Naught sentence example

naught
  • But as Paul wrote: ` Even if I give my body up to be burned and have not charity, it avails me naught.'
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  • Perhaps this god-awful crawl in here wasn't for naught after all.
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  • Sadly, all their attention was for naught.
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  • The Theban rulers decreed that only Eteocles should receive the honour of burial, but the decree was set at naught by Antigone, the sister of Polyneices.
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  • Your investment would be for naught.
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  • Thus the highest idea is that of goodness; things are, only if they are good; being without well-being is naught.
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  • As with Said's project these schemes came to naught.
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  • Later in the 17th century ships were sent from St Helena by the English East India Company to Tristan to report on a proposed settlement there, but that project also came to naught.
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  • Barrie, duly chastened, took up position to defend the resultant freekick which came to naught.
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  • Mrs. Rinaldi questions me and tries to read these lines, but all for naught.
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  • All the upgrades Alex had installed were for naught.
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  • The carefully devised scheme of operations from which they had expected so much had come to naught in its most important features.
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  • This speedily came to naught, and Alcott returned (1844) to his home near that of Emerson in Concord, removing to Boston four years later, and again living in Concord after 1857.
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  • The first project for reunion thus came to naught, but from that time forward it was recognized in South Africa that federation would afford the best solution of most of the difficulties that beset the country.
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  • I'm stalled of doing naught; and I do like - I could like to hear her!
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  • But when I approached Fleeming, I found myself in another world; he would have naught of me.
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  • Unfortunately, all of the internal conflict comes to naught; we're completely unmoved.
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  • He repaired as far as possible the ruinous effects of his father's wastefulness, but on his accession found everything in the utmost confusion, "the great lords," to cite the old chronicler Rogerius (c. 1223-1266), "having so greatly enriched themselves that the king was brought to naught."
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  • He set at naught the jealousy of his superiors and brother friars, and despite the want of funds, instruments, materials for copying and skilled copyists, completed in about eighteen months three large treatises, the Opus Majus, Opus Minus and Opus Tertium, which, with some other tracts, were despatched to the pope.
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  • The decree Frequens was not wholly neglected; though the next council, at Siena, came to naught, the council at Basel, whose chief business was to put an end to the terrible religious war that neatly, as if we were mere barbarians.
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  • Qasim, consented thus to set at naught the order of succession established by Abdalmalik; and Suleiman succeeded without difficulty on the death of his brother Jomada II.
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  • The old accusations against him were revived, and he was further charged with having set at naught the decision of a council.
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  • Rivalry between Madame dEtampes, the imperious mistress of the aged Francis I., and Diane de Poitiers, whose ascendancy over the dauphin was complete, now brought court outbreak intrigues and constant changes in those who held of war, office, to complicate still further this wearisome policy of ephemeral combinazion.i with English, Germans, Italians and Turks, which urgent need of money always brought to naught.
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  • Surely right naught; and therefore I tell thee no more but those that fall unto thee if thou travail in this work.
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  • Unfortunately, all of the internal conflict comes to naught; we 're completely unmoved.
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  • In the Eumenides of Aeschylus" the Erinyes are reproached in that by aiding Clytemnestra, who slew her husband, " they are dishonouring and bringing to naught the pledges of Zeus and Hera, the marriage-goddess "; and these were the divinities to whom sacrifice was offered before the wedding," and it may be that some kind of mimetic representation of the " Holy Marriage," the IEpos ydpos, of Zeus and Hera formed a part of the Attic nuptial ceremonies.'
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