Naturally sentence example

naturally
  • We can't naturally fly, so we make airplanes.
    285
    54
  • Those that follow are naturally increasingly interesting and entertaining.
    74
    40
  • That culture was naturally Aramaic.
    55
    25
  • Do you know how many edible plants grow naturally in our own front yards?
    44
    35
  • Naturally, the statute of limitations has expired so he's as free as a summer breeze.
    32
    27
    Advertisement
  • When the people saw me come from the sky they naturally thought me some superior creature, and bowed down before me.
    21
    10
  • Naturally he wouldn't say anything about his meeting with the other man.
    18
    10
  • And because of this, we would therefore lose the inevitable relationships that naturally formed?
    15
    10
  • The flow of history will naturally end war.
    14
    4
  • " The animals act naturally and by springs, like a watch."
    14
    5
    Advertisement
  • I HAVE TRIED FROM THE BEGINNING TO TALK NATURALLY TO HELEN AND TO TEACH HER TO TELL ME ONLY THINGS THAT INTEREST HER AND ASK QUESTIONS ONLY FOR THE SAKE OF FINDING OUT WHAT SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
    14
    10
  • Naturally white-blonde, she'd dyed it pink on a whim last weekend.
    12
    16
  • Naturally, there was at first a strong tendency on her part to use only the important words in a sentence.
    10
    3
  • His military service terminated at the time of the Self-denying Ordinance in 1645; he had associated himself with the Presbyterian faction, and naturally enough was not included in the New Model.
    10
    4
  • Naturally he didn't use his bathroom.
    10
    6
    Advertisement
  • She was naturally good.
    10
    9
  • While such judgments are naturally exaggerated, there is no doubt that he takes a very high place among modern Latin poets.
    10
    10
  • While the sea of history remains calm the ruler-administrator in his frail bark, holding on with a boat hook to the ship of the people and himself moving, naturally imagines that his efforts move the ship he is holding on to.
    10
    13
  • This steam condensing adds to the water in the pipe and naturally causes an overflow, which is led back to the boiler and re-used.
    8
    7
  • All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.
    8
    13
    Advertisement
  • Resolved to behave as naturally as she could, she stripped and turned up the shower as hot as she could tolerate.
    8
    14
  • Naturally, however, as the ideals of the members of the party are the same, the members of the Labour party will be generally found voting together on all important divisions, the chief exception being with regard to free trade or protection.
    5
    4
  • He was so simply and naturally humble--if he can be called humble who never aspires--that humility was no distinct quality in him, nor could he conceive of it.
    5
    4
  • But the fact remains that Miss Canby's story was read to me once, and that long after I had forgotten it, it came back to me so naturally that I never suspected that it was the child of another mind.
    5
    5
  • This law naturally made a deep impression on military Europe, not merely because the period of color service was reducedGermany had taken this step years beforebut because of the almost entire absence of the usual exemptions.
    5
    6
    Advertisement
  • But in the excitement of carrying me to church my father lost the name on the way, very naturally, since it was one in which he had declined to have a part.
    5
    6
  • Both were talking and listening too eagerly and too naturally, which was why Anna Pavlovna disapproved.
    5
    7
  • The traveller on the prairie is naturally a hunter, on the head waters of the Missouri and Columbia a trapper, and at the Falls of St. Mary a fisherman.
    5
    8
  • Xander's low voice, with its naturally husky edge, made her flush.
    5
    9
  • My mind opened naturally and joyously to a conception of antiquity.
    5
    9
    Advertisement
  • Books, the oldest and the best, stand naturally and rightfully on the shelves of every cottage.
    5
    16
  • The old lady babbled something to her husband about Howie, and naturally, Howie doesn't know what guy is talking about.
    4
    3
  • She urged every one to speak to Helen naturally, to give her full sentences and intelligent ideas, never minding whether Helen understood or not.
    4
    3
  • But such undercurrents still existed among the people and gathered new forces ready to manifest themselves just as strangely, unexpectedly, and at the same time simply, naturally, and forcibly.
    4
    3
  • Both the countess and Sonya understood that, naturally, neither Moscow nor the burning of Moscow nor anything else could seem of importance to Natasha.
    4
    4
    Advertisement
  • Not till 1881, however, were the Croatian-Slavonian march-lands completely merged in the kingdoms to which they naturally belonged.
    4
    5
  • As we envision a world where machines do more and more work that people used to do, our minds naturally turn to those who would be displaced by technological advance.
    4
    5
  • He was naturally the very sort of victim wanted, and he was decreed "of accusation" on the 3rd of October.
    3
    3
  • She ran her fingers along the lines, finding the words she knew and guessing at the meaning of others, in a way that would convince the most conservative of educators that a little deaf child, if given the opportunity, will learn to read as easily and naturally as ordinary children.
    3
    3
  • They're all several hours after the fact and come from an unusual viewpoint; not where there would naturally be someone observing.
    3
    4
    Advertisement
  • The pope was naturally proud of his family and had practised nepotism from the outset.
    3
    4
  • The conversation naturally turned on the peace.
    3
    4
  • Ministers were naturally anxious to obtain the reversion to his vacant post, and Indian affairs formed at this time the hinge on which party politics turned.
    3
    6
  • These habitations would naturally in the first instance lie in close proximity to the western approach; after the building of the Pelasgicum they seem to have extended beyond its walls towards the south and south-west - towards the sea and the waters of the Ilissus.
    2
    0
  • A frame naturally slight had been further attenuated by rigorous habits of temperance, and thus rendered proof against the diseases of the tropics.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • follow more naturally upon v.
    2
    1
  • Considerations of this latter kind will naturally present themselves in the two great departments of cosmology and psychology, or they may be delegated to an independent research under the name of religious philosophy.
    2
    2
  • The Loss Of A Charge Is Naturally Largely Dependent On The Richness Of The Surrounding Air In Ions.
    2
    2
  • They naturally take their rise among an agricultural folk.
    2
    2
  • They were naturally talking about the campaign.
    2
    2
    Advertisement
  • A diminution in the number of positive ions would thus naturally be accompanied by a rise in potential gradient.
    2
    3
  • Public opinion, excited by the prospect of a war with Chile, naturally supported the candidature of General Roca, and he elected without opposition (12th October 1898).
    2
    3
  • The climate is naturally good, but continued neglect of sanitary precautions has made the city unhealthy.
    2
    3
  • The country is naturally very healthful, as evidence of which may be mentioned that no great epidemic has ever visited the state.
    2
    3
  • Naturally neither Natasha nor her parents wished to hear of this, but Prince Andrew was firm.
    2
    3
  • That way the kid could reposition naturally.
    1
    0
  • Let's allow it to happen naturally.
    1
    0
  • The League naturally sympathized with Poland, not only because Poland was the enemy of the knights, but also because under Poland it hoped to enjoy the practical liberty which Polish anarchy already seemed to offer.
    1
    0
  • The first volume of a Histoire naturelle des perroquets, a companion work by the same author, appeared in the same year, and is truly a monograph, since the parrots constitute a family of birds so naturally severed from all others that there has rarely been anything else confounded with them.
    1
    0
  • We may most naturally think of them as the members of the churches of Asia.
    1
    0
  • This naturally caused great dissatisfaction, and more than once resulted in irreparable disaster.
    1
    0
  • The deputies of the clergy were naturally conservative.
    1
    0
  • The latter was so well designed, so naturally and beautifully coloured, and so strongly expressive of suffering and agony, that it was found necessary to remove it from the place where it had been exhibited in the chapel of a convent.
    1
    1
  • As followers rapidly increased they were compelled to hold their own Sunday services, and this naturally led them to appoint as preachers godly laymen possessing the gift of exhortation.
    1
    1
  • This naturally Asie led to a contraband trade of considerable dimensions.
    1
    1
  • The Athenian tradition, which he follows in the main, would naturally seek to obscure their services.
    1
    1
  • In a region so extensive very great varieties of climate are naturally to be expected, but it may be stated as a general law that the climate of Australia is milder than that of corresponding lands in the northern hemisphere.
    1
    1
  • The lack of employment in factories naturally affected the coal mining industry, and indeed every industry in the states, except those connected with the export trade, was severely affected.
    1
    1
  • During the first six years of federation there were five ministries; the tenure of office under the threeyearly system was naturally uncertain, and this uncertainty was reflected in the proposals of whatever ministry was in office.
    1
    1
  • This naturally affectionate abandonment that every one felt in him had procured him profound attachments and rare devotions.
    1
    1
  • All deaf people naturally gesticulate.
    1
    1
  • It seemed as though not the trumpeters were playing, but as if the army itself, rejoicing at the Emperors' approach, had naturally burst into music.
    1
    1
  • Three hundred persons took their seats in the dining room, according to their rank and importance: the more important nearer to the honored guest, as naturally as water flows deepest where the land lies lowest.
    1
    1
  • Speaking of the position of Prussia, Anna Pavlovna very naturally asked Boris to tell them about his journey to Glogau and in what state he found the Prussian army.
    1
    1
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
    1
    1
  • At the council at Fili the prevailing thought in the minds of the Russian commanders was the one naturally suggesting itself, namely, a direct retreat by the Nizhni road.
    1
    1
  • As deputy he had no vote, and he naturally took little share in the debates, but it was part of his duty to send written reports of the proceedings to his patron, since the government, with a well-grounded fear of all that might stir popular feeling, refused to allow any published reports.
    1
    2
  • A work so widely circulated by the author naturally attracted attention, but in France it was principally the mathematicians who took it up, and their criticisms were more pungent than complimentary.
    1
    2
  • The figure of Alexander naturally impressed itself upon the imagination of the world which his career had shaken.
    1
    2
  • The steps by which the practice of resting from labour on the Lord's day instead of on the Sabbath was established in Christendom and received civil as well as ecclesiastical sanction are dealt with under Sunday; it is enough to observe here that this practice is naturally and even necessarily connected with the religious observance of the Lord's day as a day of worship and religious gladness, and is in full accordance with the principles laid down by Jesus in His criticism of the Sabbath of the Scribes.
    1
    2
  • If the human soul is a force in the narrower sense, a substance, and not a combination of substances, then, as in the nature of things there is no transition from existence to non-existence, we cannot naturally conceive the end of its existence, any more than we can anticipate a gradual annihilation of its existence."
    1
    2
  • As, however, these machines impressed the popular imagination, they naturally figure largely in the traditions about him.
    1
    3
  • When we're ready, it will happen naturally.
    0
    0
  • I think I'll let that part happen or not happen naturally.
    0
    0
  • The stable manure is taken into the tortuous passages of these cellars, and the spawn introduced from masses of dry dung where it occurs naturally.
    0
    0
  • This naturally stimulated the popular devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, which had been already widespread before the definition of the dogma.
    0
    0
  • The principal motion in a crane is naturally the hoisting or lifting motion.
    0
    0
  • The contracts naturally do not concern such criminal cases as the above, as a rule, but marriage contracts do specify death by strangling, drowning, precipitation from a tower or pinnacle of the temple or by the iron sword for a wife's repudiation of her husband.
    0
    0
  • Cadmium does not occur naturally in the uncombined condition, and only one mineral is known which contains it in any appreciable quantity, namely, greenockite, or cadmium sulphide, found at Greenock and at Bishopton in Scotland, and in Bohemia and Pennsylvania.
    0
    0
  • Cadmium sulphide, CdS, occurs naturally as greenockite (q.v.), and can be artificially prepared by passing sulphuretted hydrogen through acid solutions of soluble cadmium salts, when it is precipitated as a pale yellow amorphous solid.
    0
    0
  • The Aegean itself is naturally divided by the island-chains and the ridges from which they rise into a series of basins or troughs, the deepest of which is that in the north, extending from the coast of Thessaly to the Gulf of Saros, and demarcated southward by the Northern Sporades, Lemnos, Imbros and the peninsula of Gallipoli.
    0
    0
  • Though naturally passionate, Matthias's self-control was almost superhuman, and throughout his stormy life, with his innumerable experiences of ingratitude and treachery, he never was guilty of a single cruel or vindictive action.
    0
    0
  • They, and also the inhabitants of central Italy, are more industrious than the inhabitants of the southern provinces, who have by no means recovered from centuries of misgovernment and oppression, and are naturally more hot-blooded and excitable, but less stable, capable of organization or trustworthy.
    0
    0
  • During eight years (1806-1814) the chief places of the island had been garrisoned by British troops; and the commander of the force which upheld the tottering rule of Ferdinand at Palermo naturally had great authority.
    0
    0
  • Meeting with Cranmer, they were naturally led to discuss the king's meditated divorce from Catherine of Aragon.
    0
    0
  • The gradual elaboration of the sacrificial ceremonial, as the all-sufficient expression of religious devotion, and a constantly growing tendency towards theosophic and mystic speculation on the significance of every detail of the ritual, could not fail to create a demand for explanatory treatises of this kind, which, to enhance their practical utility, would naturally deal with the special texts and rites assigned in the ceremonial to the several classes of officiating priests.
    0
    0
  • Hence it naturally has a moral argument in reserve.
    0
    0
  • s Janet naturally is in opposition here.
    0
    0
  • 2 Materialism further brings with it an extreme or " hard " determinism; and, denying the soul's separate existence in any sense, it naturally denies immortality.
    0
    0
  • But before this event John had instituted a great inquiry, the inquest of service of June 1212, for the purpose of finding out how much he could exact from each of his vassals, a measure which naturally excited some alarm; and then, fearing a baronial rising, he had abandoned his proposed expedition into Wales, had taken hostages from the most prominent of his foes, and had sought safety in London.
    0
    0
  • The morphology of the group thus falls naturally into four sections - (I) the hydropolyp, (2) the polyp-colony, (3) the hydromedusa, (4) the medusa-colonies.
    0
    0
  • The supposition that sensation thus rests on a material process of absorption from external bodies naturally led up to the idea that plants and even inorganic subtances are precipient, and so to an indistinct recognition of organic life as a scale of intelligence.
    0
    0
  • Yet this process of development is not to be conceived as if one stage is naturally produced out of the other, and not even as if the one followed the other in time.
    0
    0
  • Naturally very many other factors have to be considered, but this alone is a sufficient reason to restrain attempts to place existing forms in linear phylogenetic series.
    0
    0
  • - This arose naturally from the sacred character of Christian marriage.
    0
    0
  • When Gotama the Buddha, himself a Kosalan by birth, determined on the use, for the propagation of his religious reforms, of the living tongue of the people, he and his followers naturally made full use of the advantages already gained by the form of speech current through the wide extent of his own country.
    0
    0
  • Naturally he felt that the prevalence of Christianity was incompatible with his ideal of Roman prosperity, and therefore that the policy of the Flavian emperors was the only logical solution of an important problem.
    0
    0
  • An account of the structure of plants naturally begins with the cell which is the proximate unit of organic structure.
    0
    0
  • The formation of a massive body naturally involves the localization of the absorptive region, and the function of absorption (which in the simpler forms is carried out by the whole of the vegetative part of the mycelium penetrating a solid or immersed in a liquid substratum) is subserved by the outgrowth of the hyphae of the surface-layer of that region into rhizoids, which, like those of the Algae living on soil, resemble the root-hairs of the higher plants.
    0
    0
  • The terrible losses sustained by whole communities of farmers, planters, foresters, &c., from plant diseases have naturally stimulated the search for remedies, but even now the search is too often conducted in the spirit of the believer in quack medicines, although the agricultural world is awakening to the fact that before any measures likely to be successful can be attempted, the whole chain of causation of the disease must be investigated.
    0
    0
  • Latitudinally the region subdivides naturally into several well- marked s,ih-rea-innc which most he hrieflir discussed.
    0
    0
  • The Australian sub-region consists of Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia and New Zealand, and, though partly lying within the tropic is most naturally treated as a whole.
    0
    0
  • In 1772 the French explorer Yves Kerguelen de Tremarec had discovered the land that bears his name in the South Indian Ocean without recognizing it to be an island, and naturally believed it to be part of the southern continent.
    0
    0
  • On the fertile low grounds along the margins of rivers or in clearings of forests, agricultural communities naturally take their rise, dwelling in villages and cultivating the wild grains, which by careful nurture and selection have been turned into rich cereals.
    0
    0
  • On the seashore fishing naturally became a means of livelihood, and dwellers by the sea, in virtue of the dangers to which they are exposed from storm and unseaworthy craft, are stimulated to a higher degree of foresight, quicker observation, prompter decision and more energetic action in emergencies than those who live inland.
    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the civil war, DeIotarus naturally sided with his old patron Pompey, and after the battle of Pharsalus escaped with him to Asia.
    0
    0
  • Fossil Birds Much had naturally been expected from the study of fossil birds, but, so far as the making of classifications is concerned, they have proved rather a source of perplexities.
    0
    0
  • The Patagonian Subregion, most extratropical, is naturally devoid of a good many typically tropical birds, or these are but poorly represented, for instance Caerebidae, Mniotiltidae, Tanagridae, Vireonidae.
    0
    0
  • This region naturally comprises the African and Indian areas, conformably to be called subregions.
    0
    0
  • In this district the defeat of the Amalekites is more naturally located (Exod.
    0
    0
  • 155), the crowd shouted, "This is the father of the Christians" 2; but the words were probably prompted by the Jews, who took a prominent part in the martyrdom, and who naturally viewed Polycarp in the light of a great Christian rabbi, and gave him the title which their own teachers bore.
    0
    0
  • So far we have dealt with forms of address explicitly directed towards a power that, one might naturally conclude, has personality, since it is apparently expected to hear and answer.
    0
    0
  • To the magician, endowed in the opinion of his fellows (and doubtless of himself) with this wonderful power of effective suggestion, the output of such power naturally represents itself as a kind of unconditional willing.
    0
    0
  • The dioxide has been known since the earliest times and is found as a naturally occurring product in the gaseous exhalations of volcanoes and in solution in some volcanic springs.
    0
    0
  • These were naturally those families which had been patrician in some other Italian city, but which were plebeian at Rome.
    0
    0
  • This is what the nobility of office, if left unchecked, naturally grows into.
    0
    0
  • Thus, in view of persecution or slander, the Christian church naturally produced literary " Apologies."
    0
    0
  • This fact naturally led to his crediting himself with many discoveries which he afterwards found had been already established, often by more direct and elegant processes than his own.
    0
    0
  • Of the "Hidden Seed" the greater number were Germans; they were probably descended from a colony of German Waldenses, who had come to Moravia in 1480 and joined the Church of the Brethren; and, therefore, when persecution broke out afresh they naturally fled to the nearest German refuge.
    0
    0
  • The soil, mainly alluvial, is naturally very fertile, and wherever cultivated yields abundant crops, durra being the principal grain grown.
    0
    0
  • It is difficult to allow the appositeness of this special illustration; on the other hand, Ford has even in this case shown his art of depicting sensual passion without grossness of expression; for the exception in Annabella's language to Soranzo seems to have a special intention, and is true to the pressure of the situation and the revulsion produced by it in a naturally weak and yielding mind.
    0
    0
  • Naturally he selects fire, according to him the most complete embodiment of the process of Becoming, as the principle of empirical existence, out of which all things, including even the soul, grow by way of a quasi condensation, and into which all things must in course of time be again resolved.
    0
    0
  • When they first appeared in Europe they were idolaters or Shamanists, and as such they had naturally no religious fanaticism; but even when they adopted Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde (Berkai) who first became a Mussulman allowed the Russians to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.
    0
    0
  • As the Muscovite and the Lithuano-Polish princes were equally ambitious and equally anxious to widen their borders, they naturally came into conflict.
    0
    0
  • supply, the value of land is in proportion to the number of permanent labourers settled on it, and the landed proprietors naturally try to attract to their estates as many peasants as possible; and in this competition the large proprietors have evidently an advantage over their humbler and weaker rivals.
    0
    0
  • Her reign (1730-40) was a regime of methodical German despotism on the lines laid down by her uncle, Peter the Great, and as she was naturally indolent and much addicted to frivolous amusements, the administration was directed by her favourite Biren (q.v.) and other men of German origin.
    0
    0
  • This naturally caused profound disappointment and dissatisfaction in the liberal section of the educated classes and especially among the young officers of the regiments which had spent some years in western Europe.
    0
    0
  • In these circumstances sanguine enthusiasm naturally gave way to despondency, and the reforming zeal of the government was replaced by tendencies of a decidedly reactionary kind.
    0
    0
  • From Manchuria, it was assumed, the political influence and spontaneous infiltration would naturally spread to Korea, and on the deeply indented coast of the Hermit Kingdom might be constructed new ports and arsenals more spacious and strategically more important than Port Arthur.
    0
    0
  • The opportunity thus given for debate naturally stimulated the movement in favour of constitutional government, which received new impulses from the sympathetic attitude of the emperor Alexander II., his grant in 1879 of a constitution to the liberated principality of Bulgaria, and the multiplication of Nihilist outrages which pointed to the necessity of conciliating Liberal opinion in order to present a united front against revolutionary agitation.
    0
    0
  • Naturally the company named does not reach all of these points, but its line across the Andes supplies the indispensable link of communication, in the absence of which the east coast towns and the west coast towns have hitherto been as widely separated as if they had been located on different continents-indeed, far more widely separated in point of time and of freight charges than Great Britain and the United States.
    0
    0
  • naturally constructed as side stations, and whether offices are provided on both sides or whether they are mainly concentrated on one will depend on local circumstances, the amount of the traffic, and the direction in which it preponderates.
    0
    0
  • Motors may be applied to every axle in the train, and their individual torques adjusted to values suitable to the weights naturally carried by the several axles.
    0
    0
  • Their primary object being the development and peopling of the land, they have naturally been made as cheaply as possible; and as in such cases the cost of the land is inconsiderable, economy has been sought by the use of lighter and rougher permanent way, plant, rolling stock, &c. Such railways are not " light " in the technical sense of having been made under enactments intended to secure permanent lowness of cost as compared with standard lines.
    0
    0
  • The idea of communicating with the departed was naturally attractive even to the merely curious, still more to those who were mourning for lost friends, and most of all to those who believed that this was the commencement of a new revelation.
    0
    0
  • - Explanations of sacrifice, as of other rites, are naturally not wanting among the peoples who have practised or still practise it; but they are often of the nature of aetiological myths and give no clue to the original meaning.
    0
    0
  • This was naturally found in the non-human member of the totem-kin - the totem animal; in a sense, therefore, the god died for his people.
    0
    0
  • (5) The victim might be naturally sacred or might have to undergo sanctification.
    0
    0
  • also Mount Nebo, which was a place-name both in Moab and in Judah, and naturally connects itself with the name of the Babylonian deity).
    0
    0
  • Now when the Hebrews succeeded to these agricultural conditions and acquired possession of the Canaanite abodes, they naturally fell into the same cycle of religious ideas and tradition.
    0
    0
  • of the 16th of August 1527, 2 during the absence in France of Wolsey, who, not blinded by passion like Henry, naturally opposed the undesirable alliance, and was negotiating a marriage with Renee, daughter of Louis XII.
    0
    0
  • Although the goddess of agriculture is naturally inclined to peace and averse from war, the memory of the time when her land was won and kept by the sword still lingers in the epithets xpvuaopos and 1.4n7 pos and in the name Triptolemus, which probably means " thrice fighter " rather than " thrice plougher."
    0
    0
  • According to Farnell, the meaning of the epithet is to be looked for in the original conception of Erinys, which was that of an earth-goddess akin to Ge, thus naturally associated with Demeter, rather than that of a wrathful avenging deity.
    0
    0
  • Some persons are naturally absolutely immune (Celli), but this is rare; immunity is also sometimes acquired by infection, but as a rule persons once infected are more predisposed than others.
    0
    0
  • Many bird parasites belonging to the Rippoboscidae have naturally been carried about the world by their hosts, while other species, such as the house-fly, blow-fly and drone-fly, have in like manner been disseminated by human agency.
    0
    0
  • The heat attendant on these actions, and on the vital processes of the animal organism, naturally first attracted attention.
    0
    0
  • This train of thinking naturally drew him towards the socialist philosophers of the school of Saint-Simon, whom he joined.
    0
    0
  • The course leads naturally into either Palestine or Babylonia, and, following the Euphrates, northern Syria is eventually reached.
    0
    0
  • There are, of course, numerous problems relating to the nature, limits and dates of the two recensions, of the incorporated sources, and of other sources (whether early or late) of independent origin; and here there is naturally room for much divergence of opinion.
    0
    0
  • It is naturally impossible to treat them from any modern standpoint as fiction; they are honest even where they are most untrustworthy.
    0
    0
  • Without sufficient external and independent evidence wherewith to interpret in the light of history the internal features of the intricate narratives, any reconstruction would naturally be hazardous, and all attempts must invariably be considered in the light of the biblical evidence itself, the date of the Israelite exodus, and the external conditions.
    0
    0
  • But the history of (north) Israel had naturally its own independent political backgrounds and the literary sources contain the same internal features as the annals and prophetic narratives which are already met with in 1 Samuel.
    0
    0
  • The scanty details of these important events must naturally be contrasted with the comparatively full accounts of earlier Philistine wars and internal conflicts in narratives which date from this or even a later age.
    0
    0
  • [The genuineness of such discoveries is naturally a matter for historical criticism to decide.
    0
    0
  • Nehemiah naturally gives us only his version, and the attitude of Haggai and Zechariah to Zerubbabel may illustrate the feeling of his partisans.
    0
    0
  • A special class of Roman prelatures exist at Rome, endowed as a kind of ecclesiastical majority to which those members of certain families who are destined for the clerical life naturally succeed.
    0
    0
  • shores, adds to its naturally high temperature, and the absence of high mountainous ridges to intercept the moisture-bearing clouds from the Atlantic gives it a limited rainfall.
    0
    0
  • It was naturally a term of respectful address from early times; thus St Augustine (Epist.
    0
    0
  • The tribes 'to the north, subject to Russia, are naturally more peaceable, and have been brought into some degree of discipline.
    0
    0
  • " Political circumstances naturally led to an ever-increasing appreciation of his person and his work as the unifier of Israel.
    0
    0
  • Naturally, it is among the free living forms that the parapodium is best developed, and least developed among the tubicolous belongs typically a long tentacle, the cirrus, which 'r podium or neuropodium, and may be developed into an arborescent gill or into a flat scale-like process, A the elytron (in Polynoe, &c.).
    0
    0
  • The subject of the poem is the rescue of the queen from her abductor Meleagant; and what makes the matter more perplexing is that Chretien handles the situation as one with which his hearers are already familiar; it is Lancelot, and not Arthur or another, to whom the office of rescuer naturally belongs.
    0
    0
  • The De rebus Geticis falls naturally into four parts.
    0
    0
  • But his proposal to substitute for all aides and customs duties a single capitation tax of a tenth of the revenue of all property was naturally opposed by the farmers of taxes and found little support.
    0
    0
  • Instead of replacing the former imposts, however, Desmarets simply added his dixieme to them; the experiment was naturally disastrous, and the idea was abandoned.
    0
    0
  • him into frequent communication with the most eminent scientific men, and he was naturally among the first to recognize the benefit that would accrue from regular intercourse among workers in the field of science.
    0
    0
  • Bentham's family connexions would naturally have given him a fair start at the bar, but this was not the career for which he was preparing himself.
    0
    0
  • The corn harvest naturally follows: rye and wheat were usually shorn, and barley and oats cut with the scythe.
    0
    0
  • Improved varieties, obtained by cross-impregnation either naturally or artificially brought about, were carefully propagated and generally adopted, and increased attention was bestowed on the cultivation of the natural grasses.
    0
    0
  • per quarter, and farmers naturally shrank from seeding the land freely with a crop which could not be grown except at a heavy loss.
    0
    0
  • The grazier buys and sells cattle much less frequently than the butcher buys them, so that the latter is naturally more skilled in estimating the weight of a beast through the use of the eye and the hand.
    0
    0
  • The absence of conviction in regard to British commercial policy naturally had its counterpart in the attitude of many men to the financial system of the country.
    0
    0
  • Introduced into Britain at the beginning of the 17th century, the silver fir has become common there as a planted tree, though, like the Norway spruce, it rarely comes up from seed scattered naturally.
    0
    0
  • When Mahmud succeeded to the throne, and evinced such active interest in the work, Firdousi was naturally attracted to the court of Ghazni.
    0
    0
  • He conducted experiments to show that certain abstract forms and proportions are naturally pleasing to our senses, and gave some new illustrations of the working of aesthetic association.
    0
    0
  • h, Mantle-skirt, which is naturally carried in a reflected condition so as to cover the sides of the shell.
    0
    0
  • Further discords naturally arose between so masterful a lieutenant as Bonaparte and so autocratic a chief as Paoli.
    0
    0
  • The occupation of Lisbon, which led on to Napoleon's intervention in Spanish affairs, resulted naturally from the treaty of Tilsit.
    0
    0
  • Naturally nothing more was heard of the partition of Portugal.
    0
    0
  • The threat naturally did not tend to reassure statesmen at Vienna; and the tsar now resolved to prevent the total wreck of the European system by screening the House of Habsburg from the wrath of his ally.
    0
    0
  • After imposing these harsh terms on his enemy, the conqueror might naturally have shown clemency to the Tirolese leader, Andreas Hofer; but that brave mountaineer, when betrayed by a friend, was sentenced to death at Mantua owing to the arrival of a special message to that effect from Napoleon.
    0
    0
  • Tiryns and Hissarlik, other communities of the early race began to arrive at civilization, but were naturally influenced by the more advanced culture of Crete, in proportion to their nearness of vicinity.
    0
    0
  • (The feelers and legs are cut short.) years; (2) certain stages of the life that are naturally " resting stages " may be in exceptional cases prolonged, and that to a very great extent; in this case no food is taken, and the activity of the individual is almost nil; (3) the life of certain insects in the adult state may be much prolonged if celibacy be maintained; a female of Cybister roeselii (a large water-beetle) has lived five and a half years in the adult state in captivity.
    0
    0
  • In addition to these abnormal cases, the life of certain insects is naturally more prolonged than usual.
    0
    0
  • became painfully frequent in the mouth of the young commander, not yet 21, who was far from being naturally cruel.
    0
    0
  • The ornithology of Britain naturally demands greater attention.
    0
    0
  • In 1855 Gray brought out, as one of the Museum publications, A Catalogue of the Genera and Subgenera of Birds, a handy little volume, naturally founded on the larger works.
    0
    0
  • Those of most interest to English ornithologists naturally refer to Britanny, Normandy and Picardy, and are by Baillon, Benoist, Blandin, Bureau, Canivet, Chesnon, Degland, Demarle, De Norguet, Gentil, Hardy, Lemetteil, Lemonnicier, Lesauvage, Maignon, Marcotte, Nourry and Tasle, while perhaps the Ornithologie parisienne of M.
    0
    0
  • The points at issue between Cuvier and Etienne Geoffroy St-Hilaire before mentioned naturally attracted the attention of L'Herminier, who in 1836 presented to the French Academy the results of his researches into the mode Isidore of growth of that bone which in the adult bird he had already studied to such good purpose.
    0
    0
  • Here the matter must be left; but it is undoubtedly a subject which demands further investigation, and naturally any future investigator of it should consult the abstract of L'Herminier's memoir and the criticisms upon it of the younger Geoffroy.
    0
    0
  • was naturally deemed a discovery of the greatest value by those ornithologists who thought most highly of the latter, and it was.
    0
    0
  • This Tentamen, containing his complete method of classifying birds in general, naturally received much attention, the more so perhaps, since, with its appendices, it was nearly the last labour of its respected author, whose industrious life came to an end in the course of the following year.
    0
    0
  • Naturally spirits of these latter kinds are more valuable as familiars than ordinary dead men's souls.
    0
    0
  • Societies for the discussion and publication of papers on entomology were naturally established as the number of students increased.
    0
    0
  • Having entered the Christian priesthood, he naturally took an interest in the Priscillianist controversy then going on in his native country, and it may have been in connexion with this that he went to consult Augustine at Hippo in 413 or 414.
    0
    0
  • The machine which will gin the largest quantity in the shortest time is naturally preferred, unless such injury is, occasioned as materially to diminish the market value of the cotton.
    0
    0
  • The establishment of the Cotton Bank naturally followed.
    0
    0
  • Such a rock is typically exemplified by a coarse-grained sandstone or conglomerate, while a limestone may be naturally porous, or, like the Trenton limestone of Ohio and Indiana, rendered so by its conversion into dolomite and the consequent production of cavities due to shrinkage - a change occurring only in the purer limestones.
    0
    0
  • It was thus natural, for these reasons, that the conquest of the Holy Land should gradually become an object for the ambition of Western Christianity - an object which the papacy, eager to realize its dream of a universal Church subject to its sway, would naturally cherish and attempt to advance.
    0
    0
  • - The First Crusade falls naturally into two parts.
    0
    0
  • Of these the people's Crusade - prior in order of time, if only secondary in point of importance - may naturally be studied first.
    0
    0
  • The great figure in the siege was naturally Bohemund (who had also been the hero of Dorylaeum).
    0
    0
  • Irritated by the concessions made by Alexius to the Pisans in II II, and furious at the revocation of her own privileges by John Comnenus in 1118, the republic naturally sought a new outlet in the Holy Land.
    0
    0
  • They gave the kingdom a connexion of its own with the Red Sea and its shipping; and they enabled the Franks to 2 Pisa naturally connected itself with Antioch, because Antioch was hostile to Constantinople, and Pisa cherished the same hostility, since Alexius I.
    0
    0
  • Yet the high court, which decided all problems of descent, would naturally intervene if a problem of descent arose, as it frequently did, in the kingdom; and thus the barons had the right of deciding between different claimants, and also of formally "approving" each new successor to the throne.
    0
    0
  • But the greatest success was attained when St Bernard - no great believer in pilgrimages, and naturally disposed to doubt the policy of a second Crusade - was induced by the pope to become the preacher of the new movement.
    0
    0
  • In these dissensions it was inevitable that Philip Augustus and Richard I., already discordant, should take contrary sides; and while Richard naturally sided with Guy de Lusignan, who came from his own county of Poitou, Philip as naturally sided with Conrad.
    0
    0
  • It took time and effort to bring them round to the diversion: the pope - naturally enough - set his face sternly against the project, the more as the usurper, Alexius III., was in negotiation with him in order to win his support against the Hohenstaufen, and Innocent hoped to find, as Alexius promised, a support and a reinforcement for the Crusade in an alliance with the Greek empire.
    0
    0
  • On the death of Conradin, Hugh of Cyprus had been recognized in the East as king of Jerusalem (1269); but his pretensions were opposed by Mary of Antioch, a granddaughter of Amalric II., who was prepared to bequeath her claims to Charles of Anjou, and was therefore naturally supported by him.
    0
    0
  • Until about 1840 the authority followed for its history was naturally the great work of William of Tyre.
    0
    0
  • His temper was naturally that of a trimmer; and he had thus many qualifications for the writing of well-informed and unbiassed history.
    0
    0
  • Between these systems run the main rivers; and these naturally rise near the medial ridge, in the lacustrine district of el-Buka`a, or Coelesyria, and flow in opposite directions.
    0
    0
  • Since these streams had in no case originally easy access to the sea, we naturally find lakes on their course, and several of them terminate in tracts of more or less permanent inundation.
    0
    0
  • Each town with its surrounding district seems to have constituted a small separate state; the conduct of affairs naturally devolved upon the noble families.
    0
    0
  • This exclusiveness naturally strengthened the popularity and power of the districts, where energy and talent found a scope elsewhere denied.
    0
    0
  • While the Malays were famous almost exclusively for their piratical expeditions they naturally bore an evil reputation among Europeans, but now that we have come into closer Character, contact with them,, and have learned to understand aca them better, the old opinions concerning them have been greatly modified.
    0
    0
  • Brazil's chief industrial importance is due to its situation in the heart of the "Brazil block" coal (so named because it naturally breaks into almost perfect rectangular blocks) and clay and shale region; among its manufactures are mining machinery and tools, boilers, paving and enamelled building bricks, hollow bricks, tiles, conduits, sewer-pipe and pottery.
    0
    0
  • Almost any fatty substance can be employed in soap-making; but the choice is naturally restricted by the price of the fat and also the quality of the soap desired.
    0
    0
  • They naturally favoured the city at the expense of the rural districts, so that in 1832 the latter proclaimed their independence, and in 1833 were organized into the half canton of Basel Landschaft, the city forming that of Basel Stadt.
    0
    0
  • The anxiety, fatigue and cold to which he was thus exposed, affecting a constitution naturally weak, laid the foundation of the disease to which he afterwards succumbed.
    0
    0
  • He was therefore naturally invited to defend the doctrine of transubstantiation against the attacks of Berengar of Tours.
    0
    0
  • Naturally, when the see of Rouen next fell vacant (1067), the thoughts of the electors turned to Lanfranc. But he declined the honour, and he was nominated to the English primacy as soon as Stigand had been canonically deposed (1070).
    0
    0
  • Each community could speak of its own baal, although a collection of allied communities might share the same cult, and naturally, since the attributes ascribed to the individual baals were very similar, subsequent syncretism was facilitated.
    0
    0
  • The attention of many students has naturally been concentrated on the ancient city, the birthplace of European art and literature, and a great development of investigation and discussion in the special domain of Athenian archaeology has given birth to a voluminous literature.
    0
    0
  • The situation of the Acropolis, dominating the surrounding plain and possessing easy communication with the sea, favoured the formation of a relatively powerful state - inferior, however, to Tiryns and Mycenae; the myths of Cecrops, Erechtheus and Theseus bear witness to the might of the princes who ruled in the Athenian citadel, and here we may naturally expect to find traces of massive fortifications resembling in some degree those of the great Argolid cities.
    0
    0
  • His character was naturally impetuous and enthusiastic, but became marked with great self-control as he gradually brought his will under his reason.
    0
    0
  • was, therefore, naturally selected as one of the twelve arbitrators to draw up the ban of Kenilworth (1266), by which the disinherited rebels were allowed to make their peace.
    0
    0
  • Its naturally strong position was formerly fortified, and part of the walls, serving as a promenade, remain.
    0
    0
  • Born in a stirring seaport, the son of a distinguished naval officer, he naturally adopted the profession of a sailor.
    0
    0
  • Organic acids also condense with alcohols to form similar compounds: the fats, waxes, and essential oils are naturally occurring substances of this class.
    0
    0
  • Megalithic town walls were naturally common in that stony land, Palestine, and very typical specimens of them were found in the Palestine Exploration Fund's excavations at Bethshemesh (`Ain Shems) directed by Dr. Duncan Mackenzie, 29 whose work also threw new light on the phenomenon of the appearance in Palestine between the 12th and 10th centuries B.C. of subMycenaean (Greek) pottery, which can only be ascribed to the Philistines, whose historical position as a foreign invading force from the Aegean area (Lycia and Crete-Kaphtor) is now entirely vindicated.
    0
    0
  • This view naturally raises the question whether the independent stories were all told of Gilgamesh or, as almost always happens in the case of ancient tales, were transferred to Gilgamesh as a favourite popular hero.
    0
    0
  • It falls naturally into two main divisions: - I.
    0
    0
  • Special officials were naturally attached to the service of the finances.
    0
    0
  • The official surnames must not, of course, be confused with the popular nicknames which were naturally not recognized by the court, e.g.
    0
    0
  • The title Belit was naturally transferred to the great mother-goddess Ishtar after the decline of the cult at Nippur, and we also find the consort of Marduk, known as Sarpanit, designated as Belit, for the sufficient reason that Marduk, after the rise of the city of Babylon as the seat of his cult, becomes the Bel or "lord" of later days.
    0
    0
  • This principle must naturally be adhered to when delineating the features of the ground.
    0
    0
  • Wandering tribes naturally enjoy a great advantage in this respect over sedentary ones.
    0
    0
  • The geographical knowledge of Anaximander was naturally more ample than that of Homer, for it extended from the Cassiterides or Tin Islands in the west to the Caspian in the east, which he conceived to open out into Oceanus.
    0
    0
  • Nicolaus Germanus (1466), naturally led to what is generally known as Flamsteed's projection.
    0
    0
  • The ears, naturally pendent at the tips, are always cropped.
    0
    0
  • The introduction of an ordered system and discipline was, naturally, viewed with some suspicion by people taught to believe that the inward light of each individual man was the only true guide for his conduct.
    0
    0
  • They naturally fell into this Society.
    0
    0
  • ==Fauna== The three climatic regions of Alberta have naturally a varying fauna.
    0
    0
  • Naturally resolute and fearless, he seems to have under-estimated his danger, the more so since his power had never seemed more secure.
    0
    0
  • The Avesta is, indeed, our principal source for the doctrine of Zoroaster; on the subject of his person and his life it is comparatively reticent; with regard to his date it is, naturally enough, absolutely silent.
    0
    0
  • movement, the childhood of a new community of faith, are reflected so naturally in them all, that it is impossible for a moment to think of a later period of composition by a priesthood whom we know to, have been devoid of any historical sense, and incapable of reconstructing the spiritual conditions under which Zoroaster lived.
    0
    0
  • It is then pruned, in order clearly to show the mode of branching, and is spread out as naturally as possible with the right hand.
    0
    0
  • If during this process part of the fronds run together, the beauty of the specimen may be restored by dipping the edge into water, so as to float out the part and allow it to subside naturally on the paper.
    0
    0
  • The relics having been removed, the visits of pilgrims naturally ceased, and by degrees the very existence of those wonderful subterranean cemeteries was forgotten.
    0
    0
  • We have, however, sufficient Theories of evidence that they were used as places of refuge from the use of the fury of the heathen, in which the believers - the cata- especially the bishops and clergy, who would naturally combs.
    0
    0
  • 1 The pozzolana is the material required for building purposes, for admixture with mortar; and the sandpits are naturally excavated in the stratum which supplies it.
    0
    0
  • At the age of twenty he was fitted, in six months, for college, and in 1819, graduated with highest honours, from the Brown University at Providence, Rhode Island, having devoted himself so unremittingly to his studies as to weaken further his naturally feeble constitution.
    0
    0
  • It divides itself naturally, by its contents, into two parts, in one of which the theme is righteousness and wisdom, in the other the early fortunes of the Israelite people considered as a righteous nation beloved by God.
    0
    0
  • The style shows that the book was written in Greek, though naturally it contains Hebraisms. The author of the first part was in all probability an Alexandrian Jew; nothing further is known of him; and this is true of the author of the second part, if that be a separate production.
    0
    0
  • Its exclusion from the Jewish Canon of Scripture resulted naturally from its Alexandrian thought and from the fact that it was written in Greek.
    0
    0
  • The project of the Code Napoleon, however - the code itself not being available in Louisiana, though promulgated in France in 1804 - was used by the compilers in the arrangement and substance of their work; and the French traditions of the colony, thus illustrated, were naturally introduced more and more into the organic commentaries and developments that grew up around the Code Napoleon.
    0
    0
  • By the spring of 1866 the ex-Confederates had succeeded in gaining possession of most of the local government and most of the state offices, although not of the governorship. The Republican party naturally became extremely radical.
    0
    0
  • Since the abolition of slavery the status of the black has been made more definite, and his rights naturally much greater.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, no great reforms were made in the abuses naturally incident to the old personal system.
    0
    0
  • The mainstay of the Ottoman dynasty is the Asiatic portion of the empire, where the Mahommedan religion is absolutely predominant, and where the naturally vigorous and robust Turki race forms in Asia Minor a compact mass of many millions, far outnumbering any other single ethnical element and probably equalling all taken collectively.
    0
    0
  • The former year naturally felt the effect of this, and the tithes which should have been encashed in the last months of the year were discounted and spent several months in advance.
    0
    0
  • They were therefore naturally open to bribery and corruption, with the result that, while the rich often got off almost scot free, the poor were unduly taxed, and often cruelly oppressed by the tax collectors and farmers of revenue.
    0
    0
  • But the Bagdad Railway Company' (the share capital of which is £600,000 half paid up), naturally anxious to earn the whole of the capitalized subvention, completed the construction of the entire 200 kilometres.
    0
    0
  • These were naturally dismissed after the defeat of the Russians; the former made good his escape to Russia, the latter was executed.
    0
    0
  • Fuzuli showed far more originality than any of his predecessors; for, although his work is naturally Persian in form and in general character, it is far from being a mere echo from Shiraz or Isfahan.
    0
    0
  • This place had been held by a French garrison, but had capitulated only twenty-four hours beforehand, a fact of which Napoleon was naturally unaware.
    0
    0
  • With the change of the methods of transportation its importance has naturally declined.
    0
    0
  • The few remaining fragments produce the impression of vivid and rapid narrative, to which the flow of the native Saturnian verse, in contradistinction to the weighty and complex structure of the hexameter, was naturally adapted.
    0
    0
  • The motion of the outwardscreeping inland ice will naturally be more independent of the configurations of the underlying land in the interior, where its thickness is so enormous, than near the margin where it is thinner.
    0
    0
  • certain gild services in honour of the Blessed Virgin, and the growing habit, resulting naturally from the doctrine of transubstantiation, of ascribing a supreme virtue to the act of looking on the Holy Sacrament.
    0
    0
  • I, 3), and would naturally increase the weight of the ark, which, according to 2 Sam.
    0
    0
  • Occasionally the rounded cracks extend from the matrix into some of the crystals especially those of quartz which have naturally a conchoidal fracture.
    0
    0
  • Africa and Asia, being the produce of naturally occurring trees and vines.
    0
    0
  • Thus, at the age of three-and-thirty, this naturally indolent and self-indulgent woman, with little knowledge and no experience of affairs, suddenly found herself at the head of a great empire at one of the most critical periods of its existence.
    0
    0
  • This wide area is naturally subdivided into West Siberia (basins of the Ob and the Irtysh) and East Siberia (the remainder of the region).
    0
    0
  • 2 The great plateau of North America, also turning its narrower point towards Bering Strait, naturally suggests the idea that there was a period in the history of our planet when the continents turned their narrow extremities towards the northern pole, as now they turn them towards the southern.
    0
    0
  • The protectress of cities was naturally also a goddess of war.
    0
    0
  • Thus the general taille, raised for the benefit of the king, became more and more frequent, and naturally tended to become permanent.
    0
    0
  • The royal taille naturally retained the distinctive characteristics of the seigniorial, as can be seen from an examination of the way in which it was assessed and collected; the chief characteristic being that ecclesiastics and nobles, who were exempt from the seigniorial taille, were also exempt from the royal.
    0
    0
  • The two methods have been conducted so as to be in constant touch, though the nature of the results obtained by the one differs much from those which flow naturally from the other.
    0
    0
  • Our estimate of the theological teaching of this book will naturally be influenced by the particular critical theory which is adopted.
    0
    0
  • Guillaume 6 explains the ferromagnetism of Heusler's alloy by supposing that the naturally low critical temperature of the manganese contained in it is greatly raised by the admixture of another appropriate metal, such as aluminium or tin; thus the alloy as a whole becomes magnetizable at the ordinary temperature.
    0
    0
  • These naturally became the popular religious books of the rising Jewish-Christian communities, and were held by them in still higher esteem, if possible, than by the Jews.
    0
    0
  • The former literature was generally written in Hebrew or Aramaic, and seldom in Greek; the latter naturally in Greek.
    0
    0
  • 45, 50 that Joseph married the daughter of a heathen priest naturally gave offence to later Judaism, and gave rise to the fiction that Asenath was really the daughter of Shechem and Dinah, and only the foster-daughter of Potipherah (Targ.-Jon.
    0
    0
  • one day to come to an end; the prohibition of marriage follows naturally on this view.
    0
    0
  • As for the papal countships, which are still freely bestowed on those of all nations whom the Holy See wishes to reward, their prestige naturally varies with the religious complexion of the country in which the titles are borne.
    0
    0
  • The Spanish counts of old creation, some of whom are grandees and members of the Upper House, naturally take the highest rank; but the title, still bestowed for eminent public services or other reasons, is of value.
    0
    0
  • Pliny informs us that alumen was found naturally in the earth.
    0
    0
  • The flora falls naturally into three great divisions: that of the Amazon basin where exceptional conditions of heat and moisture prevail; that of the coast where heat, varying rainfall, oceanic influences and changing seasons have greatly modified the general character of the vegetation; and that of the elevated interior, or sertao, where dryer conditions, rocky surfaces, higher sun temperatures and large open spaces produce a vegetation widely different from those of the other two regions.
    0
    0
  • Coffee naturally occupies first place, and is grown wherever frosts are not severe from the Amazon south to Parana.
    0
    0
  • This policy received the approval and sympathy of the majority of Brazilians, but naturally met with bitter opposition from the military element.
    0
    0
  • Sofia in Bulgaria) formed themselves into a synod, and naturally declared in favour of Athanasius and Marcellus, while at the same time they anathematized the leaders of the Eusebian party.
    0
    0
  • Standing in the centre of a great coal-bearing basin, Sydney is naturally the seat of numerous manufactures, to the prosperity of which the abundance and cheapness of coal has been highly conducive.
    0
    0
  • We find, however, as late as 1473 the attempt made to bind all teachers in the university of Paris by oath to teach the doctrines of Realism; but this expiring effort was naturally ineffectual, and from 1481 onward even the show of obedience was no longer exacted.
    0
    0
  • Monroe was about six feet tall, but, being stoop-shouldered and rather ungainly seemed less; his eyes, a greyish blue, were deep-set and kindly; his face was delicate, naturally refined, and prematurely lined.
    0
    0
  • But it remains the fact that his success with the free-trade movement was for years unchallenged, and that the leaps and bounds with which English commercial prosperity advanced after the repeal of the cornIaws were naturally associated with the reformed fiscal policy, so that the very name of protectionism came to be identified with all that was not merely heterodox but hateful.
    0
    0
  • The centenary of his birth in 1904 was celebrated by a flood of articles in the newspapers and magazines, naturally coloured by the new controversy in England over the Tariff Reform movement.
    0
    0
  • Broadly speaking, Mongolia may be divided naturally into three parts: (1) north-western Mongolia, which occupies the high terrace of the plateau; (2) the Gobi, in its wide sense, covering the lower terrace of the plateau, together with a slightly more elevated and better-watered zone along the western slope of the Great Khingan and its south-western continuation; and (3) southeastern Mongolia, on the eastern slope of the Khingan.
    0
    0
  • Politically it increased the power of the nobility at the expense of the crown, every competing pretender naturally endeavouring to win adherents by distributing largesse in the shape of crown-lands.
    0
    0
  • The ancient royal tenants became the feudatories of the great nobles, and fell naturally into two classes, the nobiles bene possessionati, and the nobiles unius sessionis, in other words the richer and the poorer gentry.
    0
    0
  • A monarch so overburdened with cares was naturally always in need of money,' and thus obliged to lean heavily upon the support of the estates of the realm.
    0
    0
  • For education so scholarly a monarch as Matthias naturally did what he could.
    0
    0
  • The clergy, the chief official class, were naturally less ignorant than the gentry.
    0
    0
  • Their reigns synchronized with the Thirty Years' War, during which the emperors were never in a position seriously to withstand the attacks of the malcontent Magyars, the vast majority of whom were still Protestants, who naturally looked upon the Transylvanian princes as their protectors and joined them in thousands whenever they raided Moravia or Lower Austria, or threatened to advance upon Vienna.
    0
    0
  • The great majority of the nation naturally desired a composition with its ruler and with Austria, and this general desire was unerringly interpreted and directed by Deak, who carried two-thirds of the deputies along with him.
    0
    0
  • parties had not come about naturally, was an additional difficulty.
    0
    0
  • The difficulty is due to the fact that number is naturally not continuous, so that continuity can only be achieved by an artificial development.
    0
    0
  • The deepest line of cleavage is naturally between the view that episcopacy is a divinely ordained institution essential to the effective existence of a church as a channel of grace, and the view that it is merely a convenient form of church order, evolved as the result of a variety of historical causes, and not necessary to the proper constitution of a church.
    0
    0
  • This appointment, at a moment when Austria-Hungary was again contemplating war with Serbia, naturally increased the ferment, and on Aug.
    0
    0
  • The Czechs and Yugosla y s, finding the door thus shut in the face of their national aspirations, even in the modified Habsburg form, naturally stiffened in their opposition.
    0
    0
  • 30) naturally rendered the nationalities indisposed to concessions, and the Austrian Premier's admission that national autonomy was now inevitable was icily received.
    0
    0
  • The equivocal attitude of the Entente toward the new State naturally hastened the process of union.
    0
    0
  • In accordance with the Declaration of Corfu, the decision regarding the actual form of the State was left to a constituent assembly: but as the machinery of Belgrade was naturally quite inadequate to the task of administering a country three times the size of the Serbia of 1914, the provincial Governments of Croatia (with the Ban at its head), Slovenia, Dalmatia and Bosnia continued to function, though the local diets were no longer summoned.
    0
    0
  • The first post-Darwinian systematists naturally and without reflexion accepted of' the idea that existing simpler forms represent stages i n the gradual progress of development - are in fact survivors from past ages which have retained the exact grade of development which their ancestors had reached in past ages.
    0
    0
  • 22: " Yea, for thy sake are we killed all the day long," &c. On the other hand, not only is the atmosphere of the second collection of psalms as a whole the atmosphere of godly Judaism in the 2nd century B.C., but it may fairly be claimed that this collection contains many psalms which may naturally be interpreted in the light of the history of that period, of which no satisfactory explanation (in their details) can be given if they are assigned to any other time.
    0
    0
  • Such an enthusiasm of militant piety, plainly based on actual successes of Israel and the house of Aaron, can only be referred to the first victories of the Maccabees, culminating in the purification of the Temple in 164 B.C. This restoration of the worship of the national sanctuary, under circumstances that inspired religious feelings very different from those of any other generation since the return from Babylon, might most naturally be followed by an extension of the Temple psalmody; it certainly was followed by some liturgical innovations, for the solemn service of dedication on the 25th day of Chisleu was made the pattern of a new annual feast (that mentioned in John x.
    0
    0
  • The only possible question for the critic is whether the ascription of these psalms to David was due to the idea that he was the psalmist par excellence, to whom any poem of unknown origin was naturally ascribed, or whether we have in some at least of these titles an example of the habit so common in later Jewish literature of writing in the name of ancient worthies.
    0
    0
  • An explanation that naturally suggests itself is that, at the time when books II.
    0
    0
  • Both include psalms which are most naturally understood as referring to the persecution of Antiochus Epiphanes and to the Maccabaean victories, and cannot therefore be separated by a long interval of time.
    0
    0
  • Certainly in happier times, when the worst period of storm and stress was over, there would be a desire to enliven the services with music, which would naturally be borrowed from the traditional music of the great national sanctuary.
    0
    0
  • and of this last passage it may be said that all the translatable portions of it can be naturally explained, if it refers to the time when the resistance of the Hasidim, whom the Sadducees had despised and shunned, had won freedom for Israel as a whole, and at no other known period; the fragment, Ps.
    0
    0
  • The dissenting inhabitants of Samaria are naturally absent from such a festival.
    0
    0
  • Here was material enough for an explosion, even if personal misunderstandings and aggravations, adding fuel to the fire, had not naturally occurred (or even been deliberately plotted) during the negotiations.
    0
    0
  • Naturally and necessarily the capture of Bloemfontein was followed by a period of reaction.
    0
    0
  • When the view had once obtained currency, it would naturally become a tradition.
    0
    0
  • They were naturally suspected of sympathizing with the Roman enemies rather than with their own Persian rulers.
    0
    0
  • Chesterfield was selfish, calculating and contemptuous; he was not naturally generous, and he practised dissimulation till it became part of his nature.
    0
    0
  • Naturally, as the temperature became lower, a new function was gradually acquired by his clothing, that of protecting the body of the wearer.
    0
    0
  • Rank has accounted for much, and ceremonial dress - the apparel Romans, naturally left its mark, and there have been ages of increasing luxury followed by periods of reaction, with a general levelling and nationalization on religious grounds (Judaism, Islam).
    0
    0
  • When the deities were regarded as anthropomorphic they naturally wore clothing which, on the whole, was less subject to change of fashion and was apt to be symbolical of their attributes.
    0
    0
  • The drug has naturally always been liable to great adulteration in spite of penalties, the severity of which suggests the surviving tradition of its sacred character.
    0
    0
  • In this respect the greatest efforts have naturally been made by Hamburg; but Magdeburg, Dresden, Meissen, Riesa, Tetschen, Aussig and other places have all done their relative shares, Magdeburg, for instance, providing a commercial harbour and a winter harbour.
    0
    0
  • The Admiralty was naturally anxious to secure the services of trustworthy flag officers, and having confidence in Hood promoted him rear-admiral out of the usual course on the 26th of September 1780, and sent him to the West Indies to act as second in command under Rodney, to whom he was personally known.
    0
    0
  • Moltke, knowing well the danger for a great army of being forced into a battle with an unfordable river behind it, and with his naturally strong bent towards the defensive in tactics, concluded that Benedek would elect to hold the left bank of the Elbe, between the fortified towns of Josephstadt and Kiiniggra,tz, with his right thrown back and covered by the lower courses of the Aupa and the Mettau.
    0
    0
  • From the foregoing it will be gathered that the problems in pathology are many-sided and require to be attacked from all points of vantage; and the subject falls naturally into certain great divisions, the chief of which are the following: I.
    0
    0
  • Man, like other animals, was naturally intended to lead an outdoor life.
    0
    0
  • Her great deliverance and victory naturally stirred up the energies of Syracuse at home and abroad.
    0
    0
  • Its importance and historic associations naturally marked it out as the residence of the Roman praetor or governor of Sicily.
    0
    0
  • The times at which crises were to be expected were naturally looked for with anxiety; and it was a cardinal point in the Hippocratic system to foretell them with precision.
    0
    0
  • But the intellectual thread is naturally traced with greater difficulty than that which is the theme of civil history; and in periods such as that from the 5th to the 10th century in Europe it is almost lost.
    0
    0
  • It was at first very naturally imagined that the simple revival of classical and especially of Greek literature would at once produce the same brilliant results in medicine as in literature and philosophy.
    0
    0
  • When William Harvey by his discovery of the circulation furnished an explanation of many vital processes which was reconcilable with the ordinary laws of mechanics, the efforts of medical theorists were naturally directed to bringing all the departments of medicine under similar laws.
    0
    0
  • In Italy, on the other hand, it received enthusiastic support, and, naturally, a corresponding degree of opposition.
    0
    0
  • He was naturally studious, however, and supplemented his scant schooling by night study.
    0
    0
  • His favour at court had naturally exasperated his enemies; it had not secured him any real friends, and even a gentlemanship of the chamber was no solid benefit, except from the morey point of view.
    0
    0
  • Incense was not burnt in private masses, so that the clergy were accustomed to celebrations without it, and would naturally forego it on any plausible ground."
    0
    0
  • The City naturally offers the richest field for study in this direction.
    0
    0
  • In the West End of London the majority of important street-names are naturally of a later derivation than those in the ancient City, though Charing Cross is an instance of an exception.
    0
    0
  • This is most probable, because the Romans naturally required a special protection on the river at the west as well as at the east.
    0
    0
  • Roach Smith is a strong advocate for the bridge, and remarks, " It would naturally be erected somewhere in the direct line of road into Kent, which I cannot but think pointed towards the site of Old London Bridge, both from its central situation, from the general absence of the foundations of buildings in the approaches on the northern side, and from discoveries recently made in the Thames on the line of the old bridge " (Archaeologia, xxix.
    0
    0
  • The word " port " in the title "portreeve " does not indicate the Port of London as might naturally be supposed, for Stubbs has pointed out that it is porta not por us, and "although used for the city generally, seems to refer to it specially in its character of a Mart or City of Merchants."
    0
    0
  • They often held rank outside the city, and naturally took their place among the rulers of the country..
    0
    0
  • After the establishment of the Commune and the appointment of a mayor the sheriffs naturally lost much of their importance, and they became what they are styled in Liber Albus " the Eyes of the Mayor."
    0
    0
  • In order to lessen the cost of handling the rock-filling, the excavation sometimes takes the form of inclined working-places, parallel to the slope naturally taken by the rock when dumped from above into the working 7 -,, , --,, ?
    0
    0
  • In addition to this it is desirable to take advantage of the natural ventilation, that is, to circulate the air in the direction that it goes naturally, as otherwise the resistance to the movement of the air may be greatly increased.
    0
    0
  • The great numerical superiority which they had at first possessed was gone by the 9th, and their task had come to be the ejection of an almost equal enemy from a naturally formidable position.
    0
    0
  • There are naturally very many trees in these forests besides the teak.
    0
    0
  • Many are found as minerals, the more important of such naturally occurring carbonates being cerussite (lead carbonate, PbC03), malachite and azurite (both basic copper carbonates), calamine (zinc carbonate, ZnCO 3), witherite (barium carbonate, BaCO 3), strontianite (strontium carbonate, SrC03), calcite (calcium carbonate, CaC03), dolomite (calcium magnesium carbonate, CaCO 3 MgCO 3), and sodium carbonate, Na 2 CO 3.
    0
    0
  • It was naturally divided into Cilicia Trachea, W.
    0
    0
  • 23.3), and naturally attributed to him the celebrated writings of the pseudo-Areopagite.
    0
    0
  • The English dialect in which the Anglo-Saxon laws have been handed down to us is in most cases a common speech derived from West Saxon - naturally enough as Wessex became the predominant English state, and the court of its kings the principal literary centre from which most of the compilers and scribes derived their dialect and spelling.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the tendency to maintain peace naturally takes its course towards the strongest ruler, the king, and we witness in Anglo-Saxon law the gradual evolution of more and more stringent and complete rules in respect of the king's peace and its infringements.
    0
    0
  • It naturally falls into two divisions, the northern being more or less mountainous, while the southern is flat and marshy; the near approach of the two rivers to one another, at a spot where the undulating plateau of the north sinks suddenly into the Babylonian alluvium, tends to separate them still more completely.
    0
    0
  • Great attention was naturally paid to the calendar, and we find a week of seven and another of five days in use.
    0
    0
  • From the care of sacred relics preserved in royal chapels, &c. (sacella or capellae), the office of capellanus naturally extended its scope until it covered practically that of the modern court chaplain, and was officially recognized by the Church.
    0
    0
  • As a verb, the word means to stifle or check; hence damped vibrations or oscillations are those which have been reduced or stopped, instead of being allowed to die out naturally; the "dampers" of the piano are small pieces of feltcovered wood which fall upon the strings and stop their vibrations as the keys are allowed to rise; and the "damper" of a chimney or flue, by restricting the draught, lessens the rate of combustion.
    0
    0
  • Under the guidance of such a principle the writer naturally expected the world's culmination in evil to be the immediate precursor of God's intervention on behalf of the righteous, and every fresh growth in evil to be an additional sign that the time was at hand.
    0
    0
  • Each fresh apocalypse would in the eyes of its writer be in some degree but a fresh edition of the traditions naturally attaching themselves to great names in Israel's past, and thus the books named respectively Enoch, Noah, Ezra would to some slight extent be not pseudonymous.
    0
    0
  • Early Christianity had thus naturally a special fondness for this class of literature.
    0
    0
  • The starting point was ordinary(d)mannite (mannitol),C 6 H 14 0 61 a naturally occurring hexahydric alcohol, which only differed from a-acritol, the alcohol obtained by reducing a-acrose, with regard to optical activity.
    0
    0
  • in length; with such coils, and a sufficient annular space in the pan free from obstruction, in order to allow a natural down-current of the cooking mass, while an up-current all round is also naturally produced by the action of the heated worms or coils, rapid evaporation and crystallization can be obtained, without any mechanical adjuncts to require attention or afford excuse for negligence.
    0
    0
  • Such a region was naturally occupied from a very early period by wild and lawless races of mountaineers, who were very imperfectly reduced to subjection by the powers that successively established their dominion in Asia Minor.
    0
    0
  • It is naturally much.
    0
    0
  • The whole wide field of Jewish taboo naturally involves sacrilege as its reverse side.
    0
    0
  • The period of the Reformation naturally increased the commonness of the crime.
    0
    0
  • The questions naturally suggest themselves - Are the reappearances due to a revival of the contagion derived from previous outbreaks in the same place, or to some favouring condition which the place offers for the development of infection derived from some other quarter; and have favouring conditions any dependence upon the character and state of the soil?
    0
    0
  • Imbued with the idea of the brotherhood of man, the church naturally fostered the early growth of gilds and tried to make them displace the old heathen banquets.
    0
    0
  • When the old kin-bond or maegth was beginning to weaken or dissolve, and the state did not yet afford adequate protection to its citizens, individuals naturally united for mutual help.
    0
    0
  • sal, salt, petra, a rock), the commercial name given to three naturally occurring nitrates, distinguished as (1) ordinary saltpetre, nitre, or potassium nitrate, (2) Chile saltpetre, cubic nitre, or sodium nitrate, (3) wall-saltpetre or calcium nitrate.
    0
    0
  • The salt is obtained from the soil in which it occurs naturally, or from the heaps in which it is formed artificially, by extracting with water, and adding to the solution wood-ashes or potassium carbonate.
    0
    0
  • Tobacco being cultivated over such a large area of the world, under very varying climatic conditions, and by many different races of mankind, the methods employed in its production naturally differ very considerably.
    0
    0
  • The trees form their heads naturally, and therefore little pruning is required, it being merely necessary to cut off straggling growths, and to prevent the branches from interlacing.
    0
    0
  • The islands of Schouwen and Duiveland are united owing to the damming of the Dykwater; St Filipsland, or Philipsland, and South Beveland are connected with the mainland of North Brabant by naturally formed mud banks.
    0
    0
  • Josephus also mentions that the city was "naturally strong" (Antiq.
    0
    0
  • The site is naturally very strong, the town standing on an isolated hill, commanding the western road to Jerusalem just where it begins to enter the mountains of Judea.
    0
    0
  • Somewhat curiously, but very naturally, Enoch the son of Cain is confused with the Enoch who was translated to heaven - an error which the author of the Old English Genesis avoids, though (according to the existing text) he confounds the names of Enoch and Enos.
    0
    0
  • The country falls naturally into three main divisions, a northern, a central and a southern; the first includes the area between the Midian coast on the west and the head of the Persian Gulf on the east, a desert tract throughout, stony in the north, sandy in the south, but furnishing at certain seasons excellent pasturage; its population is almost entirely nomad and pastoral.
    0
    0
  • These journeys, naturally following the most frequented routes, often cover the same ground, while immense tracts, owing to their difficulty of access, remain unvisited by any European.
    0
    0
  • Mahomet early found an excuse for attacking the Jews, who were naturally in the way of his schemes.
    0
    0
  • - The writing of geographical books naturally began with the description of the Moslem world, and that for practical purposes.
    0
    0
  • The historical interval that separated these two events is treated as naturally dividing itself into three great periods, - those of Moses, David and Ezra.
    0
    0
  • 13) does not necessarily imply the capital, it is most naturally understood of Rome.
    0
    0
  • But the flexibility of a letter-writer, under different moods of feeling, which would naturally lead to rapid transitions, may be adduced as some explanation of the latter phenomena.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the political and commercial interests binding Florence to the Roman court, the Guelph element naturally prevailed there, while the growth of its trade and commerce necessarily compelled that state to encroach on waters subject to Pisan rule.
    0
    0
  • The sympathies of Dante Alighieri, the Florentine patriot and foe of Rome, were naturally in favour of the victims of an aristocratic prelate, opposed to all reconciliation with Florence.
    0
    0
  • In these two regions the date palm is never met with growing naturally wild.
    0
    0
  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.
    0
    0
  • Some authorities, however, dispute this, in a measure, by saying that it was not naturally forested, and that the trees growing represented orchards of olives or other fruit trees planted by the Romans or romanized Berbers.
    0
    0
  • long from the Maranon to the Bolivian frontier, is naturally divided into two sections, the sub-tropical forests in the ravines and on the eastern slopes of the Andes, and the dense tropical forests in the Amazonian plain.
    0
    0
  • Edwy naturally resented this interference, and in 957 Dunstan was driven into exile.
    0
    0
  • Her death naturally broke up the fellowship, but its members did not cease their activity and kept up what mutual correspondence was possible.
    0
    0
  • Streams from the Pisidian mountains make the land on the south-west and south of the city a garden; but on the east and north-east a great part of the naturally fertile soil is uncultivated.
    0
    0
  • The senate and the estates, naturally anxious about the succession to the throne, had repeatedly urged her majesty to marry, and had indicated her cousin, Charles Gustavus, as her most befitting consort.
    0
    0
  • The site of Mainz would seem to mark it out naturally as a great centre of trade, but the illiberal rule of the archbishops and its military importance seriously hampered its commercial and industrial development, and prevented it from rivalling its neighbour Frankfort.
    0
    0
  • In the encrusting type, which is found in a large proportion of the genera, the zooids are usually in a single layer, with their orifices facing away from the substratum; but in certain species the colony becomes multilaminar by the continued superposition of new zooids over the free surfaces of the older ones, whose orifices they naturally occlude.
    0
    0
  • However, so epoch-making an event as the institution of the monarchy naturally held a prominent place in later ideas and encouraged the growth of tradition.
    0
    0
  • " Thousands had cultivated science, and with splendid success; not one had conceived the philosophy which the sciences when organized would naturally evolve.
    0
    0
  • From this time he continued to pour forth a number of critical writings on literature, art, &c. His bold ideas on these subjects, which were a great advance even on Lessing's doctrines, naturally excited hostile criticism, and in consequence of this opposition, which took the form of aspersions on his religious orthodoxy, he resolved to leave Riga.
    0
    0
  • The youth grows up strong, swift-footed and of great personal beauty, but, naturally enough, of very limited intelligence.
    0
    0
  • By the rest of the Carolingian kings it was less frequently visited, and this neglect was naturally greater during the period of the Saxon and Salic emperors from 919 to 1137.
    0
    0
  • If the calculation be carried farther backas has been done by the seismic disaster investigation committee of Japan, a body of scientists constantly engaged in studying these phenomena under government auspices,it is found that, since the countrys history began to be written in the 8th century AD,, there have been 2006 major disturbances; but inasmuch as 1489 of these occurred before the beginning of the Tokugawa administration (early in the 17th century, and therefore in an era when methods of recording were comparatively defective), exact details are naturally lacking.
    0
    0
  • Naturally these migratory crabs are not limited to Japanese waters.
    0
    0
  • One naturally expects to find, and one does find, that this moral sunshine is associated with good temper.
    0
    0
  • But naturally not all were believers in the same philosophy.
    0
    0
  • The development of the art of Japanese color-printing naturally had its effect on book-illustration, and the later years of the I8th and the earlier of the 19th century saw a vast increase of books illustrated by this process.
    0
    0
  • Naturally such specimens are not produced in large numbers.
    0
    0
  • The porcelains of Owari and Arita naturally received most attention at the hands of the Hyochi-en decorators, but there was scarcely one of the principal wares of Japan upon which they did not try their skill, and if a piece of monochromatic Minton or Svres came in their way, they undertook to improve it by the addition of designs copied from old masters or suggested by modern taste.
    0
    0
  • Only about one-twentieth of the land is naturally barren, and Armagh offers a relatively large area of cultivable soil.
    0
    0
  • He had prepared to distinguish himself as an orator by the elaborate cultivation of his voice, which was naturally harsh and shrill.
    0
    0
  • He seems, in fact, to have agreed with the foreign policy of the Tories and with the home policy of the Whigs, and naturally incurred the reproach of time-serving and the hearty abuse of both parties.
    0
    0
  • As the conquest of the Aargau was the first made by the Confederates, their delegates (or the federal diet) naturally met at Baden, from 1426 to about 1712, to settle matters relating to these subject lands, so that during that period Baden was really the capital of Switzerland.
    0
    0
  • The startling successes of the French produced a revolution among the Dutch people, who naturally turned for help to the scion of the house of Orange.
    0
    0
  • His literary activity extends over about thirty years and naturally divides itself into three periods, each marked by a distinct character.
    0
    0
  • The incidents of his life are shrouded by uncertain traditions, which naturally sprang up in the absence of any authentic record; the earliest biography was by one of the Sorani, probably Soranus the younger of Ephesus, in the 2nd century; Suidas, the lexicographer, wrote of him in the 11th, and Tzetzes in the 12th century.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, it naturally came to pass that certain of the allies became weary of incessant warfare and looked for a period of commercial prosperity.
    0
    0
  • The Ionians were naturally averse from prolonged warfare, and in the prosperity which must have followed the final rout of the Persians and the freeing of the Aegean from the pirates (a very important feature in the league's policy) a money contribution was only a trifling burden.
    0
    0
  • This new coalition naturally alarmed Sparta, which at once made overtures to Athens on the ground of their common danger from Thebes.
    0
    0
  • The maritime allies naturally had no desire to be involved in the quarrels of Sicily, Thessaly and the Peloponnese.
    0
    0
  • The addition of an "Achaean " group, and the inclusion of this and the Ionic group under a single generic name, would naturally follow the recognition of the real kinship of the " Achaean " colonies of Magna Graecia with those of Ionia.
    0
    0
  • from the Landing, but it was in a naturally strong position, and Beauregard suspended the attack at sunset.
    0
    0
  • Not only do we know nothing from internal or external evidence of the existence of a prophet of this name, 1 but the occurrence of the word in the title is naturally explained as derived from iii.
    0
    0
  • But this was a modification of the Deuteronomic law naturally called for under the circumstances of the return from Babylon, and Neh.
    0
    0
  • The next stage in the logical development of the state religion should naturally be found in the worship of the gens, the aggregate of households belonging to one clan, Agri- but our information about the gentile worship is so scanty and uncertain 2 that we cannot make practical use of it.
    0
    0
  • Adaptation proceeds at first naturally enough on the lines of analogy.
    0
    0
  • They had a mental deficiency of which they were unconscious, and, naturally enough, supposed that those who affirmed they were possessed of it were romancing."
    0
    0
  • Villele, who before the promulgation of the charter had written some Observations sur le projet de constitution opposing it, as too democratic in character, naturally took his place on the extreme right with the ultra-royalists.
    0
    0
  • The Apostles who had known the Lord would naturally recall the facts of His life, and the story of His words and works would form a great deal of their preaching.
    0
    0
  • But the authority enjoyed by the latter rendered it secure against any encroachments; hence any later expansions, especially those of a popular Haggadic character, naturally found their way into the less stereotyped Targum Jerushalmi.
    0
    0
  • The vegetation of these regions is naturally subjected to the different climateric conditions.
    0
    0
  • The following form which Seeberg gives as the creed of St Paul is an artificial combination of fragments of oral teaching, which naturally reappear in the teaching of St Peter, but finds no attestation in the later creeds of particular churches which would prove its claim to be their parent form: " The living God who created all things sent His Son Jesus Christ, born of the seed of David, who died for our sins according to the scriptures, and was buried, who was raised on the third day according to the scriptures, and appeared to Cephas and the XI I., who sat at the Der Katechismus der Urchristenheit, p. 85.
    0
    0
  • In an age when the foundations of the system on which society had rested for centuries were seriously shaken, such subjects as the right of the magistrate to interfere with the belief of the individual, and the limits of his authority over conscience, naturally assumed a prominence hitherto unknown.'
    0
    0
  • The differences of opinion which arose on this problem naturally led to the inquiry as to whether any universally valid statement was possible.
    0
    0