identified, like Bellona, with Virtus.
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  • The name Germanicus, the only one by which he is known in history, he inherited from his father, Nero Claudius Drusus, the famous general, brother of Tiberius and stepson of Augustus.
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  • He had nine children, six of whom, three sons and three daughters, survived him, amongst them the future emperor Gaius and the notorious Agrippina, the mother of Nero.
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  • He even contemplated cutting a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth, but was afraid to carry out his plan because the same thing had been unsuccessfully attempted before by the emperor Nero.
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  • Whether Simon of Gitta ever exhibited his skill in Rome we have no means of determining, but at all events the compound Simon, resulting from the fusion of him with his predecessor, is brought to Rome by popular legend, and represented as enjoying great influence with Nero.
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  • BOADICEA, strictly BouDZCCA, a British queen in the time of the emperor Nero.
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  • He had by his will divided his private wealth between his two daughters and Nero, trusting thereby to win imperial favour for his family.
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  • PUBLIUS CLODIUS THRASEA PAETUS, Roman senator and Stoic philosopher, lived during the reign of Nero.
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  • At first he was treated with great consideration by Nero, probably owing to the influence of Seneca, and became consul in A.D.
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  • In 59 Thrasea first openly showed his disgust at the behaviour of Nero and the obsequiousness of the senate by retiring without voting after the emperor's letter justifying the murder of Agrippina had been read.
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  • Nero showed his displeasure by refusing to receive Thrasea when the senate went in a body to offer its congratulations on the birth of a princess.
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  • The simplicity of his life and his adherence to Stoic principles were looked upon as a reproach to the frivolity and debaucheries of Nero, who "at last yearned to put Virtue itself to death in the persons of Thrasea and Soranus" (Tacitus).
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  • 65 against Nero.
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  • It was the favourite residence of many of the emperors; Nero made his first appearance on the stage in one of its theatres; Titus assumed the office of its archon; and Hadrian became its demarch.
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  • Julius Caesar was the first who used the title continuously (from 58 B.C. to his death in 44 B.C.), as well domi as militiae; and his nephew Augustus took a further step when he made the term imperator a praenomen, a practice which after the time of Nero becomes regular.
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  • The appearance of Antichrist, identified with Nero and the Man from the East, is expected at an early date.
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  • 23), commonly called Drusus junior, to distinguish him from his uncle Nero Claudius Drusus, was the only son of the emperor Tiberius by his first wife Vipsania Agrippina.
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  • It was said that he was accused of treason both by Nero and by Domitian, but escaped by miraculous means.
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  • In the time of Nero, owing to its dilapidated condition, it was replaced by a copy made by the painter Dorotheus (Pliny, Nat.
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  • p. 480), who regards the author as flourishing from the reign of Nero to that of Trajan, and U.
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  • 7; Suetonius, Nero, 2).
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  • His son was married to Antonia, daughter of Antony, and became the grandfather of the emperor Nero.
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  • It was carried off to Rome by Caligula, restored by Claudius, and again carried off by Nero.
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  • Fleay has suggested that the more famous anonymous tragedy of Nero (printed 1624, reprints in A.
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  • The Romans also used lead as an alloy in their bronze coins, but gradually reduced the quantity, and under Caligula, Nero, Vespasian and Domitian, coined pure copper coins; afterwards they reverted to the mixture of lead.
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  • Though the crimes of Nero and the catastrophes which resulted from his downfall, provoked the troubles of the year A.D.
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  • Suetonius, in his Life of Nero, refers to a Cynic philosopher named Isidore, who is said to have jested publicly at the expense of Nero.
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  • CAESIUS BASSUS, a Roman lyric poet, who lived in the reign of Nero.
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  • Nero >>
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  • 'LUCIUS ANNAEUS CORNUTUS, Stoic philosopher, flourished in the reign of Nero.
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  • He was banished by Nero (in 66 or 68) for having indirectly disparaged the emperor's projected history of the Romans in heroic verse (Dio Cassius lxii.
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  • His Dialogues philosophiques, written in 1871, his Ecclesiastes (1882) and his Antichrist (1876) (the fourth volume of the Origins of Christianity, dealing with the reign of Nero) are incomparable in their literary genius, but they are examples of a disenchanted and sceptical temper.
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  • Claudius restored the royal titles to the family; but, after the death of its last member, Nero made the district into a province, and the town into a municipium.
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  • emperor Nero joint heir.
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  • Nero's horse took fright at the smell of a dead body lying by the roadside, which made him expose his face.
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  • America's Philo Vance had the strange gentility of Wimsey while Nero Wolf sounded more predatory.
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  • A fine fresco of Apollo playing a lyre - see picture - is thought to represent the young Nero.
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  • Stoic philosopher who later became an adviser to the emperor Nero.
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  • Nero was a cruel tyranny who would torture his subjects by playing the fiddle to them.
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  • You probably won't find any Nero underpants in Primark (or anywhere else ), either.
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  • See Lucian, 'AX�EavSpos IkevSo�avrns; Samuel Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius (1904); and F.
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  • 80 (on a coin of this year he calls himself Arsaces Artabanus) and the following years, and supported a pretender who rose in Asia Minor under the name of Nero (Zonaras xi.
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  • In the confusion of the disputed succession to the imperial throne after the death of Nero, the Batavians (A.D.
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  • In revenge for his own imprisonment, and the death of his brother by order of Nero, he took advantage of the disorder in the empire not only to stir up his fellow-countrymen to take up arms for independence, but to persuade a large number of German and Belgic tribes to join forces with them.
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  • In 67 disturbances broke out in Judaea, but Nero, jealous of Corbulo's success and popularity, ordered Vespasian to take command of the forces and summoned Corbulo to Greece.
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  • SoJosephus says - the war began in the twelfth year of the reign of Nero (A.D.
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  • When he had isolated the capital and was preparing to besiege it, the news of Nero's death reached him at Caesarea.
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  • xii., xiii., xiv.; Dio Cassius lix.-lxi.; Suetonius, Nero, 34; Stahr, Agrippina, die Mutter Neros (1880); Raffay, Die Memoiren der Kaiserin Agrippina (1884); B.
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  • But it seems more probable that the real author was Herennius Philo of Byblus, who was born during the reign of Nero and lived till the reign of Hadrian, and that the treatise in its present form is a revision prepared by a later Byzantine editor, whose name may have been Ammonius.
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  • Nero's works for his proposed canal from Baiae to the Tiber (A.D.
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  • 44 restored the quaestors, but nominated by the emperor for three years, for whom Nero in 56 substituted two ex-praetors, under the same conditions.
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  • The new emperor received the tidings of his rival's defeat and death at Alexandria, whence he at once forwarded supplies of corn to Rome, which were urgently needed, along with an edict or a declaration of policy, in which he gave assurance of an entire reversal of the laws of Nero, especially those relating to treason.
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  • (3) A celebrated incendiary treatise, De Mortibus Persecutorum, which describes God's judgments on the persecutors of his church from Nero to Diocletian, and has served as a model for numberless writings.
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  • that the book is directed against Rome, that Nero redivivus is to be recognized in the wounded head, that the number 666 denotes Nero Caesar, and that in chap. xi.
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  • 8, 12-14, where Nero is regarded as a demon coming up from the abyss to war not with Rome but with Christ and the elect.
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  • Nero was now a demonic monster from the abyss, and the ten kings no longer Parthians but ghostly helpers of Nero.
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  • " Nero " in 1899 found 5269 fathoms in 12° 43' N., 1 45° 49' E., the greatest depth yet measured.
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  • After the accession of Nero, Agrippina, by playing on his fears, induced him to poison Britannicus at a banquet (A.D.
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  • At Bauli, Pompey and Hortensius possessed villas, the former on the hills, while that of the latter, on the shores of the Lacus Lucrinus, was remarkable for its tame lampreys and as the scene of the dialogue in the second book of Cicero's Academica Priora; it afterwards became imperial property and was the scene of Agrippina's murder by Nero.
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  • (1898), 4.93 The wine of Fundi is spoken of by ancient writers, though the ager Caecubus, the coast plain round the Lago di Fundi, was even more renowned, and Horace frequently praises its wine; and though Pliny the Elder speaks as if its production had almost entirely ceased in his day (attributing this to neglect, but even more to the excavation works of Nero's projected canal from the lacus Avernus to Ostia), Martial mentions it often, and it is spoken of in the inscription of a wine-dealer of the time of Hadrian, together with Falernian and Setian wines (Corpus inscript.
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  • The United States telegraph ship " Nero," while surveying for a cable between Hawaii and the Philippines, sounded in 1900 the greatest depth yet known between Midway Islands and Guam (12° 43' N., 1 45° 49' E.) in 5269 fathoms, or almost exactly 6 m.
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  • During Nero's reign he was quaestor of Achaea and tribune of the plebs (A.D.
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  • Otho had owed his success, not only to the resentment felt by the praetorian guards at Galba's well-meant attempts to curtail their privileges in the interests of discipline, but also largely to the attachment felt in Rome for the memory of Nero; and his first acts as emperor showed that he was not unmindful of the fact.
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  • generation, reared in an atmosphere of resentment, first at Nero's conduct and then at the persecuting policy of the Flavian Caesars (see Revelation).
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  • The success of Seneca's own management of Nero largely depended on his being able gradually to emancipate the emperor from his mother's control.
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  • The spectacle presented by Nero's visit was unique.
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  • Gallio was the brother of Seneca, a Greek stoic philosopher who later became an adviser to the emperor Nero.
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  • You probably won't find any Nero underpants in Primark (or anywhere else), either.
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  • Nero, Roman Emperor, used emerald lenses that he claimed helped him to watch the gladiator games.
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  • Written evidence of the use of lenses to alter vision dates back to the first century A.D., in which a tutor of Emperor Nero documented the use of glass and water to magnify writing.
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  • Ancient Romans also celebrated Juvenalia, or Juvenales Ludi, scenic games instituted by the Emperor Nero.
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  • Check out the Elita Low Rise Thong with Lace, the Dolce & Gabbana Amenone Nero Thong, the Jezebel Satine Thong, and the Calvin Klein Perfectly Fit Seduction String Thong to name a few.
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  • Digital music fans looking for portability and back-up may wish to burn iTunes using Nero.
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  • Nero is a popular CD and DVD burning program for home and business use.
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  • A basic version of the program, called Nero Express, comes standard with many CD and DVD burners.
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  • The full version of Nero also includes sound editing and file creation capabilities in addition to basic burning.
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  • In order to burn iTunes using Nero, you would have to first convert the AAC files to another format, usually MP3.
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  • Without MP3 files, users cannot burn a CD in Nero.
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  • Commander Nero states the spiky, spiny massive ship he runs once was a mining ship, not intended for war.
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  • The old man was dressed in jeans and a western shirt complete with a string tie, turquoise clasp and a Nero Wolfe paperback in his back pocket.
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  • The motives alike of geographical convenience and of the advantages to be gained by recognizing these movements of Roman subjects combined to urge a forward policy at Rome, and when the vigorous Vespasian had succeeded the fool-criminal Nero, a series of advances began which gradually closed up the acute angle, or at least rendered it obtuse.
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  • 67 Nero restored Sardinia to the senate (but not Corsica) in exchange for Achaea, and the former was then governed by a legatus pro praetore; but Vespasian took it over again before A.D.
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  • The harbour was named by Nero, Portus Augusti.
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  • See Lucian, 'AX�EavSpos IkevSo�avrns; Samuel Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius (1904); and F.
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  • With regard to the region north of the Rhine we first obtain information from the accounts of the campaigns of Nero, Claudius, Drusus and Tiberius.
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  • Cotton MS. Nero D.
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  • Soon after the accession of Nero, Vologaeses (Vologasus), king of Parthia, overran Armenia, drove out Rhadamistus, who was under the protection of the Romans, and set his own brother Tiridates on the throne.
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