Narbonne sentence example

narbonne
  • Voyaging from Toulouse to Narbonne, he was captured by Barbary pirates, who took him to Tunis and sold him as a slave.
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  • Having refused to accept the civil constitution of the clergy, Dillon had to leave Narbonne in 1790, then to emigrate to Coblenz in 1791.
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  • The Midi (Southern) has lines radiating from Toulouse to Bordeaux via Agen, to Bayonne via Tarbes and Pau, and to Cette via Carcassonne, Narbonne and Bziers.
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  • From Bordeaux there is also a direct line to Bayonne and Irun (for Madrid), and at the other end of the Pyrenees a line leads from Narbonne to Perpignan and Barcelona.
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  • In 1793, however, she made a visit of some length to England, and established herself at Mickleham in Surrey as the centre of the Moderate Liberal emigrants - Talleyrand, Narbonne, Jaucourt and others.
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  • There was not a little scandal about her relations with Narbonne; and this Mickleham sojourn (the details of which are known from, among other sources, the letters of Fanny Burney) has never been altogether satisfactorily accounted for.
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  • Narbonne's place had been supplied by Benjamin Constant, whom she first met at Coppet in 1794, and who had a very great influence over her, as in return she had over him.
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  • He subdued the Gascons, and defended Narbonne against the infidels.
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  • In 793 Hescham, the successor of Abd-al-Rahman II., proclaimed a holy war against the Christians, and collected an army of Ioo,000 men, half of which was directed against the kingdom of the Asturias, while the second invaded France, penetrating as far as Narbonne.
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  • He was Hadhemar, count of Narbonne, who in 809 and 810 was one of the leaders sent by Louis against Tortosa.
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  • In the hands of the trouveres they became all brothers of Guillaume, and sons of Aymeri de Narbonne,' the grandson of Garin de Monglane, and his wife Ermenjart.
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  • ' The poem of Aymeri de Narbonne contains the account of the young Aymeri's brilliant capture of Narbonne, which he then receives as a fief from Charlemagne, of his marriage with Ermenjart, sister of Boniface, king of the Lombards, and of their children.
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  • P. Tarbe (Reims, 1850); Hernaut de Beaulande (fragment 14th century); Renier de Gennes, which only survives in its prose form; Aymeri de Narbonne (c. 1210) by Bertrand de Bar-sur-Aube, ed.
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  • The Canal du Midi, following the courses of the Fresquel and the Aude, traverses it for 76 m.; and a branch, the Canal de la Robine, which passes through Narbonne to the sea, has a length of 24 m.
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  • The capital is Carcassonne, and the department is divided into the four arrondissements of Carcassonne, Limoux, Narbonne and Castelnaudary, with 31 cantons and 439 communes.
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  • Carcassonne, Narbonne and Castelnaudary are the principal towns.
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  • Knowledge of ancient Iberian language and history is mainly derived from a variety of coins, found widely distributed in the peninsula,' and also in the neighbourhood of Narbonne.
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  • The ex-emperor Attalus danced at the marriage festival, which was celebrated with great pomp at Narbonne.
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  • From Aquileia he went to Gaul (366-370), visiting in turn the principal places in that country, from Narbonne and Toulouse in the south to Treves on the north-east frontier.
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  • On arriving at manhood d'Amboise attached himself to the party of the duke of Orleans, in whose cause he suffered imprisonment, and on whose return to the royal favour he was elevated to the archbishopric of Narbonne, which after some time he changed for that of Rouen (1493).
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  • The pax ecclesiae is first heard of in the year 990 at three synods held in different parts of southern and central France - at Charroux, Narbonne and Puy.
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  • Although he was not successful in his attempt to recover Narbonne (737), he destroyed the fortresses of Agde, Beziers and Maguelonne, and set fire to the amphitheatre at Nimes.
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  • An interest in Latin literature lived longest in Gaul, where schools of learning flourished as early as the 1st century at Autun, Lyons, Toulouse, Nimes, Vienne, Narbonne and Marseilles; and, from the 3rd century onwards, at Trier, Poitiers, Besancon and Bordeaux.
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  • The chancellor, Pierre Flotte, charged him with high treason, and he was placed in the keeping of the archbishop of Narbonne, his metropolitan.
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  • Abdallah, even crossed the Pyrenees and took possession of Narbonne; but he was beaten and killed at Toulouse in July 720.
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  • Hajjaj, a man of high qualities, re-entered Gaul and pushed forward his raids as far as Lyons, but the Franks again drove back the Arabs as far as Narbonne.
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  • In 1257 he became bishop of Le Puy; in 1259 he was elected archbishop of Narbonne; and on the 24th of December 1261 Urban IV.
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  • The chief town of the Tectosages was Tolosa (Toulouse); of the Arecomici, Nemausus (Nîmes); the capital of the province and residence of the governor was Narbo Martius (Narbonne).
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  • Toulouse passed away to the Frank; but the Goth kept Narbonne and its district, the land of Septimania - the land which, as the last part of Gaul held by the Goths, kept the name of Gothia for many ages.
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  • But the only minister who influenced the course of affairs was the comte de Narbonne, minister of war.
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  • Narbonne trusted to find in it the means of restoring a certain authority to the crown and limiting the Revolution.
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  • The king and queen, however, who looked for help from abroad and especially from Leopold, dreaded a war with Austria and had no faith in the schemes of Narbonne.
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  • In France Narbonne failed to carry the king or his colleagues along with him.
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  • He stood aloof from parties and had no rigid principles, but held views closely resembling those of Narbonne.
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  • At a synod at Toulouse in 1056, Berengar of Narbonne accused the bishop of having purchased his see for ioo,000 solidi, and of having plundered his church and sold relics and crucifixes to Spanish Jews in order to secure another ioo,000 solidi with which to buy for his brother the bishopric of Urgel.
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  • Up to The this time Hellenism and the mercantile spirit of the ~ Jews had almost exclusively dominated the Mediterranean littoral, and at first the Latin spirit only won foothold for itself in various spots on the western coastas at Aix in Provence (123 B.C.) and at Narbonne (118 B.C.).
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  • Matters being thus settled with Rome, Pippin again took up his wars against the Saxons, against the Arabs (whom he drove from Narbonne in 758), and above all against Wailer, duke of Aquitaine, and his ally, duke Tassilo of Bavaria.
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  • His writings became the text-book of Levi ben Gerson at Perpignan, and of Moses of Narbonne.
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  • From this date till the very end of the reign of Amalaric (5r1 531), the seat of the Visigothic kings was at Bordeaux, or Toulouse or Narbonne, and their main interests were in Gaul.
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  • Amalaric (50753) fled from Narbonne, to meet the usual violent end of a Visigothic king at Barcelona.
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  • On his death there was an obscure interregnum of five months, which ended by the election of Liuva (567572), the governor of Narbonne, the surviving remnant of the Visigoth power to the north of the Pyrenees.
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  • - - 567572 Elected at Narbonne.
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  • They disappeared, however, at a comparatively late date from those regions (council of Lavaur, 1368; council of Narbonne, 1374).
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  • Moreover, the church decreed severe chastisement against all laymen suspected of sympathy with the heretics (council of Narbonne, 1235; Bull Ad extirpanda, 1252).
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  • There were some recrudescences of heresy, such as that produced by the preaching (1298-1309) of the Catharist minister, Pierre Authier; the people, too, made some attempts to throw off the yoke of the Inquisition and the French,' and insurrections broke out under the leadership of Bernard of Foix, Aimery of Narbonne, and, especially, Bernard Delicieux at the beginning of the 14th century.
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  • Narbonne was officially enthroned in January 1409 and started gathering an army to face the Aragonese threat.
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  • He was born at St Germain, entered the priesthood and was successively cure of Elan near Mezieres, vicar-general of Pontoise (1747), bishop of Evreux (1753) and archbishop of Toulouse (1758), archbishop of Narbonne in 1763, and in that capacity, president of the estates of Languedoc. He devoted himself much less to the spiritual direction of his diocese than to its temporal welfare, carrying out many works of public utility, bridges, canals, roads, harbours, &c.; had chairs of chemistry and of physics created at Montpellier and at Toulouse, and tried to reduce the poverty, especially in Narbonne.
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  • His first wife died in 1636, and in 1644 he married Frangoise de Narbonne, daughter of Charles, baron of Mareuil.
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  • They make him a citizen of Narbonne and captain of the first cohort under the emperors Diocletian and Maximian.
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  • The chief heroes who fought Charlemagne's battles were Roland; Ganelon, afterwards the traitor; Turpin, the fighting archbishop of Reims; Duke Naimes of Bavaria, the wise counsellor who is always on the side of justice; Ogier the Dane, the hero of a whole series of romances; and Guillaume of Toulouse, the defender of Narbonne.
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  • The chief town of the Tectosages was Tolosa (Toulouse); of the Arecomici, Nemausus (Nîmes); the capital of the province and residence of the governor was Narbo Martius (Narbonne).
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