Natural-selection sentence example

natural-selection
  • The natural selection process is survival of the fittest.
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  • The process of natural selection allows the fittest creatures to survive and continue to reproduce.
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  • Under natural selection the less well-adapted forms of life would on the average have a heavier death-rate and a lower multiplication-rate.
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  • Sexual Selection - selection driven by the competition for mates, considered an adjunct to natural selection.
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  • Human neural circuitry was designed by natural selection to solve problems our ancestors faced during our evolutionary history.
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  • He proposes that natural selection has endowed us with an implicit theory about what makes us happy that is false by design.
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  • Belief in natural selection has become the sine qua non of entry to much of polite society.
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  • These collective systems have evolved by means of natural SELECTION to exhibit striking problem-solving capacities, while functioning within a complex, dynamic ENVIRONMENT.
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  • In conclusion the theory of natural selection does render the design argument worthless.
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  • Of these, the former endeavours to explain the most elaborate psychical activities of men as developments of elementary forms of conscious processes in the animal kingdom as a whole; the latter is a defence of the theory of natural selection against the attacks of St George Mivart, and appeared in an English edition on the suggestion of Darwin.
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  • How far " natural selection " suffices for the production of species remains to be seen.
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  • It is quite conceivable that every species tends to produce varieties of a limited number and kind, and that the effect of natural selection is to favour the development of some of these, while it opposes the development of others along their predetermined lines of modification.
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  • Wallace suggests that the remotely ancient representatives of the human species, being as yet animals too low in mind to have developed those arts of maintenance and social ordinances by which man holds his own against influences from climate and circumstance, were in their then wild state much more plastic than now to external nature; so that " natural selection " and other causes met with but feeble resistance in forming the permanent varieties or races of man, whose complexion and structure still remained fixed in their descendants (see Wallace, Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection, p. 319).
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  • Darwin's theory of evolution is based upon the idea of natural selection.
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  • Traits that are neither necessary nor helpful for survival can disappear over long periods of time due to natural selection.
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  • He taught, spoke and researched the subject of natural selection and helped head up the idea of evolutionary synthesis.
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  • And how could a loving creator create creatures with such obvious defects, that are entirely explicable by natural selection?
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  • Wallace published their Theory of Natural Selection.
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  • But the causes and conditions of variation have yet to be thoroughly explored; and the importance of natural selection will not be impaired, even if further inquiries should prove that variability is definite, and is determined in certain directions rather than in others, by conditions inherent in that which varies.
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  • Inasmuch as Lamarck attempted to frame a theory of evolution in which the principle of natural selection had no part, the interpretation placed on their work by many bionomical investigators recalls the theories of Lamarck, and the name Neo-Lamarckism has been used of such a school of biologists, particularly active in America.
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  • The great work that is going on is the simplification of the facts to be explained by grouping them under empirical laws; and the most general statement relating to these that can yet be made is that no single one of these laws has as yet shown signs of taking rank as a vera causa comparable with the Darwinian principle of natural selection.
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  • Thus it is that the variations are produced upon which natural selection has to work.
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  • The plebs did not gather round the patres, neither were they conquered by the patres; the patres were developed by natural selection out of the plebs, or, more strictly, out of the ancient populus.
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  • Races inhabiting malarious districts acquire a certain degree of resistance, no doubt through natural selection.
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  • Do they originate through the natural selection of those variations which are the more adaptive; or do they originate through the inheritance of those acquired modifications which are impressed on the nervous system in the course of individual and intelligent use ?
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  • A useless " correlated variation " may have attained great volume and quality before it is (as, it were) seized upon and perfected by natural selection.
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  • It has been maintained that this tendency to a severance of the hybrid stock into its components must favour the persistence of a new character of large volume suddenly appearing in a stock, and the observations of Mendel have been held to favour in this way the views of those who hold that the variations upon which natural selection has acted in the production of new species are not small variations but large and " discontinuous."
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  • It does not, however, appear that " large " variations would thus be favoured any more than small ones, nor that the eliminating action of natural selection upon an unfavourable variation' could be checked.
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  • It is no discovery that this latter kind of variation is not hereditable, and it is not the fact that the small variations, to which Darwin attached great but not exclusive importance as the material upon which natural selection operates, are of this latter kind.
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  • But this instance is really fully explained (as the present writer has shown) by the theory of natural selection acting on congenital fortuitous variations.
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  • A natural selection would thus be effected.
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  • It is, however, to be noted, in the first place, that the imitation of the parent by the young possibly accounts for some part of these complicated actions, and, secondly, that there are cases in which curiously elaborate actions are performed by animals as a characteristic of the species, and as subserving the general advantage of the race or species, which, nevertheless, can not be explained as resulting from the transmission of acquired experience, and must be supposed to be due to the natural selection of a fortuitously developed habit which, like fortuitous.
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  • This is at once connected with the nebular hypothesis, and subsequently deduced "from the ultimate law of the" persistence of force,"and finally supplemented by a counter-process of dissolution, all of which appears to Spencer only as" the addition of Von Baer's law to a number of ideas that were in harmony with it."It is clear, however, that Spencer's ideas as to the nature of evolution were already pretty definite when Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) revolutionized the subject of organic evolution by adding natural selection to the direct adaptation by use and disuse, and so suggesting an intelligible method of producing modifications in the forms of life.
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  • Passing from Moleschott to Lyell's view of the evolution of the earth's crust and later to Darwin's theory of natural selection and environment, he reached the general inference that, not God but evolution of matter, is the cause of the order of the world; that life is a combination of matter which in favourable circumstances is spontaneously generated; that there is no vital principle, because all forces, non-vital and vital, are movements; that movement and evolution proceed from life to consciousness; that it is foolish for man to believe that the earth was made for him, in the face of the difficulties he encounters in inhabiting it; that there is no God, no final cause, no immortality, no freedom, no substance of the soul; and that mind, like light or heat, electricity or magnetism, or any other physical fact, is a movement of matter.
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  • He believed that species had been formed by means of natural selection.
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  • Darwin certainly was impressed with the view that natural selection and variation together formed a mechanism, the central product of which was adaptation.
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  • Although knowledge of variation has become much wider and more definite, the estimation in which natural selection is held has changed very little since Darwin and Wallace first expounded their theories.
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  • Variation provides the material for selection, and although opinions may differ as to the nature of that material, the modes by which it comes into existence and their relative values and permanences, there is an increasingly wide consensus of opinion that all such material has to pass through the sieve of natural selection and that the sifted products form new varieties and species, and new adaptations.
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  • To what extent such responses are transmitted to offspring, and what part they play in the formation of the adaptive characters that are conspicuous in many animals, remain dubious, but it is at least clear that natural selection can favour those individuals and those races which show the greatest power of responsive plasticity in the individual.
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  • When man has advanced so far as to be sensitive to the opinions of his fellow-men, their approbation and disapprobation reinforce the influence of natural selection.
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  • Wallace became convinced of the truth of evolution, and originated the theory of natural selection during these travels.
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  • The difference between Lamarck's theory and natural selection is very clearly pointed out.
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  • In 1871 Wallace's two essays, written at Sarawak and Ternate, were published with others as a volume, Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection.
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  • Probably, next to the Origin of Species, no single work has done so much to promote clear understanding of natural selection and confidence in its truth; for in addition to these two historic essays, there are others in which the new theory is applied to the interpretation of certain classes of facts.
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  • In the 19th century, however, Lamarck's theory of the development of new species by habit and circumstance led through Wallace and Darwin to the doctrines of the hereditary transmission of acquired characters, the survival of the fittest, and natural selection.
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  • A consideration of the biology of the sorus gives an insight into the advantages obtained by the one type over the preceding, as regards protection, spore production and the dispersal of the spores, and thus indicates the way in which natural selection may have acted.
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  • The resemblances which the members of one class often present to the members of another class in regard to the form of the limb-branches (rami) of the parapodia, and the formation of tagmata (regions) are not hastily to be ascribed to common inheritance, but we must consider whether they are not due to homoplasy - that is, to the moulding of natural selection acting in the different classes upon fairly similar elements under like exigencies.
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  • Regarding the social tendency as originally itself an instinct developed out of parental or filial affection, he seems to suggest that natural selection, which was the chief cause of its development in the earlier stages, may very probably influence the transition from purely tribal and social morality into morality in its later and more complex forms. But he admits that natural selection is not necessarily the only cause, and he refrains from identifying the fully developed morality of civilized nations with the " social instinct."
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  • That's the natural selection process at work - survival of the fittest.
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  • That's the kind of thing natural selection does all the time.
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  • Another excellent feature of the gloss is its natural selection of colors.
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  • A traditonal form of candle, beeswax is long burning, available in a natural selection of different shades of honey brown and has a beautiful distinctive aroma.
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  • Breeding is unregulated and natural selection prevails.
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