Natural-history sentence example

natural-history
  • After a few years the father quarrelled with the Russian government, and went to England, where he obtained a professorship of natural history and the modern languages at the famous nonconformist academy at Warrington.
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  • The elder Forster, however, was soon provided for elsewhere, being appointed professor of natural history at Halle.
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  • There are a theatre, an interesting museum of antiquities, natural history and art; and a picturesque park (Bjergsted).
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  • The palace contains a picture gallery and collections of natural history and antiquities, and in front of it are two monumental fountains and a monument to the emperor William I.
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  • Of natural history and botany he pretends to no special knowledge.
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  • Science (1893); Tenison-Woods, The Fish and Fisheries of New South Wales (Sydney, 1883); Ogilvy, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1892); Aflalo, Natural History of Australia (London, 1896); Flower and Lydekker, Mammals, Living and Extinct (London, 1891); J.
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  • The modern doctrine of evolution or " evolving," as opposed to that of simple creation, has been defined by Prof. James Sully in the 9th edition of this encyclopaedia as a " natural history of the cosmos including organic beings, expressed in physical terms as a mechanical process."
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  • The Portland Society of Natural History, founded in 1843 and incorporated in 1850, has a building (1880) containing a library and natural history collections.
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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the konak or governor's residence, the Roman Catholic and Orthodox cathedrals, the hospital, the townhall and the museum, with fine antiquarian and natural history collections.
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  • There are several good palaces of the early Renaissance, a fine theatre (1857) and a museum containing important palaeo-ethnological collections, ancient and medieval sculptures, and the natural history collection of Spallanzani.
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  • In the parish of Ludgvan were rich copper works, abounding with mineral and metallic fossils, of which he made a collection, and thus was led to study somewhat minutely the natural history of the county.
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  • In 1758 appeared his Natural History of Cornwall.
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  • In 1832 the Registro Trimestre, a literary and scientific journal printed at Mexico, contained a communication by Dr. Pablo de la Llave, describing this species (with which he first became acquainted before 1810, from examining more than a dozen specimens obtained by the natural-history expedition to New Spain and kept in the palace of the Retiro near Madrid) under the name by which it is now known, Pharomacrus mocino.3 Quezal, male and female.
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  • C. Miall, Natural History of Aquatic Insects (London, 1895).
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  • This foundation was laid by the joint labours of Francis Willughby (1635-1672) and John Ray (1628-1705), for it is impossible to separate their share of work in natural history more than to say that, while the former more especially devoted himself to zoology, botany was the favourite pursuit of the latter.
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  • 1743 Mark Catesby brought out in London his Natural History of Carolina - two large folios containing highly coloured plates of the birds of that colony, Florida and the Bahamas.'
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  • Between 1666 and 1669 Perrault edited at Paris eight accounts of the dissection by du Verney of as many species of birds, which, translated into English, were published by the Royal Society in 1702, under the title of The Natural History of Animals.
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  • Barton's Fragments of the Natural History of Pennsylvania,' both printed at Philadelphia, one in 1791, the other in 1799; but J.
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  • The earliest list of British birds we possess is that given by Merrett in his Pinax rerun naturalium Britannicarum, printed in London in 1667.4 In 1677 Plot published his Natural History of Oxfordshire, which reached a second edition in 1705, and in 1686 that of Staffordshire.
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  • In 1769 Berkenhout gave to the world his Outlines of the Natural History of Great Britain and Ireland, which reappeared under the title of Synopsis of the same in 1795.
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  • Hayes's Natural History of British Birds, a folio with forty plates, appeared between 1771 and 1775, but was of no scientific value.
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  • In 1789 White's share of the correspondence, together with some miscellaneous matter, was published as The Natural History of Selborne - from the name of the village in which he lived.
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  • It has passed through a far greater number of editions than any other work on natural history in the whole world, and has become emphatically an English classic - the graceful simplicity of its style, the elevating tone of its spirit, and the sympathetic chords it strikes recommending it to every lover of Nature, while the severely scientific reader can scarcely find an error in any statement it contains, whether of matter of fact or opinion.
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  • Lewin s Natural History of the Birds of New South Wales (4to, 1822), which reached a third edition in 1838.
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  • But a bolder attempt at classification was that made in 1838 by Blyth in the New Series (Charlesworth's) of the Magazine of Natural History (ii.
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  • In order to lighten the palace the Venetian Institute of Science, Letters and Arts removed its headquarters and its natural history collection to Santo Stefano.
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  • and pamphlets), the Massachusetts Historical Society (founded 1791; 50,300), the Boston medical library (founded 1874; about 80,000), the New England Historic-Genealogical Society (founded 18 45; 33,750 volumes and 34,150 pamphlets), the state library (founded 1826; 140,000), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (founded 1780; 30,000), the Boston Society of Natural History (founded 1830; about 35,000 volumes and 27,000 pamphlets).
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  • Among institutions there are a specially fine public library, museums of geology and natural history and antiquities, mining and science schools, the West Cornwall Infirmary and a meteorological station.
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  • In 1877 he became professor of natural history at the College de France, in Paris, and in 1881 he was elected a member of the Academy of Sciences.
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  • The city has a Memorial Hall, erected in honour of the soldiers and sailors of Winnebago county, and in charge of the Grand Army of the Republic; a soldiers' memorial fountain; a Carnegie library, containing 51,340 volumes in 1909; and the Velie Museum of natural history.
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  • A tribunal and chamber of commerce, a board of trade-arbitrators, a lycee, a branch of the Bank of France, a school of industry, a school of cloth manufacture and a museum of natural history are among its institutions.
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  • It contains a short description of the ancient world, with remarks on historical, social, religious and natural history questions.
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  • The greater part is taken from Pliny's Natural History and the geography of Pomponius Mela.
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  • Romanes, Mental Evolution in Animals (1883), and Natural History of Instinct (1886); Lord Avebury, On the Instincts of Animals (1889); Marshall, Instinct and Reason (1898); Mills, Nature of Animal Intelligence (1898); St George Mivart, Nature and Thought (1882), and Origin of Human Reason (1899); E.
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  • Detmold possesses a natural history museum theatre, high school, library, the house in which the poet Ferdinand Freiligrath (1810-1876) was born, and that in which the dramatist Christian Dietrich Grabbe (1801-1836), also a native, died.
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  • 1857) graduated at the university of Wisconsin in 1879, became instructor in geology there in 1883, in 1897 became consulting geologist of the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, and in 1900 became geologist in charge of the Division of Pre-Cambrian and Metamorphic Geology, U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • The natural history collections (including the very large ichnological collection of President Hitchcock, and Audubon's collection of birds) are of exceptional richness.
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  • His attainments included Latin, which he could both read and write; he knew something of the English laws and language, and it may have been from an interest in natural history that he collected, during his reign, the Woodstock menagerie which was the admiration of his subjects.
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  • The new Natural History Museum, completed in 1891, stands a little distance farther south.
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  • Twelve natural history and ethnological museums have been established by the exiles - the Minusinsk museum being the best.
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  • In 1844 he presented to the British Museum his portfolios, accounts of his expeditions, and specimens of natural history illustrative of Lycia.
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  • Pocock, assistant in the Natural History departments of the British Museum, for valuable assistance in the preparation of this article and for the classification and definition of the groups of Eu-arachnida here given.
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  • He has ever been the patron saint of Mediterranean sailors, who regard St Elmo's fire as the visible sign of his guardianship. The phenomenon was known to the ancient Greeks, and Pliny in his Natural History states that when there were two lights sailors called them Castor and Pollux and invoked them as gods.
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  • The word alumen, which we translate alum, occurs in Pliny's Natural History.
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  • Among the other public institutions the following are the more important: the town library, first opened to students in the 17th century; the Archivio, a record office, instituted in 1858, containing a valuable and splendidly arranged collection of documents; the Fine Arts Institution, founded in 1816; and the natural history museum of the Royal Academy of the Physiocritics, inaugurated in the same year.
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  • The library contains over 130,000 volumes, and the city has good collections of pictures, antiquities and natural history.
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  • treatises on various groups of plants and animals were published during the period between Ray and Linnaeus, the latter had his career marked out for him in a university, that of Upsala, where he was first professor of medicine and subsequently of natural history.
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  • From 1898 to 1907 he was director of the Natural History Department of the British Museum.
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  • In Lemberg is the National Institute founded by Count Ossolinski, which contains a library of books and manuscripts relating chiefly to the history and literature of Poland, valuable antiquarian and scientific collections, and a printing establishment; also the Dzieduszycki museum with collections of natural history and ethnography relating chiefly to Galicia.
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  • He became a member of the Committee of Public Instruction early in 1793, and after carrying many useful decrees on the preservation of national monuments, on the military schools, on the reorganization of the Museum of Natural History and other matters, he brought forward on the 26th of June his Projet d'education nationale (printed at the Imprimerie Nationale), which proposed to lay the burden or primary education on the public funds, but to leave secondary education to private enterprise.
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  • The museum contains a valuable library and various collections, including antiquities and objects of art and natural history.
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  • Moreover, his works on natural history doubtless furthered the progress among the Greeks of sciences tributary to medicine, though the only specimens of such works which have come down to us from the Peripatetic school are those of Theophrastus, who may be considered the founder of the scientific study of botany.
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  • In his Natural History we find as complete a summary of the popular medicine of his time as Celsus gives of the scientific medicine.
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  • At the same time the discovery of new diseases, unknown to the ancients, and the keener attention which the great epidemics of plague caused to be paid to those already known, led to more minute study of the natural history of disease.
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  • The latter had, in neglecting anatomy, neglected the most solid basis for studying the natural history of disease; though perhaps it was less from choice than because his practice, as he was not attached to a hospital, gave him no opportunities.
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  • de Lacroix (1706-1767), gave, under the title Nosologia methodica, a natural-history classification of diseases; Jean Astruc (1684-1766) contributed to the knowledge of general diseases.
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  • Willan, by following the natural-history method of Sydenham, at once put the study on a sound basis; and his work has been the starting-point of the most important modern researches.
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  • In no department is the experimental method more continually justified than in that of the natural history of disease, which at first sight would seem to have a certain independence of it and a somewhat exclusive value of its own.
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  • After graduating at Strassburg University he spent a year in the counting-house of his father, a banker and merchant, and then in 1851 went to live in Paris with his maternal grandfather, Georges Louis Duvernoy (1777-1855), professor of natural history and, from 1850, of comparative anatomy, at the College de France.
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  • The natural history branch was removed to a building at South Kensington (the Natural History Museum) in 1881, where the zoological, botanical and mineralogical exhibits are kept.
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  • Of this baby chimpanzee the skeleton may be seen in the Natural History branch of the British Museum alongside the volume in which it is described.
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  • Rawlinson's Natural History and Antiquities of Surrey (1719); his antiquarian notes on Wiltshire were printed in Wiltshire; the Topographical Collections of John Aubrey, corrected and enlarged by J.
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  • Jackson (Devizes, 1862); part of another MS. on "The Natural History of Wiltshire" was printed by John Britton in 1847 for the Wiltshire Topographical Society; the Miscellanies were edited in 1890 for the Library of Old Authors; the "Minutes for Lives" were partially edited in 1813.
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  • The Opera del Duomo contains models and pieces of sculpture connected with the cathedral; the Etruscan and Egyptian museum, the gallery of tapestries, the Michelangelo museum, the museum of natural history and other collections are all important in different ways.
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  • The same applies to the information of Pliny in his Natural History.
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  • Hans Makart's painted dome in the natural history museum is the largest pictorial canvas in the world.
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  • The imperial natural history museum contains a mineralogical, geological and zoological section, as well as a prehistoric and ethnographical collection.
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  • Cedar-wood, however, is said to be injurious to natural history objects, and to instruments placed in cabinets made of it, as the resinous matter of the wood becomes deposited upon them.
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  • The city possesses also an academy of the fine arts, with a gallery of paintings; and the university a library of 120,000 volumes, a natural history museum, botanical garden and agricultural schools.
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  • It is a vast summary of all the natural history known to western Europe towards the middle of the 13th century.
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  • The Speculum Doctrinale, in seventeen books and 2374 chapters, is a summary of all the scholastic knowledge of the age and does not confine itself to natural history.
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  • Among the most prominent secular buildings are: the Tergesteo, a huge edifice containing a cruciform arcade roofed with glass, where the exchange is established, besides numerous shops and offices; the town-hall, rebuilt in 1874, with the handsome hall of the local Diet; the imposing old exchange, now the seat of the chamber of commerce; the palatial offices of the Austrian Lloyd, the principal shipping company; the commercial and nautical academy, with its natural history museum, containing the complete fauna of the Adriatic Sea; and finally the municipal museum, Revoltella, are all worth mentioning.
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  • HERMANN FRANZ MORITZ KOPP (1817-1892), German chemist, was born on the 30th of October 1817 at Hanau, where his father, Johann Heinrich Kopp (1777-1858), a physician, was professor of chemistry, physics and natural history at the Lyceum.
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  • The old electoral palace (1627-1678), a large building of red sandstone, now contains a valuable collection of Roman and Germanic antiquities, a picture gallery, a natural history museum, the Gutenberg Museum, and a library of 220,000 volumes.
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  • It is one of the most remarkable facts in the natural history of the Polyzoa that a single zooecium may be tenanted by several polypides, which successively degenerate.
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  • In the village of South Natick is the Bacon Free Library (1880), in which is housed the Historical, Natural History and Library Society.
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  • Herder defines human history as " a pure natural history of human powers, actions and propensities, modified by time and place."
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  • It was sent from India to Emmanuel, king of Portugal, in 1513; and from a sketch taken in Lisbon, Albert Diirer composed his celebrated but fanciful engraving, which was reproduced in so many old books on natural history.
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  • He early displayed a strong leaning towards natural history.
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  • to fill the professorship of natural history in the Imperial Academy of Science, St Petersburg, and in the same year he was appointed naturalist to a scientific expedition through Russia and Siberia, the immediate object of which was the observation of the transit of Venus in 1769.
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  • of plates, contained, in addition to the narrative, the natural history results of the expedition; and an English translation in three volumes appeared in 1812.
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  • The empress bought Pallas's natural history collections for 20,000 roubles, 5000 more than he asked for them, and allowed him to keep them for life.
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  • Pallas also edited and contributed to Neue nordische Beitrage zur physikal schen Erdand Volkerbeschreibung, Naturgeschichte, and Oekonomie (1781-1796), published Illustrationes plantarum imperfecte vel nondum cognitarum (Leipzig, 1803), and con tributed to Buffon's Natural History a paper on the formation of mountains.
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  • One of his great merits is that he was the first to dissociate medicine from priestcraft, and to direct exclusive attention to the natural history of disease.
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  • But when we come to study his observations on the natural history of disease as presented in the living subject, we recognize at once the presence of a great clinical physician.
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  • In 1700 he became acquainted with Dr John Woodward (1665-1728) physician to the duke and author of a work entitled The Natural History of the Earth, to whom he entrusted a large number of fossils of his own collecting, along with a mass of manuscript notes, for arrangement and publication.
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  • A misunderstanding as to the manner in which these should be dealt with was the immediate occasion of the publication by Hutchinson in 1724 of Moses's Principia, part i., in which Woodward's Natural History was bitterly ridiculed, his conduct with regard to the mineralogical specimens not obscurely characterized, and a refutation of the Newtonian doctrine of gravitation seriously attempted.
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  • PAUL GERVAIS (1816-1879), French palaeontologist, was born on the 26th of September 1816 at Paris, where he obtained the diplomas of doctor of science and of medicine, and in 1835 he began palaeontological research as assistant in the laboratory of comparative anatomy at the Museum of Natural History.
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  • The town-hall contains a natural history museum.
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  • Journal of a Tour through North Wales and part of Shropshire; with observations in Mineralogy and other branches of Natural History (London, 1797); A Manual of Mineralogy (1814; ed.
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  • In the same building is the museum, which contains a picture gallery, a numismatic cabinet, and a collection of specimens of natural history.
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  • During the next ten years a series of students, of whom only Riley and Balbiani need be mentioned here, worked out the natural history of Phylloxera vastatrix, and proved its identity with the American grape-louse.
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  • Vauquelin's chemical laboratory, afterwards becoming his assistant at the natural history museum in the Jardin des Plantes.
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  • He succeeded his master, Vauquelin, as professor of organic chemistry at the natural history museum in 1830, and thirty-three years later assumed its directorship also; this he relinquished in 1879, though he still retained his professorship. In 1886 the completion of his hundredth year was celebrated with public rejoicings; and after his death, which occurred in Paris on the 9th of April 1889, he was honoured with a public funeral.
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  • Mention should also be made of the Sassen Poort, one of the old city gates; a gild-house (1571); the provincial government offices, containing the archives; and a museum of antiquities and natural history.
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  • The contents are of a varied character: the natural history of man, the influence of the stars and genii, music, religious rites, astronomy, the doctrines of the Greek philosophers.
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  • In addition to his interest in politics and public improvements, he devoted much study to the natural sciences; among his published works are a Memoir on the Antiquities of Western New York (1818), and Letters on the Natural History and Internal Resources of New York (1822).
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  • The reports of travellers and of various missionary societies have thrown a great deal of light on the natural history of the island, on its resources, and the islanders.
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  • His idea of applying the natural history method of classification to psychical phenomena gave scientific character to his work, the value of which was enhanced by his methodical exposition and his command of illustration.
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  • The Boston public library, exceeded in size in the United States by the library of Congress at Washington - and probably first, because of the large number of duplicates in the library of Congress - and the largest free municipal library in the world; the library of Harvard, extremely well chosen and valuable for research; the collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1791); the Boston Athenaeum (1807); the State Library (1826); the New England Historic Genealogical Society (1845); the Congregational Library; the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1780); and the Boston Society of Natural History (1830), all in Boston, leave it easily unrivalled, unless by Washington, as the best research centre of the country.
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  • The Mexican Geographical Society (Sociedad mexicana de geografia y estadistica), founded in 1833, has rendered invaluable services in the work of exploration and publication; there are also the Geological Society, the Association of Engineers and Architects, and the Society of Natural History.
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  • An account of savage life, therefore, includes the knowledge of the animal life of America and its distribution, regarding the continent, not only as a whole, but in those natural history provinces and migrations which governed and characterized the activities of the peoples.
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  • At, the head of the scientific institutions of Haarlem may be placed the Dutch Society of Sciences (Hollandsche Maatschappij van Wetenschappen), founded in 1752, which possesses valuable collections in botany, natural history and geology.
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  • The Romer museum of antiquities and natural history is housed in the former church of St Martin; the buildings of Trinity hospital, partly dating from the 14th century, are now a factory; and the Wedekindhaus (1598) is now a savingsbank.
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  • For a general discussion of the origin of the phosphates, see " The Natural History of Phosphate Deposits," by, J.
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  • The Rothschild Museum, erected in 1889, contains air extensive natural history collection.
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  • Expert naturalists accompanied the party, which did not emerge from the wilderness until the middle of the following March, bringing with it a collection which scientists pronounce of unusual value for students of natural history.
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  • There are also the Bose Museum, containing collections of pictures and antiquities of Hessian origin, museums of natural history and ethnography, an industrial exhibition hall, and an industrial art school.
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  • He is also credited with an interest in botany and natural history (iv.
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  • It has a geological and mineralogical museum and under its supervision is carried on the state geological and natural history survey, the state geologist being head of the department of geology and mineralogy of the university.
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  • To the student of the natural history of jurisprudence the fusion of the two systems of law and equity may well recall a similar result brought about in Imperial Rome; to the student of British institution, the supreme court, for once presided.
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  • Mitchell, The Herring, its Natural History and National Importance (Edinburgh, 1864).
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  • Garstang's "Reports on the Natural History of the Plaice" (Rapports et proces-verbaux du conseil international pour l'exploration de la mer, 1905 seq.).
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  • From earliest childhood he displayed a love of adventure and natural history.
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  • It also has training-colleges, a lycee, a school of art and technics, museums of antiquities, natural history and painting, and several learned societies.
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  • Boyle bequeathed his natural history collections to the Royal Society, which also possesses a portrait of him by the German painter, Friedrich Kerseboom (1632-1690).
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  • In 1793 the Paris Museum of Natural History was re-established by law, and Buffon's idea of attaching to it a menagerie was carried out; the latter, as the collection in the Jardin des Plantes, still survives.
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  • The Cincinnati Society of Natural History (incorporated 1870) has a large library and a museum containing a valuable palaeontological collection, and bones and implements from the prehistoric cemetery of the mound-builders, at Madisonville, Ohio.
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  • Among the institutions connected with the university are the national institution for East Indian languages, ethnology and geography; the fine botanical gardens, founded in 1587; the observatory (1860); the natural history museum, with a very complete anatomical cabinet; the museum of antiquities (Museum van Oudheden), with specially valuable Egyptian and Indian departments; a museum of Dutch antiquities from the earliest times; and three ethnographical museums, of which the nucleus was P. F.
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  • It comprises the university buildings proper, the medical school, the natural history museum, the Wilson Hall, a magnificent building in the Perpendicular style, and the three affiliated colleges, Trinity College (Anglican), Ormond College (Presbyterian) and Queen's College (Wesleyan).
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  • (Specimen presented to the American Museum of Natural History by the Royal Museum of Stuttgart through Professor Eberhard Fraas.) FIG.
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  • That in the palace gardens flowers from the tierra caliente were transplanted, and water-fowl bred near fresh and salt pools fit for each kind, that all kinds of birds and beasts were kept in well-appointed zoological gardens, where there were homes even for alligators and snakes - all this testifies to a cultivation of natural history which was really beyond the European level of the time.
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  • A few years ago a full-sized tree was felled in Fresno county, California, and contiguous transverse sections have been set up, one in the Museum of Natural History at New York, the other (upper one) in the British Museum of Natural History at South Kensington; the annual rings of the latter section have been carefully counted and found to indicate an age of 1335 years.
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  • Hornaday, American Natural History (New York, 1904); W.
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  • Close by is the Natural History Museum, in a great building by Alfred Waterhouse, opened as a branch of the British Museum in 1880.
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  • Other public buildings include the assembly rooms, the town-hall, the museum (in which the antiquities and natural history of the shire are abundantly illustrated), the district asylum, the academy, the county buildings and the court house, the market buildings, the Victoria school of science and art, and Lady Gordon-Cumming's children's home.
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  • [Not Aristotle's work on this subject.] 254 7repi 9avpaatwv acova / CZrwv: De mirabilibus auscultationibus: On phenomena chiefly connected with natural history.
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  • How otherwise, we wonder, could one man writing alone and with so few predecessors compose the first systematic treatises on the psychology of the mental powers and on the logic of reasoning, the first natural history of animals, and the first civil history of one hundred and fifty-eight constitutions, in addition to authoritative treatises on metaphysics, biology, ethics, politics, rhetoric and poetry; in all penetrating to the very essence of the subject, and, what is most wonderful, describing more facts than any other man has ever done on so many subjects ?
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  • In 1781 it was turned into a penitentiary and lunatic asylum, but in 1835-1838 was completely restored, and now contains a natural history museum.
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  • In 1849 he became curator of the Natural History Museum at Wiesbaden, and began to study the Tertiary strata of the Mayence Basin, and also the Devonian fossils of the Rhenish provinces, on which he published elaborate memoirs.
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  • A few years later he was chosen director of the observatory at Florence, where he also lectured at the museum of natural history.
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  • James Nicol (1769-1819), the poet, was minister of Traquair, and his son James Nicol (1810-1879), the geologist and professor of natural history in Aberdeen University, was born in the manse.
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  • In 1867 he was appointed geologist-in-charge of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, and from his twelve years of labour there resulted a most valuable series of volumes in all branches of natural history and economic science; and he issued in 1877 his Geological and Geographical Atlas of Colorado.
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  • It has various technical schools, an experimental fruit-farm, a military hospital, and a natural history museum.
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  • Streets, Contributions to the Natural History of the Hawaiian and Fanning Islands, Bulletin 7 of U.S. National Museum (Washington, 1877).
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  • In a word, Mach and Kirchhoff agree that force is not a cause, convert Newtonian reciprocal action into mere interdependency, and, in old terminology, reduce mechanics from a natural philosophy of causes to a natural history of mere facts.
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  • with the physical geography and natural history of Mexico and Peru; books V., VI.
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  • The death of his mother in 1762 having deprived him of his means of support, he went in 1763 on the invitation of the pastor of the Lutheran community, Anton Friedrich Biisching, the founder of the modern historic statistical method of geography, to teach natural history in the Lutheran academy, St Petersburg.
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  • 17) has a short but striking sketch of them, derived in all probability from Alexander Polyhistor, who is mentioned among the authorities for the fifth book of his Natural History.
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  • It possesses a castle, with natural history and antiquarian collections, and a parish church (restored 1891), with the mausoleum (1892) of the reigning princes.
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  • An academy of agriculture, with a natural history museum and botanic garden attached, is established in the palace of Clemensruhe at Poppelsdorf, which is reached by a fine avenue about a mile long, bordered on both sides by a double row of chestnut trees.
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  • He wrote, after Aristotle and Theophrastus, books on the natural history of animals and plants, frequently quoted by the elder Pliny.
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  • The two young men stood for chairs of physics and natural history respectively, first at Toronto, next at Sydney, but they were in each case unsuccessful.
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  • Among modern public buildings the principal are St Ninian's Episcopal Cathedral, in the Early Middle Pointed style, an important example (completed 1890) of the work of William Butterfield (1814-1900); the municipal buildings (1881); the city-hall; the Marshall Memorial Hall (1823), housing the public library and the museum of the Perth Literary and Antiquarian Society; the Perthshire natural history museum; the Sandeman public library (1898), founded by a bequest of Professor Sandeman of Owens College, Manchester.
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  • Zschokke (1900) is an important treatise on an interesting department of alpine natural history.
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  • The town possesses two Protestant and a Roman Catholic church, a technical institute, a natural history museum, a library, a theatre, a monument to the emperor William I.
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  • Among its auxiliary establishments are a good natural history museum, an observatory, a laboratory, and a library which contains a copy of Erasmus' New Testament with marginal annotations by Luther.
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  • Is a rodent known in natural history as the coypu, about half the size of a beaver, and when unhaired has not more than half, generally less, the depth of fur, which is also not so close.
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  • In 1757 appeared Four Dissertations: The Natural History of Religion, Of the Passions, Of Tragedy, Of the Standard of Taste.
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  • The Natural History of Religion is a powerful contribution to the deistic controversy; but, as in the case of Hume's earlier work, its significance was at the time overlooked.
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  • Early writers on natural history used the term in its vague logical sense without limiting it to a special category in the hierarchy of classification.
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  • The Bergen museum contains antiquities and a natural history collection.
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  • King, The Natural History of Precious Stones and Precious Metals (1883); M.
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  • He was an enthusiastic student in particular of natural history and geology.
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  • Of the former city gates four have been retained, restored and converted into museums: the Severin gate, on the south, contains the geological section of the natural history museum; the Hahnen gate, on the west, is fitted as the historical and antiquarian museum of the city; and the Eigelstein gate, on the north, accommodates the zoological section of the natural history museum.
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  • He had as a youth a taste for collecting objects of natural history and other curiosities.
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  • The Upper Town, on high ground west of the Medvescak, contains the palace of the ban and the natural history museum.
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  • Its museum, like the ethnological and natural history collection of the Essex Institute, was bought by the Peabody Academy of Science, whose museum now includes Essex county collections (natural history, mineralogy, botany, prehistoric relics, &c.), type collections of minerals and fossils; implements, dress, &c. of primitive peoples, especially rich in objects from Malaysia, Japan and the South Seas; and portraits and relics of famous Salem merchants, with models and pictures of Salem merchant vessels.
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  • The museum contains a natural history section with the complete fauna and flora of Transylvania, and a rich ethnographical section.
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  • Attached to it are a library, an observatory, a botanical garden, and a physical and natural history museum.
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  • Of Scottish descent, he went to Edinburgh to complete his education, and graduated at the university in 1842, having gained a knowledge of geology and natural history from Robert Jameson.
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  • Ray's reputation was high also as a tutor; and he communicated his own passion for natural history to several pupils, of whom Francis Willughby is by far the most famous.
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  • The plants, 626 in number, are enumerated alphabetically, but a system of classification differing little from Caspar Bauhin's is sketched at the end of the book; and the notes contain many curious references to other parts of natural history.
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  • The society of sciences, that of northern antiquaries, the natural history and the botanical societies, &c., publish their transactions and proceedings, but the Naturhistorisk Tidsskrift, of which 14 volumes with 259 plates were published (1861-1884), and which was in the foremost rank in its department, ceased with the death in 1884 of the editor, the distinguished zoologist, I.
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  • The principal public buildings are the guildhall, town-hall and market-house, and public rooms, which include a museum of natural history.
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  • Soon after his release he was appointed professor of natural history in the College des Quatre Nations.
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  • He was distinguished for his folio work The Natural History of Oxfordshire (1677), in which various fossils, as well as other objects of interest, were figured and described.
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  • In 1686 he wrote The Natural History of Staf f ordshire.
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  • The town possesses a museum with good archaeological and natural history collections, a literary institute and a horticultural society.
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  • Next to it comes the national museum, founded in 1807 through the donations of Count Stephan Szechenyi, which contains extensive collections of antiquities, natural history and ethnology, and a rich library which, in its manuscript department of over 20,000 MSS., contains the oldest specimens of the Hungarian language.
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  • This may be considered a fair illustration of the situation in Ecuador so far as natural history exploration is concerned.
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  • The University publishes Bulletins of the Agricultural and Engineering Experiment Stations; Reports of the State Water Survey, of the State Natural History Survey, of the State Geological Survey, and of the State Entomologist's Office; University Studies; and The Journal of English and Germanic Philology.
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  • trans., Natural History of Norway (2 vols., 1755), containing curious accounts, often referred to, of the Kraaken, sea-serpent, and the like; Origines hafnienses (1760); Menoza (3 vols., 1 74 2 - 1 743), a religious novel.
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  • Tristram, Natural History of the Bible (1867); G.
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  • The museum (1849) contains an interesting collection of local antiquities and a natural history collection.
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  • Forbes (edited by), The Natural History of Sokotra and Abd-el-Kuri (Liverpool, 1903); F.
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  • There are a number of museums; the historical (archaeological and medieval), the natural history (in which the skin of Barry, the famous St Bernard dog, is preserved), the art (mainly modern Swiss pictures), and the Alpine (in which are collections of all kinds relating to the Swiss Alps).
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  • Nothing is known of its natural history outside the body, but on cultivation it is apt to undergo numerous involution forms. Its presence in a patient is regarded as positive diagnostic proof of plague; but failure to find or to identify it does not possess an equal negative value, and should not be too readily accepted, for many instances are recorded in which expert observers have only succeeded in demonstrating its presence after repeated attempts.
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  • The university of Pavia has long been famous as a medical school, and has the oldest anatomical cabinet in Italy; in addition it has a natural history museum founded under Spallanzini in 1772, a botanical garden, begun in 1774, and excellent geological, palaeontological and mineralogical collections.
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  • and Natural History Society, vols.
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  • The interest which Bogota has always taken in education, and because of which she has been called the "Athens of South America," is shown in the number and character of her institutions of learning - a university, three endowed colleges, a school of chemistry and mineralogy, a national academy, a military school, a public library with some 50,000 volumes, a national observatory, a natural history museum and a botanic garden.
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  • The museum (1901) is an imposing building in the German Renaissance style and contains, in addition to a valuable library, ethnographical and natural history collections.
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  • From 1833 to 1839 he was secretary of state and superintendent of schools in New York, and in this capacity made valuable reports concerning the public schools of the state, and a report (1836) which led to the publication of the Natural History of the State of New York (1842-1866).
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  • C. Prichard's Natural History of Man, and edited various writings of S.
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  • Opposite to it, on the north side, and adjoining the pretty palace gardens, are the court theatre and the armoury, and a little farther west the handsome buildings of the new museum, erected in 1905 and containing the valuable scientific and art collections of the state, which were formerly housed in the palace: a library of 600,000 volumes and 4000 MSS., a museum of Egyptian and German antiquities, a picture gallery with masterpieces of old German and Dutch schools, a natural history collection and the state archives.
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  • There is no doubt that much remains still to be done in illustrating human morality by the facts and principles of biology and natural history.
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  • The new method is valueless, because inapplicable, unless it be supplied with materials duly collected and presented - in fact, unless there be formed a competent natural history of the Phaenomena Universi.
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  • Following this summary philosophy come the sciences proper, rising like a pyramid in successive stages, the lowest floor being occupied by natural history or experience, the second by physics, the third, which is next the peak of unity, by metaphysics.
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  • What he really meant by observation was a competent natural history or collection of facts.
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  • Thus, in the preface to his series of works forming the third part of the Instauratio, he says: " It comes, therefore, to this, that my Organum, even if it were completed, would not without the Natural History much advance the Instauration of the Sciences, whereas the Natural History without the Organum would advance it not a little."
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  • 3 But a complete natural history is evidently a thing impossible, and in fact a history can only be collected by attending to the requirements of the Organum.
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  • For the true natural history is to take nothing except instances, connections, observations and canons."
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  • The mechanical character both of the natural history and of the logical method applied to it, resulted necessarily from Bacon's radically false conception of the nature of cause and of the causal relation.
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  • Its natural history by F.
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  • In the Annals and Magazine of Natural History for 1868 (p. 381) is a most interesting account, by Charles Buxton, of the naturalization of parrots at Northreps Hall, Norfolk.
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  • The Natural History Museum, the observatory and meteorological office, and the botanical gardens are under the supervision of the royal academy of sciences.
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  • Lamarck in the chair of natural history at the museum.
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  • Among the principal buildings are a Franciscan convent, with a rich library and an interesting collection of antiquities and ecclesiastical objects; a Piarist and a Minorite convent; a handsome new town-hall; and a natural history and historical museum to which is attached a public library.
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  • Then came La Mer (1861), a return to the natural history class, which, considering the powers of the writer and the attraction of the subject, is perhaps a little disappointing.
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  • In metaphysics and in natural history Aristotle was a law to him, and in medicine Galen, but he was not a slave to the text or the details of either.
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  • He graduated as a doctor of medicine in Vienna, and became in 1854 professor of botany and natural history at the medical and surgical military academy in that city.
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  • Cunningham, Natural History of the Marketable Marine Fishes of the British Islands (London, 1896); A Manual of Fish-Culture (Washington, 1897); Roche, La Culture des mess (Paris, 1898); W.
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  • The design was as farreaching as that of the Natural History of Pliny.
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  • For a complete bibliography of Stonehenge see The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine (Dec. 1901), by W.
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  • He wrote a defence of revealed religion in his View of Lord Bolingbroke's Philosophy (1754), and Hume's Natural History of Religion called forth some Remarks ...
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  • The only facts in natural history which appear even indirectly to countenance the flotation theory are the presence of a swimming bladder in some fishes, and the existence of membranous expansions or pseudowings in certain animals, such as the flying fish, flying dragon and flying squirrel.
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  • His first discourses were delivered before the Society of Natural History and the Mechanics' Institute.
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  • In 1870 he delivered a course of lectures before the university on "The Natural History of the Intellect."
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  • The picture gallery, the cabinet of engravings, the natural history museum, the Chinese museum, and the cabinet of art, which includes a collection of Egyptian, Etruscan, Roman and German antiquities, are now included in the new museum, completed in 1878, which stands on a terrace to the south of the castle.
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  • To anthropology, however, in its more general sense as the natural history of man, ethnology and ethnography may both be considered to belong, being related as parts to a whole.
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  • C. Prichard, who perhaps of all others merits the title of founder of modern anthropology, wrote in his Natural History of Man:- " The organized world presents no contrasts and resemblances more remarkable than those which we discover on comparing mankind with the inferior tribes.
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  • C. Prichard, Natural History of Man (London, 1843); T.
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  • In connexion with the gardens there are an aquarium (1882), a library, and an ethnographical and natural history museum.
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  • Similarly, logic, so far as it is an art of thought or a doctrine of fallacies, and ethics, so far as it is occupied with a natural history of impulses and moral sentiments, do neither of them belong, except by courtesy, to the philosophic province.
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  • The city is the see of a Greek Catholic archbishop and of an Armenian archbishop, and contains a Lamaist monastery, as well as technical schools, an ichthyological museum, the Peter museum, with ethnographical, archaeological and natural history collections, a botanical garden, an ecclesiastical seminary, and good squares and public gardens, one of which is adorned with a statue (1884) of Alexander II.
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  • It would be impossible here even to state all the questions that have arisen about rates; but the essential confusion caused by the neglect of practical men to study the natural history of taxation, as it may be called, must be obvious to every student.
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  • Blades, and Transactions of the Bedfordshire Natural History and Field Club.
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  • Bryden, Kloof and Karoo; sport, legend and natural history in Cape Colony (London, 1889); South African Education Yearbook (Cape Colony edition, Cape Town, 1906 et seq.).
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  • The Ludwigsburg, another palace in the town, built in 1742, accommodates the natural history collections belonging to the prince.
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  • In connexion with the natural history society there is a valuable museum, and the scientific institute possesses a large library and a rich collection of antiquities, coins and articles of virtu.
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  • He declined many offers from other Italian universities and from St Petersburg until 1768, when he accepted the invitation of Maria Theresa to the chair of natural history in the university of Pavia, which was then being reorganized.
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  • insectum, used by Pliny in his Natural History as the equivalent of the Gr.
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  • The word was introduced to English readers in a translation (1601) of Pliny's Natural History by Philemon Holland, who defined "insects" as "little vermine or smal creatures which have (as it were) a cut or division betwene their heads and bodies, as pismires, flies, grashoppers, under which are comprehended earthworms, caterpilers, &c."
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  • While still residing with his father at Lincoln's Inn Fields, he gained some knowledge of natural history and an interest in fossils from visits to the museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, at a time when W.
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  • He was an active member of the Cotteswold Naturalists' Club and of the Warwickshire Natural History and Archaeological Society, and in 1854 he was chief founder of the Warwickshire Naturalists' and Archaeologists' Field Club.
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  • For physical description and natural resources see the Reports (biennial) and the Bulletins (Madison) of the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, especially important for economic geology, hydrography and agriculture, and the Annual Reports of the Wisconsin State Board of Agriculture; the Reports (biennial) of the State Forester, the Reports of the U.S. Census, and the Mineral Resources of the United States, published annually by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • iii., new series, of the Bulletin (Milwaukee) of the Wisconsin Natural History Society, are valuable.
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  • There are also industrial and historical museums, and collections of painting and natural history.
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  • See History of the Chapel Royal, Stirling (Grampian Club, 1882); Charters of Stirling (1884); John Jamieson, Bell the Cat (Stirling, 1902); The Battle of Stirling Bridge - the Kildean Myth (Stirling Natural History and Archaeological Society, 1905).
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  • In 1807 he became assistant keeper, and in 1813 he was appointed keeper, of the department of natural history in the British Museum, and afterwards of geology and mineralogy, retaining the post until the close of his life.
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  • There is a society of natural history and an historical society, both of which possess considerable libraries and collections.
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  • Other important institutions of a semi-educational character are the Royal Servian Academy (1836), which controls the national museum and national library in Belgrade, and publishes periodicals, &c.; the ethnographical museum (1891), the natural history museum (1904), the national theatre (1890), the State Archives (1866, reorganized 1901), and the state printing office (1831), all in Belgrade.
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  • There are also a few devoted to curious points of natural history.
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  • Cunningham's Natural History of the Strait of Magellan and paper in the Zoological Society's Proceedings for 1871 (pp. 105 - IIo), as well as FI.
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  • Among other buildings are: Christ Church (Protestant Episcopal) St Michael's Cathedral (Roman Catholic), the South Congregational Church, the Memorial Church, and the Church of the Sacred Heart; the Art Museum (1894-1896), which contains the George Walter Vincent Smith art collection and an art library; the Horace Smith Hall of Sculpture; the Museum of Natural History (1898), organized in 1859; a group of municipal buildings, with a tower 270 ft.
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  • The Public Library, the Art Museum, and the Museum of Natural History are controlled by the City Library Association, organized in 1857.
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  • Moral functions cannot be performed by the individual in isolation but only in his relation to the family, the state, the school, the church, and society - all forms of human life which ethical science finds to its hand and leaves to the science of natural history to account for.
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  • Many of the volumes consist of coloured lithograph plates illustrating the natural history of the country, as well as atlases of maps from the earliest period.
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  • The principal buildings of entertainment are the aquarium (also used as a concert hall); the museum, a rotunda in Doric style, containing excellent antiquarian and natural history collections; two theatres, and the assembly rooms attaching to the Spa House.
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  • that Lafitau, a Jesuit missionary in North America, while inclined to take a mystical view of the secrets concealed by Iroquois myths, had also pointed out the savage element surviving in Greek mythology.5 Recent Mythological Systems. - Up to a very recent date students of mythology were hampered by orthodox traditions, and still more by ignorance of the ancient languages and of the natural history of man.
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  • The chief buildings are the hydropathic and the Macfarlane museum of fine art and natural history.
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  • Bearing this in mind the reader will understand that so much of the natural history of the honey-bee as is necessary for elucidating the practical part of our subject may be comprised in (I) the life of the insect, (2) its mission in life, and (3) utilizing to the utmost the brief period during which it can labour before being worn out with toil.
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  • The following books on the subject may be consulted for further details: - Francois Huber, New Observations on the Natural History of Bees; T.
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  • Childrey, Natural History of England (1659) and Britannia Baconica, p. 183 (1661); D.
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  • On the completion of his arts course, he nominally studied divinity at Edinburgh until 1787; in1788-1789he spent rather more than a year as private tutor in a Virginian family, and from 1790 till the close of 1792 he held a similar appointment at Etruria in Staffordshire, with the family of Josiah Wedgwood, employing his spare time in experimental research and in preparing a translation of Buffon's Natural History of Birds, which was published in nine 8vo vols.
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  • The next, Benjamin, became the publisher of most of the leading works of natural history which appeared during his lifetime, including that of his brother.
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  • The third, John, became chaplain at Gibraltar, where he accumulated much material for a work on the natural history of the rock and its neighbourhood, and carried on a scientific correspondence, not only with his eldest brother, but with Linnaeus.
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  • Such a beginning might induce more able naturalists to write the history of various districts and might in time occasion the production of a work so much to be wished for - a full and complete natural history of these kingdoms."
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  • Yet the famous Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne did not appear until 1789.
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  • Moreover, as the first book which raised natural history into the region of literature, much as the Compleat Angler did for that gentle art, we must affiliate to it the more finished products of later writers like Thoreau or Richard Jefferies.
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  • Donovan, in his Natural History of British Fishes (1802-1808), misled by specimens sent to him as whitebait, declared it to be the young of the shad.
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  • Regarded from the individualist point of view, this line of inquiry becomes purely psychological, and the answer may be presented, as it was presented by Locke, in the fashion of a natural history of the growth of conscious experience in the mind of the subject.
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  • He is not asking, with Locke, whence the details of experience arise; he is not attempting a natural history of the growth of experience in the individual mind; but he is endeavouring to state exhaustively what conditions are necessarily involved in any fact of knowledge, i.e.
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  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. In the Capitol are the library (about 6000 volumes) and natural history collections of the Kansas Academy of Science, and the library (30,000 books, 94,000 pamphlets and 28,500 manuscripts) and collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, which publishes Kansas Historical Collections (1875 sqq.) and Biennial Reports (1879 sqq.).
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  • accusatory finger, let's look at the natural history of two chemical elements: carbon and oxygen.
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  • Other displays highlight the natural history of the area, including, in summer, a very active observation beehive.
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  • ACTIVITIES About half the Society's 1200 members include botany among their natural history interests.
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  • cameramanpplied for recognition for wildlife cameramen and women who work for the BBC Natural History Unit.
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  • degeneracy thesis was first prompted toward the end of the 18th century by Count Buffon's research in natural history.
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  • He was a pioneer in the use of the natural history diorama to exhibit large mammals against a representation of their habitat.
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  • Alongside this moral lesson, there is also a long disquisition on the natural history of the ass.
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  • entomology collections of The Natural History Museum, where I am a scientific associate.
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  • The new building was to house the natural history collections of the British Museum, including the vast herbarium of Sir Joseph Banks.
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  • Compared with many terrestrial mammals, little is known of cetacean natural history.
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  • Often they have lived there for several years; inevitably their knowledge and interests extend beyond just the area's natural history.
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  • There is also a Victorian naturalist 's study in the Natural History Gallery.
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  • Treatment can alter the natural history of opioid dependence, most commonly by prolonging periods of abstinence from illicit opioid dependence, most commonly by prolonging periods of abstinence from illicit opioid misuse.
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  • overworked word but how else can you adequately describe the remarkable experiences that comprise a natural history tour of New Zealand?
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  • parasitology collections of the Natural History Collection.
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  • Other chapters concern the value of single case studies, the natural history of Alzheimer's disease, neurobiology and cognitive psychopharmacology.
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  • Natural history The natural history of oesophageal reflux is not well studied, and the frequency of spontaneous remission remains unclear.
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  • Long-running hospital soap ' Casualty ', plus the multi-award-winning Natural History Unit, are both based in Bristol.
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  • A monstrous giant squid has gone on display at the Natural History Museum in London.
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  • MORE » The Kingfisher Book of Living Worlds A natural history book with a difference - much of it is quite unreadable.
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  • Thomas Bell Thomas Bell was an eminent 19th century zoologist whose collections reflected his wide interests in natural history.
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  • There may also be mentioned a large number of other places of worship, a town hall with fine classical facade and tower, market hall, museums of natural history and of art and industry, an exchange, assembly rooms, and various benevolent institutions.
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  • This treatise must not be confused with the Natural History of Religion, in which Hume acts as a pioneer for comparative religion, with its study of facts.
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  • The impulse given to the study of natural history by the example of Linnaeus; the results brought back by Sir Joseph Banks, Dr Solander and the two Forsters, who accompanied Cook in his voyages of discovery; the studies of De Saussure in the Alps, and the lists of desiderata in physical geography drawn up by that investigator, combined to ' Printed in Schriften zur physischen Geographie, vol.
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  • Sharp's contribution to the Cambridge Natural History (vol.
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  • These two sections are connected by a "Monologue Recreatif," in which the author displays his general knowledge of popular songs, dances and tales, of astronomy, natural history and naval matters.
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  • The shrewdness which, more than inventiveness, characterized their husbandry comes out well in the following quotation from the 18th book of the Natural History of Pliny: - " Cato would have this point especially to be considered, that the soil of a farm be good and fertile; also, that near it there be plenty of labourers and that it be not far from a large town; moreover, that it have sufficient means for transporting its produce, either by water or land.
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  • The works of Columella (1st century A.D.) and of Palladius (4th century A.D.) are exhaustive treatises, and the Natural History of the elder Pliny (A.D.
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  • Eleazar Albin between 1738 and 1740 produced a Natural History of Birds in three volumes of more modest dimensions; but he seems to have been ignorant of ornithology, and his coloured plates are greatly inferior to Catesby's.
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  • This did not hinder Swainson, who had succeeded in getting the ornithological portion of the first zoological work ever published at the expense of the British government (namely, the Fauna BorealiAmericana) executed in accordance with his own opinions, from maintaining them more strongly than ever in several of the volumes treating of Natural History which he contributed to the Cabinet Cyclopaedia - among others that from which we have just given some extracts - and in what may be deemed the culmination in England of the Quinary System, the volume of the " Naturalist's Library " on The Natural Arrangement and History of Flycatchers, published in 1838, of which unhappy performance mention has already been made in this present work (vol.
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  • Sheets of mica are used as a surface for painting, especially in India; for lantern slides; for carrying photographic films; as a protective covering for pictures and historical documents; for mounting soft and collapsible natural history specimens preserved in spirit; for the vanes of anemometers; mirrors of delicate physical instruments; for various optical and many other purposes.
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  • Street, is a fine example of modern Gothic. Among the principal buildings and institutions are the town-hall, museum of the natural history society, theatre and opera-house (1880), market, schools of art and science, the Torbay infirmary and dispensary, the Western hospital for consumption, Crypt House institution for invalid ladies and the Mildmay home for incurable consumptives.
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  • The attempt to classify diseases on a natural-history plan was not new, having been commenced by Sauvages and others, and is perhaps not a task of the highest importance.
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  • 'The following are the more important of his works in addition to the two already mentioned: - Considerations touching the Usefulness of Experimental Natural Philosophy (1663), followed by a second part in 1671; Experiments and Considerations upon Colours, with Observations on a Diamond that Shines in the Dark (1663); New Experiments and Observations upon Cold (1665); Hydrostatical Paradoxes (1666); Origin of Forms and Qualities according to the Corpuscular Philosophy (1666); a continuation of his work on the spring of air (1669); tracts about the Cosmical Qualities of Things, the Temperature of the Subterraneal and Submarine Regions, the Bottom of the Sea, &c. with an Introduction to the History of Particular Qualities (1670); Origin and Virtues of Gems (1672); Essays of the strange Subtilty, great Efficacy, determinate Nature of Effluviums (1673); two volumes of tracts on the Saltness of the Sea, the Hidden Qualities of the Air, Cold, Celestial Magnets, Animadversions on Hobbes's Problemata de Vacuo (1674); Experiments and Notes about the Mechanical Origin or Production of Particular Qualities, including some notes on electricity and magnetism (1676); Observations upon an artificial Substance that Shines without any Preceding Illustration (1678); the Aerial Noctiluca 0680); New Experiments and Observations upon the Icy Noctiluca (1682) a further continuation of his work on the air; Memoirs for the Natural History of the Human Blood (1684); Short Memoirs for the Natural Experimental History of Mineral Waters (1685); Medicina Hydrostatica (1690); and Experimenta et Observationes Physicae (1691).
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  • He made a collection of the speeches and letters of the Romans of the older republican period, probably including a corpus of proceedings of the senate (Ada senatus), and was the author of a work, chiefly dealing with the natural history and geography of the East, which is often quoted by Pliny as an authority, especially for fabulous statements.
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  • Faber, in his additions to Hernandez's work on the Natural History of Mexico (1651),(1651), figures (p. 697) one seen and described by Puteus (Dal Pozzo) at Fontainebleau.
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  • The natural history of Sokotra, unravelled by the study of its geology and biology, has been summarized by Professor Balfour as follows: "During the Carboniferous epoch there was in the region of Sokotra a shallow sea, in which was deposited, on the top of the fundamental gneisses of this spot, ...
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  • The subject of natural history was treated, not from the point of view of mere science, nor from that of sentiment, nor of anecdote nor of gossip, but from that of the author's fervent democratic pantheism, and the result, though, as was to be expected, unequal, was often excellent.
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  • In La Montagne (1868), the last of the natural history series, the tricks of staccato style are pushed even farther than by Victor Hugo in his less inspired moments, though - as is inevitable, in the hands of such a master of language as Michelet - the effect is frequently grandiose if not grand.
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  • The next year White sketched to Pennant the project of "a natural history of my native parish, an annus historico-naturalis, comprising a journal for a whole year, and illustrated with large notes and observations.
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  • The Museum of Natural History features a towering elephant and a tyrannosaurus rex along with all sorts of prehistoric creatures.
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  • Weomstoem. Stuart, et al. "Health and Function of Patients with Untreated Idiopathic Scoliosis: a 50-Year Natural History Study."
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  • I was probably 13 or 14 years old and participating in a special Saturday morning program for science students at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History.
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  • San Diego Natural History Museum Website-The site offers a wealth of information on nature, including the section entitled "Fish and Games."
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  • Beyond pure entertainment bliss, the theaters also possess a learning aspect because they are present in many natural history and science museums, showing films specifically made to educate the masses.
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  • For example, offer dinosaur party menus at a natural history museum.
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