Mutual sentence example

mutual
  • We agreed on our mutual commitment.

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  • We both have a mutual problem.

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  • It was a terrific speech and they both nodded in mutual agreement.

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  • I want mutual trust and love.

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  • Certainly. It's not as if they don't have a mutual interest in this business.

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  • By mutual agreement, Alex had final say in decisions, but they were supposed to discuss it first.

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  • Was it wishful thinking, or was there a mutual attraction between them?

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  • They have thus upheld the true contractual nature of concordats and the mutual juridical obligation which results from them.

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  • The feeling is mutual.  You're the reason I spent so much time in Hell.

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  • Although Ethel and Fred had never met, that didn't stop them from developing a strong mutual dislike, fueled via telephone mes­sages and third-party comments.

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  • The gemeente - consisting only of those bound by the communal oath for mutual help and defence - elected their own magistrates.

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  • We both managed a smile at our mutual concern.

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  • Since concordats are contracts they give rise to that special mutual obligation which results from every agreement freely entered into; for a contract is binding on both parties to it.

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  • But with these reservations it must unhesitatingly be said that concordats are bilateral or synallagmatic contracts, from which results an equal mutual obligation for the two parties, who enter into a juridical engagement towards each other.

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  • Could it have been mutual?

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  • It was of the nature of a contract, entered into by mutual promise, the clasping of hands, and exchange of an agreement in writing (tabula hospitalis) or of a token (tessera or symbolum), and was rendered hereditary by the division of the tessera.

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  • Mary liked him, and the feelings were obviously mutual.

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  • The feeling is mutual.

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  • They were pious foundations created for mutual benefit and for purposes of charity.

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  • But the mutual jealousy of the allies saved her.

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  • Over the years, our friendship grew through our mutual love of music and mutual dislike for each other's football teams.

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  • They are formed by the action of nitrous fumes on ammoniacal solutions of cobaltous salts, or purpureo-salts, or by the mutual reaction of chlorpurpureosalts and alkaline nitrites.

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  • Thus when one carries one's thoughts back to a series of events, one constructs a psychic whole made up of parts which take definite shape and character by their mutual interrelations.

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  • But, with advancing civilization and the consequent increase in the number of the conditions to be imposed on both parties, leases became mutual contracts, bilateral in form.

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  • The general state of the island when the Japanese assumed possession was that the plain of Giran on the eastern coast and the hill-districts were inhabited by semibarbarous folk, the western plains by Chinese of a degraded type, and that between the two there existed a traditional and continuous feud, leading to mutual displays of merciless and murderous violence.

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  • He defined structure " as the manner of the mutual linking of the atoms in the molecule," but denied that any such structure could give information as to the orientation of the atoms in space.

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  • From the former point of view the freeman, then essentially a warrior, and the slave were mutual auxiliaries, simultaneously exercising different and complementary functions - each necessary to the community.

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  • There were treaties between states for the extradition of fugitives, and contracts of mutual assurance between individuals against their loss by flight.

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  • Nicholas preached a crusade, and endeavoured to reconcile the mutual animosities of the Italian states, but without much success.

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  • He showed that the attraction between the rubbed body and the test object is mutual.

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  • The ' secret mutual connivance ' is not an idea that either astrologers or Jung the scientist finds easy to see or illumine.

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  • He certainly had Destiny's approval - and the admiration appeared to be mutual.

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  • In sympathy with this Platonism, the medieval church began by assuming the entire mutual harmony of faith and reason.

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  • Organized as they are into a kind of community for mutual protection and mutual help, they soon become masters of the trade wherever they penetrate.

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  • They style themselves " truly spiritual Christians," and in their rejection of the sacraments, their indifference to outward forms, and their insistence on the spiritual interpretation of the Bible (" the letter killeth "), they are closely akin to the Quakers, whom they resemble also in their inoffensive mode of life and the practice of mutual help.

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  • The mutual assurances of unbounded confidence, admiration and sympathy, if there was any genuine sincerity in them, represented merely a transient state of feeling.

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  • On national the 30th of July 1907 she signed a convention with position Japan of mutual respect for treaty and territorial of Russia.

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  • Similarly in Great Britain there is a tendency towards combination by mutual agreement among the companies while they still preserve their independent existence.

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  • As results of Roberval's labours outside the department of pure mathematics may be noted a work on the system of the universe, in which he supports the Copernican system and attributes a mutual attraction to all particles of matter; and also the invention of a special kind of balance which goes by his name.

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  • Mdlle Curchod soon afterwards became the wife of Necker, the famous financier; and Gibbon and the Neckers frequently afterwards met on terms of mutual friendship and esteem.

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  • Richelieu intercepted the letters, and by omissions and falsifications succeeded in destroying their mutual confidence.

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  • In this way we account most simply for the uniformity in the direction in which the planets revolve, and for the mutual proximity of the planes in which their orbits are contained.

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  • Religion was inseparable from ordinary life, and, like that of all peoples who are dependent on the fruits of the earth, was a nature-worship. The tie between deities and worshippers was regarded as physical and entailed mutual obligations.

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  • Under Ventidius Cumanus (48-52) the mutual hatred of Jews and Romans, Samaritans and Jews, found vent in insults and bloodshed.

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  • The protective instinct was responsible for much of this interference with the natural impulse of men of various creeds towards mutual esteem and forbearance.

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  • Society is conceived as regulated by, mutual obligations, of which the duties of parents and children are the most important.

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  • This was probably the reason why their marriage was annulled by mutual consent in 1151, but contemporary scandal-mongers attributed the separation to the king's jealousy.

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  • An end was put to these disorders only by the mutual agreement of the two contestants, alike horrified and exhausted by the fierce outburst of passion, in September 1905.

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  • In 1818 he was appointed political agent for the states of western Rajputana, where he conciliated the chieftains, settled their mutual feuds and collected materials for his Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan (2 vols., 1829-1832).

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  • The lord of the manor with his officials and retainers, the peasantry bound to him by ties of personal dependence and mutual rights and obligations, constituted a little world, in which we can watch the play of motives and passions not so dissimilar as we are sometimes led to believe from those of the great modern world.

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  • The results of more than twenty years' labour were set forth in his Hexapla and Tetrapla, in which he placed the Hebrew text side by side with the various Greek versions, examined their mutual relations in detail, and tried to find the basis for a more reliable text of the LXX.

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  • Doubtless there was often genuine mutual affection; slaves sometimes, as in noted instances during the civil wars, showed the noblest spirit of devotion to their masters.

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  • A freedman, unless he became such by operation of law, remained client of his master, and both were bound by the mutual obligations arising out of that relation.

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  • In 1831 and 1833 Great Britain entered into an arrangement with France for a mutual right of search within certain seas, to which most of the other powers acceded; and by the Ashburton treaty (1842) with the United States provision was made for the joint maintenance of squadrons on the west coast of Africa.

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  • The birds of the genus Leucosticte seem to be more terrestrial in their habit than those of Linota, perhaps from their having been chiefly observed where trees are scarce; but it is possible that the mutual relationship of the two groups is more apparent than real.

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  • Four years later his influence brought about a truce between Hungary and the Venetians, who had agreed with Bosnia for mutual support against the Croats; and in 1353, the year of his death, his daughter Elizabeth was married to King Louis.

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  • These events and the friction caused by mutual complaints of infringements of the treaty stirred up public opinion in Turkey, and the British ambassador lent his support to the war party.

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  • On the other hand, under the influence of the mechanics of his day, which had hardly distinguished between inertia, or the inability of a body to change itself, and resistance or the ability of bodies to oppose one another, he concluded that, as inertia is passive, so is resistance, and refused to recognize that in collision the mutual resistance of moving bodies is a force, or active power, of changing their movements in opposite directions.

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  • Bodies then are triply extended substances, each occupying enough space to prevent mutual penetration, and by this force of mutual impenetrability or interresistance cause one another to form a joint mass with a common velocity whenever they collide.

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  • The importance of the kindred, however, was not limited to purposes of mutual protection.

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  • At length the two parties grew weary of this state of revolution, and a regime of conciliation, the fruit of mutual concessions, was established under Clement III.

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  • Assuming such a base to exist, Newton admitted at the outset the difficulty of identifying it, but pointed out that the key to the situation might be found in the identification of forces; that is to say, in the mutual character of laws of acceleration as applied to any given body and any other by whose presence its motion is influenced.

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  • In fact, experiments upon the changes of velocity of bodies, due to a mutual influence between them, bring to light a property of bodies which may be specified by a quantity proportional to their volumes in the case of bodies which are perceived by other tests to be of one homogeneous substance, but otherwise involving also another factor.

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  • When, as in the case of contact, a mutual relation is perceived between the motions of two particles, the changes of velocity are in opposite directions, and the ratio of their magnitudes determines the ratio of the masses of the particles; the motion being reckoned relative to any base which is unaffected by the change.

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  • The Galileo-Newton theory of motion is that, relative to a suitably chosen base, and with suitable assignments of mass, all accelerations of particles are made up of mutual (so-called) actions between pairs of particles, whereby the two particles forming a pair have accelerations in opposite directions in the line joining them, of magnitudes inversely proportional to their masses.

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  • The mutual action between two particles is specified by means of a directed quantity to which the term "force" is appropriated.

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  • Thus each mutual action is associated with a pair of equal forces in opposite directions.

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  • It is not, however, a true force in the sense of corresponding to any mutual relation between two portions of matter.

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  • The more complete phenomena of mutual solubility are illustrated by the case of phenol and water.

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  • When the two components form chemical compounds with each other, the phenomena of mutual solubility become more complex.

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  • A form of edict drawn by Grotius was published by the states, recommending mutual toleration, and forbidding ministers in the pulpit from handling the disputed dogmas.

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  • Muller to include cases of mutual resemblance between two or more noxious species inhabiting the same area.

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  • Besides consideration for the mutual convenience of sovereigns and their feudatories, there were other causes which materially contributed towards bringing about those changes in The the military system of Europe which were finally accomplished in the 13th and 14th centuries.

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  • After the battle of Legnano, in 1174, although the Lombard cities failed to reap the fruit of their united action, and fell to mutual jealousy once more, Milan internally began to grow in material prosperity.

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  • Their compact, moss-like growth and general structural peculiarities are not an expression of mutual affinity, but are in adaptation to the combined cold and dryness of their habitat.

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  • Lacking often the protection of a strong ruler, the Lombard cities had been accustomed to act together for mutual defence, and in 1093 Milan, Lodi, Piacenza and Cremona formed an alliance against the emperor Henry IV., in favour of his rebellious son Conrad.

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  • They held a meeting at Bologna and raised an army, but as in 1226, the matter ended in mutual fulminations and defiances.

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  • Let us also suppose that the plates A and C are so distant from each other that there is no mutual influence, and that p' is the capacity of one of the disks when it stands alone.

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  • Although Moab and Ammon were "brothers," their history was usually associated with that of Judah and Israel respectively, and naturally depended to a considerable extent upon these two and their mutual relations.

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  • There are polymers which have hardly any inter-relations other than identity in composition; on the other hand, there are others which are related by the possibility of mutual transformation; examples of this kind are cyanic acid (Cnoh) and cyanuric acid (Cnoh) 3, the latter being a solid which readily transforms into the former on heating as an easily condensable vapour; the reverse transformation may also be realized; and the polymers methylene oxide (CH 2 O) and trioxymethylene (CH20)3.

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  • The cases of mutual transformation are generally characterized by the fact that in the compound of higher molecular weight no new links of carbon with carbon are introduced, the trioxymethylene being O CH2-0 CH 2 whereas honey-sugar correg probably C C H 2 -0% sponds to CH 2 0H [[Choh Choh Choh Choh Cho]], each point representing a linking of the carbon atom to the next.

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  • In this equation a relates to molecular attraction; and it is not improbable that in isomeric molecules, containing in sum the same amount of the same atoms, those mutual attractions are approximately the same, whereas the chief difference lies in the value of b, that is, the volume occupied by the molecule itself.

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  • For what reason this volume may differ from case to case lies close at hand; in connexion with the notion of negative and positive atoms, like chlorine and hydrogen, experience tends to show that the former, as well as the latter, have a mutual repulsive power, but the former acts on the latter in the opposite sense; the necessary consequence is that, when those negative and positive groups are distributed in the molecule, its volume will be smaller than if the negative elements are heaped together.

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  • Certain investigations on isomerism which have become especially prominent in recent times bear on the possibility of the mutual transformation of isomers.

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  • These laws have the advantage of being applicable to the mutual transformations of isomers, whatever be the nature of the deeper origin, and so bring polymerism, metamerism and polymorphism together.

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  • A second law for these mutual transformations is that when they take place without loss of homogeneity, for example, in the liquid state, the definite transition point disappears and the change is gradual.

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  • This best studied case shows that a number of mutual relations are to be found between the properties of two modifications when once the phenomenon of mutual transformation is accessible.

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  • In ordinary isomers indications of mutual transformation often occur; and among these the predominant fact is that denoted as tautomerism or pseudomerism.

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  • When a catalytic agent, such as sulphurous acid, is added, which produces a mutual change, the whole behaviour is different; only one meltingpoint, viz.

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  • The next simplest case consists in the mutual interchange of two affinity units, and so on.

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  • This conception led Kekule to his "closed-chain" or "ring" theory of the constitution of benzene which has been called the "most brilliant piece of prediction to be found in the whole range of organic chemistry," and this in turn led in particular to the elucidation of the constitution of the "aromatic compounds," and in general to new methods of chemical synthesis and decomposition, and to a deeper insight into the composition of numberless organic bodies and their mutual relations.

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  • In a letter of Jacqueline's, dated the 27th of September, an account of a visit paid by Descartes to Pascal is given, which, like the other information on the relations of the two, give strong suspicion of mutual jealousy.

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  • After Conrads death William of Holland received a certain allegiance, especially in the north of the country, and was recognized by the Rhenish cities which had just formed a league for mutual protection, a league which for a short time gave promise of great strength and regnum.

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  • The cities, notwithstanding every kind of discouragement, formed new associations for mutual defence or strengthened those which already existed.

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  • A series of diets between 1495 and 1499 produced only mutual recriminations, and then Maximilian met with a serious rebuff.

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  • The indispensable preliminary to a really historic view of these writings is some solution of the problem of their mutual relations.

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  • Syracuse repaid the debt by good service to the Peloponnesian cause, and from that time the mutual influence of Sicily and old Greece is far stronger than in earlier times.

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  • Unless we are to believe that the Macedonian supremacy is directly traceable to the mutual weakening of the Greek cities in 431-403, it is difficult to see what lasting importance attaches to the war.

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  • Under the guidance of Pericles Athens replied that she would do nothing on compulsion, but was prepared to submit difficulties to amicable arbitration on the basis of mutual concessions.

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  • The movements of Germany from the south-east, and of France from the west and north, were thus held in check, and by securing international agreements the mutual limits of the three European powers concerned were definitely fixed.

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  • That a father and his children have mutual duties implies that there are moral laws regulating their relationship; that it is the duty of a servant to obey his master within certain limits is part of a definite contract, whereby he becomes a servant engaging to do certain things for a specified wage.

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  • Though not free from defects, this edition is absolutely indispensable for the study of the chronicles and the mutual relations of the different MSS.

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  • Gradually the tension between natives and foreigners relaxed, and mutual confidence was established.

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  • Do not employ such physiological antagonists as pilocarpine or morphine, for the lethal actions of all these drugs exhibit not mutual antagonism but coincidence.

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  • Naturally, a mutual confidence between a king who had conquered his kingdom and a people who had stood in arms against him was not attainable immediately, and the first six years of Christian III.'s reign were marked by a contest between the Danish Rigsraad and the German counsellors, both of whom sought to rule "the pious king" exclusively.

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  • He visited Haddington occasionally in the following years, and a strong mutual regard arose between him and Miss Welsh.

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  • Yet, during the siege of Stirling (11th of June 1304), Bruce had entered into a secret band with Lamberton, bishop of St Andrews, for mutual aid.

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  • Two curious customs may be noted - the institution of an honourable order bestowed by the king, called klilt; and a species of mutual aid society, sometimes confined to women, and possessing considerable political influence.

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  • The merit of Hegel is to have indicated and to a large extent displayed the filiation and mutual limitation of our forms of thought; to have arranged them in the order of their comparative capacity to give a satisfactory expression to truth in the totality of its relations; and to have broken down the partition which in Kant separated the formal logic from the transcendental analytic, as well as the general disruption between logic and metaphysic. It must at the same time be admitted that much of the work of weaving the terms of thought, the categories, into a system has a hypothetical and tentative character, and that Hegel has rather pointed out the path which logic must follow, viz.

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  • Syria could control the situation, and it in turn was influenced by the ambitions of Assyria, to whose advantage it was when the small states were rent by mutual suspicion and hostility.

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  • Hyder died in 1782, and peace was finally concluded with Tippoo in 1784, on the basis of a mutual restitution of all conquests.

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  • The old divisions of nobility, clergy and people were a maintained and their mutual rivalry encouraged; the nobles were won over by titles and by the splendour of the viceregal court, but many persons of low birth who showed talent were raised to high positions.

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  • Ferdinand strongly resented foreign interference, and even rejected the Austrian proposal for a league of the Italian despots for mutual defence against external attacks and internal disorder.

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  • At the same time he endeavoured to bring about a union of Aragon with Navarre, by a contract of mutual adoption between himself and the Navarrese king, Sancho, who was old enough to be his grandfather.

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  • According To The Elementary Kinetic Theory Of An Ideal Gas, The Molecules Of Which Are So Small And So Far Apart That Their Mutual Actions May Be Neglected, The Kinetic Energy Of Translation Of The Molecules Is Proportional To The Absolute Temperature, And Is Equal To 3/2 Of Pv, The Product Of The Pressure And The Volume, Per Unit Mass.

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  • As the simple star radiates heat and contracts, it retains its angular momentum; when this is too great for the spheroidal form to persist, the star may ultimatel y separate into two components, which are driven farther and farther apart by their mutual tides.

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  • The mutual gravitation of a large number of stars crowded in a comparatively small space must be considerable, and the individual stars must move in irregular orbits under their mutual attractions.

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  • It was shown by Homer Lane that a mass of gas held in equilibrium by the mutual gravitation of its parts actually grows hotter through radiating heat; the heat gained by the resulting contraction more than counterbalances that lost by radiation.

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  • Thus we are led to regard the two systems as completely intermingled, a fact which adds considerably to the difficulty of explaining the phenomena otherwise than as produced by two great systems - universes they have been called - which have come together, perhaps, by their mutual attraction, and are passing through one another.

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  • He held that in relation to the will things possess an objective fitness similar to the mutual consistency of things in the physical universe.

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  • But Abu Moslim contrived to re-awaken their mutual distrust and jealousy, and, taking advantage of the opportunity, made himself master of Merv, in Rabia II.

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  • At an annual spiritual examination of the members, there are mutual criticisms and public confessions of sin.

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  • There were, for both sides, many advantages in arranging their mutual relations on this basis.

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  • These rights, which are heritable but not transferable, protect the tenant against eviction, except for default in payment of rent, while the rent may not be enhanced except by mutual agreement or by order of a revenue court.

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  • Oppression by the throne and the official and noble classes prevailed extensively; but the weak protected themselves by the use of the Kyei, or principle of association, which developed among Koreans into powerful trading gilds, trades-unions, mutual benefit associations, money-lending guilds, &c. Nearly all traders, porters and artisans were members of guilds, powerfully bound together and strong by combined action and mutual helpfulness in time of need.

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  • Starting from the obvious antithesis of thought and that of which it is the thought, it is possible to view the ultimate relation of its term as that of mutual indifference or, secondly, as that of a correspondence such that while they retain their distinct character modification of the one implies modification of the other, or thirdly and lastly, as that of a mergence of one in the other of such a nature that the merged term, whichever it be, is fully accounted for in a complete theory of that in which it is merged.

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  • Pledges of mutual good faith and fellowship were renewed between Philip and Richard of England on the 30th of December 1189, and they both prepared to go on the crusade.

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  • This may occur by the dissolution of one of the contracting states, by the object-matter of the agreement ceasing to exist, by full performance, by performance becoming impossible, by lapse of the time for which the agreement was made, by contrarius consensus or mutual release, by " denunciation " by one party under a power reserved in the treaty.

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  • The commune (communia, communa, communio, communitas, conjuratio, confoederatio) was formed by an oath of mutual help (sacramentum, juramentum communise).

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  • A strict line of demarcation, however, remains in the mutual oath which forms the basis of the civic community in both varieties of the latter, and in the fact that the ville libre stands to its lord in the relation of vassal and not in that of an immediate possession.

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  • The word "confederation," as distinct from "federation" has been sometimes, though not universally, used to distinguish from such a federal state (Bundesstaat) a mere union of states (Staatenbund) for mutual aid, and the promotion of interests common to all (see Confederation).

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  • Gradually their statement of this position underwent serious modifications, as it became realized that neither Jewish nor Gentile Christianity was a uniform genus, but included several species, and that the apostolic leaders from the first stood for mutual understanding and unity.

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  • They have been passed though one editorial mind, and some mutual assimilation in phraseology and idea may well have resulted.

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  • Statics of a System of ParticlesWe assume that the mutual forces between the pairs of particles, whatever their nature, are subject to the Law of Action and Reaction (Newtons Third Law); i.e.

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  • For if we have an assemblage of particles whose mutual distances are small compared with the dimensions of the earth, the forces of gravity on them constitute a system of sensibly parallel forces, sensibly proportional to the respective masses.

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  • If now the assemblage be brought into any other position relative to the earth, without alteration of the mutual distances, this is equivalent to a rotation of the directions of the forces relatively to the assemblage, the ratios of the forces remaining unaltered.

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  • This, theorem, also due to Lagrange, enables us to express the mean square of the distances of the particles from the centre of mass in terms of the masses and mutual distances.

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  • These may be divided into two categories; we have first, the extraneous forces exerted on the various particles from without, and, secondly, the mutual or internal forces between the various pairs of particles.

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  • For in time t the mutual action between two particles at P and Q produces equal and opposite momenta in the line PQ, and these will have equal and opposite moments about the fixed axis.

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  • In the case of a rigid body we must suppose that those forces adjust themselves so as to preserve the mutual distances of the various particles unaltered.

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  • The terms due to F in (33) are such as would arise from frictional resistances proportional to the absolute velocities of the particles, or to mutual forces of resistance proportional to the relative velocities; they are therefore classed as frictional or dissipative forces.

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  • In either case the tangential force, whether effort or resistance, exerted between the band and the pulley is their mutual friction, caused by and proportional to the normal pressure between them.

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  • Stiffness of Ropes.Ropes offer a resistance to being bent, and, when bent, to being straightened again, which arises from the mutual friction of their fibres.

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  • But Falk retired in 1879; various mutual concessions were made which led to a gradual abrogation of the May laws.

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  • Mutual jealousies were only increased when the seculars were grouped together under an arch-priest in 1599.

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  • Hermann's revelations are mainly taken up with an attempt to show the mutual relationship of nearly all the characters he introduces.

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  • He made the acquaintance of the Spanish reformer Juan de Valdes at Rome, and got to know him as a theologian at Naples, being especially drawn to him through the appreciation expressed by Bernardino Ochino, and through their mutual friendship with the Lady Julia Gonzaga, whose spiritual adviser he became after the death of Valdes.

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  • Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and New Haven constituted in their early years a group of neighbouring colonies, substantially independent of the mother country, and possessing a unity of purpose and similar institutions but in need of mutual protection from the Indians, the Dutch and the French, and also needing an arbiter to whom they might refer their own disputes, especially those relating to boundaries and trade.

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  • To understand the genesis of human morality we must study the ways of sociable animals such as horses and monkeys, which give each other assistance in trouble, feel mutual affection and sympathy, and experience pleasure in doing actions that benefit the society to which they belong.

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  • Thus, in man, do sentiments of love and mutual sympathy become instinctive and, when transmitted by inheritance, innate.

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  • Ampere in this paper gave an account of his discovery that conductors conveying electric currents exercise a mutual attraction or repulsion on one another, currents flowing in the same direction in parallel conductors attracting, and those in opposite directions repelling.

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  • By a series of well-chosen experiments Ampere established the laws of this mutual action, and not only explained observed facts by a brilliant train of mathematical analysis, but predicted others subsequently experimentally realized.

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  • These experiments furnished the first elementary forms of electric motor, since it was then seen that rotatory motion could be produced in masses of metal by the mutual action of conductors conveying electric current and magnetic fields.

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  • Electric attractions and repulsions were, however, regarded as differential actions in which the mutual repulsion of the particles of electricity operated, so to speak, in antagonism to the mutual attraction of particles of matter for one another and of particles of electricity for matter.

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  • The mission failed, as the mutual jealousy of the sovereigns would not allow either to begin operations.

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  • The worship of ancestors has again and again gathered around it powerful and ethical influences, emphasizing the parental and filial relations, and strengthening the mutual obligations of communal life.

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  • In many cases a division of sentiment came to prevail on the matter of infant-baptism, and for a while mutual toleration prevailed; but mixed churches had their manifest disadvantages and separation ultimately ensued.

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  • Henry Wilde, in 1875, in depositing copper on iron printing-rollers, recognized this principle and rotated the rollers during electrolysis, thereby renewing the surfaces of metal and liquid in mutual contact, and imparting sufficient motion to the solution to prevent stratification; as an alternative he imparted motion to the electrolyte by means of propeller blades.

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  • The martyrs fell asleep in a mutual embrace.

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  • The conflicting interests and mutual jealousies of these four independent assemblies made the work of legislation exceptionally difficult.

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  • When the Riksdag met in 1760, the indignation against the Hat leaders was so violent that an impeachment seemed inevitable; but once more the superiority of their parliamentary tactics prevailed, and when, after a session of twenty months, the Riksdag was brought to a close by the mutual consent of both the exhausted factions, the Hat government was bolstered up for another four years.

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  • The external and internal conditions of the empire are in mutual reaction upon one another.

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  • That the alliance with the Turks should soon change to hostility .and mutual attack was inevitable from the nature of the case; in the second Roman war the Turkish Khan was leagued with Rome.

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  • At this time not only was there religious fanaticism at work to stir up the mutual hatred ever existing between Sunni and Shiah, but the intrigue of European courts was probably directed towards the maintenance of an hostility which deterred the sultan from aggressive operations north and west of Constantinople.

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  • Russia and Turkey, naturally hostile to one another, had taken occasion of the weakness of Persia to forget their mutual quarrels and unite to plunder the tottering kingdom of the Safawid kings.

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  • Owing, however, to the mutual jealousies and misconduct of Goring and Grenville, and the prince's own disregard and contempt of the council, his presence was in no way advantageous, and could not prevent the final overthrow of the king's forces in 1646.

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  • In the same year the writ was used to release the wife of Earl Ferrers from his custody and maltreatment, and was unsuccessfully applied for by John Wilkes to get back his wife, who was separated from him by mutual agreement.

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  • After a conflict of mutual affection, Pylades at last yields, but the letter brings about a recognition between brother and sister, and all three escape together, carrying with them the image of Artemis.

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  • A further cause of dissatisfaction was the mutual jealousy of Portugal and Brazil.

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  • Among the buildings in the burned section restored since 1906, the Union Trust, Mutual Savings, Merchants Exchange, Crocker, Flood and the Call (newspaper) buildings are notable.

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  • On 6th February 1873 Bolivia entered upon a secret agreement with Peru, the ostensible object of which was the preservation of their territorial integrity and their mutual defence against exterior aggression.

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  • Instead of calculating the direction and magnitude of the resultant force on each particle arising from the action of neighbouring particles, he formed a single expression which is the aggregate of all the potentials arising from the mutual action between pairs of particles.

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  • It consists of three parts, the first depending on the action of gravity, the second on the mutual action between the particles of the fluid, and the third on the action between the particles of the fluid and the particles of a solid or fluid in contact with it.

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  • It is found by experiment that it is only very close to the bounding surface of a liquid that the forces arising from the mutual action of its parts have any resultant effect on one of its particles.

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  • The actual force between the particles arises in part from their mutual gravitation, which is inversely as the square of the distance.

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  • The pressure at any point of the liquid arises from two causes, the external pressure P to which the liquid is subjected, and the pressure arising from the mutual attraction of its molecules.

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  • The former can be found at once by calculating the mutual attraction of the parts of a large mass which lie on opposite sides of an imaginary plane interface.

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  • If we now suppose the crevasse produced by direct separation of its walls, the work necessary must be the same as before, the initial and final configurations being identical; and we recognize that the tension may be measured by half the work that must be done per unit of area against the mutual attraction in order to separate the two portions which lie upon opposite sides of an ideal plane to a distance from one another which is outside the range of the forces.

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  • If a i, a 2 represent the densities of the two infinite solids, their mutual attraction at distance z is per unit of area 21ra l a fZ '(z)dz, (30) or 27ra l 02 0(z), if we write f 4,(z)dz=0(z) (31) The work required to produce the separation in question is thus 2 7ru l a o 0 (z)dz; (32) and for the tension of a liquid of density a we have T = a f o 0 (z)dz.

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  • The second effect is readily attributed to the mutual repulsion of the electrified drops, but the action of feeble electricity in producing apparent coherence was long unexplained.

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  • He divorced his first wife Blanche of Navarre in 1453 on the ground of "mutual impotence."

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  • Numerous spurs, striking in all directions from the Sailughem mountains, fill up the space between that range and the lowlands of Tomsk, but their mutual relations are far from being well known.

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  • There had been mutual excommunications before, but they had not resulted in permanent schisms. Now, however, the separation was final, and the ostensible cause of its finality was the introduction by the Latins of two words Filioque into the creed.'

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  • For many years he was engaged in managing various business enterprises, and became, in 1877, president of the Boston Manufacturers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company, a post which he held till his death.

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  • The Wiirzburg Conference is the name given to the meeting of representatives of the smaller German states in 1859 to devise some means of mutual support.

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  • It rested on a solid basis of mutual affection and of common studies, the different temperaments of the two scholars securing them against the disagreements of rivalry or jealousy.

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  • In contrast with the mutual friendliness and loyalty of the Pharisees, their behaviour towards one another is lacking in courtesy, and when they mix with their fellow-countrymen, they are as offhanded as if their fellows were aliens."

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  • Guizot inaugurated a different policy; by mutual confidence and friendly offices they entirely succeeded in restoring the most cordial understanding between the two governments, and the irritation which Lord Palmerston had inflamed gradually subsided.

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  • Amesbury was settled about 1644 as a separate part of Salisbury, and in 1654, by mutual agreement of the old and new "towns," became practically independent, although not legally a township until 1666 (named Amesbury, from the English town in Wilts, in 1667).

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  • The two men were bound together by a mutual respect deeper than a sympathy of tastes, and a community of spirit stronger than a similarity of opinions.

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  • Between friends the mutual promotion of virtue should be the guiding principle.

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  • Parental tenderness and care for the young are strongly marked among the lower animals, though so inferior in scope and duration to the human qualities; and the same may be said of the mutual forbearance and defence which bind together in a rudimentary social bond the families and herds of animals.

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  • The domestic and social affections, the kindly care of the young and the old, some acknowledgment of marital and parental obligation, the duty of mutual defence in the tribe, the authority of the elders, and general respect to traditional custom as the regulator of life and duty, are more or less well marked in every savage tribe which is not disorganized and falling to pieces.

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  • The two "coming men" became fast friends, and their mutual esteem was never disturbed.

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  • The necessity for such sacrificial furniture has been felt in most religions, and consequently we find its use widespread among races and nations which have no mutual connexion.

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  • The first, the religious, including women and laymen as well as clergy, still maintained the old ideals of purity and mutual responsibility.

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  • The jubilee showed conclusively that, whatever politicians might say, the ties of blood and kinship, which united the two peoples, were too close to be severed by either for some trifling cause; that the wisest heads in both nations were aware of the advantages which must arise from the closer union of the Anglo-Saxon races; and that the true interests of both countries lay in their mutual friendship. A war in which the United States was subsequently engaged with Spain cemented this feeling.

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  • Hair having a property of mutual cohesion or " felting," which depends upon a roughened scaly surface and a tendency to curl, as in domestic sheep, is called " wool."

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  • The new fortress of Megalopolis, instead of supplying a centre of national life, merely accentuated the mutual jealousy of the cities.

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  • There is more force in the charge that his Hellenic sympathies prevented him from seeing the innate weakness and mutual jealousies of the Greek states of that period, whose only hope of peace and safety lay in submitting to the protectorate of the Roman republic. But if the event proved that the liberation of Greece was a political mistake, it was a noble and generous mistake, and reflects nothing but honour on the name of Flamininus, "the liberator of the Greeks."

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  • This was a changing England, and one that Disraeli could govern on terms of mutual satisfaction; but not if the reviving "spirit of the country" ran to extremes of selfassertion.

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  • Similarly on land, the post it occupied between northern Greece and the Peloponnese materially influenced its relation to other states, both in respect of its alliances, such as that with Thessaly, towards which it was drawn by mutual hostility to Boeotia, which lay between them; and also in respect of offensive combinations of other powers, as that between Thebes and Sparta, which throughout an important part of Greek history were closely associated in their politics, through mutual dread of their powerful neighbour.

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  • The laws, which although called the laws of Edward the Confessor were not drawn up until about 1130, contain a clause about frithborhs which decrees that in every place societies of ten men shall be formed for mutual security and reparation.

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  • He rested this sovereignty on virtual mutual contract on the part of the people themselves to be so governed.

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  • Truth and falsehood belong only to assertions or denials concerning ideas, that is, to our interpretations of our ideas according to their mutual relations.

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  • But there was no mutual confidence between the sovereigns, who were at that very time pursuing opposite policies with regard to Poland.

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  • Then they invaded Alsace, but their mutual jealousy prevented them from going farther.

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  • By imbuing Frenchmen with such a mutual hatred as nothing but the arm of despotic power could control the Reign of Terror rendered political liberty impossible for many years.

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  • Catching a single deer and belling it, he drives it through the wood; the other deer, whose instinct leads them to gather into herds for mutual protection against the mosquitoes, are attracted by the sound.

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  • The songs are similar to those of the Finns, and a process of mutual borrowing seems to have gone on.

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  • By the peace of Kna.red (1613) Gustavus Adolphus gave up the Swedish claim to Finmark; and in 1751 mutual renunciations brought the relations of Swedish and Norwegian (Danish) Lapland to their present position.

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  • Aristotle goes somewhat further in recognizing the moral value of friendship (c1xAia); and though he considers that in its highest form it can be realized only by the fellowship of the wise and good, he yet extends the notion so as to include the domestic affections, and takes notice of the importance of mutual kindness in binding together all human societies.

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  • Cicero, on the other hand, in his paraphrase of a Stoic treatise on external duties (De officiis), ranks the rendering of positive services to other men as a chief department of social duty; and the Stoics generally recognized the universal fellowship and natural mutual claims of human beings as such.

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  • Human law is required, not merely to determine the details for which natural law gives no intuitive guidance, but also to supply the force necessary for practically securing, among imperfect men, the observance of the most necessary rules of mutual behaviour.

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  • Thus there had become current the conception of a " state of nature " in which individuals or single families lived side by side - under none other than those " natural " laws which prohibited mutual injury and interference in the free use of the goods of the earth common to all, and upheld parental authority, fidelity of wives, and the observance of compacts freely made.

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  • This conception Grotius took, and gave it additional force and solidity by using the principles of this natural law for the determination of international rights and duties, it being obvious that independent nations, in their corporate capacities, were still in that " state of nature " in their mutual relations.

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  • In cases involving cross actions with mutual accounts, say between an Englishman and a German, if the German constitutes himself plaintiff he must sue his opponent before the British court, and vice versa.

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  • The field we have defined is divisible into at least two parts, that of Astronomy proper, or " Astrometry," which treats of the motions, mutual relations and dimensions of the heavenly bodies; and that of Astrophysics, which treats of their physical constitution.

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  • Modern theoretical astronomy, taken in the most limited sense, is based upon Celestial Mechanics, the science by which, using purely deductive mechanical methods, the laws of motion of the heavenly bodies are derived by deductive methods from their mutual gravitation towards each other.

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  • Celestial Mechanics is, strictly speaking, that branch of applied mathematics which, by deductive processes, derives the laws of motion of the heavenly bodies from their gravitation towards each other, or from the mutual action of the parts which form them.

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  • When the subject was taken up by the continental mathematicians, using the analytical method, the question naturally arose whether the motions of three bodies under their mutual attraction could not be determined with a degree of rigour approximating to that with which Newton had solved the problem of two bodies.

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  • In the language of algebra putting m l, m2, m 3, &c. for the masses of the bodies, r1.2 r1.3 r2.3, &c. for their mutual distances apart; vi, v 2, v 3, &c., for the velocities with which they are moving at any moment; these quantities will continually satisfy the equation orbit, appear as arbitrary constants, introduced by the process of integration.

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  • With these expressions we express their mutual action, or their pull upon each other at any and every moment.

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  • Hence the position of the plane of the orbit of each planet is continually changing in consequence of their mutual action.

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  • The result of these repetitions is that, during a number of revolutions, the special mutual actions of the two planets at these three points of their orbits repeat themselves, while the actions corresponding to the three intermediate arcs are wanting.

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  • Thus it happens that if the mutual actions are balanced through a period of a few revolutions only there is a small residuum of forces corresponding to the three regions in question, which repeats itself in the same way, and which, if it continued indefinitely, would entirely change the forms of the two orbits.

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  • The action of the sun alone would completely throw them out of these planes as each satellite orbit would rotate independently; but the effect of the mutual action is to keep all of the planes in close coincidence with the plane of the planet's equator.

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  • It consisted, first, in the identification, by strict numerical comparisons, of terrestrial gravity with the mutual attraction of the heavenly bodies; secondly, in the following out of its mechanical consequences throughout the solar system.

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  • The descriptive branch found its principle of development in the growing powers of the telescope, and had little to do with mathematical theory; which, on the contrary, was closely allied, by relations of mutual helpfulness, with practical astronomy, or " astrometry."

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  • The mutual relations and exact orographical connexions of several of the ranges east and north of the Khan-tengri group are not yet elucidated.

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  • Laws resulted from the combination of men who agreed for mutual protection to surrender individual freedom of action.

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  • Though it is quite obvious that the theory of a social contract (or compact, as it is also called) contains a considerable element of truth - that loose associations for mutual protection preceded any elaborate idea or structure of law, and that government cannot be based exclusively on force - yet it is open to the equally obvious objection that the very idea of contract belongs to a more advanced stage in human development than the hypothesis itself demands.

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  • The Triple Alliance of 1882 between Germany, Austria and Italy was ostensibly directed to the preservation of European peace against any possible aggressive action of France or Russia; and this led in turn, some ten years later, to the Dual Alliance between Russia and France, for mutual support in case of any hostile action of the other powers.

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  • They must respect the rights of all the cities, and thus promote unity based on mutual confidence.

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  • Throughout the domain of knowledge the two forms are found in constant mutual relations, another proof of the fundamental unity of thought and being or of the objectivity of knowledge.

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  • Besides substituting Hungarian for Austrian sovereignty, it provided that the diet and the ban should control local affairs, subject to the Croatian minister in the Hungarian cabinet, and that Croatia-Slavonia should pay 55% of its revenue to Hungary for mutual and imperial expenses, but should be represented in the Hungarian parliament by thirty-six delegates, and should continue to use Serbo-Croatian as the official language.

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  • The mutual love of these two, proceeding from the relation they hold to one another, symbolizes the Holy Spirit.

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  • In 1870 negotiations were opened between France and Great Britain on the basis of a mutual exchange of territories in West Africa.

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  • A knowledge of being and existences (concrete, not abstract) and their mutual relations, is necessary as the beginning of philosophy.

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  • Among the western Baluba, or Bashilange, a remarkable politico-religious revolution took place at a comparatively recent date, initiated by a secret society termed Bena Riamba or " Sons of Hemp," and resulted in the subordination of the old fetishism to a cult of hemp, in accordance with which all hemp-smokers consider themselves brothers, and the duty of mutual hospitality, &c., is acknowledged.

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  • There was no trace of a political idea in these disputes; the mutual hatred of two women aggravated jealousy to the point of causing terrible civil wars from 561 to 613, and these finally created a national conflict which resulted in the dismemberment of the Frankish empire.

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  • Any deprivation or supersession of the count might impoverish, dispossess or ruin the vassals of the entire county; so that all, vassals or officials, small and great, feeling their danger, united their efforts, and lent each other mutual assistance against the permanent menace of an overweening monarchy.

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  • The idea of public authority had been replaced by one Dismemthat was simpler and therefore better fitted for a half- berinent of civilized societythat of dependence of the weak on the kingthe strong, voluntarily entered on by means of mutual dow.

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  • Neither did he love his brother, Gaston of Orleans, and the feeling was mutual; for the latter, remaining for twenty years heir-presumptive to a crown which he could neither defend nor seize, posed as the beloved prince in all the conspiracies against Richelieu, and issued from them each time as a Judas.

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  • By these momentous inductions the geometrical theory of the solar system was perfected, and a hitherto unimagined symmetry was perceived to regulate the mutual relations of its members.

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  • Expulsion was impossible and combination only attainable by mutual agreement, and that was never secured.

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  • It derives its celebrity ffom the demonstration by Laplace that to whatever mutual actions all the bodies of a system may be subjected, the position of this plane remains invariable.

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  • A research into the mutual perturbations of Jupiter and Saturn secured for him the prize of the Berlin Academy in 1830, and a memoir on cometary disturbances was crowned by the Paris Academy in 1850.

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  • Zamoyski was at first in favour of a member of the Báthory family, with which he was united by ties of amity and mutual interest; but on becoming convinced of the impossibility of any such candidature, he pronounced for a native Pole, or for whichever foreign prince might be found most profitable to Poland.

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  • They are deeply separated by religious differences, and their mutual jealousies, their inordinate vanity, English Miles 0 5 io 20 30 40 50 Railways Capitals of Vilayets &c. C Longitude East 42 of Greenwich their versatility and their cosmopolitan character must always be an obstacle to the realization of the dreams of the nationalists.

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  • By mutual consent no allusion was made to the death of the Wangs.

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  • The custom by which neighbouring churches sought mutual aid and advice, prepared the way for the Presbyterian system of church government, which was established by an ecclesiastical assembly held at Saybrook in 1708, the church constitution there framed being known as the " Saybrook Platform."

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  • In 1445 an old feud with the archbishop of Magdeburg was settled, and in 1457 a treaty of mutual succession was made with the houses of Saxony and Hesse.

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  • But the ultimate conception of understanding, that of the world of objects, quantitatively determined, and standing in relation of mutual reciprocity to one another, is not a final ground of explanation.

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  • His brother is Anteros, the god of mutual love, who punishes those who do not return the love of others, without which Eros could not thrive; he is sometimes described as the opponent of Eros.

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  • That their feelings for each other were mutual, she had no doubt.

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  • They chatted further about general matters—mutual friends, and from Weller, some advice on campaigning.

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  • While Dean distrusted the Dawkins, given their mutual animosity toward one another, any collective effort on their part—on any project—seemed questionable, if not impossible.

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  • Both told childhood tales, stories of happy memories, each prompting the memory of yet another incident to their mutual delight.

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  • The job interview especially is a moment of mutual acquaintance.

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  • Despite amiable companions, continually endeavoring to bestow mutual pleasure, I was now alone.

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  • This also gives us a great opportunity to leverage synergies from our successful mutual fund business in India.

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  • Here comes all the mutual admiration for a mediocre winner.

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  • But I get annoyed by blogs whose comments boxes are nothing but mutual affirmation.

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  • Unemployment was a general experience for the working class as a whole and there was much more solidarity and mutual aid.

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  • Across swathes of domestic policy, the mutual animosity has been the ally of stasis.

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  • So the relationship has to be an equable one - for who wants to be locked into mutual antagonism for a decade?

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  • Apart from the mutual antipathy that existed between them, their lives took different directions.

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  • The EMEA also arbitrates where mutual recognition is not possible under the decentralized procedure.

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  • We had a kind of mutual armistice with the Germans in the trenches in front of us.

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  • Meanwhile Old Mutual, the country's largest life assurer, is looking outwards.

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  • He didn't simply hope to foster public attitudes toward indigenous peoples that would be the basis for a multi-cultural society based on mutual respect.

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  • Think disclosure and mutual back-scratching, and youâre half-way there.

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  • The Government is committed to working proactively to detect international bribery, open investigations and cooperate with mutual legal assistance requests.

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  • We will only undertake direct casework by mutual consent.

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  • The feeling on the part of other chimps was mutual; they tended to avoid him.

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  • She was become a bond to both, an influence over each, a mutual concord.

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  • The living mechanisms to ensure this mutual cooperation are slowly established.

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  • Through diplomatic exchanges we promote counterterrorism cooperation with friendly nations that serves our mutual interests.

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  • The payoff of mutual defection, DD, provides the baseline outcome that yields a payoff of zero to both participants.

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  • There is some truth in the romantic view of warm, close working class community supported by mutual dependence.

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  • That Mona isnât in the office all the time reinforces that mutual dependency.

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  • More importantly, neither side has experience of mutual deterrence.

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  • Is it possible to forgive and to overcome the mutual distrust?

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  • There is some mutual respect, there is some mutual distrust.

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  • There may be, and should be, some set time for mutual edification.

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  • It was our prayer that the weekend would be of mutual encouragement and I believe that intercession was answered positively.

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  • By 1727, for reasons that are obscure, her friendship with Pope had turned to mutual enmity.

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  • A sincere friendship founded on mutual esteem, had sprung up between these two.

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  • If you carry out a mutual exchange, there are certain things you are responsible for.

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  • But the mutual exclusion in such cases need not survive the addition of a verb.

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  • We are now embarking on an investigation into an altogether higher level of complexity in maintaining mutual exclusivity in signaling.

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  • Like us, they are a mutual organization, looking after members, not external shareholders.

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  • They spoke, therefore, of Mrs. Churchill's death with mutual forbearance.

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  • Bond mutual funds As the name suggests, bond mutual funds invest in bonds and other debt securities.

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  • The mutual opposition was largely futile, if only because all three initiatives shared the characteristic of being strictly voluntary.

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  • It is the planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain goodwill and mutual understanding between an organization and its publics.

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  • In that sense the Kurdish problem in Turkey is genuinely soluble through mutual goodwill.

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  • One area where mutual adjustment may be necessary is with those blind students who have a personal guide dog.

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  • The mutual sea horizon turns out to be just south of Port Ellen on Islay.

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  • In social issues, mutual distrust plays such a key role, rendering society incapable of engaging in concerted action.

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  • Once participants are contributing to the conference, a problem of mutual incomprehension arises.

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  • The good news is that in many cases these voltages can be measured through mutual inductance.

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  • As an authorized insurer the Mutual will be eligible to purchase cover from Pool Re.

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  • Friendly Societies are mutual insurers, offering long-term saving, pensions, healthcare benefits and other forms of personal insurance and investment.

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  • What are the stakes in drawing out the mutual interrelation of material and virtual?

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  • The arts of Tyrrel occasioned both a good deal of annoyance, by false representations calculated to excite their mutual jealousy.

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  • Umana's teachers ' insurance John Hancock mutual life insurance that publishes language.

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  • All that now remained was for Parky and Bestie to have an orgasmic, mutual love-in over Beckham.

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  • There's a big love-in at the end of mutual thanks from all involved, I wholeheartedly applaud their efforts also.

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  • We have experienced a breakdown in societal attitudes concerning the practicality of staying married throughout the mutual lifetime of a couple.

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  • According to Liam, ' because of the extraordinary discrepancy in height between us '; a band united only by their mutual mistrust.

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  • Is there mutual influence or is the rise of Christianity to be considered an evolution parallel to pagan monotheism?

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  • The Arthritis Care Group which meets monthly to give members mutual support.

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  • It is also described as ' fully mutual ' - meaning that all the members are tenants, and all the tenants are members.

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  • Consequently, Potter's multiculturalist diagnosis - apparently mutual respect will solve our crisis - carries little cinematic weight.

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  • And obviously mutual receptions bring most benefit because then both parties gain from each other's strength.

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  • But will there be enough mutual interest to develop a community of interest.... and is that the best way of thinking about sharing ideas?

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  • There was much discussion and the feeling became mutual until two mountaineers had their blood up and felt irresistible!

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  • The Laboratory Group will provide mutual with analytical chemistry and stability services for revenue of more than $ 1.5m per annum.

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  • We have mutual Exchange registers in our reception which anyone can come in and view between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

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  • We want to encourage networking between such people, for the purpose of mutual support.

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  • In this regard, I would like to propose the concept of shared or mutual value-creation as a behavioral norm for the new era.

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  • The agreement we sign with partners reflects our mutual obligations.

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  • And, with mutual courtesies, the little old maid and I went on our respective ways.

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  • There is no mutual defense pact ­ Nato remains the mutual defense organization for the Western alliance.

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  • Little wonder that " mutual gains " is becoming more common parlance in British workplaces.

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  • Anyway if we seemed peculiar to Howard Johnson's that afternoon, the feeling was mutual.

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  • Having American Community Mutual Insurance Company a dilated of emergency physicians a quot frozen.

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  • Yet mutual misunderstandings and negative preconceptions remain to be overcome.

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  • Our mutual recognition of the respective powers of our objects, however, is a struggle.

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  • Given two new first-order variables a and b, the translations ST a and ST b are defined by mutual recursion.

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  • Mutual belief is defined in terms of an infinite regress of nested beliefs.

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  • In the context of the model this works by mutual reinforcement.