This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

nagpur

nagpur

nagpur Sentence Examples

  • The Bhonsla Mahratta raja of Nagpur, whose dominions bordered on Bengal, was won over by the diplomacy of an emissary of Hastings.

    0
    0
  • This large tract, extending from the Arabian Sea on the west to the Satpura mountains in the north, comprises a good part of western and central India, including the modern provinces of the Konkan, Khandesh, Berar, the British Deccan, part of Nagpur, and about half the nizam's Deccan.

    0
    0
  • Thus Raghoji Bhonsla established himself in the tracts lying underneath the southern base of the Satpura range (namely, Nagpur and Berar), overran Orissa and entered Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The Bhonsla raja of Nagpur died without lineal heirs in 1853, and his territory was likewise annexed.

    0
    0
  • In October 1905 most of Sambalpur and five Oriya-speaking hill-states were transferred from the Central Provinces to Bengal, while the Hindi-speaking states of Chota Nagpur were transferred from Bengal to the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • The province, therefore, now consists of the five British divisions of Jubbulpore, Nerbudda, Nagpur, Chhattisgarh and Berar, which are divided into the twenty-two districts of Saugor, Damoh, Jubbulpore, Mandla, Seoni, Narsinghpur, Hoshangabad, Nimar, Betul, Chhindwara, Wardha, Nagpur, Chanda, Bhandara, Balaghat, Raipur, Bilaspur, Amraoti, Akola, Ellichpur, Buldana and Wun; and the fifteen tributary states of Makrai, Bastar, Kanker, Nandgaon, Kairagarh, Chhuikhadan, Kawardha, Sakti, Raigarh, Sarangarh, Chang Bhakar, Korea, Sirguja, Udaipur and Jashpur.

    0
    0
  • above the sea at Nagpur to 750 ft.

    0
    0
  • The provinces may be divided into two tracts of upland and three of plain, consisting of the Vindhya and Satpura plateaus, and the Berar, Nagpur and Chhattisgarh plains.

    0
    0
  • To the south of the Satpuras and extending along its base from west to east lie successively the Berar, Nagpur and Chhattisgarh plains.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur country, drained by the Wardha and Wainganga rivers, contains towards the west the shallow black soil in which autumn crops like cotton and the large millet, juar, which do not require excessive moisture, can be successfully cultivated.

    0
    0
  • The eastern part of the Nagpur country and the Chhattisgarh plain, comprising the Mahanadi basin, form the great rice tract of the province, its heavy rainfall and hard yellowish soil rendering it excellently adapted for the growth of this crop.

    0
    0
  • In the cold weather the temperature in Nagpur and the other hot districts is about the same as in Calcutta and substantially higher than that of northern India.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of the decade 1891-1901 wheat was the staple product of the Vindhyan and Nerbudda valley districts, and was also grown extensively in all the Satpura districts except Nimar and in Wardha and Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Cotton and juar were produced principally in Nimar, Nagpur, Wardha and the southern portion of Chhindwara, and the latter also in Chanda.

    0
    0
  • Until recently, the only railway in the Central Provinces was the Great Indian Peninsula, with two branches, one terminating at Nagpur, the other at Jubbulpore, whence it was continued by the East Indian system to Allahabad.

    0
    0
  • He founded the city of Nagpur, which his successor made his capital.

    0
    0
  • The Deogarh kingdom, at its widest extent, embraced the modern districts of Betul, Chhindwara, Nagpur, with parts of Seoni, Bhandara and Balaghat.

    0
    0
  • In 1743 Raghoji Bhonsla of Berar established himself at Nagpur, and by 1751 had conquered the territories of Deogarh, Chanda and Chhattisgarh.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur state, however, continued to grow.

    0
    0
  • Under this latter raja the Nagpur state covered practically the whole of the present Central Provinces and Berar, as well as Orissa and some of the Chota Nagpur states.

    0
    0
  • Until the formation of the Central Provinces in 1861, Nagpur province, which consists of the present Nagpur division, Chhindwara and Chhatisgarh, was administered by a commissioner under the central government.

    0
    0
  • Restored to the North-West Provinces in 1853, they were finally joined with the Nagpur province to constitute the new Central Provinces in 1861.

    0
    0
  • and the mountainous highlands of Chota Nagpur on the W.

    0
    0
  • (3) A river of Chota Nagpur in Bengal, which rises in the state of Chang Bhakar and falls into the Sone near Rampur.

    0
    0
  • The Division Of Bhagalpur stretches across the Ganges from the Nepal frontier to the hills of Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • In 1804, when the war closed, he was appointed British resident at Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Chhattisgarh, or "the thirty-six forts," is a low-lying plain, enclosed on every side by hills and forests, while a rocky barrier shuts it off from the Nagpur plain on the west.

    0
    0
  • The Peshvva at Poona, the Bhonsla raja at Nagpur and the army of the infant Holkar each took up arms, but were separately defeated.

    0
    0
  • The Central African Mission (1858), indeed, is not for the most part manned by graduates, though it is led by them; but the Cambridge Mission at Delhi (1878), the Oxford Mission at Calcutta (1880), and the Dublin Missions in Chota Nagpur (Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1891) and the Fuh-Kien Province of China (Church Missionary Society, 1887) consist of university men.

    0
    0
  • the Kols and Santals of Chota Nagpur (Berlin Gossner Mission and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel), and the tribes of the Khassia Mountains east of Bengal (Welsh Calvinistic Methodists).

    0
    0
  • Since then, however, new sees have been founded which are under no such restrictions: by the creation of dioceses either in native states (Travancore and Cochin), or out of the existing dioceses (Chota Nagpur, Lucknow, &c.).

    0
    0
  • In the interval it had been a prey to armed bands from the highlands of Chota Nagpur, with whom the raja was unable to cope, and who practically brought the trade of the Company in the district to a standstill.

    0
    0
  • It is considered very healthy, and forms a resort for European visitors from Nagpur and Kampti during the hot weather.

    0
    0
  • The same current also supplies with rain the broad band across India, which includes the Satpura range, Chota Nagpur, the greater part of the Central Provinces and Central India, Orissa and Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The Munda or Kolarian family, which is now distinguished from the Dravidian, is almost confined to Chota Nagpur, its best-known tribe being the Santals.

    0
    0
  • But the mangoes of Bombay, of Multan, and of Malda in Bengal, and the oranges of Nagpur and the Khasi hills, enjoy a high reputation; while the guavas of Madras are made into an excellent preserve.

    0
    0
  • The river-valleys of Chota Nagpur are also known to have yielded a tribute of diamonds to their Mahommedan conquerors.

    0
    0
  • Chief among these generals were the gaikwar in Gujarat, Sindhia and Holkar in Malwa, and the Bhonsla raja of Berar and Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • The diplomacy of Hastings won over the nizam and the Mahratta raja of Nagpur, but the army of Hyder Ali fell like a thunderbolt upon the British possessions in the Carnatic. A strong detachment under Colonel Baillie was cut to pieces at Perambakam, and the Mysore cavalry ravaged the country unchecked up to the walls of Madras.

    0
    0
  • Towards the east the Bhonsla raja of Nagpur reigned from Berar to the coast of Orissa.

    0
    0
  • This greatly extended the British territorial influence in western India, but led directly to the second Mahratta war, for neither Sindhia nor the raja of Nagpur would tolerate this abandonment of Mahratta independence.

    0
    0
  • In the same year (1817) as that in which the Pindaris were crushed, and almost in the same month (November), the three great Mahratta powers at Poona, Nagpur and Indore Third ro s e against the English.

    0
    0
  • Almost the same plot was enacted at Nagpur, where the honour of the British name was saved by the sepoys who defended the hill of Sitabaldi against enormous odds.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of the peshwa's dominions was ultimately incorporated in the Bombay presidency, while the nucleus of the Central Provinces was formed out of territory taken from the peshwa and the raja of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • An infant was recognized as the heir of Holkar, and a second infant was proclaimed raja of Nagpur under British guardianship. At the same time the several states of Rajputana accepted the position of feudatories of the paramount power.

    0
    0
  • These both ended in large acquisitions of territory, while Nagpur, Oudh and several minor states also came under British rule.

    0
    0
  • But the most conspicuous application of the doctrine of lapse was the case of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • by Chota Nagpur, Rewa, the Bundelkhand states, and the Central Provinces; and on the W.

    0
    0
  • Aegeus, and Drakon or Cecrops the first king of Athens), the Arabian dynasty of Edessa, the dynasty of Abyssinia, &c.; it is proper, therefore, to notice the serpent-symbol of royalty on the signets of the Rajahs of Chota Nagpur, the fire-spitting serpent which adorned the head of Egyptian Pharaohs, and the dragons which entwine King Arthur as he stands at the tomb of ' Crooke ii.

    0
    0
  • The Central Provinces and the Bengal district of Chota Nagpur enclose it on the S.

    0
    0
  • Chief among these was Dalhousie's policy of annexation, which brought under British dominion such small states as Satara, Nagpur and Jhansi, and finally the kingdom of Oudh.

    0
    0
  • It consists of the provinces of Behar, Orissa and Chota Nagpur, and the western portion of the Ganges valley, but without the provinces of Northern and Eastern Bengal; and is divided into the six British divisions of the presidency, Bhagalpur, Patna, Burdwan, Chota Nagpur and Orissa, and various native states.

    0
    0
  • The province was reconstituted in 1905, when the Chittagong, Dacca and Rajshahi divisions, the district of Malda and the state of Hill Tippera were transferred from Bengal to a new province, Eastern Bengal and Assam; the five Hindi-speaking states of Chota Nagpur, namely Chang Bhakar, Korea, Sirguja, Udaipur and Jashpur, were transferred from Bengal to the Central Provinces; and Sambalpur and the five Oriya states of Bamra, Rairakhol, Sonpur, Patna and Kalahandi were transferred from the Central Provinces to Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The province of Bengal, therefore, now consists of the thirty-three British districts of Burdwan, Birbhum, Bankura, Midnapore, Hugh, Howrah, Twenty-four Parganas, Calcutta, Nadia, Murshidabad, Jessore, Khulna, Patna, Gaya, Shahabad, Saran, Champaran, Muzaffarpur, Darbhanga, Monghyr, Bhagalpur, Purnea, Santal Parganas, Cuttack, Balasore, Angul and Khondmals, Puri, Hazaribagh, Ranchi, Palamau, Manbhum, Singhbum and Sambalpur, and the native states of Sikkim and the tributary states of Orissa and Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Three sub-provinces of the present lieutenant-governorship of Bengal - namely, Bengal proper, Behar and Orissa - consist of great river valleys; the fourth, Chota Nagpur, is a mountainous region which separates them from the central India plateau.

    0
    0
  • Between Behar and Orissa lies the province of Chota Nagpur, of which a portion was given in 1905 to the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of Bengal is occupied by the alluvial deposits of the Ganges, but in the south-west rises the plateau of Chota Nagpur composed chiefly of gneissic rocks.

    0
    0
  • The Aryan languages are spoken in the plains by almost the whole population; the Munda and Dravidian in the Chota Nagpur plateau and adjoining tracts; and the Tibeto-Burman in Darjeeling, Sikkim and Jalpaiguri.

    0
    0
  • As a rule Bengali is the language of Bengal proper, Hindi of Behar and Chota Nagpur, and Oriya of Orissa.

    0
    0
  • The number of divisions or commissionerships is 6, of which Chota Nagpur ranks as "non-regulation."

    0
    0
  • The distress was most acute in the densely populated districts of northern Behar, and in the remote hills of Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • The 5th division, with headquarters at Mhow, consists of three brigades, located at Nasirabad, Jubbulpore and Jhansi, and includes the previous Mhow, Deesa, Nagpur, Nerbudda and Bundelkhand districts, with the Bombay district north of the Tapti.

    0
    0
  • There are 3648 small lakes and tanks in Bhandara district, whence it is called the "lake region of Nagpur"; they afford ample means of irrigation.

    0
    0
  • The district is traversed by the main road from Nagpur to the east, and also by the Bengal-Nagpur railway.

    0
    0
  • In 1743 it was conquered by the Mahrattas, who governed it till 1853, when it lapsed to the British government, the raja of Nagpur having died without an heir.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur line of the Great Indian Peninsula railway runs through the north of the district.

    0
    0
  • "above the ghats or passes," the highlands), a district of British India in the Nagpur division of the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • from Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • A genealogical list of kings of this dynasty was carefully kept up to the fifty-fifth representative in the year 1741, when the country was seized without a struggle by the Mahrattas of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • From 1818 to 1830 Bilaspur came under the management of the British government, the Mahratta chief of Nagpur being then a minor.

    0
    0
  • It is a station on the Nagpur branch of the Great Indian Peninsula railway and is 383 m.

    0
    0
  • The Bhonsla Mahratta raja of Nagpur, whose dominions bordered on Bengal, was won over by the diplomacy of an emissary of Hastings.

    0
    0
  • This large tract, extending from the Arabian Sea on the west to the Satpura mountains in the north, comprises a good part of western and central India, including the modern provinces of the Konkan, Khandesh, Berar, the British Deccan, part of Nagpur, and about half the nizam's Deccan.

    0
    0
  • Thus Raghoji Bhonsla established himself in the tracts lying underneath the southern base of the Satpura range (namely, Nagpur and Berar), overran Orissa and entered Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The Bhonsla raja of Nagpur died without lineal heirs in 1853, and his territory was likewise annexed.

    0
    0
  • In October 1905 most of Sambalpur and five Oriya-speaking hill-states were transferred from the Central Provinces to Bengal, while the Hindi-speaking states of Chota Nagpur were transferred from Bengal to the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • The province, therefore, now consists of the five British divisions of Jubbulpore, Nerbudda, Nagpur, Chhattisgarh and Berar, which are divided into the twenty-two districts of Saugor, Damoh, Jubbulpore, Mandla, Seoni, Narsinghpur, Hoshangabad, Nimar, Betul, Chhindwara, Wardha, Nagpur, Chanda, Bhandara, Balaghat, Raipur, Bilaspur, Amraoti, Akola, Ellichpur, Buldana and Wun; and the fifteen tributary states of Makrai, Bastar, Kanker, Nandgaon, Kairagarh, Chhuikhadan, Kawardha, Sakti, Raigarh, Sarangarh, Chang Bhakar, Korea, Sirguja, Udaipur and Jashpur.

    0
    0
  • Farther to the west and again divided off by hills is the great plain of Nagpur, extending over 24,000 sq.

    0
    0
  • above the sea at Nagpur to 750 ft.

    0
    0
  • The provinces may be divided into two tracts of upland and three of plain, consisting of the Vindhya and Satpura plateaus, and the Berar, Nagpur and Chhattisgarh plains.

    0
    0
  • To the south of the Satpuras and extending along its base from west to east lie successively the Berar, Nagpur and Chhattisgarh plains.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur country, drained by the Wardha and Wainganga rivers, contains towards the west the shallow black soil in which autumn crops like cotton and the large millet, juar, which do not require excessive moisture, can be successfully cultivated.

    0
    0
  • The eastern part of the Nagpur country and the Chhattisgarh plain, comprising the Mahanadi basin, form the great rice tract of the province, its heavy rainfall and hard yellowish soil rendering it excellently adapted for the growth of this crop.

    0
    0
  • In the cold weather the temperature in Nagpur and the other hot districts is about the same as in Calcutta and substantially higher than that of northern India.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of the decade 1891-1901 wheat was the staple product of the Vindhyan and Nerbudda valley districts, and was also grown extensively in all the Satpura districts except Nimar and in Wardha and Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Cotton and juar were produced principally in Nimar, Nagpur, Wardha and the southern portion of Chhindwara, and the latter also in Chanda.

    0
    0
  • Until recently, the only railway in the Central Provinces was the Great Indian Peninsula, with two branches, one terminating at Nagpur, the other at Jubbulpore, whence it was continued by the East Indian system to Allahabad.

    0
    0
  • He founded the city of Nagpur, which his successor made his capital.

    0
    0
  • The Deogarh kingdom, at its widest extent, embraced the modern districts of Betul, Chhindwara, Nagpur, with parts of Seoni, Bhandara and Balaghat.

    0
    0
  • In 1743 Raghoji Bhonsla of Berar established himself at Nagpur, and by 1751 had conquered the territories of Deogarh, Chanda and Chhattisgarh.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur state, however, continued to grow.

    0
    0
  • Under this latter raja the Nagpur state covered practically the whole of the present Central Provinces and Berar, as well as Orissa and some of the Chota Nagpur states.

    0
    0
  • without heirs, Nagpur lapsed to the British paramount power.

    0
    0
  • Until the formation of the Central Provinces in 1861, Nagpur province, which consists of the present Nagpur division, Chhindwara and Chhatisgarh, was administered by a commissioner under the central government.

    0
    0
  • Restored to the North-West Provinces in 1853, they were finally joined with the Nagpur province to constitute the new Central Provinces in 1861.

    0
    0
  • and the mountainous highlands of Chota Nagpur on the W.

    0
    0
  • (3) A river of Chota Nagpur in Bengal, which rises in the state of Chang Bhakar and falls into the Sone near Rampur.

    0
    0
  • The Division Of Bhagalpur stretches across the Ganges from the Nepal frontier to the hills of Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • In 1804, when the war closed, he was appointed British resident at Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Chhattisgarh, or "the thirty-six forts," is a low-lying plain, enclosed on every side by hills and forests, while a rocky barrier shuts it off from the Nagpur plain on the west.

    0
    0
  • The Peshvva at Poona, the Bhonsla raja at Nagpur and the army of the infant Holkar each took up arms, but were separately defeated.

    0
    0
  • The Central African Mission (1858), indeed, is not for the most part manned by graduates, though it is led by them; but the Cambridge Mission at Delhi (1878), the Oxford Mission at Calcutta (1880), and the Dublin Missions in Chota Nagpur (Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1891) and the Fuh-Kien Province of China (Church Missionary Society, 1887) consist of university men.

    0
    0
  • the Kols and Santals of Chota Nagpur (Berlin Gossner Mission and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel), and the tribes of the Khassia Mountains east of Bengal (Welsh Calvinistic Methodists).

    0
    0
  • The old province, stretching widely across the valley of the Ganges from the frontier of Nepal to the hills of Chota Nagpur, corresponds to the two administrative divisions of Patna and Bhagalpur, with a total area of 44,197 sq.

    0
    0
  • Since then, however, new sees have been founded which are under no such restrictions: by the creation of dioceses either in native states (Travancore and Cochin), or out of the existing dioceses (Chota Nagpur, Lucknow, &c.).

    0
    0
  • In the interval it had been a prey to armed bands from the highlands of Chota Nagpur, with whom the raja was unable to cope, and who practically brought the trade of the Company in the district to a standstill.

    0
    0
  • It is considered very healthy, and forms a resort for European visitors from Nagpur and Kampti during the hot weather.

    0
    0
  • Chhindwara formed part of the dominions of the ancient Gond dynasty of Chhindwara and Nagpur, whose seat was at Deogarh until, in the 18th century, it was removed by Chand Sultan, son of Bakht Buland (founder of the short-lived greatness of the dynasty, and of the city of Nagpur) to Nagpur (see Gondwana and Nagpuu) .

    0
    0
  • The same current also supplies with rain the broad band across India, which includes the Satpura range, Chota Nagpur, the greater part of the Central Provinces and Central India, Orissa and Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The Munda or Kolarian family, which is now distinguished from the Dravidian, is almost confined to Chota Nagpur, its best-known tribe being the Santals.

    0
    0
  • But the mangoes of Bombay, of Multan, and of Malda in Bengal, and the oranges of Nagpur and the Khasi hills, enjoy a high reputation; while the guavas of Madras are made into an excellent preserve.

    0
    0
  • The river-valleys of Chota Nagpur are also known to have yielded a tribute of diamonds to their Mahommedan conquerors.

    0
    0
  • Chief among these generals were the gaikwar in Gujarat, Sindhia and Holkar in Malwa, and the Bhonsla raja of Berar and Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • The diplomacy of Hastings won over the nizam and the Mahratta raja of Nagpur, but the army of Hyder Ali fell like a thunderbolt upon the British possessions in the Carnatic. A strong detachment under Colonel Baillie was cut to pieces at Perambakam, and the Mysore cavalry ravaged the country unchecked up to the walls of Madras.

    0
    0
  • Towards the east the Bhonsla raja of Nagpur reigned from Berar to the coast of Orissa.

    0
    0
  • This greatly extended the British territorial influence in western India, but led directly to the second Mahratta war, for neither Sindhia nor the raja of Nagpur would tolerate this abandonment of Mahratta independence.

    0
    0
  • In the same year (1817) as that in which the Pindaris were crushed, and almost in the same month (November), the three great Mahratta powers at Poona, Nagpur and Indore Third ro s e against the English.

    0
    0
  • Almost the same plot was enacted at Nagpur, where the honour of the British name was saved by the sepoys who defended the hill of Sitabaldi against enormous odds.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of the peshwa's dominions was ultimately incorporated in the Bombay presidency, while the nucleus of the Central Provinces was formed out of territory taken from the peshwa and the raja of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • An infant was recognized as the heir of Holkar, and a second infant was proclaimed raja of Nagpur under British guardianship. At the same time the several states of Rajputana accepted the position of feudatories of the paramount power.

    0
    0
  • These both ended in large acquisitions of territory, while Nagpur, Oudh and several minor states also came under British rule.

    0
    0
  • But the most conspicuous application of the doctrine of lapse was the case of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • by Chota Nagpur, Rewa, the Bundelkhand states, and the Central Provinces; and on the W.

    0
    0
  • Aegeus, and Drakon or Cecrops the first king of Athens), the Arabian dynasty of Edessa, the dynasty of Abyssinia, &c.; it is proper, therefore, to notice the serpent-symbol of royalty on the signets of the Rajahs of Chota Nagpur, the fire-spitting serpent which adorned the head of Egyptian Pharaohs, and the dragons which entwine King Arthur as he stands at the tomb of ' Crooke ii.

    0
    0
  • The Central Provinces and the Bengal district of Chota Nagpur enclose it on the S.

    0
    0
  • Chief among these was Dalhousie's policy of annexation, which brought under British dominion such small states as Satara, Nagpur and Jhansi, and finally the kingdom of Oudh.

    0
    0
  • It consists of the provinces of Behar, Orissa and Chota Nagpur, and the western portion of the Ganges valley, but without the provinces of Northern and Eastern Bengal; and is divided into the six British divisions of the presidency, Bhagalpur, Patna, Burdwan, Chota Nagpur and Orissa, and various native states.

    0
    0
  • The province was reconstituted in 1905, when the Chittagong, Dacca and Rajshahi divisions, the district of Malda and the state of Hill Tippera were transferred from Bengal to a new province, Eastern Bengal and Assam; the five Hindi-speaking states of Chota Nagpur, namely Chang Bhakar, Korea, Sirguja, Udaipur and Jashpur, were transferred from Bengal to the Central Provinces; and Sambalpur and the five Oriya states of Bamra, Rairakhol, Sonpur, Patna and Kalahandi were transferred from the Central Provinces to Bengal.

    0
    0
  • The province of Bengal, therefore, now consists of the thirty-three British districts of Burdwan, Birbhum, Bankura, Midnapore, Hugh, Howrah, Twenty-four Parganas, Calcutta, Nadia, Murshidabad, Jessore, Khulna, Patna, Gaya, Shahabad, Saran, Champaran, Muzaffarpur, Darbhanga, Monghyr, Bhagalpur, Purnea, Santal Parganas, Cuttack, Balasore, Angul and Khondmals, Puri, Hazaribagh, Ranchi, Palamau, Manbhum, Singhbum and Sambalpur, and the native states of Sikkim and the tributary states of Orissa and Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • Three sub-provinces of the present lieutenant-governorship of Bengal - namely, Bengal proper, Behar and Orissa - consist of great river valleys; the fourth, Chota Nagpur, is a mountainous region which separates them from the central India plateau.

    0
    0
  • Between Behar and Orissa lies the province of Chota Nagpur, of which a portion was given in 1905 to the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of Bengal is occupied by the alluvial deposits of the Ganges, but in the south-west rises the plateau of Chota Nagpur composed chiefly of gneissic rocks.

    0
    0
  • The Aryan languages are spoken in the plains by almost the whole population; the Munda and Dravidian in the Chota Nagpur plateau and adjoining tracts; and the Tibeto-Burman in Darjeeling, Sikkim and Jalpaiguri.

    0
    0
  • As a rule Bengali is the language of Bengal proper, Hindi of Behar and Chota Nagpur, and Oriya of Orissa.

    0
    0
  • The number of divisions or commissionerships is 6, of which Chota Nagpur ranks as "non-regulation."

    0
    0
  • The distress was most acute in the densely populated districts of northern Behar, and in the remote hills of Chota Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • The 5th division, with headquarters at Mhow, consists of three brigades, located at Nasirabad, Jubbulpore and Jhansi, and includes the previous Mhow, Deesa, Nagpur, Nerbudda and Bundelkhand districts, with the Bombay district north of the Tapti.

    0
    0
  • BHANDARA, a town and district of British India, in the Nagpur division of the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • There are 3648 small lakes and tanks in Bhandara district, whence it is called the "lake region of Nagpur"; they afford ample means of irrigation.

    0
    0
  • The district is traversed by the main road from Nagpur to the east, and also by the Bengal-Nagpur railway.

    0
    0
  • In 1743 it was conquered by the Mahrattas, who governed it till 1853, when it lapsed to the British government, the raja of Nagpur having died without an heir.

    0
    0
  • The Nagpur line of the Great Indian Peninsula railway runs through the north of the district.

    0
    0
  • "above the ghats or passes," the highlands), a district of British India in the Nagpur division of the Central Provinces.

    0
    0
  • from Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • A genealogical list of kings of this dynasty was carefully kept up to the fifty-fifth representative in the year 1741, when the country was seized without a struggle by the Mahrattas of Nagpur.

    0
    0
  • From 1818 to 1830 Bilaspur came under the management of the British government, the Mahratta chief of Nagpur being then a minor.

    0
    0
  • It is a station on the Nagpur branch of the Great Indian Peninsula railway and is 383 m.

    0
    0
  • BHANDARA, a town and district of British India, in the Nagpur division of the Central Provinces.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →