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mythology

mythology

mythology Sentence Examples

  • It was famous in Greek mythology, and is frequently mentioned by the great poets, especially by Sophocles.

  • NEREUS, in Greek mythology, the eldest son of Pontus and Gaea, and father of the fifty Nereids.

  • MARSYAS, in Greek mythology, a Phrygian god or Silenus, son of Hyagnis.

  • MEROPE, the name of several figures in Greek mythology.

  • Mtvciravpos, from Mivws, and Taupos, bull), in Greek mythology, a fabulous Cretan monster with the body of a man and the head of a bull.

  • The swan played a part in classical mythology as the bird of Apollo, and in Scandinavian lore the swan maidens, who have the gift of prophecy and are sometimes confused with the Valkyries, reappear again and again.

  • TYPHON (TYPHAON, TYPHOEUS), in Greek mythology, youngest son of Gaea and Tartarus.

  • GR.) From the somewhat conflicting evidence of mythology it may be gathered that in prehistoric days Megara had maritime intercourse with the southern Aegean.

  • EREBUS, in Greek mythology, son (according to Hesiod, Theog.

  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to Greek mythology.

  • VARUNA, in early Hindu mythology, the greatest, with Indra, of the gods of the Rig Veda.

  • Ultimately in post-Vedic mythology he becomes the Hindu Neptune.

  • Macdonell, Vedic Mythology (Strassburg, 1897).

  • BERCHTA (English Bertha), a fairy in South German mythology.

  • GOLDEN FLEECE, in Greek mythology, the fleece of the ram on which Phrixus and Helle escaped, for which see Argonauts.

  • In Greek mythology he is the son of Hermes (or Pan) and a nymph.

  • Passing from mythology to speculation properly so called, we find in the early systems of philosophy of India theories of emanation which approach in some respects the idea of evolution.

  • FREYIA, the sister of Frey, and the most prominent goddess in Northern mythology.

  • HECTOR, in Greek mythology, son of Priam and Hecuba, the husband of Andromache.

  • Creuzer's first and most famous work was his Symbolik and Mythologie der alten V dlker, besonders der Griechen (1810-1812), in which he maintained that the mythology of Homer and Hesiod came from an Eastern source through the Pelasgians, and was the remains of the symbolism of an ancient revelation.

  • ELYSIUM, in Greek mythology, the Elysian fields, the abode of the righteous after their removal from earth.

  • FLORA, in Roman mythology, goddess of spring-time and flowers, later identified with the Greek Chloris.

  • ALCMENE, in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Electryon, king of Mycenae, and wife of Amphitryon.

  • Grey, Polynesian Mythology and Maori Legends (Wellington, 1885); A.

  • ARETHUSA, in Greek mythology, a nymph who gave her name to a spring in Elis and to another in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse.

  • The overwhelming numerical superiority of the Sla y s, and the very great differences in ethnical type, belief and mythology between the IndoEuropean and the Ural-Altaic races, may have contributed to the same end.

  • HESPERIDES, in Greek mythology, maidens who guarded the golden apples which Earth gave Hera on her marriage to Zeus.

  • DEMETER, in Greek mythology, daughter of Cronus and Rhea and sister of Zeus, goddess of agriculture and civilized life.

  • But passing from this region of pure mythology to the semi-mythic or heroic age, we find almost all the early legends and traditions of the island grouped around the name of Minos.

  • Ostern), like the names of the days of the week, is a survival from the old Teutonic mythology.

  • Mythology >>

  • 204), and he belongs rather to mythology than to history.

  • In Greek mythology Demeter and Proserpine were closely associated, being known together as the two goddesses, the venerable or august goddesses, sometimes as the great goddesses.

  • Into these regions descended Hibil the brilliant, in the power of Mana rabba, just as in the Manichaean mythology the "primal man," armed with the elements of the king of light, descends to a contest with the primal devil.

  • Other features are borrowed by the Mandaean mythology under this head from the well-known epos of Istar's descensus ad inferos.

  • HANUMAN, in Hindu mythology, a monkey-god, who forms a central figure in the Ramayana.

  • But in the Syrian mythology foreign influences frequently betray themselves.

  • MEMNON, in Greek mythology, son of Tithonus and Eos (Dawn), king of the Aethiopians.

  • Cox, Mythology and Folklore, p. 267).

  • Harrison, Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens (London, 1890); E.

  • Xenophanes in the middle of the 6th century had made the first great attack on the crude mythology of early Greece, including in his onslaught the whole anthropomorphic system enshrined in the poems of Homer and Hesiod.

  • The Hindus are fond of painting the outside of their houses a deep red colour, and of covering the most conspicuous parts with pictures of flowers, men, women, bulls, elephants and gods and goddesses in all the many forms known in Hindu mythology.

  • ARIADNE (in Greek mythology), was the daughter of Minos, king of Crete, and Pasiphae, the daughter of Helios the Sun-god.

  • The cause of this attachment to and veneration for the dog is, however, explained in a far more probable and pleasing way than by many of the fables of ancient mythology.

  • He gives a faithful sketch of the doctrines, mythology and dualistic system of the Magian Zoroaster.

  • TERMINUS, in Roman mythology, the god of boundaries, the protector of the limits both of private property and of the public territory of Rome.

  • ANTAEUS, in Greek mythology, a giant of Libya, the son of Poseidon and Gaea.

  • By the time of the ninth edition (1875) precise details are no longer considered worthy of inclusion; and the age of scientific comparative mythology has been reached.

  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to German or Norse mythology.

  • ATHENA (the Attic form of the Homeric Athene, also called Athenaia, Pallas Athene, Pallas), one of the most important goddesses in Greek mythology.

  • He is conceived as controlling or overcoming the forces of nature; and though an earlier mythology has supplied some of the ideas, yet, as with the opening chapters of Genesis, they are transfigured by the moral purpose which animates them, the purpose to subdue all things that could frustrate the destiny of God's anointed (v.

  • NIOBE, in Greek mythology, daughter of Tantalus and Dione, wife of Amphion, king of Thebes.

  • His published works deal chiefly with topography and ancient mythology.

  • ORION (or OARION), in Greek mythology, son of Hyrieus (Eponymus of Hyria in Boeotia), or of Poseidon, a mighty hunter of great beauty and gigantic strength, perhaps corresponding to the "wild huntsman" of Teutonic mythology.

  • Pan (Mythology) >>

  • Hercules (Mythology) >>

  • GANDHARVA, in Hindu mythology, the term used to denote (I) in the Rig-Veda usually a minor deity; (2) in later writings a class of divine beings.

  • The dictionary of mythology entitled 'Iwvca ("Collection of Violets"), which formerly used to be ascribed to her, was not composed till 1543 (Constantine Palaeokappa).

  • Rather he was a theologian who arrived at his theory of the unity of the Supreme Being by criticism of the contemporary mythology.

  • VALKYRIES (Old Norse valkyriur, "choosers of the slain"), figures of Northern mythology, generally represented as divine (less frequently human) maidens who ride through the air on Odin's service.

  • In his cosmogonic treatise on nature and the gods, called Hevr4tvxo (Preller's correction of Suidas, who has E7rTaµuXos) from the five elementary or original principles (aether, fire, air, water, earth; Gomperz substitutes smoke and darkness for aether and earth), he enunciated a system in which science, allegory and mythology were blended.

  • He was controverted by Ctesias, who, however, has mistaken mythology for history, and Greek romance owed to him its Ninus and Semiramis, its Ninyas and Sardanapalus.

  • PLUTUS, in Greek mythology, son of Iasion and Demeter, the personification of wealth.

  • The central portion of Muttra district forms one of the most sacred spots in Hindu mythology.

  • PROTEUS, in Greek mythology, a prophetic old man of the sea.

  • The last book (xvii.) treats of theology or (as we should now say) mythology, and winds up with an account of the Holy Scriptures and of the Fathers, from Ignatius and Dionysius the Areopagite to Jerome and Gregory the Great, and even of later writers from 'Isidore and Bede, through Alcuin, Lanfranc and Anselm, down to Bernard of Clairvaux and the brethren of St Victor.

  • Best, The Irish Mythological Cycle and Celtic Mythology (1903); L.

  • Moyen age (1896); C. Squire, The Mythology of the British Isles: an Introduction to Celtic Myth and Romance (1905); J.

  • DURGA, or Devi (Sanskrit for inaccessible), in Hindu mythology, the wife of Siva and daughter of Himavat (the Himalayas).

  • SIVA, in Hindu mythology, a god who forms the supreme trinity with Brahma and Vishnu.

  • Herder's services in laying the foundations of a comparative science of religion and mythology are even of greater value than his somewhat crude philological speculations.

  • He thus intimately associated religion with mythology and primitive poetry.

  • YAMA (Sanskrit "twin," in allusion to his being twin with his sister Yami, traditionally the first human pair), in Hindu mythology, judge of men and king of the unseen world.

  • Gnosticism was the result of the attempt to blend with Christianity the religious notions of pagan mythology, mysterology, theosophy and philosophy" (p. 98).

  • YGGDRASIL, in Scandinavian mythology, the mystical ash tree which symbolizes existence, and binds together earth, heaven and hell.

  • Polynesia, that classic land of mythology, is specially rich in myths of creation.

  • - India, however, is the natural home of a mythology recast by speculation.

  • 229-302; Gill, Myths and Songs of the South Pacific; Schirren, Wandersagen der Neuseelander; also an older work (Sir George) Grey's Polynesian Mythology.

  • NINUS, in Greek mythology, the eponymous founder of Nineveh, and thus the city itself personified.

  • The colouring is that of classic mythology, but the spiritual element is as individual as that of any classical poem by Milton, Gray, Keats or Tennyson.

  • He anticipated Ovid in recalling the stories of Greek mythology to a second poetical life.

  • NISUS, in Greek mythology, king of Megara, brother of Aegeus, king of Athens.

  • His Morte d'Arthur, printed by Caxton in 1485, epitomizes the rich mythology which Geoffrey's work had first called into life, and gave the Arthurian story a lasting place in the English imagination.

  • to one another: hence there is no Roman mythology.

  • The knowledge of Greek mythology, to which they were thus introduced, set poets and antiquarians at work in a field wholly foreign to the Roman religious spirit, the task of creating a Roman anthropomorphic mythology.

  • ARGUS, in ancient Greek mythology, the son of Inachus, Agenor or Arestor, or, according to others, an earth-born hero (autochthon).

  • AMPHITRYON, in Greek mythology, son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns in Argolis.

  • - In mythology, Corinth (originally named Ephyre) appears as the home of Medea, Sisyphus and Bellerophon, and already has over-sea connexions which illustrate its primitive commercial activity.

  • AGNI, the Hindu God of Fire, second only to Indra in the power and importance attributed to him in Vedic mythology.

  • Wilkins, Hindu Mythology (London, 1900); A.

  • Lastly, the restriction to aniconic worship saved them from much superstition, for there is nothing which so much stimulates the growth of a mythology as the manufacture of idols.

  • Farnell, The Evolution of Religion (London, 1905); Jacob Grimm, Teutonic Mythology, translation by J.

  • The only certainly genuine work of Hecataeus was the FuenNo-yiac or `IcrTopiat, a systematic account of the traditions and mythology of the Greeks.

  • NECTAR, in ancient mythology generally coupled with ambrosia, the nourishment of the gods in Homer and in Greek literature generally.

  • Grimm, Teutonic Mythology (Eng.

  • The story of Roland's birth from the union of Charles with his sister Gilles, also found in German and Scandinavian versions, has abundant parallels in mythology, and was probably transferred from mythology to Charlemagne.

  • But Gunkel's explanation is an attempt to account for one ignotum per ignotius; for hitherto no trace of the myth of the sun-god's birth and persecution and the flight into the wilderness has been found in Babylonian mythology.

  • Yet another explanation from Egyptian mythology is given by Bousset (Offenbarung Johannis, 2nd ed., pp. 354, 355) in the birth of the sun-god Horus.

  • 661), Spitta and Erbes, have contended that 616 was the original reading (I'aios Kaivap= 6r6) and that ' On the possibility of other points of contact between the Apocalypse and Egyptian mythology, see Mrs Grenfell's article, "Egyptian Mythology and the Bible," in the Monist (1906), pp. 169 - zoo.

  • OANNES, in Babylonian mythology, the name given by Berossus to a mythical being who taught mankind wisdom.

  • The first of the three dialogues contains the substance of the allegory, which, under the disguise of an assault on heathen mythology, is a direct attack on all forms of anthropomorphic religion.

  • Dam(Habonde, Notre Dame d'Abondance), whose name often occurs in poems of the Middle Ages, a beneficent fairy, who brought plenty to those whom she visited (Grimm, Teutonic Mythology, tr.

  • For attempts to find a mythological interpretation of Isaac's life, see Goldziher, Mythology of the Hebrews; Winckler, Gesch.

  • Philochorus also wrote on oracles, divination and sacrifices; the mythology and religious observances of the tetrapolis of Attica; the myths of Sophocles; the lives of Euripides and Pythagoras; the foundation of Salamis.

  • His work shows little or no originality; he simply versified in iambic trimeters the fables current in his day under the name of "Aesop," interspersing them with anecdotes drawn from daily life, history and mythology.

  • They studied criticism, grammar, prosody and metre, antiquities and mythology.

  • To perform their task adequately required from the critics a wide circle of knowledge; and from this requirement sprang the sciences of grammar, prosody, lexicography, mythology and archaeology.

  • This Plato expressed in the myth of the Sun, but the garment of mythology in which Plato clothed his idealism, beautiful as it is in itself and full of suggestion, covered an essential weakness.

  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about people from Greek mythology.

  • The Dene (Tinneh) myths resembled those of the Eskimo, and all the hunting tribes of eastern Canada and United States and the Mississippi valley have a mythology based upon their zootechny and their totemism.

  • AMPHIARAUS, in Greek mythology, a celebrated seer and prince of Argos, son of Oicles (or Apollo) and Hypermestra, and through his father descended from the prophet Melampus (Odyssey, xv.

  • Grey, Polynesian Mythology and Maori Legends (New Zealand, 1885); Edward Tregear, The Maori Race (New Zealand, 1704); S.

  • The latter have been connected by Ewald and others with the later doctrine of seven chief angels 25, parallel to and influenced by the Ameshaspentas (Amesha Spenta), or seven great spirits of the Persian mythology, but the connexion is doubtful.

  • ZEPHYRUS, in Greek mythology, the west wind (whence the English "zephyr," a light breeze), brother of Boreas, the north wind, and son of the Titan Astraeus and Eos, the dawn.

  • 'SZKEavos), in Greek mythology, the greatest of rivers and at the same time a divine personification.

  • His subsequent works were dissertations on the origin of alphabetical writing (Die Erfindung der Buchstabenschrift, 1801), on the antiquity of the Codex Vaticanus (1810), and on ancient mythology (Ober den Mythos der alten Volker, 1812); a new interpretation of the Song of Solomon (Das hohe Lied in einer noch unversuchten Deutung, 1813), to the effect that the lover represents King Hezekiah, while by his beloved is intended the remnant left in Israel after the deportation of the ten tribes; and treatises on the indissoluble character of the matrimonial bond (De conjugii christiani vinculo indissolubili commentatio exegetica, 1816) and on the Alexandrian version of the Pentateuch (1818).

  • This system spread widely, and the early Christians especially appealed to it as a confirmation of their belief that ancient mythology was merely an aggregate of fables of human invention.

  • (Leipzig, 1891); and works on comparative religion and mythology.

  • The serpent, too, in mythology is a regular symbol of water.

  • Possibly the narrator, or redactor, desired to tone down the traces of mythology.

  • Is he a pale form of the Babylonian chaos-dragon, or of the serpent of Iranian mythology who sprang from heaven to earth to blight the" good creation "?

  • Hence in later times he is often represented in art and mythology as a herald.

  • PANDORA (the "All-giving") in Greek mythology, according to Hesiod (Theog.

  • It is largely owing to the peculiar character of this god and the prominent position which he occupies that the mythology of the north presents so striking a contrast to that of Greece.

  • EURYDICE (Evpvbucn), in Greek mythology, the wife of Orpheus.

  • APSARAS, in Hindu mythology, a female spirit of the clouds and waters.

  • AUTOLYCUS, in Greek mythology, the son of Hermes and father of Anticleia, mother of Odysseus.

  • ARES, in ancient Greek mythology, the god of war, or rather of battle, son of Zeus and Hera.

  • The figure of Ares appears in various stories of ancient mythology.

  • Adonis (Mythology) >>

  • AEOLUS, in Greek mythology, according to Homer the son of Hippotes, god and father of the winds, and ruler of the island of Aeolia.

  • SALMONEUS, in Greek mythology, son of Aeolus (king of Magnesia in Thessaly, the mythic ancestor of the Aeolian race), grandson of Hellen and brother of Sisyphus.

  • KUBERA (or Kuvera), in Hindu mythology, the god of wealth.

  • `EMv), in Greek mythology, daughter of Zeus by Leda (wife of Tyndareus, king of Sparta), sister of Castor, Pollux and Clytaemnestra, and wife of Menelaus.

  • PHORCYS (PHORCUS, PHORCYN), in Greek mythology, son of Pontus (Sea) and Gaea (Earth), father of the Graeae, the Gorgons, Scylla, and Ladon (the dragon that guarded the golden apples of the Hesperides).

  • Furtwangler; mythology (with cognate subjects) by G.

  • in AMBROSIA ancient mythology, sometimes the food, sometimes the drink of the gods.

  • Grey, Polynesian Mythology (London, 1855); W.

  • This derivation is, however, fanciful; the name bucentaurus is unknown in ancient mythology, and the figurehead of the bucentaurs, of which representations have come down to us, is the lion of St Mark.

  • SISYPHUS, in Greek mythology, son of Aeolus and Enarete, and king of Ephyra (Corinth).

  • In 1873 Dr Murray published a Manual of Mythology, and in the following year contributed to the Contemporary Review two articles - one on the Homeric question - which led to a friendship with Mr Gladstone, the other on Greek painters.

  • AMPHITRITE, in ancient Greek mythology, a sea-goddess, daughter of Nereus (or Oceanus) and wife of Poseidon.

  • In other words, thought, which will 'not stop, takes to mythology; and in the place of reason we have superstition.

  • Moreover, in the unbridled exercise of speculation, the number of divine beings was increased indefinitely; and these fantastic accessions to l Olympus in the system of Iamblichus show that Greek philosophy 'is returning to mythology, and that nature-religion is still a power in the world.

  • FENRIR, or Fenris, in Scandinavian mythology, a waterdemon in the shape of a huge wolf.

  • Introduction to the Philosophy of Mythology (1856); ii.

  • Philosophy of Mythology (1857); iii.

  • This conception of a difference, of an internal structure in the absolute, finds other and not less obscure expressions in the mystical contributions of the Menschliche Freiheit and in the scholastic speculations of the Berlin lectures on mythology.

  • America; and all over that region it is the chief figure in a group of myths, fulfilling the office of a culture hero who brings the light, gives fire to mankind, &c. Together with the eaglehawk the crow plays a great part in the mythology of S.E.

  • ==Mantis== Cagn is a prominent figure in Bushman mythology; the mantis and the caterpillar, Ngo, are his incarnations.

  • But little need be said on the relation of animism and mythology.

  • While a large part of mythology has an animistic basis, it is possible to believe, e.g.

  • in a sky world, peopled by corporeal beings, as well as by spirits of the dead; the latter may even be entirely absent; the mythology of the Australians relates largely to corporeal, non-spiritual beings; stories of transformation, deluge and doom myths, or myths of the origin of death, have not necessarily any animistic basis.

  • At the same time, with the rise of ideas as to a future life and spiritual beings, this field of mythology is immensely widened, though it cannot be said that a rich mythology is necessarily genetically associated with or combined with belief in many spiritual beings.

  • URANUS (Heaven), in Greek mythology, the husband of Gaea (Earth), and father of Cronus (Saturn) and other deities.

  • Of all the minor creatures of mythology the fairies are the most beautiful, the most numerous, the most memorable in literature.

  • Keightley's Fairy Mythology is full of interesting matter; Rhys's Celtic Mythology is especially copious about Welsh fairies, which are practically identical with those of Ireland and Scotland.

  • The cumbrous mythology and cosmogony of Mithraism at last weakened its hold upon men's minds, and it disappeared during the 4th century before a victorious Catholicism, yet not until another faith, equally Iranian in its mythology mad cosmological beliefs, had taken its place.

  • He certainly shows that the old Assyrian mythology influenced Mani, but not that this element did not reach him through Persian channels.

  • What gave it strength was that it united an ancient mythology and a thorough-going materialistic dualism with an exceedingly simple spiritual worship and a strict morality.

  • The only part of the Manichaean mythology that became popular was the crude, physical dualism.

  • ELECTRA ('HMKTpa), "the bright one," in Greek mythology.

  • HEPHAESTUS, in Greek mythology, the god of fire, analogous to, and by the ancients often confused with, the Roman god Vulcan; the derivation of the name is uncertain, but it may well be of Greek origin.

  • HERMAPHRODITUS, in Greek mythology, a being, partly male, partly female, originally worshipped as a divinity.

  • Norse, Nornir), in Northern mythology, the female divinities of fate, somewhat similar to the Gr.

  • BRIAREUS, or Aegaeon, in Greek mythology, one of the three hundred-armed, fifty-headed Hecatoncheires, brother of Cottus and Gyges (or Gyes).

  • GLADSHEIM (Old Norse Gladsheimr), in Scandinavian mythology, the region of joy and home of Odin.

  • 3 It is, however, best to restrict the term "consecration" to cases where the spirit falls on a person, not automatically or unexpectedly, but by invitation, in response to prayer, through layingon of hands and greasing, after a formal fast, continence, ritual 2 "Vedic Mythology," by A.

  • Though less superstitious than the Tahitians, the idolatry of the Sandwich Islanders was equally barbarous and sanguinary, as, in addition to the chief objects of worship included in the mythology of the other islands, the supernatural beings supposed to reside in the volcanoes and direct the action of subterranean fires rendered the gods objects of peculiar terror.

  • MARUTS, in Hindu mythology, storm-gods.

  • Besides the anthropomorphic " giants, " mentioned above, Northern mythology speaks also of theriomorphic demons, the chief of which were Midgar6sormr, the " worldserpent," and Fenrisulfr, a monster wolf, the enemies of Thor and Odin respectively.

  • One of the most striking conceptions of Northern mythology is that of the " world-tree," Yggdrasil's Ash, which sheltered all living beings (see Yggdrasil).

  • Beside this belief, however, we find another which seems hardly to be compatible with it, viz., that the souls of the dead passed to the realm of Hel, who in Northern mythology is represented as the daughter of Loki.

  • Some scholars hold that they were peculiar to the mythology of Norway and Iceland and that they arose at a late period, largely through Christian influence.

  • To these must be added a large number of Old Norse writings including the older Edda and the prose Edda (the chief authorities for Northern mythology), Islands Landnamabok and many sagas dealing with the history of families in Iceland (such as Eyrbyggia Saga) or with the lives of Norwegian and other kings, both historical and legendary (in Heimskringla, Fornmanna Sogur and Rafn's Fornaldar Sogur Norr landa).

  • Berlin, 1878); Teutonic Mythology (trans.

  • SOMA (Sanskrit for "pressed juice," from the root su, to press), in Hindu mythology the god who is a personification of the soma plant (Asclepias acida), from which an intoxicating milky juice is squeezed.

  • KARTIKEYA, in Hindu mythology, the god of war.

  • AMPHION and Zethus, in ancient Greek mythology, the twin sons of Zeus by Antiope.

  • (1870) was on the Vedic mythology.

  • Colchis was celebrated in Greek mythology as the destination of the Argonauts, the home of Medea and the special domain of sorcery.

  • CERBERUS, in Greek mythology, the dog who guarded the entrance to the lower world.

  • This mountainous character and the absence of any tolerable harbour - Pliny, in enumerating the islands of the Aegean, calls it "importuosissima omnium" - prevented it from ever attaining to any political importance, but it enjoyed great celebrity from its connexion with the worship of the Cabeiri, a mysterious triad of divinities, concerning whom very little is known, but who appear, like all the similar deities venerated in different parts of Greece, to have been a remnant of a previously existing Pelasgic mythology.

  • IRMIN, or Irminus, in Teutonic mythology, a deified eponymic hero of the Herminones.

  • ATLAS, in Greek mythology, the "endurer," a son of the Titan Iapetus and Clymene (or Asia), brother of Prometheus.

  • In the Apology, after contrasting the judicial treatment of Christians with that of other accused persons, he refutes the accusations brought against the Christians of atheism, eating human flesh and licentiousness, and in doing so takes occasion to make a vigorous and skilful attack on pagan polytheism and mythology.

  • CHARON, in Greek mythology, the son of E r ebus and Nyx (Night).

  • The locality was associated with a number of the most interesting legends of Greek mythology,.

  • His views on the connexion between magic and mythology are explained in 19.133 and 17.305; those on folklore are described in 10.601.

  • HERTHA, or NERTxvs, in Teutonic mythology, the goddess of fertility, "Mother Ear:h."

  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to religion and mythology.

  • TRIPTOLEMUS, in Greek mythology, the inventor of agriculture, first priest of Demeter, and founder of the Eleusinian mysteries.

  • Thus, if Epicurus objects to the doctrine of mythology, he objects no less to the doctrine of an inevitable fate, a necessary order of things unchangeable and supreme over the human will.

  • In mythology Oeta is chiefly celebrated as the scene of the funeral pyre on which Heracles burnt himself before his admission to Olympus.

  • Its importance for the history of religion and mythology is, in truth, very considerable, a fact which it is the great merit of Emin 7 and Dulaurier S to have first pointed out.

  • CYCLOPES (KbKAw?res, the round-eyed, plural of Cyclops), a type of beings variously described in Greek mythology.

  • ALASTOR, in Greek mythology, the spirit of revenge, which prompts the members of a family to commit fresh crimes to obtain satisfaction.

  • BHIMA (Sanskrit, "The Terrible"), in Hindu mythology, a hero, one of the Pandava princes who figure in the Mahabharata.

  • ATHAMAS, in Greek mythology, king of the Minyae in Boeotian Orchomenus, son of Aeolus, king of Thessaly, or of lblinyas.

  • ERIPHYLE, in Greek mythology, sister of Adrastus and wife of Amphiaraus.

  • It is no wonder that the godless Korrishites thought these stories of the Koran not nearly so entertaining as those of Rostam and Ispandiar, related by Nadr the son of Harith, who had learned in the course of his trade journeys on the Euphrates the heroic mythology of the Persians.

  • HERA, in Greek mythology, the sister and wife of Zeus and queen of the Olympian gods; she was identified by the Romans with Juno.

  • The cow was the animal specially sacred to Hera both in ritual and in mythology.

  • They deal for the most part with the hearing of diseases, the bites of snakes and scorpions, &c., but incidentally cast many sidelights on the mythology and superstitious beliefs.

  • Tradition, mythology and later customs make it possible to recover a scrap of the political history of that far-off time.

  • Thrusting aside all the multitudinous deities of Egypt and all the mythology even of Heliopolis, he devoted himself to the cult of the visible sun-disk, applying to it as its chief name the hitherto rare word Aton, meaning sun; the traditional divine name Harakht (Horus of the horizon), given to the hawk-headed sun-god of Heliopolis, was however allowed to subsist and a temple was built at Karnak to this god.

  • Some of the subjects are borrowed in altered form from the old mythology, while a few derive from Christian legend, and many deal with national history.

  • The old Scandinavian mythology lived in the hands of Ohlenschldger exactly as the classical Greek religion was born again in Keats.

  • His statements concerning Greek and Roman mythology are based respectively on the Protrepticus of Clement of Alexandria, and on Antistius Labeo, who belonged to the preceding generation and attempted to restore Neoplatonism.

  • The earliest of these works was Custom and Myth (1884); in Myth, Literature and Religion (2 vols., 1887, French trans., 1896) he explained the irrational elements of mythology as survivals from earlier savagery; in The Making of Religion (an idealization of savage animism) he maintained the existence of high spiritual ideas among savage races, and instituted comparisons between savage practices and the occult phenomena among civilized races; he dealt with the origins of totemism in Social Origins, printed (1903) together with J.

  • A mythology reminiscent of Italy is the "Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds" in the Germanic Museum at Nuremberg, founded directly upon the "Hercules and Centaur Nessus" of Pollaiuolo, now at New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A. Of portraits, besides that of his father already mentioned as done in 1497, there is his own of 1498 at Madrid.

  • Calais (Mythology) >>

  • The same peculiarity appears in the list of the ancient kings of Rome, but these are entangled in mythology.

  • SEMELE, in Greek mythology, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, and mother of Dionysus by Zeus.

  • The Phrygian mythology, so far as we know it, has a melancholy and mystic tone, and their religion partakes of the same character.

  • Harrison, Mythology and Monuments of Ancient Athens (1890); "Der Theseische Synoikismos" in C. F.

  • Gill's Myths and Songs from the South Pacific; Dr Turner's Samoa; and Mr Shortland's Maori Religion and Mythology; Sir George Grey, Polynesian Mythology.

  • Le Grand, Au pays des Canaques (Paris, 1893); Sir George Grey, Polynesian Mythology (London, 1855); T.

  • The Danes were specially renowned for their axes; but about the sword the most of northern poetry and mythology clings.

  • HARISCHANDRA, in Hindu mythology, the 28th king of the Solar race.

  • But, although not a critical scholar, he was the first to attempt a scientific treatment of Greek mythology, and he gave an undoubted impulse to philological studies.

  • POSEIDON, in Greek mythology, god of the sea and of water generally, son of Cronus and Rhea, and brother of Zeus and Pluto.

  • GANYMEDE, in Greek mythology, son of Tros, king of Dardania, and Callirrhoe.

  • His first work (1804) was an attempt to show by means of their names that the giants of the Bible and of Greek mythology were personifications of natural phenomena.

  • The Old Testament preserves traces of forgotten history and legend, of strange Oriental mythology, and the remains of a semi-heathenish past.

  • They are sunk in a paganism which seems to embrace some faint reflexion of Greek mythology, Zoroastrian principles and the tenets of Buddhism, originally gathered, no doubt, from the varied elements of their mixed extraction.

  • high, in which are images representing Ganga, Bhagirathi and other figures of mythology.

  • The sophist of whom the Platonic Protagoras is here thinking was Hippias of Elis, who gave popular lectures, not only upon the four subjects just mentioned, but also upon grammar, mythology, family history, archaeology, Homerology and the education of youth.

  • PAN (" pasturer"), in Greek mythology, son of Hermes and one of the daughters of Dryops ("oak-man"), or of Zeus and the nymph Callisto, god of shepherds, flocks and forests.

  • King, Babylonian Religion and Mythology (London, 1899); T.

  • The possibility that Hebrew traditions were subject to Babylonian influence from the period of the Canaanite conquest has long been recognized, and to the Exilic and post-Exilic Jew the mythology of Babylon may well have presented many familiar features.

  • His earlier publications here treated of mythology and the history of dogma.

  • The former, owing to the development of comparative mythology, is now of little authority, and portions of part ii.

  • ACHERON, in Greek mythology, the son of Gaea or Demeter.

  • The name appears in cult and in mythology as that of the typical river-god; a familiar legend is that of his.

  • He is not a prominent figure in Northern mythology, for even in this special capacity he is overshadowed by Odin, and there are hardly any traces of worship being paid to him.

  • Iris (Mythology) >>

  • HESTIA, in Greek mythology, the "fire-goddess," daughter of Cronus and Rhea, the goddess of hearth and home.

  • SERPENT - WORSHIP. From all parts of the world there is a very considerable body of evidence for the prominence of the serpent in religion, mythology and folk-lore.

  • a See the elaborately illustrated work of James Fergusson, Tree and Serpent Worship, or Illustrations of Mythology and Art in India (2nd ed., London, 1873); also M.

  • Grimm, Teutonic Mythology (1888), iv.

  • The Old Testament, allegorically explained, became the substitute for the outgrown mythology; intellectual activity revived; the new facts gained predominant influence in philosophy, and in turn were shaped according to its canons.

  • Some critics, however, think that the key of symbolism needs to be supplemented by that of mythology.

  • It is famous in Greek mythology; the giants are said to have piled it on Ossa in order to scale Olympus, the abode of the gods; it was the home of the centaurs, especially of Chiron, who had a cave near its summit, and educated many youthful heroes; the ship "Argo" was built from its pine-woods.

  • XetpijvES), in Greek mythology, the daughters of Phorcys the sea-god, or, in later legend, of the river-god Acheloiis and one of the nymphs.

  • Harrison, Myths of the Odyssey (1882), Mythology and Monuments of Athens (1890) and Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion (1908); J.

  • These exploits belong to the domain of pure mythology.

  • The position of Sceldwea and Beaw (in Malmesbury's Latin called Sceldius and Beowius) in the genealogy as anterior to Woden would not of itself prove that they belong to divine mythology and not to heroic legend.

  • BRIHASPATI, or Brahmanaspati ("god of strength"), a deity of importance in early Hindu mythology.

  • The first name is that of Theagenes of Rhegium, contemporary of Cambyses (525 B.C.), who is said to have founded the " new grammar " (the older " grammar " being the art of reading and writing), and to have been the inventor of the allegorical interpretations by which it was sought to reconcile the Homeric mythology with the morality and speculative ideas of the 6th century B.C. The same attitude in the " ancient quarrel of poetry and philosophy " was soon afterwards taken by Anaxagoras; and after him by his pupil Metrodorus of Lampsacus, who explained away all the gods, and even the heroes, as elementary substances and forces (Agamemnon as the upper air, &c.).

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