National-archives sentence example

national-archives
  • It was restored at the end of the 19th century to contain the important provincial library and national archives.
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  • So, also, inviolability of national archives is often stipulated.
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  • His MS. inventory is preserved in the original and in copy in the Bibliotheque Nationale, and transcriptions are in the national archives in Paris, at the record office in London, and elsewhere.
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  • After serving his native city as secretary and archivist, he became archivist to the national archives in Paris in 1866, and later librarian to the faculty of law.
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  • The National Archives online in-depth learning guides can also help you learn basic Latin skills.
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  • This chair he exchanged in 1838 for that of archaeology, and in 1840 he succeeded Pierre C. Francois Daunou (1761-1840) as keeper of the national archives.
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  • The National Archives include America's founding documents and veterans' service records.
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  • The National Archives (NARA) has searchable databases on its website.
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  • The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has searchable databases of land bounties and pensions for the Revolution.
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  • You may browse these at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. or in any of the NARA regional archives.
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  • The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the custodian of many of the historical war records.
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  • The National Archives and Records Administration holds all military records prior to approximately 1900 in its the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.
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  • You may also conduct on site research at the National Archives Building.
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  • For most public military records, the National Archives and Records Administration is your best source.
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  • With hundreds of thousands of documents relating to military service, the National Archives is the ultimate resource for free information about your ancestors in the armed forces.
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  • Both facilities keep records in microfilm, and you may be able to search these records at one of the 33 regional locations of the National Archives.
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  • For many amateur genealogists, the National Archives photos collection can be an overwhelming collection of information.
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  • Did you know that there are enough documents in the National Archives and Records Administration that, if they were laid end to end, they would circle the globe more than 57 times?
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  • Many genealogists use the National Archives to fill in the blanks in their family tree and find out details about their ancestors' lives.
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  • The National Archives Photographs and Graphic Works collections are housed at three types of facilities: the College Park, Maryland research location, various Presidential libraries, and regional archives sites around the country.
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  • See the National Archives main website for more information about the location of your nearest Regional Archives branch.
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  • Read the Guide to the Holdings of the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives and Records Administration.
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  • This document includes a great deal of helpful information about navigating the photos at the National Archives.
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  • All military personnel records are housed at the National Archives.
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  • Any military records kept prior to World War I are stored at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.
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  • In 2007, the National Archives began releasing parts of these records to the general public.
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  • You can then mail or fax the request to the National Archives.
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  • You can mail or fax the form to the National Archives.
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  • The National Archives receives about 5000 military records requests each day.
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  • Typically, it takes an average of 4.2 weeks for the National Archives to process your request.
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  • Even if you aren't an immediate family member, you may receive faster service if the National Archives knows of your relationship to the veteran.
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  • The National Archives or NARA has all passengers lists after 1820 available for all ports of entry.
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  • Searching the microfilm catalogue is done through the National Archives buildings or historical libraries around the nation or online.
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  • Family history centers, such as those owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, have the National Archives passenger ships lists on microfilm as well.
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  • If you are planning a visit to the National Archives in Washington, D.C. you are in store for a fascinating experience.
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  • The National Archives is full of interesting treasures and valuable records reflecting the American past.
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  • When visiting the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for genealogy research, you should also take the time to view the priceless documents of American history.
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  • To research at the National Archives in Washington D.C. you will need to show photo identification.
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  • The National Archives operates on a debit card system, where the research card can be used as a debit card.
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  • The National Archives also maintain extensive military records, including Civil War service records.
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  • The National Archives is full of priceless American treasures of interest to visitors and researchers.
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  • The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is a gold mine for any family tree researcher.
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  • Many of the documents have been transferred to microfilm, which can be viewed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. or at one of the regional archive centers.
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  • Older records, such as those for the Civil War, are kept at NARA in Washington, D.C.The U.S. National Archives has other military information besides service records.
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  • For historians researching Native American lineage, the National Archives has extensive holdings from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
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  • The National Archives also has documents on the immigration of Russians (1834-1897), Italians (1855-1900) and Germans (1850-1897).Naturalization documents are available for those immigrants naturalized after 1906 in a Federal Court.
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  • The National Archives has something for every genealogist.
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  • Photographs are not typically considered public records, but the National Archives and Records Administration has a huge collection of photographs from the last 150 years.
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  • However, some items, like many census records and photographs, may require a trip to your local branch of the National Archives and Records Administration.
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  • The National Archives veterans records is the mother lode of military documentation for genealogists.
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  • The National Archives and Records Administrations (NARA) is the official repository for several types of historical veteran information.
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  • The National Archives holds the records of pension claim files for those with Federal service covering the years 1775-1916.
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  • The National Archives also has the Selective Service draft registrations for World War II, which were taken in a series of four registrations.
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  • The most popular of the National Archives veterans records is probably the military service records.
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  • There are many additional types of information also available at the National Archives.
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  • If the service member is still living, he or she can request the personnel file from the National Archives.
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  • If you are the next of kin to a deceased service member, you can request a personnel file from the National Archives.
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  • The National Archives has a helpful guide for requesting this information.
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  • You can request pension records from the National Archives.
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  • The National Archives has contact information for state archives and historical societies where these records may be held.
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  • The National Archives website has a wealth of genealogy information, including many articles with general tips for people who are new to genealogy research.
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  • Census records and the National Archives are additional resources free to the public.
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