This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

needle

needle

needle Sentence Examples

  • Katie glanced up, the needle pausing in mid air.

    138
    54
  • A nurse walked in with a needle and after that she fell asleep again.

    62
    30
  • I feel more like a ship's sailor in a storm, with shredded sails with someone handing me a needle and thread.

    44
    28
  • - Single Needle with sounding arrangement.

    30
    17
  • She looked away and fumbled with the needle and thread she'd found in a sewing kit.

    22
    14
  • The galvanometer being so adjusted that a current of definite strength through one of the coils gives a definite deflection of the needle, the amount of leakage expressed in terms of the insulation resistance of the wires is given by the formula.

    21
    11
  • The needle was smaller than she remembered needles being, and she steadied her breathing before plunging it into his arm.

    12
    7
  • I wanted to ask questions but a medic stuck a needle in my arm.

    12
    9
  • The poles of a piece of magnetized steel may be at once distinguished if the two ends are successively presented to the compass; that end which attracts the south pole of the compass needle (and is therefore north) may be marked for easy identification.

    11
    5
  • The poles of a piece of magnetized steel may be at once distinguished if the two ends are successively presented to the compass; that end which attracts the south pole of the compass needle (and is therefore north) may be marked for easy identification.

    11
    5
  • He withdrew a small case with a needle in it and several small vials.

    8
    7
  • If a magnetized needle were supported so that it could move freely'about its centre of gravity it would not generally settle with its axis in a horizontal position, but would come to rest with its north-seeking pole either higher or lower than its centre.

    6
    8
  • To render the elongation evident, another wire is attached to its centre S2, this last having a thread fixed to its middle of which the other end is twisted round the shaft of an index needle or in some way connected to it through a multiplying gear.

    5
    3
  • This can be more easily shown if the compass is replaced by a magnetized knitting needle, supported horizontally by a thread.

    5
    3
  • The north pole of the bar-magnet will repel the north pole of the suspended needle, and there will likewise be repulsion between the two south poles.

    5
    3
  • This can be more easily shown if the compass is replaced by a magnetized knitting needle, supported horizontally by a thread.

    5
    3
  • The ' In London in 1910 the needle pointed about 16° W.

    4
    2
  • Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me.

    4
    2
  • Hot-wire ammeters are, however, liable to a shift of zero, and means are always provided by some adjusting screw for slightly altering the sag of the wire and so adjusting the index needle to the zero of the scale.

    4
    3
  • Once the bags were all filled Sarah removed the needle from Elisabeth's arm.

    4
    7
  • He was at Elisabeth's side before anyone realized, and tore the needle from her arm.

    4
    9
  • When a current is passed through the wire forming the coil, the fragment of iron is drawn more into the aperture of the coil where the field is stronger and so displaces an index needle over a scale.

    3
    0
  • These indications form the telegraph alphabet and are read in the same manner as in the case of the " single needle " instrument used on land.

    3
    1
  • C. Oersted's discovery that a magnetic needle is acted on by a voltaic current.

    3
    1
  • If a wire of soft iron is substituted for the suspended magnetic needle, either pole of the bar-magnet will attract either end of the wire indifferently.

    3
    1
  • A south pole would be urged oppositely to the conventional " direction " of the line; hence it follows that a very small magnetic needle, if placed in the field, would tend to set itself along or tangentially to the line of force passing through its centre, as may be approximately verified if the compass be placed among the filings on the cardboard.

    3
    1
  • Cables have frequently been picked up showing after many years of submergence no appreciable deterioration in this respect, while in other cases ends have been picked up which in the course of twelve years had been corroded to needle points, the result probably of metalliferous deposits in the locality.

    3
    2
  • If then the torsion head is provided with an index needle, and also if the movable coil is provided with an indicating point, it is possible to measure the torsional angle through which the head must be twisted to bring the movable coil back to its zero position.

    2
    0
  • All the mountains offer easy routes to pedestrians, but some of them, as Scafell, Pillar, Gable (Napes Needle), Pavey Ark above Langdale and Dow Crags near Coniston, also afford ascents for experienced climbers.

    2
    0
  • dependent upon the seaman's observation of the heavens, for these charts were in use long before the compass had been introduced on board ship (as early as 1205, according to Guiot de Provins) although it became fully serviceable only after the needle had been attached to the compass card, an improvement probably introduced by Flavio Gioja of Amalfi in the beginning of A.

    2
    0
  • Lay the compass upon the cardboard, and observe the rate at which its needle vibrates after being displaced from its position of equilibrium; this will vary greatly in different regions.

    2
    0
  • Similar instruments to the single and double needle apparatus of Cooke and Wheatstone were about the same time invented by the Rev. H.

    2
    1
  • The needle is balanced so that gravity compels it to take a certain position in which the fragment of iron occupies a position in the centre of the field of the coil where it is weakest.

    2
    1
  • When a current is passed through the coil the iron tends to move nearer to the coil of the wire where the field is stronger and so displaces the index needle over the scale.

    2
    1
  • Another type of similar instrument consists of a coil of wire having a fragment of iron wire suspended from one arm of an index needle near the mouth of a coil.

    2
    1
  • The coil carries an index needle moving over a scale, and there is generally an iron core in the interior of the coil but fixed and independent of it.

    2
    1
  • The needle is balanced so that gravity compels it to take a certain position in which the fragment of iron occupies a position in the centre of the field of the coil where it is weakest.

    2
    1
  • When a current is passed through the coil the iron tends to move nearer to the coil of the wire where the field is stronger and so displaces the index needle over the scale.

    2
    1
  • 13; in this arrangement the needle strikes against small tubes formed of tin-plate.

    2
    3
  • The singleneedle instrument is a vertical needle galvanoscope worked by a battery and reversing handle, or two " tapper " keys, the motions to right and left of one end of the index corresponding to the dashes and dots of the Morse alphabet.

    2
    5
  • If the looped lines are both in good condition and free from leakage, the current sent out on line r will be exactly equal to the current received back on line 2; and as these currents will have equal but opposite effects on the galvanometer needle, no deflection of the latter will be produced.

    1
    0
  • in diameter, attached to a stretched fibre and having a M t ru e small magnetic needle fixed to its back, is arranged within a menu.

    1
    0
  • galvanometer coil so that the influence of the latter causes the mirror (through the action of the magnetic needle) to be turned through a small angle in one direction or the other according to the direction of the current through the coil.

    1
    0
  • dent by the movement of the index needle.

    1
    0
  • In its simplest form an electromagnetic ammeter consists of a circular coil of wire in which is pivoted eccentrically an index needle carrying at its lower end a small mass of iron.

    1
    1
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.

    1
    3
  • Gammer Gurton's Needle is the second extant English comedy, properly so called.

    1
    6
  • F, Fixed coil; D, Movable coil; S, Spiral spring; T, Torsion head; MM, Mercury cups; I, Index needle.

    0
    0
  • On this side of Gable is the fine detached rock, Napes Needle.

    0
    0
  • For the practical observation of this phenomenon it is usual to employ a needle which can turn freely in the plane of the magnetic meridian upon a horizontal axis passing through the centre of gravity of the needle.

    0
    0
  • The angle which the magnetic axis makes with the plane of the horizon is called the inclination or Along an irregular line encircling the earth in the neighbourhood of the geographical equator the needle takes up a horizontal position, and the dip is zero.

    0
    0
  • At places north of this line, which is called the magnetic equator, the north end of the needle points downwards, the inclination generally becoming greater with increased distance from the equator.

    0
    0
  • South of the magnetic equator the south end of the needle is always inclined downwards, and there is a spot within the Antarctic Circle (148° E.

    0
    0
  • Gilbert in 1600, that the earth itself is a great magnet, having its poles at the two places where the dipping needle is vertical.

    0
    0
  • If, for example, a knitting needle is stroked with the south pole of a magnet, the strokes being directed from the middle of the needle towards the two extremities alternately, the needle will acquire a north pole at each end and a south pole in the middle.

    0
    0
  • Let a magnetized knitting needle, having north and south poles at the two ends respectively, be broken in the middle; each half will be found to possess a north and a south pole, the appropriate supplementary poles appearing at the broken ends.

    0
    0
  • M/H = (d 2 -1 2) tan 0/2d, where 1 is half the length of the magnet, which is placed in the " broadside-on " position as regards a small suspended magnetic needle, d the distance between the centre of the magnet and the needle, and 0 the angle through which the needle is deflected by the magnet.

    0
    0
  • A compass having a very short needle is placed on the line which bisects the axis of the magnet at right angles, and is moved until a neutral point is found where the force due to the earth's field H is balanced by that due to the magnet.

    0
    0
  • - Intensity of magnetization is most directly measured by observing the action which a magnetized body, generally a long straight rod, exerts upon a small magnetic needle placed near it.

    0
    0
  • The magnetic needle may be cemented horizontally across the back of a little plane or concave mirror, about or $ in.

    0
    0
  • Deflections of the suspended needle are indicated by the movement of a narrow beam of light which the mirror reflects from a lamp and focusses upon a graduated cardboard scale placed at a distance of a few feet; the angular deflection of the beam of light is, of course, twice that of the needle.

    0
    0
  • The suspended needle is, in the absence of disturbing causes, directed solely by the horizontal component of the earth's field of magnetic force H E, and therefore sets itself approximately north and south.

    0
    0
  • The magnetized body which is to be tested should be placed in such a position that the force H P due to its poles may, at the spot occupied by the suspended needle, act in a direction at right angles to that due to the earth - that is, east and west.

    0
    0
  • The direction of the resultant field of force will then make, with that of H E, an angle 0, such that Hp/H E tan 0, and the suspended needle will be deflected through the same angle.

    0
    0
  • In order to fulfil the requirement that the field which a magnetized rod produces at the magnetometer shall be at right angles to that of the earth, the rod may be conveniently placed in any one of three different positions with regard to the suspended needle.

    0
    0
  • (I) The rod is set in a horizontal position level with the suspended needle, its axis being in a line which is perpendicular to the magnetic meridian, and which passes through the centre of suspension of the needle.

    0
    0
  • AB is the rod and C the middle point of its axis; NS is the magnetometer needle; AM bisects the undeflected needle NS at right angles.

    0
    0
  • For most ordinary purposes the length of the needle may be assumed to be negligible in comparison with the distance between the needle and the rod.

    0
    0
  • (2) The rod may be placed horizontally east and west in such a position that the direction of the undeflected suspended needle bisects it at right angles.

    0
    0
  • Let the distance of each pole of the rod AB from the centre of the magnetometer needle = d.

    0
    0
  • v (3) In the third position the test rod is placed vertically with one of its poles at the level of the magnetometer needle, and in the line 7.

    0
    0
  • drawn perpendicularly to the undeflected needle from its centre of suspension.

    0
    0
  • 8, where AB is the vertical rod and M indicates the position of the magnetometer needle, which is supposed to be perpendicular to the plane of the paper.

    0
    0
  • If the cardboard scale upon which the beam of light is reflected by the magnetometer mirror is a flat one, the deflections as indicated by the movement of the spot of light are related to the actual deflections of the needle in the ratio of tan 20 to 0.

    0
    0
  • If the distance of the mirror from the scale is equal to n scale divisions, and if a deflection 0 of the needle causes, the reflected spot of light to move over s scale divisions, we shall have s/n = tan 20 exactly, s/2n = tan 0 approximately.

    0
    0
  • C is a " compensating coil " consisting of a few turns of wire through which the magnetizing current passes; it serves to neutralize the effect produced upon the magnetometer by the magnetizing coil, and its distance from the magnetometer is so adjusted that when the circuit is closed, no ferromagnetic metal being inside the magnetizing coil, the ti, magnetometer needle undergoes no deflection.

    0
    0
  • The wire is supported inside the glass tube A with its upper pole at the same height as the magnetometer needle.

    0
    0
  • Under the influence of the transient current, the galvanometer needle undergoes a momentary deflection, or " throw," which is proportional to Q, and therefore to 8B, and thus, if we know the deflection produced by the discharge through the galvanometer of a given quantity of electricity, we have the means of determining the value of 8B.

    0
    0
  • above them (thus A compass needle placed in the gap serves to detect any flow of induction that may exist between the bent bars.

    0
    0
  • Suppose the switches to be adjusted so that the effective number of turns in the variable coil is loo; the magnetizing forces in the two coils will then be equal, and if the test rod is of the same quality as the standard, the flow of induction will be confined entirely to the iron circuit, the two yokes will be at the same magnetic potential, and the compass needle will not be affected.

    0
    0
  • If, however, the permeability of the test rod differs from that of the standard, the number of lines of induction flowing in opposite directions through the two rods will differ, and the excess will flow from one yoke to the other, partly through the air, and partly along the path provided by the bent bars, deflecting the compass needle.

    0
    0
  • But a balance may still be obtained by altering the effective number of turns in the test coil, and thus increasing or decreasing the magnetizing force acting on the test rod, till the induction in the two rods is the same, a condition which is fulfilled when reversal of the current has no effect on the compass needle.

    0
    0
  • Experiments with annealed iron gave less satisfactory results, on account of the slowness with which the metal settled down into a new magnetic state, thus causing a " drift " of the magnetometer needle, which sometimes persisted for several seconds.

    0
    0
  • Hall Efect.-If an electric current is passed along a strip of thin metal, and the two points at opposite ends of an equipotential line are connected with a galvanometer, its needle will of course not be deflected.

    0
    0
  • The needles of the primitive compasses, being made of iron, would require frequent re-magnetization, and a " stone " for the purpose of " touching the needle " was therefore generally included in the navigator's outfit.

    0
    0
  • C. Oersted (1777-1851) had shown that a magnetic needle is deflected by an electric current, he attempted, in the laboratory of the Royal Institution in the presence of Humphry Davy, to convert that deflection into a continuous rotation, and also to obtain the reciprocal effect of a current rotating round a magnet.

    0
    0
  • (It is easy to see that the radius of the bright spot is of the same order of magnitude.) The experiment succeeds in a dark room of the length above mentioned, with a threepenny bit (supported by three threads) as obstacle, the origin of light being a small needle hole in a plate of tin, through which the sun's rays shine horizontally after reflection from an external mirror.

    0
    0
  • It is sufficient to look at wire gauze backed by the sky or by a flame, through a piece of blackened cardboard, pierced by a needle and held close to the eye.

    0
    0
  • In front of the naked eye was held a piece of copper foil perforated by a fine needle hole.

    0
    0
  • at Heliopolis, were taken by Augustus to adorn the Caesareum at Alexandria: one of these, "Cleopatra's Needle," was removed in 1877 to London, the other in 1879 to New York.

    0
    0
  • It was probably in Paris, the chief intellectual centre of his time, that Neckam heard how a ship, among its other stores, must have a needle placed above a magnet (the De utensilibus assumes a needle mounted on a pivot), which needle would revolve until its point looked north, and thus guide sailors in murky weather or on starless nights.

    0
    0
  • Cleopatra's Needle, an ancient Egyptian monument, was presented to the government by Mehemet Ali in 1819, brought from Alexandria in 1878, and erected on the Victoria embankment on a pedestal of grey granite.

    0
    0
  • a-, privative, and ywvia, an angle), the term given to the imaginary lines on the earth's surface connecting points at which the magnetic needle points to the geographical north and south.

    0
    0
  • Thus the red pine (aka-matsu or pinus densiflora), which is the favorite garden tree, has to be subjected twice a year to a process of spraydressing which involves the careful removal of every weak or aged needle.

    0
    0
  • It is not possible to enumerate here even the principal styles of ishime, but mention may be made of the zara-maki (broad-cast), in which the surface is finely but irregularly pitted after the manner of the face of a stone; the nashi-ji (pear-ground), in which we have a surface like the rind of a pear; the hari-ishime (needle ishime), where the indentations are so minute that they seem to have been made with the point of a needle; the gama-ishime, which is intended to imitate the skin of a toad; the tsuya-ishime, produced with a chisel sharpened so that its traces have a lustrous appearance; the ore-liuchi (broken-tool), a peculiar kind obtained with a jagged tool; and the gozam, which resembles the plaited surface of a fine straw mat.

    0
    0
  • Formerly the embroiderer was content to produce a pattern with his needle, now he paints a picture.

    0
    0
  • A simple method for condenser comparison is to charge the two condensers to the same voltage by a battery and then discharge them successively through a ballistic galvanometer and observe the respective " throws " or deflections of the coil or needle.

    0
    0
  • Of the rarer bismuth minerals we may notice the following: - the complex sulphides, copper bismuth glance or wittichenite, BiCu 3 S 3, silver bismuth glance, bismuth cobalt pyrites, bismuth nickel pyrites or saynite, needle ore (patrinite or aikinite), BiCuPbS 3, emplectite, CuBiS 2, and kobellite, BiAsPb 3 S 6; the sulphotelluride tetradymite; the selenide guanajuatite, B12Se3, Iv.

    0
    0
  • The products of the textile industry in America were bark cloth, wattling for walls, fences and weirs, paper, basketry, matting, loom products, needle or point work, net-work, lacework and embroidery.

    0
    0
  • Schwabach is the chief seat of the needle manufacture in Bavaria; its other industries include gold and silver wire work, brewing and the making of soap and earthenware.

    0
    0
  • These coils are placed with their axes at right angles to one another, and at the point where the axes intersect a small pivoted needle of soft iron is placed, carrying a longer index needle moving over a scale.

    0
    0
  • The small pivoted iron needle ns placed in their common field therefore takes up a certain position, dependent on the relative value of these fields.

    0
    0
  • The tangent of the angle of deflection 0 of this needle measured from its position, when the shunt coil is disconnected, is equal to the ratio of the voltage of the dynamo to the current through the insulator.

    0
    0
  • Hence the deflection of the needle is proportional to the insulation resistance, and the scale can be graduated to show directly this resistance in megohms.

    0
    0
  • The exact position of the core, and, therefore, of an index needle connected with it, is dependent on the ratio of the voltage applied to the terminals of the high resistance or insulator and the current passing through it, This, however, is a measure of the insulation-resistance.

    0
    0
  • The exact position taken up by the needle is therefore determined by the potential difference (P.D.) of the quadrants and the P.D.

    0
    0
  • If the quadrants of an electrometer are con - nected to the ends of a non-inductive circuit in series with the power-absorbing circuit, and if the needle is connected to the end of this last circuit opposite to that at which the inductionless re - sistance is connected, then the deflexion of the electrometer will be proportional to the power taken up in the circuit, since it is pro - portional to the mean value of (A - B) IC - 1 (A ±B)}, where A and B are the potentials of the quadrants and C is that of the needle.

    0
    0
  • In the space between them is suspended a "needle" which consists of a light aluminium axis, to which are affixed a number of paddle-shaped aluminium blades.

    0
    0
  • This needle is suspended by a fine platinum silver wire, and its normal position is such that the aluminium paddle blades are just outside the quadrantal-shaped plates.

    0
    0
  • If the needle is connected to one terminal of a circuit, and the fixed plates or cells to the other member of the circuit, and a difference of potential is created between them, then the movable needle is drawn in so that the aluminium blades are more included between the fixed plates.

    0
    0
  • This movement is resisted by the torsional elasticity of the suspending wire, and hence a fixed indicating needle attached to the movable system can be made to indicate directly on a scale, the difference of potential between the terminals of the instrument in volts.

    0
    0
  • For such purposes the whole of the working parts are contained in a metal case; the indicating needle moving over a divided scale which is calibrated to show directly the potential difference in volts of the terminals of the instrument.

    0
    0
  • As the frame has the same linear expansion as the wire, external changes of the temperature will not affect their relative length, but if the fine wire is heated by the passage of an electric current, its expansion will move the indicating needle over the scale, the motion being multiplied by the gear.

    0
    0
  • In the Hartmann and Braun form of hot-wire voltmeter, the fine wire is fixed between two supports, and the expansion produced when a current is passed through it causes the wire to sag down, the sag being multiplied by a gear and made to move an indicating needle over a scale.

    0
    0
  • in a small piece of soft iron, as in the case of the corresponding ammeters, and this in turn may be made to displace an indicating needle over a scale so that corresponding to every given potential difference between the terminals of the instrument there is a corresponding fixed position of the needle on the scale.

    0
    0
  • The movable coil has attached to it an index needle moving over a scale, and a fixed coil of high-resistance wire is included in series with the movable coil between the terminals of the instrument.

    0
    0
  • This motion is resisted by the torsion of a spiral spring resembling the hair-spring of a watch having one end fixed to the coil axis, and there is therefore a definite position of the needle on the scale corresponding to each potential difference between the terminals, provided it is within the range of the control.

    0
    0
  • The qualities required in a good voltmeter are: - (i.) It should be quick in action, that is to say, the needle should come quickly to a position giving immediately the P.D.

    0
    0
  • The needle weir has, however, attained its greatest development in the United States across the Big Sandy river at Louisa, where, instead of needles 3 to 4 in.

    0
    0
  • - Needle Weir, River Moldau.

    0
    0
  • adopted for closing the timber passes alongside the needle weirs placed across the Main, with a single upper paddle 393 ft.

    0
    0
  • This may be relieved by tapping the cavity with a small hollow needle (Southey's trocar), or by passing into it a large sharp-pointed tube.

    0
    0
  • A bulging having been found, that part of the liver which apparently overlies the abscess should be stitched up to the sides of the opening made in belly-wall, and should then be explored by a hollow needle.

    0
    0
  • It is inadvisable to explore for a suspected abscess with a hollow needle without first opening the abdomen, as septic fluid might thus be enabled to leak out, and infect the general peritoneal cavity.

    0
    0
  • The cathedral was founded on the ruins of St Wilfrid's abbey about 680, but of this Saxon building nothing now remains except the crypt, called St Wilfrid's Needle.

    0
    0
  • Creak, and has been found to give satisfactory results on board ship. The circle is provided with two needles in addition to those used for determining the dip, one (a) an ordinary dip needle, and the other (b) a needle which has been loaded at one end by means of a small peg which fits into one of two symmetrically placed holes in the needle.

    0
    0
  • Attached to the cross-arm which carries the microscopes used to observe the ends of the dipping needle is a clamp, which will hold the needle b in such a way that its plane is parallel to the vertical circle and its axis is at right angles to the line joining the two microscopes.

    0
    0
  • Hence, when the microscopes are adjusted so as to coincide with the points of the dipping needle a, the axes of the two needles must be at right angles.

    0
    0
  • The needle a being suspended between the jewels, and the needle b being held in the clamp, the cross-arm carrying the reading microscopes and the needle b is rotated till the ends of the needle a coincide with the cross-wires of the microscopes.

    0
    0
  • The verniers having been read, the cross-arm is rotated so as to deflect the needle a in the opposite direction, and a new setting is taken.

    0
    0
  • the angle through which the needle a has been deflected under the action of the needle b.

    0
    0
  • This angle depends on the ratio of the magnetic moment of the needle b to the total force of the earth's field.

    0
    0
  • Hence the above observation gives us a means of obtaining the ratio of the magnetic moment of the needle' b to the value of the earth's total force.

    0
    0
  • The needle b is then substituted for a, there being now no needle in the clamp attached to the microscope arm, and the difference between the reading now obtained and the dip, together with the weight added to the needle, gives the product of the moment of the needle b into the earth's total force.

    0
    0
  • In an actual observation the deflecting needle would be reversed, as well as the deflected one, while different weights would be used to deflect the needle b..

    0
    0
  • The principle of the method consists in deflecting the compass needle by means of a horizontal magnet supported vertically over the compass card, the axis of the deflecting magnet being always perpendicular to the axis of the magnet attached to the card.

    0
    0
  • The mariner's compass, with which this article is concerned, is an instrument by means of which the directive force of that great magnet, the Earth, upon a freely-suspended needle, is utilized for a purpose essential to navigation.

    0
    0
  • The needle is so mounted that it only moves freely in the horizontal plane, and therefore the horizontal component of the earth's force alone directs it.

    0
    0
  • The direction assumed by the needle is not generally towards the geographical north, but diverges towards the east or west of it, making a horizontal angle with the true FIG.

    0
    0
  • In the usual navigable waters of the world the variation alters from 30° to the east to 45° to the west of the geographical meridian, being westerly in the Atlantic and Indian oceans, easterly in the Pacific. The vertical plane passing through the longitudinal axis of such a needle is known as the magnetic meridian.

    0
    0
  • Following the first chart of lines of equal variation compiled by Edmund Halley in 1700, charts of similar type have been published from time to time embodying recent observations and corrected for the secular change, thus providing seamen with values of the variation accurate to about 30' of arc. Possessing these data, it is easy to ascertain by observation the effects of the iron in a ship in disturbing the compass, and it will be found for the most part in every vessel that the needle is deflected from the magnetic meridian by a horizontal angle called the deviation of the compass; in some directions of the ship's head adding to the known variation of the place, in other directions subtracting from it.

    0
    0
  • Local magnetic disturbance of the needle due to magnetic rocks is observed on land in all parts of the world, and in certain places extends to the land under the sea, affecting the compasses on board the ships passing over it.

    0
    0
  • The general direction of these disturbances in the northern hemisphere is an attraction of the north-seeking end of the needle; in the southern hemisphere, its repulsion.

    0
    0
  • Thus in every ship the compass needle is more or less subject to deviation differing in amount and direction for every azimuth of the ship's head.

    0
    0
  • The horizontal directive force on the needle on board is nearly always less than on land, sometimes much less, whilst in armour-plated ships it ranges from 8 to 2 when the directive force on land= 1 o.

    0
    0
  • In this he gave equations resulting from the hypothesis that the magnetism of a ship is partly due to the permanent magnetism of hard iron and partly to the transient induced magnetism of soft iron; that the latter is proportional to the intensity of the inducing force, and that the length of the needle is infinitesimally small compared to the distance of the surrounding iron.

    0
    0
  • 121, where the lodestone is defined as "a stone with which an attraction can be given to a needle," but this knowledge is no more than that existing in Europe at least five hundred years before.

    0
    0
  • The Chinese name for the compass is ting-nan-ching, or needle pointing to the south; and a distinguishing mark is fixed on the magnet's southern pole, as in European compasses upon the northern one."

    0
    0
  • The needle is peculiarly poised, with its point of suspension a little below its centre of gravity, and is exceedingly sensitive; it is seldom more than an inch in length, and is less than a line in thickness.

    0
    0
  • P. Badger, Hakluyt Soc., 1863, note, pp. 31 and 32) that the name of Bushla or Busba, from the Italian Bussola, though common among Arab sailors in the Mediterranean, is very seldom used in the Eastern seas, - Dairah and Beit el-Ibrah (the Circle, or House of the Needle) being the ordinary appellatives in the Red Sea, whilst in the Persian Gulf Kiblah-n¢meh is in more general use.

    0
    0
  • Bailak Kibdjaki, also, an Arabian writer, shows in his Merchant's Treasure, a work given to the world in 1282, that the magnetized needle, floated on water by means of a splinter of wood or a reed, was employed on the Syrian seas at the time of his voyage from Tripoli to Alexandria (1242), and adds:"They say that the captains who navigate the Indian seas use, instead of the needle and splinter, a sort of fish made out of hollow iron, which, when thrown into the water, swims upon the surface, and points out the north and south with its head and tail" (Klaproth, Lettre, p. 57).

    0
    0
  • The Arab traders in the Levant certainly used a floating compass, as did the Italians before the introduction of the pivoted needle; the magnetized piece of iron being floated upon a small raft of cork or reeds in a bowl of water.

    0
    0
  • He speaks there of a needle carried on board ship which, being placed on a pivot, and allowed to take its own position of repose, shows mariners their course when the polar star is hidden.

    0
    0
  • c. 89, he writes, - "Mariners at sea, when; through cloudy weather in the day which hides the sun, or through the darkness of the night, they lose the knowledge of the quarter of the world to which they are sailing, touch a needle with the magnet, which will turn round till, on its motion ceasing, its point will be directed towards the north" (W.

    0
    0
  • The magnetical needle, and its suspension on a stick or straw in water, are clearly described in La Bible Guiot, a poem probably of the r3th century, by Guiot de Provins, wherein we are told that through the magnet (la manette or l'amaniere), an ugly brown stone to which iron turns of its own accord, mariners possess an art that cannot fail them.

    0
    0
  • A needle touched by it, and floated by a stick on water, turns its point towards the pole-star, and a light being placed near the needle on dark nights, the proper course is known (Hist.

    0
    0
  • Guido Guinizzelli, a poet of the same period, writes: - "In those parts under the north are the mountains of lodestone, which give the virtue to the air of attracting iron; but because it [the lodestone] is far off, [it] wishes to have the help of a similar stone to make it [the virtue] work, and to direct the needle towards the star."

    0
    0
  • 28-30) mentions the pointing of the magnetic needle toward the pole star.

    0
    0
  • He then describes a new compass with a needle thrust through a pivoted axis, placed in a box with transparent cover, cross index of brass or silver, divided circle, and an external "rule" or alhidade provided with a pair of sights.

    0
    0
  • The mounting of the card upon the needle or "flie," so as to turn with it, is probably of Amalphian origin.

    0
    0
  • Da Buti, the Dante commentator, in 1380 says the sailors use a compass at the middle of which is pivoted a wheel of light paper to turn on its pivot, on which wheel the needle is fixed and the star (wind-rose) painted.

    0
    0
  • The placing of the card at the bottom of the box, fixed, below the needle, was practised by the compassmakers of Nuremberg in the 16th century, and by Stevinus of Bruges about 1600.

    0
    0
  • Barlowe, in his treatise Magnetical Advertisements, printed in 1616 (p. 66), complains that "the Compasse needle, being the most admirable and usefull instrument of the whole world, is both amongst ours and other nations for the most part, so bungerly and absurdly contrived, as nothing more."

    0
    0
  • The form he recommends for the needle is that of "a true circle, having his Axis going out beyond the circle, at each end narrow and narrower, unto a reasonable sharpe point, and being pure steele as the circle it selfe is, having in the middest a convenient receptacle to place the capitell in."

    0
    0
  • He also showed that the Chinese mode of suspending the needle conduces most to sensibility.

    0
    0
  • acus, needle, or acer, sharp), needleshaped, a term used in botany (since Linnaeus) as descriptive of the leaves, e.g., of pines.

    0
    0
  • The usual form of ice-crystals in clouds is a right hexagonal prism, which may be elongated as a needle or foreshortened like a thin plate.

    0
    0
  • Adam's Needle.

    0
    0
  • The process of inserting white hairs is called in the trade "pointing," and is either done by stitching them in with a needle or by adhesive caoutchouc.

    0
    0
  • In high latitudes the average height is probably less, but the direction in which the magnetic needle TABLE V.

    0
    0
  • Thus there must in general be a difference between the observer's magnetic meridian - answering to the mean position of the magnetic needle at his station - and the direction the needle would have at a given hour, if undisturbed by the aurora, at any spot where the phenomena which the observer sees as aurora exist.

    0
    0
  • This seems in general to be nearly coincident with the direction of the dipping needle.

    0
    0
  • As the curtain approached, the compass needle always deviated to the west, oscillated as the curtain passed the zenith, and then deviated to the east.

    0
    0
  • The behaviour of the needle, as Paulsen points out, is exactly what it should be if the space occupied by the auroral curtain were traversed by electric currents directed upwards from the ground.

    0
    0
  • The direction in which the compass needle deviated was west or east, according as the curtain approached from the south or the north; as the curtain retired the deviation eventually diminished.

    0
    0
  • A simple form, which is sometimes referred to as a conical pen dulum, may be con structed with a large sewing needle carrying a galvanometer mirror, suspended by means of a silk or quartz fibre as shown in fig.

    0
    0
  • To avoid the possi bility of displacements clue to magnetic influences, the needle may be replaced by a brass or glass rod.

    0
    0
  • wide, now light brown with age, on which have been worked with a needle, in worsteds of eight colours, scenes representing the conquest of England by the Normans.

    0
    0
  • The nets are often very large, and are netted with a needle and mesh as in hand-netting among ourselves.

    0
    0
  • This can be effected (after setting the axis) by rotating Cs until a needle indicates true time on the hour dial B.

    0
    0
  • Above the firs come the tamarack, constituting the bulk of the lower Alpine forest; the hardy long-lived mountain pine; the red cedar or juniper, growing even on the baldest rocks; the beautiful hemlock spruce; the still higher white pine, nut pine, needle pine; and finally, at io,000 to 12,000 ft., the dwarf pine, which grows in a tangle on the earth over which one walks, and may not show for a century's growth more than a foot of height or an inch of girth.

    0
    0
  • It consisted simply of a light metallic needle balanced on a pivot like a compass needle.

    0
    0
  • 1 In this case the visible indication consisted in the attraction exerted between the electrified body and the light pivoted needle which was acted upon A, ' j+ C and electrified by induction.

    0
    0
  • electrical needle and proved that innumerable bodies he called electrica, when rubbed, can attract the needle of the versorium (see Electroscope).

    0
    0
  • In the Annals of Philosophy (1820, 16, p. 273) is to be found an English translation of Oersted's original Latin essay (entitled " Experiments on the Effect of a Current of Electricity on the Magnetic Needle "), dated the 21st of July 1820, describing his discovery.

    0
    0
  • We may likewise conclude that this conflict performs circles round the wire, for without this condition it seems impossible that one part of the wire when placed below the magnetic needle should drive its pole to the east, and when placed above it, to the west."

    0
    0
  • Oersted's important discovery was the fact that when a wire joining the end plates of a voltaic pile is held near a pivoted magnet or compass needle, the latter is deflected and places itself more or less transversely to the wire, the direction depending upon whether the wire is above or below the needle, and on the manner in which the copper or zinc ends of the pile are connected to it.

    0
    0
  • C. Schweigger (1779-1857) with his " multiplier " made an advance upon Oersted's discovery, by winding the wire conveying the electric current many times round the pivoted magnetic needle and thus increasing the deflection; and L.

    0
    0
  • He found that a vibrating magnetic compass needle came to rest sooner when placed over a plate of copper than otherwise, and also that a plate of copper rotating under a suspended magnet tended to drag the magnet in the same direction.

    0
    0
  • Abandoning the long and somewhat heavy magnetic needles that had been used up to that date in galvanometers, he attached to the back of a very small mirror made of microscopic glass a fragment of magnetized watch-spring, and suspended the mirror and needle by means of a cocoon fibre in the centre of a coil of insulated wire.

    0
    0
  • the eye of a needle."

    0
    0
  • 5) a flat paddleshaped needle of aluminium foil U is supported by a bifilar suspension consisting of two cocoon fibres.

    0
    0
  • This needle is suspended in the interior of a glass vessel partly coated with tin-foil on the outside and inside, forming therefore a Leyden jar (see fig.

    0
    0
  • In the bottom of the vessel is placed some sulphuric acid, and a platinum wire attached to the suspended needle dips into this acid.

    0
    0
  • By giving a charge to this Leyden jar the needle can thus be maintained at a certain constant high potential.

    0
    0
  • from the needle and from the case, and the two pairs are connected to two electrodes.

    0
    0
  • The needle in its normal position is symmetrically placed with regard to the quadrants, and carries a mirror by means of which its displacement can be observed in the usual manner by reflecting the ray of light from it.

    0
    0
  • If the two quadrants are at different potentials, the needle moves from one quadrant towards the other, and the image of a spot of light on the scale is therefore displaced.

    0
    0
  • According to the mathematical theory of the instrument,' if V and V' are the potentials of the quadrants and v is the potential of the needle, then the torque acting upon the needle to cause rotation is given by the expression, C(V - V'){v-2(V-{-V')}, where C is some constant.

    0
    0
  • The formula indicates that the sensibility of the instrument should increase with the charge of the Leyden jar or needle, whereas Hopkinson found that as the potential of the needle was increased by working the replenisher of the jar, the deflection due to three volts difference between the quadrants first increased and then diminished.

    0
    0
  • He found that when the potential of the needle exceeded a certain value, of about volts, for the particular instrument he was using (made by White of Glasgow), the above formula did not hold good.

    0
    0
  • Hopkinson had been inclined to attribute the anomaly to an increase in the tension of the bifilar threads, owing to a downward pull on the needle, but they showed that this theory would not account for the discrepancy.

    0
    0
  • If the quadrants were near together there were certain limits between which the potential of the needle might vary without producing more than a small change in the deflection corresponding with the fixed potential difference of the quadrants.

    0
    0
  • of 1.45 volts between the quadrants only varied about II% when the potential of the needle varied from 896 to 3586 volts.

    0
    0
  • In this case the deflection of the needle was practically quite constant when its potential varied from to 3227 volts.

    0
    0
  • between the quadrants was almost directly proportional to the potential of the needle.

    0
    0
  • Finally, these observers traced the variation to the fact that the wire supporting the aluminium needle as well as the wire which connects the needle with the sulphuric acid in the Leyden jar in the White pattern of Leyden jar is enclosed in a metallic guard tube to screen the wire from external action.

    0
    0
  • In order that the needle may project outside the guard tube, openings are made in its two sides; hence the moment the needle is deflected each half of it becomes unsymmetrically placed relatively to the two metallic pieces which join the upper and lower half of the guard tube.

    0
    0
  • The importance of this investigation resides in the fact that an electrometer of the above pattern can be used as a wattmeter, provided that the deflection of the needle is proportional to the potential difference of the quadrants.

    0
    0
  • Blondlot and P. Curie afterwards suggested that a single electrometer could be constructed with two pairs of quadrants and a duplicate needle on one stem, so as to make two readings simultaneously and produce a deflection proportional at once to the power being taken up in the inductive circuit.

    0
    0
  • The needle and quadrants are of small size, and the FIG.

    0
    0
  • The needle, a piece of paddle-shaped paper thinly coated with silver foil, is suspended by a quartz fibre, its extreme lightness making it possible to use a very feeble controlling force without rendering the period of oscillation unduly great.

    0
    0
  • The resistance offered by the air to a needle of such light construction suffices to render the motion nearly dead-beat.

    0
    0
  • The needle is charged to a potential of 50 to 200 volts by means of a dry pile or voltaic battery, or from a lighting circuit.

    0
    0
  • To facilitate the communication of the charge to the needle, the quartz fibre and its attachments are rendered conductive by a thin film of solution of hygroscopic salt such as calcium chloride.

    0
    0
  • The lightness of the needle enables the instrument to be moved without fear of damaging the suspension.

    0
    0
  • long, the needle being charged to 110 volts, the period and swing of the needle was 18 seconds.

    0
    0
  • 7rLru), a name given by the ancients to some of the resinous cone-bearing trees to which it is now applied, and, as limited by modern botanists, the designation of a large genus of true conifers, differing from the firs in their hard woody cone-scales being thickened at the apex, and in their slender needle - shaped leaves growing from a membranous sheath, either in pairs or from three to five together - each tuft representing an abortive branch, springing from the axil of a partially deciduous scale-leaf, the base of which remains closely adherent to the stem.

    0
    0
  • C, Cone, needle and seed.

    0
    0
  • He found that a magnetic needle, made to oscillate over nonferruginous surfaces, such as water, glass, copper, &c., falls more rapidly in the extent of its oscillations according as it is more or less approached to the surface.

    0
    0
  • This discovery, which gained him the Copley medal of the Royal Society in 1825, was followed by another, that a rotating plate of copper tends to communicate its motion to a magnetic needle suspended over it ("magnetism of rotation").

    0
    0
  • In his experiments a long compass needle is mounted so as to swing in the surface of the liquid under investigation.

    0
    0
  • The cases of ordinary clean water and alcohol are strongly contrasted, the motion of the needle upon the former being comparatively sluggish.

    0
    0
  • In the case of water the whole of the surface in front of the needle moves with it, while on the other hand the dust floating on alcohol is scarcely disturbed until the needle actually strikes it.

    0
    0
  • This work, which embodied the results of many years' research, was distinguished by its strict adherence to the scientific method of investigation by experiment, and by the originality of its matter, containing, as it does, an account of the author's experiments on magnets and magnetical bodies and on electrical attractions, and also his great conception that the earth is nothing but a large magnet, and that it is this which explains, not only the direction of the magnetic needle north and south, but also the variation and dipping or inclination of the needle.

    0
    0
  • It was, therefore, the earliest example of a true "magnetic" telegraph, all preceding experiments to this end having been on the galvanometer or needle principle.

    0
    0
  • In the Californian Pinus monophylla each spur bears usually one needle, but two are not uncommon; it would seem that rudiments of two needles are always produced, but, as a rule, only one develops into a needle.

    0
    0
  • In Sciadopitys similar spurs occur, each bearing a single needle, which in its grooved surface and in the possession of a double vascular bundle bears traces of an origin from two needle-leaves.

    0
    0
  • - Diagrammatic treatment of: A, Double needle of Sciadopitys (a, a, leaves; b, shoot; Br, bract).

    0
    0
  • A pine needle grown iji continuous light differs from one grown under ordinary conditions in the absence of hypodermal fibres, in the absence of the characteristic infoldings of the mesophyll cell-walls, in the smaller size of the resin-canals, &c. The endodermis in Pinus, Picea and many other genera is usually a well-defined layer of cells enclosing the vascular bundles, and separated from them by a tissue consisting in part of ordinary parenchyma and to some extent of isodiametric tracheids; but this tissue, usually spoken of as the pericycle, is in direct continuity with other stem-tissues as well as the pericycle.

    0
    0
  • In all household work she was specially proficient, her skill in the use of the needle not being excelled (she said) by that of any matron even of Rouen.

    0
    0
  • His attention was also turned to the subject of compass needles, his Bakerian lecture "On the Best Kind of Steel and Form for a Compass Needle" (Phil.

    0
    0
  • The injection should be intra-muscular, the needle being boldly plunged into a muscular mass, such as that of the deltoid or the gluteal region.

    0
    0
  • There is reason to believe that Gunter was the first to discover (in 1622 or 1625) that the magnetic needle does not retain the same declination in the same place at all times.

    0
    0
  • They are produced as follows: A sharp-pointed needle is placed perpendicular to a non-conducting plate, such as of resin, ebonite or glass, with its point very near to or in contact with the plate, and a Leyden jar is discharged into the needle.

    0
    0
  • A curious fact, which may be used for the detection of the minutest quantity of oils and fats, is that camphor crushed between layers of paper without having been touched with the fingers rotates when thrown on clean water, the rotation ceasing immediately when a trace of oil or fat is added, such as introduced by touching the water with a needle which has been passed previously through the hair.

    0
    0
  • of N., in 1652 magnetic north was true north, in 1815 the magnetic needle pointed 2 4 2° W.

    0
    0
  • The voltmeter needle may then be made to record its variations graphically on a drum covered with paper and so to delineate the wave form of the current.

    0
    0
  • They consist essentially of a galvanometer of which the needle or coil has such a short natural periodic time that it can follow all the variations of a current which runs through its cycle in say i;nth second.

    0
    0
  • This needle or coil must be so damped that when the current is cut off it returns to zero at once without overshooting the mark.

    0
    0
  • In one form of Blondel's oscillograph, the vibrating system is a small magnetic needle carrying a mirror, but the principle on which it operates is the same as that of the instrument above described.

    0
    0
  • I feel more like a ship's sailor in a storm, with shredded sails with someone handing me a needle and thread.

    0
    0
  • I wanted to ask questions but a medic stuck a needle in my arm.

    0
    0
  • He withdrew a small case with a needle in it and several small vials.

    0
    0
  • The needle was smaller than she remembered needles being, and she steadied her breathing before plunging it into his arm.

    0
    0
  • She looked away and fumbled with the needle and thread she'd found in a sewing kit.

    0
    0
  • You want to find a needle in a haystack, get a magnet.

    0
    0
  • Once the bags were all filled Sarah removed the needle from Elisabeth's arm.

    0
    0
  • He was at Elisabeth's side before anyone realized, and tore the needle from her arm.

    0
    0
  • Katie glanced up, the needle pausing in mid air.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →