Nave sentence example

nave
  • The nave is the most beautiful portion.
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  • Its foundation dates from the year 1030, while the nave is Romanesque of the middle of the 12th century, with much pointed work.
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  • Later he erected the priory, for canons of his order, of which the nave and transepts of the church remain.
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  • The main building, consisting of a nave with apsidal end and two aisles,.
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  • The abbey church of St Mary the Virgin is a stately cruciform building with central tower, the nave and choir having aisles and clerestory.
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  • The church of All Saints is mentioned in Domesday, and tradition ascribes the building of its nave to King John, while the western side of the tower must be older still.
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  • It was not completed, however, till the 19th century, when the west portal and towers and two bays of the nave were added, according to the plans of Violletle-Duc. The fine stained glass of the windows dates from the 13th to the 15th centuries.
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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.
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  • Brizio, separated from the nave by a fine 14th-century wroughtiron screen.
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  • The church is cruciform and the altar stands beneath the eastern lantern arch, a fine rood screen separating off the choir, which was devoted to monastic use, while the nave was kept for the parishioners, in consequence of a dispute between the vicar and the monastery in 1499.
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  • At Steetley, near Worksop, is a small Norman chapel, with apse, restored from a ruinous condition; Youlgrave church, a building of much general interest, has Norman nave pillars and a fine font of the same period, and Normanton church has a peculiar Norman corbel table.
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  • Petronio, the patron saint of Bologna, which was begun in 1390; only the nave and aisles as far as the transepts were, however, completed, but even this is a fine fragment, in the Gothic style, measuring 384 ft.
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  • Thu: church of St Peter and St Paul has a double nave, with aisles, the north arcade being Norman; but the rest of the building is mainly Decorated and Perpendicular.
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  • The western limit of the former nave of the church is marked by a fine Early English doorway, now forming an entrance to the churchyard.
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  • In the restoration of 1866 some early mural painting was discovered, and a transition Norman clerestory was discovered, remaining above the later nave.
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  • The church is without aisles, and has a semicircular roof, and the choir is raised twelve steps above the floor of the nave.
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  • Bishop Dean (temp. Henry VII.) rebuilt the choir, Bishop Skevyngton (1532) added tower and nave.
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  • The choir was lengthened and the beautiful eastern rose window added by Bishop Stewart in 1511, and the porch and the western end of the nave were finished in 1540 by Bishop Robert Reid.
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  • The qanki, or sanctuary, is divided from the nave, by a solid wall, pierced by a single doorway; it contains the altar, or madhb'kha (literary, the sacrificing place), and may be entered only by persons in holy orders who are fasting.
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  • The pillars which support the nave are of marble from Elba and Giglio; those of the side aisles are the spoils of ancient Greek and Roman buildings brought by the Pisan galleys.
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  • The church was remodelled in 1139, to which period much of the existing structure belongs, including the richly sculptured west front and the open confessio or crypt, which occupies the eastern half of the church, raising the choir high above the nave.
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  • The nave, dating from the 11th century, is supported by alternate columns and pillars, and contains frescoes of the 11th-14th centuries.
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  • It consists of a nave in six bays, aisles, transepts, each with two eastern chapels, and an apse, all vaulted with simple quadripartite brick groining.
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  • The eastern portion of the vaulting, including the choir and one bay of the nave, has the older and simpler decorations; the rest of the nave has more elaborate painted ornament - foliage mixed with figures of Dominican saints, executed in the 15th century.
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  • It is mainly built of red brick, with fine nave columns of red and white marble and an elaborate marble pavement inlaid in many different patterns.
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  • The plan is unusual, consisting of a large nave without aisles, the span being between 45 and 50 ft.; it also has two shallow transepts and an apsidal east end.
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  • From this period date the nave and the side aisles; the choir was completed in 1315-1338 and the long transepts in 1 34 6 - 1 354.
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  • The Liebfrauenkirche is first mentioned in 1314 as a collegiate church; the nave was consecrated in 1340.
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  • It had a fine Gothic façade: the interior had mosaics in the apses dating from 1330, and the nave contained 26 granite columns, said to have been brought from a temple of Poseidon near Faro, and had a fine wooden roof of 1260.
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  • The interior was restored in 1 559, though the pointed arches of the nave, borne by ancient granite columns, are still visible: and the only mosaics preserved are those of the apse and the last bay of the choir: they are remarkably fine specimens of the art of the period (1148) and, though restored in 1859-1862, have suffered much less than those at Palermo and Monreale from the process.
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  • The cathedral, built entirely of marble, occupies the site of an earlier church, and was begun in 1396, from which period the nave dates: the façade belongs to 1457-1486, while the east of the exterior was altered into the Renaissance style, and richly decorated with sculptures by Tommaso Rodari in 1487-1526.
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  • The first portion (the nave) was consecrated on the 2nd of June 1904.
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  • The pulpit was formerly used in the nave of Westminster Abbey, being presented to Belfast cathedral by the dean and chapter of that foundation.
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  • The former cathedral church was mainly built 1069-1089, but was later gothicized; near the west end of the nave a plate in the floor marks the spot where Huss stood when condemned to death, while in the midst of the choir is the brass which covered the grave of Robert Hallam, bishop of Salisbury, who died here in 1417, during the council.
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  • The chancel, nave and two side chapels exist, and it still serves as the parish church.
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  • The church of St Mary and All Saints, originally collegiate, is Perpendicular, and only the nave with aisles, and the tower surmounted by an octagon, remain; but the building is in the best style of its period.
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  • It is mainly Early English, and a fine example of the style; but some of the windows including the nave clerestory, and the beautiful carved wooden roof, are Perpendicular.
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  • An open space forming the heart of the square in which the church stands separates the solitary western tower (14th century) from the choir and transept, the nave having been blown down by a violent hurricane in 1674 and never rebuilt.
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  • Even the waggon vaults over the nave, choir and transepts are of stone unprotected by lead or tiles.
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  • The church of All Saints has a fine Perpendicular tower, left uninjured when the nave and chancel were burned down in 1842.
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  • Here he instituted evening nave services.
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  • The church of St Peter and St Paul shows fine Perpendicular work, especially in the ornate interior of the nave.
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  • The church, which rises high above the buildings clustering round it, consists of transepts and four bays of the nave of Romanesque architecture and of a fine choir (1450 - I 521) in the Flamboyant Gothic style with a triforium surmounted by lofty windows.
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  • In 1776 three of the seven bays of the nave were pulled down, and soon after the incongruous western front was added.
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  • The church of Our Lady, a late Romanesque building, has two ancient crypts and a 13thcentury choir of exceptional beauty, but the nave suffered severely from a restoration in 1764.
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  • The nave and choir have aisles, triforium and clerestory.
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  • In the middle of the nave is the tomb of Gerhard III., count of Gelderland, and his wife Margaret of Brabant.
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  • The form it took was a solemn procession of boats, headed by the doge's maesta nave, afterwards the Bucentaur (from 1311) out to sea by the Lido port.
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  • The nave is of ornate Norman work, with a massive triforium, surmounted by a Perpendicular clerestory and a beautiful wooden roof.
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  • The restoration involved the complete rebuilding of the choir and the south side of the nave, but the model of the ancient building was followed with great care.
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  • The church of St John the Baptist is a perpendicular cruciform structure, consisting of chancel, nave of seven bays, aisles, transepts and lofty western tower.
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  • The nave is like an Italian basilica, while the large triple-apsed choir is like one of the early three-apsed churches, of which so many examples still exist in Syria and other eastern countries.
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  • The basilican nave is wide, with narrow aisles.
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  • The other half, Eastern in two senses, is both wider and higher than the nave.
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  • At the west end of the nave are two projecting towers, with a narthex-entrance between them.
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  • The subjects in the nave begin with scenes from the Book of Genesis, illustrating the Old Testament types of Christ and His scheme of redemption, with figures of those who prophesied and prepared for His coming.
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  • The pavement of the nave, on the other hand, is of the 16th century.
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  • Santa Maria is a fine example of Spanish Gothic, and consists, like many Catalan churches, of nave and chancel, aisles and ambulatory, without transepts.
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  • The church (D) is cruciform, with a nave of nine bays, and a semicircular apse at either extremity.
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  • Eastward of this cloister extend the hall and chapel of the infirmary, resembling in form and arrangement the nave and chancel of an aisled church.
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  • The cellarer's buildings were near the west end of the nave, in which ordinary visitors of the middle class were hospitably entertained.
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  • The nave was 102 ft.
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  • The nave (G) had double vaulted aisles on either side.
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  • It consists of a vast nave of eleven bays, entered by a narthex, with a transept and short apsidal choir.
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  • The stalls of the monks, forming the ritual choir, occupy the four eastern bays of the nave.
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  • There was a second range of stalls in the extreme western bays of the nave for the fratres conversi, or lay brothers.
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  • The cemetery, the last resting-place of the brethren, lay to the north side of the nave of the church (H).
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  • The windows are unornamented, and the nave has no triforium.
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  • The cloister to the south (4) occupies the whole length of the nave.
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  • The name is derived from the original duty attached to the office, - that of the custody or guardianship of the fabric and furniture of the church, - which dates from the 1 4 th century, when the responsibility of providing for the repairs of the nave, and of furnishing the utensils for divine service, was settled on the parishioners.
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  • Its design was that of a Jerusalem cross, with two flanking towers at the east end, two at the west end, and one in the centre, at the intersection of the roofs of the nave and transepts.
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  • The church of St Mary and St Aldhelm, standing high, is a majestic fragment consisting of the greater part of the nave (with aisles) of a Benedictine abbey church.
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  • The nave is transitional Norman, with a Decorated superstructure including the clerestory.
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  • The building has a round tower at the west end of the nave.
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  • The church of St Peter and St Paul is cruciform, and as a whole Perpendicular in appearance, but retains a nave arcade and ornate tower-arches of the Early English period.
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  • Consisting of a chancel, clerestoried nave, and aisles, it is Early English and Perpendicular in style, and contains a beautiful 13th-century oak roof of 350 panels, each with a different design; a 15th-century pulpit of carved stone; and some interesting old monuments of the Strode, Mallet and Gournay families.
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  • His monument, by Alfred Stevens, stands in the nave of the cathedral.
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  • The church (12th century), of which only the choir and apse are appropriated to divine service, has a beautiful nave formerly covered by four cupolas destroyed in 1816.
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  • The nave is Perpendicular, a fine example of the style.
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  • The Little Church (15th century) was demolished in 1883, except for a portion of the nave and the old tower and steeple, from which the bells curiously project.
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  • Among' the earlier churches the principal is Sant' Andrea, enriched with' sculpture, and probably designed by Gruamons and his brother Adeodatus in 1136; in the nave is Giovanni Pisano's magnificent pulpit, imitated from his father's pulpit at Pisa.
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  • Within are an ancient font, a canopied piscina, and a fine timber roof over the nave and aisles.
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  • The nave, portions of the central tower, and two bays of the choir are Perpendicular,'having been rebuilt towards the close of the 15th century.
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  • The church of St Michael is a fine example of Norman work, with certain late details, having clerestoried nave, chancel and aisles, with central and two western towers.
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  • In the West the high altar was moved to the east end (the presbyterium) with a space before it for the assisting deacons and subdeacons (the chancel proper) railed off as a spot peculiarly holy (now usually called the sanctuary); between this and the nave, where the laity were, was the choir, with seats for the clergy on either side.
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  • This was divided from the nave, sometimes by an arch forming part of the structure of the building, sometimes by a screen, or by steps, sometimes by all three (see Chancel).
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  • The division of churches into chancel and nave, the outcome of the sacramental and sacerdotal spirit of the Catholic Church,' may be taken as generally typical of church construction in the medieval West, though there were exceptions, e.g.
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  • Finally, for the convenience of processions, the nave and chancel aisles were carried round behind the high altar as ambulatories.
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  • The church of St Nicholas is a large and handsome structure in various styles of architecture, and consists of nave, chancel and aisles, with a square embattled tower having pinnacles at the angles.
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  • The nave and porch were floored with plain red tesserae: in the apse was a simple mosaic panel in red, black and white.
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  • This type comprised nave and aisles, ending at one end in an apse and two chambers resembling rudimentary transepts, and at the other end in a porch (narthex).
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  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.
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  • There remain only the fine Early English choir, with Decorated additions, the Norman south transept and the majestic Decorated tower; while slight fragments of a Norman nave are seen.
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  • The church at Bayham was destitute of aisles either to nave or choir.
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  • The nave very usually consisted of two equal bodies, one containing the stalls of the brotherhood, the other left entirely free for the congregation.
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  • We not unfrequently find a single transept, sometimes of great size, rivalling or exceeding the nave.
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  • The friars' churches were at first destitute of towers; but in the 14th and 15th centuries, tall, slender towers were commonly inserted between the nave and the choir.
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  • At Toulouse the nave also has two parallel aisles, but the choir is apsidal, with radiating chapel.
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  • The church of the Black Friars of Norwich departs from the original type in the nave (now St Andrew's Hall), in having regular aisles.
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  • There was a slender tower between the nave and the choir.
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  • The nave of the church of the Austin Friars or Eremites in London is still standing.
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  • The original edifice is believed to have been erected in the time of Columba, but the transept and nave of the existing structure date from the early part of the 13th century, the choir from the 15th.
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  • The nave and two aisles end in apses.
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  • In shape the church is cruciform, with double aisles to the nave and aisles to the transepts.
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  • Ambrogio, in the Corso Magenta, is the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, built by the Dominicans about 1460, to which the Gothic facade and nave belong.
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  • The church or minster of St Cuthberga is a fine cruciform structure of various styles from Early Norman to Perpendicular, and consists of a central lantern tower, nave and choir with aisles, transepts without aisles, western or bell tower, north and south porches, crypt and vestry or sacristy, with the library over it.
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  • The abbey church originally consisted of a nave, choir without aisles, and transepts.
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  • The nave, in the Transitional and Decorated styles, with a rich midPointed triforium of broad round arches, has been restored, and used as the parish church since 1862.
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  • Among the principal buildings are the cathedral (rebuilt in the 16th century), and several other churches, among which the Mariae Kirke with its Romanesque nave is the earliest; a hospital, diocesan college, naval academy, school of design and a theatre.
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  • In this quarter of the town, too, is the Liebfrauenkirche, a fine church (nave 1250, choir 1404-1431) with lofty late Romanesque towers; the castle of the electors of Trier, erected in 1280, which now contains the municipal picture gallery; and the family house of the Metternichs, where Prince Metternich, the Austrian statesman, was born in 1773.
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  • The parish church, of mixed architecture, including the Norman nave of the old priory church, and containing some of the most beautiful examples of window tracery in England, was restored in 1866, and enlarged by the addition of a south nave in 1879.
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  • A monument to his memory was placed in the nave of the ancient cathedral of St Magnus, Kirkwall.
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  • The church of St Ulrich and St Afra, built 1474-1500, is a Late Gothic edifice, with a nave of magnificent proportions and a tower 300 ft.
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  • The large Protestant church of St Willibrord has a choir, built 1424-1526, which is one of the noblest Gothic structures on the Lower Rhine, and a modern nave (1882-96).
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  • The great east window at Wells and the window at the west end of the nave at Chartres are fine examples.
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  • He divided the nave of the church into two compartments for the separation of the sexes.
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  • The church of St Botolph is of Norman foundation, but the nave is principally Decorated and the chancel Perpendicular, and the tower, having fallen down, was rebuilt in 1628.
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  • The nave and chancel have undergone modern restoration.
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  • The present building, a basilica with columns, dates from 864; the nave was restored in ro08, in which year the now ruined octagonal baptistery was built.
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  • A procession is formed in the nave, consisting of the lord high almoner representing the sovereign, the clergy and the yeomen of the guard, the latter carrying white and red purses in baskets.
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  • The nave was begun in 1096 and is Romanesque in style; the transept and choir, which contain magnificent stained glass of the Renaissance period, are of Gothic architecture.
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  • The most interesting buildings are the cathedral of St Michel, dating from the 13th century but restored in modern times, and St Vincent, a church of the 14th century, remarkable for the width of its nave.
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  • It is a cruciform structure, with a dome, and the central nave is supported by fourteen Corinthian columns of white marble.
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  • The interior is covered with gilding and frescoes of the 17th century, and is somewhat overloaded with rich decoration, while a range of white marble columns supports the nave.
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  • The upper church is basilican in form, the nave being, as customary in Coptic churches, divided into three sections by wooden screens, which are adorned by carvings in ivory and wood.
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  • 860 and completed in 1279, and a nave and four aisles; the interior has, however, been modernized.
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  • The adaptation of part of the nave to the purposes of a parish church and the use of the building as a quarry did further damage.
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  • From east to west it measured 258 ft., the nave is 69 ft.
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  • This building, as renovated in the 12th century, was to consist of nave and transepts, choir and aisles, and massive central tower.
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  • The Scots are believed to have destroyed the nave in 1296, but it may be doubted if it was ever completed.
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  • The land slopes gently to the sea or to the edge of cliffs that nave been cut back by the waves.
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  • Formerly known as the Toile de St Jean, it was used on certain feast days to decorate the nave of Bayeux cathedral.
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  • Among its ancient buildings must be mentioned the Reinoldikirche, with fine stained-glass windows, the Marienkirche, the nave of which dates from the I Ith century, the Petrikirche, with a curious altar, and the Dominican church, with beautiful cloisters.
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  • Fortunato, with its nave and aisles of the same height, has a splendid portal; the upper part of the façade is unfinished.
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  • He was a constant preacher, and gave a great impulse to Trench's practice of inviting distinguished preachers to the abbey pulpit, especially to the evening services in the nave.
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  • The church of St Mark has a nave with double aisles, and massive late Norman pillars and arches.
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  • Erected on the plans of Robert de Luzarches, chiefly between 1220 and 1288, it consists of a nave, nearly 140 ft.
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  • In the interior, which contains beautifully carved stalls, a choir-screen in the flamboyant style and many other works of art, the most striking features are the height of the nave and the boldness of the columns supporting the vaulting.
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  • It was begun in the 12th century, but the nave was rebuilt in the 13th in the Gothic style.
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  • The twin towers are set between the chancel and nave.
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  • The nave was erected at the end of the 13th century, and the choir in 1377-1379.
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  • Tilton, on the ground of the height of the nave, the total height of the image, including the base and the top of the throne, would be about 26 ft., the seated figure of the goddess herself about 18 ft.
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  • He died on the 29th of March 1830, and was buried in the nave of Westminster Abbey.
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  • The church of San Lorenzo (1270-1300) is noteworthy for the beautiful tracery of its Gothic windows; its nave is said to have been a Roman temple, converted by the Moors into a mosque and by Ramon Berenguer IV., last count of Barcelona, into a church.
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  • Besides a number of handsome modern churches, among which is a Roman Catholic cathedral, Portsmouth possesses, in the church of St Thomas a Becket, a fine cruciform building dating from the second half of the 12th century, in which the chancel and transepts are original, but the nave and tower date from 1698, and the whole was extensively restored in 1904.
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  • Its founder Gian Galeazzo Visconti (also the founder of Milan Cathedral) laid the first stone in August 1396, and the nave was then begun in the Gothic style, but was not completed until 1465.
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  • Besides the implements and weapons of iron there are fibulae and brooches of bronze, weaving combs and spindle-whorls, a bronze mirror and tweezers, wheel-made pottery as well as hand-made, ornamented with Late Celtic patterns, a bowl of thin bronze decorated with bosses, the nave of a wooden wheel with holes for twelve spokes, and a dug-out canoe.
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  • It consists of a choir with deambulatory and apsidal chapels:(the oldest part of the church), a transept, nave and aisles.
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  • Giotto and others, the most famous of which are those over the high altar by Giotto, illustrating the vows of the Franciscan order; while the upper church has frescoes representing scenes from the life of St Francis (probably by Giotto and his contemporaries) on the lower portion of the walls of the nave, and scenes from Old and New Testament history by pupils of Cimabue on the upper.
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  • The existing ruins comprise parts of the Early English choir, the north transept, also Early English but of later date, and the rich Decorated nave.
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  • The west side of the nave fell in 1763 and the tower in 1830.
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  • The church consists of a clerestoried nave and choir, with a western tower; the eastward extension of the choir, the construction of the retrochoir and other works were undertaken in 1900 and consecrated in 1905 as a memorial to Dr Walsham How, the first bishop. During restoration of the spire (the height of which is 247 ft.) in 1905, records of previous work upon it were discovered in a sealed receptacle in the weather-vane.
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  • After the decline of episcopacy the building was neglected for a long period, but the choir, which contains some carved oak stalls of the 16th century, was restored in 1873, and the nave roofed and restored in 1892-1895, under the direction of Sir Rowand Anderson, the architect.
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  • On the right bank is the church (once the cathedral) of Ste Marie, the choir of which is thought to date in parts from the 9th century, while the nave belongs to the 12th century.
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  • The total length is 235 ft., the nave being 1331 ft.
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  • The nave, on each side, has nine pointed arches in the basement storey, nine round arches in the triforium, and thirty-six pointed arches in the clerestory, through which an arcade is carried on both sides.
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  • The tower, at the intersection of the nave and transepts, is of unusually massive proportions, being 30 ft.
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  • All that is left of the choir, which contains some very early Norman work, is two bays with three tiers on each side, corresponding to the design of the nave.
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  • The church itself was a cruciform structure with a choir, nave and transepts, and a tower surmounting the centre of intersection.
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  • The nave had ten bays and the choir six.
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  • Of the nave three bays of the south side are still standing, and the windows have pointed arches externally and semicircular arches internally.
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  • The nave has only two bays and the choir is insignificant.
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  • Meanwhile on the 29th of September 1394 he had begun the recasting of the nave of the cathedral with William Wynford, the architect of the college, as chief mason, and Simon Membury, an old Wykehamist, as clerk of the works.
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  • On the 16th of August 1404, he signed an agreement with the prior and convent for three monks to sing daily three masses in his beautiful chantry chapel in the nave of the cathedral, while the boys of the almonry, the cathedral.
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  • The church of St Andrew retains a very fine series of Norman pier-arches in the nave.
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  • The vaulting of the nave takes the form of a series of cupolas, and that of the choir and transept is similar.
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  • It previously consisted of a tower and chancel (with a fine Decorated window) built by Bishop Gower, the piers of the chancel arch being partly built on earlier Norman work, the Herbert Chapel (originally St Ann's) of about the same date as the chancel and rebuilt in the early part of the 16th century, and a nave built in 1739.
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  • The cathedral, which was restored in 1884-1886, has a choir, a crypt and two towers of the 11th, a transept of the 13th and a late Gothic nave of the 16th century.
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  • The remains of the abbey chiefly consist of the shell of the beautiful Cruciform church, with a central saddleback tower rising from the transepts to a height of over 90 ft., and a graceful rose window at the west end of the nave.
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  • Its majestic cathedral was built in the 13th century on the site of a Romanesque church, to which the lateral arcades of the nave and the two western towers with their high stone spires belonged.
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  • The cathedral of St Martin was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II.); but the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile are probably the only remnants of the early edifice, the nave and transepts having been rebuilt in the Gothic style in the 14th century, while the west front was begun in 1204 by Guidetto (lately identified with Guido Bigarelli of Como), and "consists of a vast portico of three magnificent arches, and above them three ranges of open galleries covered with all the devices of an exuberant fancy."
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  • The ground plan is a Latin cross, the nave being 273 ft.
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  • In the nave is a little octagonal temple or chapel, which serves as a shrine for the most precious of the relics of Lucca, a cedar-wood crucifix, carved, according to the legend, by Nicodemus, and miraculously conveyed to Lucca in 782.
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  • St Frediano or Frigidian dates originally from the 7th century, but was built in the Romanesque style in 1112-1147, though the interior, originally with four aisles and nave, shows traces of the earliest structure; the front occupies the site of the ancient apse; in one of its chapels is the tomb of Santa Zita, patroness of servants and of Lucca itself.
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  • It is the only monastic church in the Abruzzi in which the nave is separated from the aisles by ancient columns.
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  • The church of St Mary, entirely Perpendicular, with parvise, chancel, nave, aisles, porch, and tower 80 ft.
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  • The general plan is that of a basilica with a nave and two (Gothic vaulted) aisles separated by pilasters.
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  • The parish church of St James is a fine Perpendicular building, with a lofty spire, and a beautiful open-work roof over the nave.
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  • Much more important architecturally is the church of St Andrea, built towards the close of the 15th century, after plans by Leon Battista Alberti, and consisting of a single, barrel-vaulted nave 350 ft.
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  • The breadth of the nave without the aisles is 38 ft.
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  • The body of the church has a remarkable appearance of uniformity, because, although the building of the new nave was continued with intermissions from the 14th century until Tudor times, the broad design of the Early English work in the eastern part of the church was carried on throughout.
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  • It comprises a nave with aisles, and an apsidal eastward end formed of five small radiating chapels.
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  • A splendid series of carved oak stalls lines each side of the nave, and above them hang the banners of the Knights of the Bath, of whom this was the place of installation when the Order was reconstituted in 1725.
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  • Monuments, tombs, busts and memorials crowd the choir, its chapels and the transepts, nor is the nave wholly free of them.
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  • Just eight years later its fabric was complete, and June 1903 saw both the Cardinal's Requiem Mass and Elgar's first London performance of "The Dream of Gerontius" held in its towering nave.
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  • The extreme length is 360 ft., the breadth 156 ft., the breadth of the nave 60 ft., and its height (domes within)is 112 ft.
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  • Mustiola is a basilica with a nave and two aisles, with eighteen columns of different kinds of marble, from ancient buildings.
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  • Its lofty clerestoried nave has an elaborately carved timber roof, and the south porch, though repaired in 1612, preserves its Norman mouldings.
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  • The small Romanesque church of the 10th century known as the BasseOuvre occupies the site destined for the nave.
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  • The earliest part of the church is of transitional Norman date; the nave, which is perfect, is Early English and Decorated.
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  • The plan consists of a nave, with aisles and lateral chapels, transept and choir, with a deambulatory at a slightly lower level.
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  • Of the abbey church of St Germain, built in the 13th and 14th centuries, most of the nave has disappeared, so that its imposing Romanesque tower stands apart from it; crypts of the 9th century contain the tombs of bishops of Auxerre.
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  • It now consists of the nave and side aisles.
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  • On the flat panelled ceiling of the nave are the heraldic shields of the princes, noblemen and bishops who shared in its erection, and the great west window contains modern painted glass of excellent colour and design.
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  • Driving pulleys are usually constructed of cast iron, and are of circular form, having a central nave by which they are secured to the shaft by keys or other fastenings, and straight or curved arms connecting the nave to the rim, which latter is of a form adapted to the connector.
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  • The dimensions of the nave depend to a large extent on the method of keying or otherwise securing the pulley to the shaft.
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  • The arms are elliptical in cross-section, diminishing from the nave to the rim, and are usually designed as equally loaded cantilevers, fixed at the nave and free at the rim.
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  • Benjamin (American Machinist, 1898) on castiron pulleys loaded by a belt to imitate the conditions in practice led him to the conclusion that the rim is usually not sufficiently rigid to load the arms equally, and that the ends of the arms are subjected to bending movements of opposite sign, that at the nave being almost invariably the greater.
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  • 1 shows a built-up pulley having a cast-iron nave A, straight wrought-iron arms B, screwed therein and connected to a steel plate-rim C by riveted ends, and also by screwed flanges D riveted on each side to the rim.
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  • The two halves of the nave are secured by bolts or rivets passing through the flanges F, and the pulley is connected to the shaft by a sunk key or by conical keys driven in between the shaft and the boss, which latter is bored to suit.
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  • A modified form of this arrangement of cone keys is shown in the figure, in which a screwed conical bush M, divided into several parts longitudinally, is clamped round the shaft, and screwed into the corresponding part of the nave until the grip is sufficient.
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  • Wooden pulleys are generally made in two halves, bolted together at the rim and nave, and are provided with wooden spokes dovetailed into the rim and secured by keys.
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  • The pulley is secured to the shaft by conical keys, to give a frictional grip on both the shaft and the pulley; these keys may have their exterior surfaces eccentric to the shaft, with corresponding recesses in the nave, so that the pulley and keys virtually form one piece.
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  • 4, shows a clutch for a rope-driven pulley A, which runs freely on a bush B on the shaft, and is provided with an enlarged cylindrical nave or clutch box C. A split ring D, carried by the clutch and turning with it, can be thrust against the clutch box by rightand left-handed screws E, so that a sufficient grip is obtained to cause the clutch and the pulley to turn as one piece.
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  • (2) By the general canon law the burden of repairing the nave, as well as the chancel of the church, was upon the parson or rector who collected the whole tithe.
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  • St Mary's in Kirkgate, the parish church of South Leith, was founded in 1483, and was originally cruciform but, as restored in 1852, consists of an aisled nave and north-western tower.
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  • After proceeding up the nave, he was to kneel and pray at the topmost step of the entrance of the choir, into which he was to be introduced by the bishop or his commissary, and placed in his stall.
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  • The nave, restored in 1892, is used as the parish church, but the choir and transepts are roofless, though otherwise kept in repair.
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  • The church was rebuilt soon afterwards and possibly some portions of the preceding structure were incorporated in the nave.
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  • The nave (the West church), divided from the aisles by a double row of massive round pillars, is a transition between Romanesque and Gothic, with pointed windows.
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  • The choir is in the Decorated and Perpendicular styles and is higher than the nave.
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  • When the Reformers attacked the abbey church in March 1560, they spared the nave, which served as the parish church till the 19th century, and now forms the vestibule of the New church.
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  • The old building was a fine example of simple and massive Norman, as the nave testifies, and has a beautiful doorway in its west front.
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  • Over the central portion of the nave, a square area at the angles of which stand the four piers, and at a height of 179 ft.
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  • The nave is thus covered completely by a domical canopy, which, in its ascent, swells larger and larger, mounts higher and higher, as though a miniature heaven rose overhead.
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  • The eight porphyry columns, placed in pairs in the four bays at the corners of the nave, belonged originally to the temple of the sun at Baalbek.
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  • The columns of verde antique on either side of the nave are commonly said to have come from the temple of Diana at Ephesus, but recent authorities regard them as specially cut for use in the church.
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  • Noticeable for its high roof, low tower and dwarf spire, the church consists of an aisleless nave, chancel (adorned with Chantrey's statue of the 1st duke) and transepts.
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  • The remains include the vestry, the southern transept (the famous rose window of which is still entire), part of the chancel, the southern wall of the nave, part of the entrance towers and the western doorway.
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  • It is chiefly characterized by the almost universal employment of the pointed arch, not only in arches of wide span such as those of the nave arcade, but for doorways and windows.
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  • The actual introduction of the pointed arch took place at a much earlier date, as in the nave arcade of the Cistercian Abbey of Buildwas (1140), though the clerestory window above has semicircular arches.
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  • The arches are sometimes cusped; circles with trefoils, quatrefoils, &c., are introduced into the tracery, and large rose windows in the transept or nave, as at Lincoln (1220).
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  • The conventional foliage decorating the capitals is of great beauty and variety, and extends to spandrils, bosses, &c. In the spandrils of the arches of the nave, transept or choir arcades, diaper work is occasionally found, as in the transept of Westminster Abbey.
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  • The latter is one of the chief examples of the period, to which must be added the cathedral of Salisbury (except the tower); the Galilee at Ely; nave and transept of Wells (1225-1240); nave of Lincoln; west front of Peterborough; and the minster at Beverley.
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  • Of the existing building, the easternmost bay of the nave, the transepts with east and west aisles, the choir with aisles and short transepts, and the Lady chapel, are Early English, a superb example of the finest development of that style.
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  • The remainder of the nave is Decorated, excepting the westernmost bay which is Perpendicular, as is the ornate west front with its graceful flanking towers.
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  • The church of Long Sutton, besides its fine Norman nave, possesses an Early English tower and spire which is comparable with the very early specimen at Oxford cathedral.
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  • The church of NotreDame, a Romanesque building, with a nave of the IIth century and a central tower and choir of the 13th century, is a fine example of the Norman architecture of those periods.
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  • The columns of the aisles are half the height of those in the nave.
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  • The nave arcades are of four bays, with octagonal shafts, molded capitals and bases, and pointed arches.
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  • A third, the narrow northern aisle, is on the far side of the nave.
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  • There is a fine 15th century brass cross under the high altar and further portions of a brass monument in the nave aisle.
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  • The nave altar is just visible on the far right.
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  • Inside they had an antechamber, a nave with raised benches along the walls, and a sanctuary with altars and the tauroctony.
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  • East wall: nave apex to just below belfry window.
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  • To the east a further three bays to nave and aisles, and a two bayed chancel with three sided E apse.
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  • In keeping with Gilbert Scott's Norman style the nave arcade has four bays with rounded arches resting on solid squat pillars.
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  • The nave was only re-roofed in the 19th century; its wooden barrel vault is probably correct.
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  • The crossing is very high, much higher than the nave, and outside on its gable sits a fine Sanctus bell turret.
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  • In Figure 8, the high flying buttresses have been used to build a very high nave with very large windows.
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  • North wall: two stepped buttresses divide the nave into three bays to the west side of the vestry.
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  • East wall: has a broad two-centred doorway with fluted chamfers, leading to the nave.
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  • Inside, a double chamfered nave arch on semi circular responds.
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  • Architecture The church consists of a nave and slightly narrower chancel, a west tower and a south vestry.
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  • All is vaulted in stone and the nave is tall enough to have had a clerestory, but there is blank wall here instead.
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  • In the fifteenth century the walls of the nave were raised to form a clerestory and the nave covered with a new low-pitched roof.
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  • The church is a large building comprising a five bay nave with aisles, a tall polygonal apse, and an exceptionally tall clerestory.
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  • Angels heads were painted in spandrels above the nave clerestory windows.
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  • Roof covering both nave and chancel of 8 bays with arch-braced collars.
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  • The walls of the nave consist of arcades, with Doric colonnades above through which the light enters the building.
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  • The roof in both nave and aisle has open painted panels elaborately decorated in blue and studded with gilded bosses.
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  • Nave (north wall) of 3 bays with buttresses, bracketed eaves, coupled lancet windows; there is a basement entrance below.
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  • The best chance would appear to be offered by the west end or nave, of which the nave would allow a larger area.
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  • A wrought iron cross finial from the east end now lies alongside the south wall of the nave.
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  • A feature of the nave over the chancel arch and along the walls are the 19 th century frescoes by Edward Frampton.
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  • The doors lead into a vestibule under the west gallery, and this opens with three arches into the nave proper.
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  • Beside the west end of the nave, a pile of broken 19th century gravestones gave me pause for thought.
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  • Chancel roofline is lower than the nave and has decorative ironwork along the ridge.
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  • The nave is perhaps 13thC on the basis of paired lancets in the nave.
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  • The south aisle opens to the nave by an arcade of two bays and has three trefoiled lancets in the east wall.
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  • A change to ashlar masonry at the extreme east end of the nave.
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  • On the north side of the nave was a building with square-headed windows and wooden mullions, apparently c.
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  • East wall:- abuts nave, the latter's roof rising to more than half way up the second stage.
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  • The western part comprises a nave, and to its east is the choir or chancel.
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  • It had an aisled nave with eleven bays, which extended over ninety meters.
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  • Inside, graceful arcades divide the lofty clerestoried nave from the aisles.
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  • The interior is very dark and consists of an aisleless nave, and slightly lower apsidal choir.
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  • Nesfield kept the church's great medieval treasure, the stained glass in the east window of the north nave.
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  • A set of beautifully ornate iron gates separates the East wing from the nave, built by William Edney in 1710.
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  • Nave south side Nave north side The crenelated parapet on the nave dates from the 17th century.
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  • Seating in the center Nave of the Church is in narrow pine pews.
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  • The nave arches are borne on octagonal piers, probably of an earlier church.
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  • The aisle is separated from the nave by five large bays, resting on octagonal pillars.
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  • Others include a guild altar piscina in the nave, and some woodwork in the chancel - nothing substantial, but lovingly preserved.
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  • It has a lofty nave and side aisles, separated by elegant light clustered pillars, supporting pointed arches.
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  • The old porch was removed and a new one designed using an oak purlin from the wagon roof in the nave.
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  • North east angle of nave has big rough quoins in its lower section.
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  • Red sandstone quoins define the original chancel, at its juncture with the present nave.
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  • Suspended between the sanctuary and nave is the great rood or crucifix.
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  • The interior, with its oak rood screen dividing the nave from the choir, is in perfect taste.
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  • Constructed in brick with stone floors, it consisted of a wide nave and square west tower with a pyramidal roof.
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  • East wall: apex of nave roof up to middle of second stage, with slit window just above.
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  • East wall: visible only above the nave roofline, the apex of which reaches almost to the timber belfry.
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  • The Lady Chapel The Lady Chapel, set off the east end of the nave is a place of special sanctity.
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  • The nave has a low-pitched roof with arched braces having pierced spandrels and resting on large angel corbels.
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  • The old church had a small western wooden steeple, a north aisle shorter than the nave, and a north porch.
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  • Walls as nave and roof of two bays also as nave but trusses lack raking struts.
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  • The windows in the round nave were designed to conform to the style of glazing appropriate to the style of architecture.
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  • The external circle of the tower has a perfect tangent in the nave west wall.
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  • Evidence for south aisle provided by abrupt termination of chamfered plinth on west side of south nave, suggesting a pre-existing wall.
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  • It will form a magnificent backdrop to the new Baptistery being set up in the north nave transept.
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  • The nave is wide and has transverse arches and all the fittings are in keeping.
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  • The nave walls are built from oak tree trunks, brought from Epping Forest, which have been split down the middle.
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  • It is almost unheard-of for the monks ' dormitory to lead into the nave.
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  • Very large flat bosses with scenes dominate the quadripartite vaulting of the nave roof.
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  • The west bay has entrance vestibule with upper gallery, further five bays to the nave, wide, with a flat paneled ceiling.
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  • Also in the nave is a memorial to a former vicar.
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  • East wall: two-centred arch to nave has long stone voussoirs.
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  • (see Screen), which divides the chancel or the choir from the nave.
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  • The central tower of a church over the intersection of the nave and chancel with the transepts is sometimes called the " rood tower "; an example is that at Notre Dame at Paris.
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  • Eu has three buildings of importance - the beautiful Gothic church of St Laurent (12th and 13th centuries) of which the exterior of the choir with its three tiers of ornamented buttressing and the double arches between the pillars of the nave are architecturally notable; the chapel of the Jesuit college (built about 1625), in which are the tombs of Henry, third duke of Guise, and his wife, Katherine of Cleves; and the château.
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  • On one side stands the cathedral of San Lorenzo, a Gothic structure of the 14th and 15th centuries, in the plan of a Latin cross, with nave and aisles of equal height; on the other the Palazzo del Municipio, presenting two fine Gothic façades, of the 14th century (though the building was not completed till 5443), with the figures of the Perugian griffin and the Guelph lion above the outside stair; and in the centre the marble fountain constructed in1277-1280by Arnolfo di Cambio, and adorned with statues and statuettes by Niccolo and Giovanni Pisano.
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  • The walls of the nave are adorned with mosaics of the 6th century; the scenes from the New Testament above the windows date from the time of Theodoric, while the somewhat stiff processions below, of virgins on one side and of saints on the other, are substitutions of the latter half of the 6th century for representations which probably contained some allusion to Arianism or episodes in the life of Theodoric (so Ricci).
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  • The choir only is used for service (Protestant), the nave being used as a gymnasium.
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  • The exteriors of the north Italian Gothic churches are characterized by the flatness of the roof; the treatment of the west facade as a mere screen wall, masking the true lines of the aisle roofs; the great circular window in the west front for lighting the nave; the absence of pinnacles owing to the unimportance of the buttresses; the west-end porches with columns resting on lions or other animals.
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  • The facade of San Zaccaria (1457-1515), the stately design of Anton Marco Gambello and Mauro Coducci, offers some slight modifications in the use of the semicircular pediment, the line of the aisle roof being indicated by quarter-circle pediments abutting on the facade of the nave.
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  • The great colonnade, which is its most striking feature, was apparently intended for the nave of a hypostyle hall like that of Karnak, but had to be hastily finished without the aisles.
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  • He published in 1551 Regola generale per sollevare ogni affondata nave, intitolata la Travagliata Invenzione (an allusion to his personal troubles at Brescia), setting forth a method for raising sunken ships, and describing the diving-bell, then little known in western Europe.
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  • In the interior, which comprises the nave with aisles, transept and choir with ambulatory and side chapels, there are fine rose-windows with stained glass of the r4th century, and other works of art.
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  • Of the interior decorations it is enough to mention the altars of the nave, said to be after designs by Michelangelo, and the mosaics in the dome and the apse, which were among the latest designs of Cimabue.
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  • It had a fine Gothic façade: the interior had mosaics in the apses dating from 1330, and the nave contained 26 granite columns, said to have been brought from a temple of Poseidon near Faro, and had a fine wooden roof of 1260.
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  • The cathedral, built entirely of marble, occupies the site of an earlier church, and was begun in 1396, from which period the nave dates: the façade belongs to 1457-1486, while the east of the exterior was altered into the Renaissance style, and richly decorated with sculptures by Tommaso Rodari in 1487-1526.
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  • The cathedral of St Stephen was begun in the 12th century in the Tuscan Romanesque style; to this period belongs the narrow nave with its wide arches; the raised transepts and the chapels were added by Giovanni Pisano in 1317-1320; the campanile dates from 1340 (it is a much smaller and less elaborate version of Giotto's campanile at Florence), while the façade, also of alternate white sandstone and green serpentine, belongs to 1413.
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  • In the former,';as at Canterbury, the refectory ran east and west parallel to the nave of the church, on the side of the cloister farthest removed from it.
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  • The nave in the northern houses, not unfrequently, had only a north aisle, as at Bolton, Brinkburn and Lanercost.
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  • The church follows the plan adopted by the Austin canons in their northern abbeys, and has only one aisle to the nave - that to the north; while the choir is long, narrow and aisleless.
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  • It was an oblong edifice divided by columns into a central hall and a corridor running round all the four sides with a tribunal opposite the main entrance; and, unlike the usual basilicae, it had, instead of a clerestory, openings in the walls of the corridor through which light was admitted, it being almost as lofty as the nave.
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  • The west front and a large portion of the north half of the nave and aisle have perished, but the remains include the rest of the nave, the two transepts, the chancel and choir, the two western piers of the tower and the sculptured roof of the east end.
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  • The nave had an aisle on each side, the north noticeably the narrower, the south furnished with eight chapels, one in each bay.
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  • Fortunato, with its nave and aisles of the same height, has a splendid portal; the upper part of the façade is unfinished.
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  • Michele (for plan see Architecture: § Romanesque and Gothic in Italy) was originally constructed under the Lombard kings, but was burnt in 1004, and the present building dates from the latter part of the 11th (crypt, choir and transepts) and the first half of the 12th centuries (façade and nave with two aisles), and was completed in 1155.
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  • To the Early English chancel a very wide north aisle, resembling a second nave, was added in the Decorated period, and the general appearance of the chancel, with its north aisle and Lady-chapel, is Decorated.
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  • The nave, forming a Greek cross, is surmounted by a hemispherical dome, the 600 sq.
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  • Roof similar to nave but all arch-braced collars (6), and four tiers of quatrefoil windbraces.
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  • I was also struck by the iron grille which separates the nave from the nun 's choir with two rows of ancient choir stalls.
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  • The spacious chancel is separated from the nave and aisles by a lofty carved wooden screen and contains some ancient and modem monuments.
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  • The nave arcades are of four bays, with octagonal shafts, molded capitals and bases, and pointed arches of two chamfered orders.
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  • The chancel, the nave arcades and the south aisle were rebuilt in the 13th century.
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  • The church, which lies past the deserted lighthouse, has stumpy twin towers and a short nave.
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  • The triforium passage in the South transept is essentially matched to the nave clerestorey passage, however.
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  • The nave is lined north and south with box pews, and to the east, against the south wall sits the triple-decker pulpit.
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  • However, with Bishop King 's support gone, the vaulting of the nave could not be contemplated.
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  • Simple tiled floor with heating vent grilles down the aisle of the nave.
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  • The modern church consists of a chancel, organ chamber and vestry on the north, nave, and north aisle.
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  • All Saints' church is Norman and has the original buttresses with a wagon roof in the nave.
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  • In 1860 the nave was widened on the north side, swallowing up a transept.
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  • You play the commander of U.S. Nave Seal Squad in Socom 3.
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  • Upon entering the cathedral, one is struck by the massive stone nave and the huge vaulted ceiling.
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  • John are by Correggio, and the arabesques on the vault of the nave by Anselmi.
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  • The roof of the nave is of Moorish plaster work.
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  • San Pietro de' Cassinensi (outside the Porta Romana) is a basilica with nave and aisles, founded in the beginning of the i 1th century by San Pietro Vincioli on the site of a building of the 6th century, and remarkable for its conspicuous spire, its ancient granite and marble columns, its walnut stall-work of 1535 by Stefano de' Zambelli da Bergamo, and its numerous pictures (by Perugino, &c.).
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  • Paul began the famous Villa Borghese; enlarged the Quirinal and Vatican; completed the nave, facade and portico of St Peter's; erected the Borghese Chapel in Sta Maria Maggiore; and restored the aqueduct of Augustus and Trajan ("Acqua Paolina").
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  • The vaulting of the nave and aisles and the beautiful cloisters were added in the 13th century.
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  • According to this scheme only the old choir was left; the nave and transepts were to be rebuilt after the classical style, with a lofty dome at the crossing - not unlike the plan eventually carried out.
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  • But the dean and chapter objected to the absence of a structural choir, nave and aisles, and wished to follow the medieval cathedral arrangement.
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  • The principal portal is a fine specimen of 12th-century Romanesque, and the lower part of the nave is of the same period; the choir and the transept are striking examples of the style of the 13th century.
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  • St Michael's, the parish church, has a striking Perpendicular tower, an arch of carved oak dividing its nave and chancel, a magnificent rood-loft, and a 13th-century monument doubtfully described as the tomb of Bracton, the famous lawyer, whose birthplace, according to local tradition, was Bratton Court in the vicinity.
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  • The position of the ambo was not absolutely uniform; sometimes in the central point between the sanctuary and the nave, sometimes in the middle of the church, and sometimes at one or both of the sides of the chancel.
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  • Ursus in 370-390, which had a nave and four aisles, was destroyed in 1734-44, only the (inaccessible) crypt and the round campanile remaining from the earlier structure; there are fragments of reliefs from a pulpit erected by Archbishop Agnellus (556-569) in the interior.
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  • It has a nave and aisles with a closed vestibule on the west, and a fine round campanile of the 9th (?) century.
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  • The plan consists of a large rectangular nave, with semicircular recesses for altars, opening out of the aisles, north and south.
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  • Below the nave is another crypt.
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  • The interior, a basilica with nave and two aisles, contains columns said to come from a temple of Minerva and a fine mosaic pavement of 1166, with interesting representations of the months, Old Testament subjects, &c. It has a crypt supported by forty-two marble columns.
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  • There are ten Roman Catholic churches here, among them being the beautiful minster, with a Gothic choir dating from 1250, a nave dating from the beginning of the 13th century and a crypt of the 8th century.
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  • The building was cruciform, but only the west front and part of the nave remain.
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