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natures

natures Sentence Examples

  • The fourth argues for the orthodox belief of the two natures and one person of Christ.

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  • He stood beside her and they both watched mother natures' display in rapt silence.

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  • Extension and thought, the essences of corporeal and spiritual natures, are absolutely distinct, and cannot act upon one another.

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  • They ate in silence then, enjoying the tranquility of mother natures' work around them.

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  • People are often victims of their own natures.

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  • Alfred de Musset was introduced, and the two natures leapt together as by elective affinity.

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  • Thus the council rejected both Nestorianism and Eutychianism, and stood upon the doctrine that Christ had two natures, each perfect in itself and each distinct from the other, yet perfectly united in one person, who was at once both God and man.

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  • In his Christology he departed from the Lutheran and Zwinglian doctrine of the two natures by insisting on what he called the Vergotterung des Fleisches Christi, the deification or the glorification of the flesh of Christ.

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  • Hydrogen and oxygen are, therefore, of very opposite natures, and this is well illustrated by the circumstance that oxygen combines, with very few exceptions, with all the remaining elements, whilst compounds of only a limited number with hydrogen have been obtained.

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  • But the followers of Cyril of Alexandria, and with them those of Eutyches, saw in the Chalcedon decree of two natures only another form of the "Nestorian" duality of persons in Christ, and rose everywhere in opposition.

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  • He became one of the famous circle of the transcendentalists, always keenly preserving his own individuality amongst such more or less potent natures as Emerson, Hawthorne and Margaret Fuller.

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  • They held that the duality of natures implied a distinction between two modes of sonship in Christ - the natural or proper, and the adoptive.

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  • Thus they did not teach a dual personality, nor the old Antiochene view that Christ's divine exaltation was due to his sinless virtue; they were less concerned with old disputes than with the problem as the Chalcedon decision had left it - the relation of Christ's one personality to his two natures.

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  • The essence, indeed, comprehends all natures, and everything that exists is a portion of this essence, by participation in which everything that is hath its existence."

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  • It is false, therefore, to speak of matter as the principle of individuation; and if this is so there is no longer any foundation for the Thomist view that in angelic natures every individual constitutes a species apart.

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  • Though:with some points of difference, they agreed in emphasizing the permanence of the two separate natures in Christ, united but not mingled or confused, and laid stress on the reality of our Lord's human experience.

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  • Thus, arguing inversely, we may learn something of the respective natures of these influences and of the way in which the nervous system is affected secondarily.

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  • 16, which enjoins the duty of study and of scrupulousness in the observance of religious ordinances, only a very remarkable characterization of the different natures of the scholars remains (Aboth di R.

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  • Various flavouring materials, such as liquorice, tonka beans (Dipteryx odorata) and other ingredients are added, the natures of which are often trade secrets.

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  • In opposition to this Eutyches went so far as to affirm that after the union of the two natures, the human and the divine, Christ had only one nature, that of the incarnate Word, and that therefore His human body was essentially different from other human bodies.

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  • This judgment is the more interesting as being in distinct conflict with the opinion of the bishop of Rome - Leo - who, departing from the policy of his predecessor Celestine, had written very strongly to Flavian in support of the doctrine of the two natures and one person.

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  • There the synod of Ephesus was declared to have been a "robber synod," its proceedings were annulled, and, in accordance with the rule of Leo as opposed to the doctrines of Eutyches, it was declared that the two natures were united in Christ, but without any alteration, absorption or confusion.

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  • If we take for instance the skins of animals that are striped or spotted, we have the best possible illustration of natures methods in this direction.

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  • The same law prevailing in all natures creation, in the plumage of birds, the painting of butterifies wings, the marking of shells, and in all the infinite variety and beauty of the floral kingdom, the lesson is constantly renewed to the observant eye.

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  • And thus, close student of natures processes, methods, and effects as the Japanese art workman is, he ever seeks to produce humble replicas from his only art master.

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  • He excels in his representations of landscapes and waterscapes, and has succeeded -in transferring to gold-lacquer panels tender and delicate pictures of natures softest moodspictures that show balance, richness, harmony and a fine sense of decorative proportion.

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  • Nestorius held the two natures so far apart as to appear to sacrifice the unity of the person of Christ.

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  • 451 affirmed "that Christ is true God and true man, according to His Godhead begotten from eternity and like the Father in everything, only without sin; and that after His incarnation the unity of the person consists in two natures which are conjoined without confusion, and without change, but also without rending and without separation."

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  • In 1781 Frederick William, then prince of Prussia, inclined, like many sensual natures, to mysticism, had joined the Rosicrucians, and had fallen under the influence of Johann Christof Wollner (1732-1800), and by him the royal policy was inspired.

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  • Further, the inclination of the line of metal to the axis gave the gun a fixed angle of elevation varying from 1 ° in light guns to 2-1° in the heavier natures.

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  • Except for some minor differences the tangent sights were the same for all natures of guns, and for all services, but the development of the modern sight has followed different lines according to the nature and use of the gun, and must be treated under separate heads.

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  • In the larger natures of War Office Handbook.

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  • The processes which have to be performed in the mensuration of figures of this kind are in effect processes of integration; the distinction between mensuration and integration lies in the different natures of the data.

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  • So far as Nestorius himself is concerned, however, it is certain that he never formulated any such doctrine;2 nor does any recorded utterance of his, however casual, come so near the heresy called by his name as Cyril's deliberately framed third anathema (that regarding the "physical union" of the two hypostases or natures) approaches Eutychianism.

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  • His aim, he tells us, had been to maintain the distinct continuance of the two natures of Christ when united through the Incarnation into one Person.

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  • "In the Person the natures use their properties mutually..

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  • The ultimate union of these two natures appears to lie in the will - "For there was one and the same will and mind in the union of the natures, so that both should will or not will exactly the same things.

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  • The natures have, moreover, a 3 Syriac, tegurta, lit."

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  • But the two natures being united are one Christ.

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  • And He who was born of the Father as to the Divinity, and from the Holy Virgin as to the humanity is and is styled one; for of the two natures there was a union."

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  • What is the relation of the divine and human natures in Christ?

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  • At the council of Chalcedon in 451 it was declared that in the person of Christ are united two complete natures, divine and human,which retain after the union all their properties unchanged.

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  • This was supplemented at the third council of Constantinople in 680 by the statement that each of the natures contains a will, so that Christ possesses two wills.

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  • The Western Church accepted the decisions of Nicaea, Chalcedon and Constantinople, and so the doctrines of the Trinity and of the two natures in Christ were handed down as orthodox dogma in West as well as East.

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  • Hence arose a general feeling of disappointment, which acted on different natures in different ways.

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  • More's was one of those highly susceptible natures which take more readily and more eagerly than common minds the impress of that which they encounter on their first contact with men.

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  • Again, Schelling urged that besides the rational element there must be something else; that there is in nature, as natures naturans, a blind impulse, a will without intelligence, which belongs to the existent; and that even God Himself as the Absolute cannot be pure thought, because in order to think He must have an existence which cannot be merely His thought of it, and therefore pure being is the prior condition of thought and spirit.

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  • But later on, about 480, and throughout the following centuries, the Armenians rejected the decrees of Chalcedon and held that the assertion of two natures in Christ was a relapse into the heresy of Nestor.

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  • Soon afterwards he went to Saumur, where in 1679 were published Liberii de Sancto Amore Epistolae Theologicae (Irenopoli: Typis Philalethianis), usually attributed to him; they deal with the doctrine of the Trinity, the hypostatic union of the two natures in Jesus Christ, original sin, and the like, in a manner sufficiently far removed from that of the conventional orthodoxy of the period.

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  • "The different natures and the different persons admit of union in one way alone, namely in the way of a complete agreement in respect of will; and thereby is revealed the One (or Monad) in activity in the case of those (wills) which have coalesced; in the manner described."

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  • For many years before the accession of his uncle Justin, the Eastern world had been vexed by the struggles of the Monophysite party, who recognized only one nature in Christ, against the view which then and ever since has maintained itself as orthodox, that the divine and human natures coexisted in Him.

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  • The flock included intelligent pupils, empty-headed imitators, and romantic natures who turned philosophy into lyric measures.

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  • natures by relegating to the divine Logos the formative and controlling agency.

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  • Two natures may form a unity, as the body and soul in man.

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  • So man, both soul and body, is brought into unity with the Logos; there being then one hypostasis for both natures."

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  • While the theologians discussed doctrine the people longed for mystery, as it satisfied their religious natures.

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  • According to this doctrine the personality of Christ is twofold; the divine Logos dwells as a distinct personality in the man Jesus Christ, the union of the two natures being analogous to the relation between the believer and the indwelling Holy Spirit.

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  • Lastly, the true form is such that it deduces the given nature from some source of being which is inherent in more natures, and which is better known in the natural order of things than the form itself."

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  • The configurations, or inner structure of bodies, include dense, rare, heavy, light, hot, cold, &c., - in fact, what are elsewhere called simple natures.

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  • We thus at last attain a definite conclusion with regard to forms, and it appears clear that in Bacon's belief the true function of science was the search for a few fundamental physical qualities, highly abstract and general, the combinations of which give rise to the simple natures and complex phenomena around us.

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  • With regard to the first., in ultimate result it depends upon the theory of forms; for whenever the compound body can be regarded as the sum of certain simple natures, then our knowledge of the forms of these natures gives us the power of superinducing a new nature on the concrete body.

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  • This can only be discovered by analysis, which will disclose the ultimate constituents (natural particles, not atoms) of bodies, and lead back the discussion to forms or simple natures, whereby alone can true light be thrown on these obscure questions.

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  • 21: - Prerogative Instances, Supports of Induction, Rectification of Induction, Varying the Investigation according to the Nature of the Subject, Prerogative Natures, Limits of Investigation, Application to Practice, Preparations for Investigation, the Ascending and Descending Scale of Axioms. The remainder of the Organum is devoted to a consideration of the twenty-seven classes of Prerogative Instances, and though it contains much that is both luminous and helpful, it adds little to our knowledge of what constitutes the Baconian method.

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  • But the strain of daily association was too much for their antagonistic natures.

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  • These differences took two separate and extreme types, the one of which forcibly separated the two natures so as to deny anything like a real union, while the other insisted upon a mixture of the two, or an absorption of the human in the divine.

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  • The same symbol also declares that Christ is " to be acknowledged in two natures.

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  • Hence the Nestorians, who insisted upon the duality of the natures to such a degree as to lose sight of the unity of the person, and who rejected the term Theotokos, repudiated the decrees both of Ephesus and of Chalcedon, and upon the promulgation of the decrees of Chalcedon formally separated from the church.

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  • The council of Chalcedon (451), the fourth oecumenical, declared that Christ is to be acknowledged " in two naturesunconfusedly, unchangeably," and therefore decided against the opinions of all who either believed that the divinity is the sole nature of Christ, or who, rejecting this, taught only one composite nature of Christ (one nature and one person, instead of two natures and one person).

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  • Christ, the Son of God, became man in two natures, which internally and inseparably united make One Person, and, according to the eternal purpose of God, has obtained for man reconciliation with God, and eternal life, inasmuch as He by His vicarious death has made satisfaction to God for the world's sins, and this satisfac tion was Perfectly Commensurate With The Sins Of The World.

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  • This did not prevent its having a considerable following, which after Apollinaris's death divided into two sects, the more conservative taking its name (Vitalians) from Vitalis, bishop of Antioch, the other (Polemeans) adding the further assertion that the two natures were so blended that even the body of Christ was a fit object of adoration.

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  • assertion was expanded and refined upon till two great doctrines had been built up - that of the Trinity of divine Persons in the unity of the Godhead, and that of the union of two distinct natures, divine and human, in the person of Jesus Christ.

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  • Did the two natures, human and divine, remain so separated in Jesus as to jeopardize the unity of His person ?

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  • Did the two natures coalesce in Jesus so as to constitute a single nature?

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  • But if it be presupposed that the purpose of Christ's mission was to deify men by bestowing physical immortality, then we must assume, first, Christ's essential Godhead, and, secondly, the fusion of His divine and human natures.

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  • If two natures, divine and human, are added to each other, what can the humanity be except one drop in the ocean of divine power, wisdom, goodness ?

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  • Leibnitz retains this attenuated belief in moral freedom and combines with it a belief in the spontaneity of moral agents in the sense that they possess the power of acting and need no other principle of action save the laws of their own natures.

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  • So far, however, there is no ethical difference between Christian faith and that of Judaism, or its later imitation, Mahommedanism; except that the personal affection of loyal trust is peculiarly stirred by the blending of human and divine natures in Christ, and the rule of duty impressively taught by the manifestation of his perfect life.

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  • These three Augustine (after St Paul) regards as the three essential elements of Christian virtue; along with these he recognizes the fourfold division of virtue into prudence, temperance, courage and justice according to their traditional interpretation; but he explains these virtues to be in their true natures only the same love to God in different aspects or exercises.

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  • To redeem man from this state of guilt, and to recover him from corruption, the Son of God became incarnate, assuming man's nature into union with His own, so that in Him were two natures in one person.

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  • The Fijians combined with this greediness a savage and merciless natures.

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  • Their effort, as defined by Dormer, was "an attempt to effect some kind of solution of the vital unity of Christ's person, which had been so seriously proposed by monophysitism, on the basis of the now firmly-established doctrine of the two natures."

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  • the doctrine that the divine and human natures, while quite distinct in His one person, had but one activity and operation.

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  • So intense did the controversy now become, that at last, towards the end of 638, Heraclius published an Ecthesis, or Exposition of the Faith (composed by Sergius), which prohibited the use of the phrase "one energy," because of its disquieting effects on some minds, as seeming to militate against the doctrine of the two natures; while, on the other hand, the expression "two energies" was interdicted because it seemed to imply that Christ had two wills.

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  • The will, Agatho said, is a property of the nature, so that as there are two natures there are two wills; but the human will determines itself ever conformably to the divine and almighty will.

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  • The old contemporary missionary Sahagun has left one of the earliest detailed accounts of the natures and myths of these gods, but, though Sahagun took great pains in collecting facts, his speculations must be accepted with caution.

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  • He claims to have shown that the dogmas of the eternity of matter and the permanence of the world are false; that their description of the Deity as the demiurgos is unspiritual; that they fail to prove the existence, the unity, the simplicity, the incorporeality or the knowledge (both of species and accidents) of God; that their ascription of souls to the celestial spheres is unproved; that their theory of causation, which attributes effects to the very natures of the causes, is false, for that all actions and events are to be ascribed to the Deity; and, finally, that they cannot establish the spirituality of the soul, nor prove its mortality.

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  • The attempt to solve the apparent incongruity of a perfect union of two complete and distinct natures in one person produced first Apollinarianism, which substituted the divine Logos for the human y ob's or 7rveuµa of Jesus, thereby detracting from the completeness of his humanity; and then Nestorianism, which destroyed the unity of Christ's person by affirming that the divine Logos dwelt in the man Jesus as in a temple, and that the union of the two was in respect of dignity, and furthermore that, inasmuch as the Logos could not have been born, to call Mary 9eororcos, " Godbearer," was absurd and blasphemous.

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  • The Alexandrians, led by Cyril, stood for the doctrine of the perfect union of two complete natures in one person, and made Novi/cos the shibboleth of orthodoxy.

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  • They ate in silence then, enjoying the tranquility of mother natures' work around them.

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  • He stood beside her and they both watched mother natures' display in rapt silence.

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  • People are often victims of their own natures.

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  • aeoney too have their experience and that experience slowly modifies their inner spiritual natures which also progress during eons of evolution.

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  • crystalline in natures.

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  • The words which express our faith and piety are not definite; yet they are significant and fragrant like frankincense to superior natures.

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  • This is not the rather impersonal matter of radically differing natures.

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  • individualized natures of the things that agree in the status.

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  • It is a delicate interplay or equation of forces and of natures acting one upon another.

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  • Presentations are known to mist speakers as natures natural laxative Two techniques that I have found to work are: Visualization.

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  • There was also the change in paint composition, it's a lot harder to match natures colors using today's mostly opaque palette.

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  • Perhaps such scientific natures have some psychic prevision of the most tremendous problem of their lives.

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  • self-serving natures of most of Mandy's reviews say a great deal about the nature of the book itself.

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  • Love makes us feel soppy, and the parasitic memes exploit that soppiness -- living off our big brains and our romantic natures.

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  • Alfred de Musset was introduced, and the two natures leapt together as by elective affinity.

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  • Extension and thought, the essences of corporeal and spiritual natures, are absolutely distinct, and cannot act upon one another.

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  • Yet he cannot deny that "he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated"; and admits that "he was not a man of blood," and that he possessed "a wonderful understanding in the natures and humour of men," and "a great spirit, an admirable circumspection and sagacity and a most magnanimous resolution."

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  • For more than twenty years he maintained the struggle against the Alexandrian dogmatic and its formulae fvwciS b and the like), and taught that in the person of Christ we must strictly distinguish two natures (hypostases), which are united indeed in one person (prosopon), but are not amalgamated in essence.

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  • Thus the council rejected both Nestorianism and Eutychianism, and stood upon the doctrine that Christ had two natures, each perfect in itself and each distinct from the other, yet perfectly united in one person, who was at once both God and man.

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  • The fourth argues for the orthodox belief of the two natures and one person of Christ.

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  • In his Christology he departed from the Lutheran and Zwinglian doctrine of the two natures by insisting on what he called the Vergotterung des Fleisches Christi, the deification or the glorification of the flesh of Christ.

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  • Norden's work contains many judicious observations on the " different natures of grounds, how they may be employed, how they may be bettered, reformed and amended."

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  • Hydrogen and oxygen are, therefore, of very opposite natures, and this is well illustrated by the circumstance that oxygen combines, with very few exceptions, with all the remaining elements, whilst compounds of only a limited number with hydrogen have been obtained.

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  • But the followers of Cyril of Alexandria, and with them those of Eutyches, saw in the Chalcedon decree of two natures only another form of the "Nestorian" duality of persons in Christ, and rose everywhere in opposition.

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  • Their objection to Chalcedon was that it was an innovation, and they fully acknowledged the distinctness of the two natures in Christ, insisting only that they became indissolubly united so that there was only one energy (ilia Kato) 6Eav8puci EvEp'yeta) of Christ's will.

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  • He became one of the famous circle of the transcendentalists, always keenly preserving his own individuality amongst such more or less potent natures as Emerson, Hawthorne and Margaret Fuller.

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  • They held that the duality of natures implied a distinction between two modes of sonship in Christ - the natural or proper, and the adoptive.

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  • Thus they did not teach a dual personality, nor the old Antiochene view that Christ's divine exaltation was due to his sinless virtue; they were less concerned with old disputes than with the problem as the Chalcedon decision had left it - the relation of Christ's one personality to his two natures.

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  • The essence, indeed, comprehends all natures, and everything that exists is a portion of this essence, by participation in which everything that is hath its existence."

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  • It is false, therefore, to speak of matter as the principle of individuation; and if this is so there is no longer any foundation for the Thomist view that in angelic natures every individual constitutes a species apart.

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  • Though:with some points of difference, they agreed in emphasizing the permanence of the two separate natures in Christ, united but not mingled or confused, and laid stress on the reality of our Lord's human experience.

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  • Thus, arguing inversely, we may learn something of the respective natures of these influences and of the way in which the nervous system is affected secondarily.

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    0
  • 16, which enjoins the duty of study and of scrupulousness in the observance of religious ordinances, only a very remarkable characterization of the different natures of the scholars remains (Aboth di R.

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  • Various flavouring materials, such as liquorice, tonka beans (Dipteryx odorata) and other ingredients are added, the natures of which are often trade secrets.

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  • In opposition to this Eutyches went so far as to affirm that after the union of the two natures, the human and the divine, Christ had only one nature, that of the incarnate Word, and that therefore His human body was essentially different from other human bodies.

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  • In this he went beyond Cyril and the Alexandrine school generally, who, although they expressed the unity of the two natures in Christ so as almost to nullify their duality, yet took care verbally to guard themselves against the accusation of in any way circumscribing or modifying his real and true humanity.

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  • This judgment is the more interesting as being in distinct conflict with the opinion of the bishop of Rome - Leo - who, departing from the policy of his predecessor Celestine, had written very strongly to Flavian in support of the doctrine of the two natures and one person.

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  • There the synod of Ephesus was declared to have been a "robber synod," its proceedings were annulled, and, in accordance with the rule of Leo as opposed to the doctrines of Eutyches, it was declared that the two natures were united in Christ, but without any alteration, absorption or confusion.

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  • His was one of those natures whose faculty of deep feeling is unhappily doomed to be inarticulate, and to pass away without the magic power of transmitting itself.

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  • The underlying principle is to reproduce natures scenic beauties, all the features being drawn to scale, so that however restricted the space, there shall be no violation of proportion.

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  • If we take for instance the skins of animals that are striped or spotted, we have the best possible illustration of natures methods in this direction.

    0
    0
  • The same law prevailing in all natures creation, in the plumage of birds, the painting of butterifies wings, the marking of shells, and in all the infinite variety and beauty of the floral kingdom, the lesson is constantly renewed to the observant eye.

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  • And thus, close student of natures processes, methods, and effects as the Japanese art workman is, he ever seeks to produce humble replicas from his only art master.

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  • He excels in his representations of landscapes and waterscapes, and has succeeded -in transferring to gold-lacquer panels tender and delicate pictures of natures softest moodspictures that show balance, richness, harmony and a fine sense of decorative proportion.

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  • Nestorius held the two natures so far apart as to appear to sacrifice the unity of the person of Christ.

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  • 451 affirmed "that Christ is true God and true man, according to His Godhead begotten from eternity and like the Father in everything, only without sin; and that after His incarnation the unity of the person consists in two natures which are conjoined without confusion, and without change, but also without rending and without separation."

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  • In 1781 Frederick William, then prince of Prussia, inclined, like many sensual natures, to mysticism, had joined the Rosicrucians, and had fallen under the influence of Johann Christof Wollner (1732-1800), and by him the royal policy was inspired.

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  • Further, the inclination of the line of metal to the axis gave the gun a fixed angle of elevation varying from 1 ° in light guns to 2-1° in the heavier natures.

    0
    0
  • Except for some minor differences the tangent sights were the same for all natures of guns, and for all services, but the development of the modern sight has followed different lines according to the nature and use of the gun, and must be treated under separate heads.

    0
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  • In the larger natures of War Office Handbook.

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  • The processes which have to be performed in the mensuration of figures of this kind are in effect processes of integration; the distinction between mensuration and integration lies in the different natures of the data.

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  • So far as Nestorius himself is concerned, however, it is certain that he never formulated any such doctrine;2 nor does any recorded utterance of his, however casual, come so near the heresy called by his name as Cyril's deliberately framed third anathema (that regarding the "physical union" of the two hypostases or natures) approaches Eutychianism.

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  • Hefele himself, one of the most learned and acute of Cyril's partisans, is compelled to admit that Nestorius accurately held the duality of the two natures and the integrity of each, was equally explicitly opposed to Arianism and Apollinarianism, and was perfectly correct in his assertion that the Godhead can neither be born nor suffer; all that he can allege against him is that "the fear of the communicatio idiomatum pursued him like a spectre."

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  • His aim, he tells us, had been to maintain the distinct continuance of the two natures of Christ when united through the Incarnation into one Person.

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  • "In the Person the natures use their properties mutually..

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  • The ultimate union of these two natures appears to lie in the will - "For there was one and the same will and mind in the union of the natures, so that both should will or not will exactly the same things.

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  • The natures have, moreover, a 3 Syriac, tegurta, lit."

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  • But the two natures being united are one Christ.

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  • And He who was born of the Father as to the Divinity, and from the Holy Virgin as to the humanity is and is styled one; for of the two natures there was a union."

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  • The most moderate form of the censure presents him in the odious light of a trimmer; the vulgar and venomous assailant is sure that Erasmus was a Protestant at heart, but withheld the avowal that he might not forfeit the worldly advantages he enjoyed as a Catholic. When by study of his writings we come to know Erasmus intimately, there is revealed to us one of those natures to which partisanship is an impossibility.

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  • What is the relation of the divine and human natures in Christ?

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  • At the council of Chalcedon in 451 it was declared that in the person of Christ are united two complete natures, divine and human,which retain after the union all their properties unchanged.

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  • This was supplemented at the third council of Constantinople in 680 by the statement that each of the natures contains a will, so that Christ possesses two wills.

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  • The Western Church accepted the decisions of Nicaea, Chalcedon and Constantinople, and so the doctrines of the Trinity and of the two natures in Christ were handed down as orthodox dogma in West as well as East.

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  • Rival schools of thought sprang up, and controversy raged over it, as it had aforetime about the homoousion, or the two natures.

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  • Hence arose a general feeling of disappointment, which acted on different natures in different ways.

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  • More's was one of those highly susceptible natures which take more readily and more eagerly than common minds the impress of that which they encounter on their first contact with men.

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  • Again, Schelling urged that besides the rational element there must be something else; that there is in nature, as natures naturans, a blind impulse, a will without intelligence, which belongs to the existent; and that even God Himself as the Absolute cannot be pure thought, because in order to think He must have an existence which cannot be merely His thought of it, and therefore pure being is the prior condition of thought and spirit.

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  • But later on, about 480, and throughout the following centuries, the Armenians rejected the decrees of Chalcedon and held that the assertion of two natures in Christ was a relapse into the heresy of Nestor.

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  • Soon afterwards he went to Saumur, where in 1679 were published Liberii de Sancto Amore Epistolae Theologicae (Irenopoli: Typis Philalethianis), usually attributed to him; they deal with the doctrine of the Trinity, the hypostatic union of the two natures in Jesus Christ, original sin, and the like, in a manner sufficiently far removed from that of the conventional orthodoxy of the period.

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  • "The different natures and the different persons admit of union in one way alone, namely in the way of a complete agreement in respect of will; and thereby is revealed the One (or Monad) in activity in the case of those (wills) which have coalesced; in the manner described."

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  • For many years before the accession of his uncle Justin, the Eastern world had been vexed by the struggles of the Monophysite party, who recognized only one nature in Christ, against the view which then and ever since has maintained itself as orthodox, that the divine and human natures coexisted in Him.

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  • The flock included intelligent pupils, empty-headed imitators, and romantic natures who turned philosophy into lyric measures.

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  • natures by relegating to the divine Logos the formative and controlling agency.

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  • Two natures may form a unity, as the body and soul in man.

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  • So man, both soul and body, is brought into unity with the Logos; there being then one hypostasis for both natures."

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  • While the theologians discussed doctrine the people longed for mystery, as it satisfied their religious natures.

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  • According to this doctrine the personality of Christ is twofold; the divine Logos dwells as a distinct personality in the man Jesus Christ, the union of the two natures being analogous to the relation between the believer and the indwelling Holy Spirit.

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  • 4 Natural philosophy is, therefore, in ultimate resort the study of forms, and, consequently, the fundamental problem of philosophy in general is the discovery of these forms. " On a given body to generate or superinduce a new nature or natures, is the work and aim of human power..

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  • Lastly, the true form is such that it deduces the given nature from some source of being which is inherent in more natures, and which is better known in the natural order of things than the form itself."

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  • The configurations, or inner structure of bodies, include dense, rare, heavy, light, hot, cold, &c., - in fact, what are elsewhere called simple natures.

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  • We thus at last attain a definite conclusion with regard to forms, and it appears clear that in Bacon's belief the true function of science was the search for a few fundamental physical qualities, highly abstract and general, the combinations of which give rise to the simple natures and complex phenomena around us.

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  • With regard to the first., in ultimate result it depends upon the theory of forms; for whenever the compound body can be regarded as the sum of certain simple natures, then our knowledge of the forms of these natures gives us the power of superinducing a new nature on the concrete body.

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  • This can only be discovered by analysis, which will disclose the ultimate constituents (natural particles, not atoms) of bodies, and lead back the discussion to forms or simple natures, whereby alone can true light be thrown on these obscure questions.

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  • 21: - Prerogative Instances, Supports of Induction, Rectification of Induction, Varying the Investigation according to the Nature of the Subject, Prerogative Natures, Limits of Investigation, Application to Practice, Preparations for Investigation, the Ascending and Descending Scale of Axioms. The remainder of the Organum is devoted to a consideration of the twenty-seven classes of Prerogative Instances, and though it contains much that is both luminous and helpful, it adds little to our knowledge of what constitutes the Baconian method.

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  • But the strain of daily association was too much for their antagonistic natures.

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  • These differences took two separate and extreme types, the one of which forcibly separated the two natures so as to deny anything like a real union, while the other insisted upon a mixture of the two, or an absorption of the human in the divine.

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  • The same symbol also declares that Christ is " to be acknowledged in two natures.

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  • Hence the Nestorians, who insisted upon the duality of the natures to such a degree as to lose sight of the unity of the person, and who rejected the term Theotokos, repudiated the decrees both of Ephesus and of Chalcedon, and upon the promulgation of the decrees of Chalcedon formally separated from the church.

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  • The council of Chalcedon (451), the fourth oecumenical, declared that Christ is to be acknowledged " in two naturesunconfusedly, unchangeably," and therefore decided against the opinions of all who either believed that the divinity is the sole nature of Christ, or who, rejecting this, taught only one composite nature of Christ (one nature and one person, instead of two natures and one person).

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  • Christ, the Son of God, became man in two natures, which internally and inseparably united make One Person, and, according to the eternal purpose of God, has obtained for man reconciliation with God, and eternal life, inasmuch as He by His vicarious death has made satisfaction to God for the world's sins, and this satisfac tion was Perfectly Commensurate With The Sins Of The World.

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  • This did not prevent its having a considerable following, which after Apollinaris's death divided into two sects, the more conservative taking its name (Vitalians) from Vitalis, bishop of Antioch, the other (Polemeans) adding the further assertion that the two natures were so blended that even the body of Christ was a fit object of adoration.

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  • assertion was expanded and refined upon till two great doctrines had been built up - that of the Trinity of divine Persons in the unity of the Godhead, and that of the union of two distinct natures, divine and human, in the person of Jesus Christ.

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  • Did the two natures, human and divine, remain so separated in Jesus as to jeopardize the unity of His person ?

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  • Did the two natures coalesce in Jesus so as to constitute a single nature?

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  • But if it be presupposed that the purpose of Christ's mission was to deify men by bestowing physical immortality, then we must assume, first, Christ's essential Godhead, and, secondly, the fusion of His divine and human natures.

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  • If two natures, divine and human, are added to each other, what can the humanity be except one drop in the ocean of divine power, wisdom, goodness ?

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  • Leibnitz retains this attenuated belief in moral freedom and combines with it a belief in the spontaneity of moral agents in the sense that they possess the power of acting and need no other principle of action save the laws of their own natures.

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  • So far, however, there is no ethical difference between Christian faith and that of Judaism, or its later imitation, Mahommedanism; except that the personal affection of loyal trust is peculiarly stirred by the blending of human and divine natures in Christ, and the rule of duty impressively taught by the manifestation of his perfect life.

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  • These three Augustine (after St Paul) regards as the three essential elements of Christian virtue; along with these he recognizes the fourfold division of virtue into prudence, temperance, courage and justice according to their traditional interpretation; but he explains these virtues to be in their true natures only the same love to God in different aspects or exercises.

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  • To redeem man from this state of guilt, and to recover him from corruption, the Son of God became incarnate, assuming man's nature into union with His own, so that in Him were two natures in one person.

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  • The Fijians combined with this greediness a savage and merciless natures.

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  • Their effort, as defined by Dormer, was "an attempt to effect some kind of solution of the vital unity of Christ's person, which had been so seriously proposed by monophysitism, on the basis of the now firmly-established doctrine of the two natures."

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  • the doctrine that the divine and human natures, while quite distinct in His one person, had but one activity and operation.

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  • So intense did the controversy now become, that at last, towards the end of 638, Heraclius published an Ecthesis, or Exposition of the Faith (composed by Sergius), which prohibited the use of the phrase "one energy," because of its disquieting effects on some minds, as seeming to militate against the doctrine of the two natures; while, on the other hand, the expression "two energies" was interdicted because it seemed to imply that Christ had two wills.

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  • The will, Agatho said, is a property of the nature, so that as there are two natures there are two wills; but the human will determines itself ever conformably to the divine and almighty will.

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  • The old contemporary missionary Sahagun has left one of the earliest detailed accounts of the natures and myths of these gods, but, though Sahagun took great pains in collecting facts, his speculations must be accepted with caution.

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  • He claims to have shown that the dogmas of the eternity of matter and the permanence of the world are false; that their description of the Deity as the demiurgos is unspiritual; that they fail to prove the existence, the unity, the simplicity, the incorporeality or the knowledge (both of species and accidents) of God; that their ascription of souls to the celestial spheres is unproved; that their theory of causation, which attributes effects to the very natures of the causes, is false, for that all actions and events are to be ascribed to the Deity; and, finally, that they cannot establish the spirituality of the soul, nor prove its mortality.

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  • The attempt to solve the apparent incongruity of a perfect union of two complete and distinct natures in one person produced first Apollinarianism, which substituted the divine Logos for the human y ob's or 7rveuµa of Jesus, thereby detracting from the completeness of his humanity; and then Nestorianism, which destroyed the unity of Christ's person by affirming that the divine Logos dwelt in the man Jesus as in a temple, and that the union of the two was in respect of dignity, and furthermore that, inasmuch as the Logos could not have been born, to call Mary 9eororcos, " Godbearer," was absurd and blasphemous.

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  • The Alexandrians, led by Cyril, stood for the doctrine of the perfect union of two complete natures in one person, and made Novi/cos the shibboleth of orthodoxy.

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  • Those are red-letter days in our lives when we meet people who thrill us like a fine poem, people whose handshake is brimful of unspoken sympathy, and whose sweet, rich natures impart to our eager, impatient spirits a wonderful restfulness which, in its essence, is divine.

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  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.

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  • But alert and healthy natures remember that the sun rose clear.

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  • Even so, the self-serving natures of most of Mandy 's reviews say a great deal about the nature of the book itself.

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  • Love makes us feel soppy, and the parasitic memes exploit that soppiness -- living off our big brains and our romantic natures.

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  • No matter which route you choose to find a Ragdoll cat for rescue, these cats have very loving natures and bond closely with their family members.

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  • Not only will it highlight the free-spirited natures of the bride and groom, but it will inspire friendly talk among guests and help bring out the major theme of the wedding.

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  • Natures Best® with Real Beef for Puppies: This formula uses beef and vegetables in the mix, along with added Omega-3 supplements to support development of the brain and nervous systems.

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  • Natures Flavors - This online store sells a range of products including powdered soy organic milk.

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  • The life-force energy, chi, has two distinct natures.

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  • However, their public bravado lies in stark contrast to their somewhat insecure natures.

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  • Their intellectual natures can also lead to periods of boredom, especially if Virgo proves to be the dominant partner and reigns in Gemini too much.

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  • While there is the initial passion and flame between these signs, different natures between the Earth and Fire sign can drive them apart after a short period of time.

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  • Her parents split when she was young, her human father leaving her with her Klingon mother, and B'Elanna always blamed her mother's and her own Klingon natures for the loss of her father.

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  • Norden's work contains many judicious observations on the " different natures of grounds, how they may be employed, how they may be bettered, reformed and amended."

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  • The underlying principle is to reproduce natures scenic beauties, all the features being drawn to scale, so that however restricted the space, there shall be no violation of proportion.

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  • Yet he cannot deny that "he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated"; and admits that "he was not a man of blood," and that he possessed "a wonderful understanding in the natures and humour of men," and "a great spirit, an admirable circumspection and sagacity and a most magnanimous resolution."

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