This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

mutineers

mutineers Sentence Examples

  • They chose their leader (eletto), marched into Brabant, and established themselves at Alost, where they were joined by other bands of mutineers.

  • Most of the rajas remained loyal; and the capture of the town of Kotah, which had been held by the mutineers of that state, in March 1858, marked the extinction of armed rebellion.

  • Wheeler with his small band of soldiers and the European and Eurasian residents were exposed for 21 days to the fire of the mutineers, is merely a bare field, containing the well where many women and children were shot while getting water.

  • Of the surviving mutineers over twelve hundred were executed, some of them by his own hand, and the entire corps was disbanded.

  • In 1797 he was called on to pacify the mutineers at Spithead, and his great influence with the seamen who trusted him was conspicuously shown.

  • He was expelled in 1311 by his Catalonian mercenaries; the mutineers bestowed the duchy " of Athens and Neopatras " on their leader, Roger Deslaur, and, in the following year, on Frederick of Aragon, king of Sicily.

  • But Abd-ul-Hamid had issued a free pardon to the mutineers, and the committee had now decided that the new regime would never be secure while the sovereign favoured reaction.

  • Zeligowski's so-called mutineers, the matter was taken up by the League of Nations, which strove to establish the fate of Vilna and other dispute I areas by means of a plebis:ite.

  • On the 19th of October a battle was fought between the mutineers and Macdonald's force, in which the former were defeated.

  • Leaving a small column to deal with Mwanga's force in the south, and another with Kabarega, Macdonald pursued the mutineers, overtook them in the swamps of Lake Kioga, and after a couple of successful skirmishes returned to Kampala, leaving Captain (afterwards Colonel) E.

  • Martyr inflicted another heavy defeat on the mutineers at Mruli.

  • remnant of the Sudanese mutineers in 1900-1901.

  • The twenty-five mutineers at first all returned to Tahiti.

  • "They have adopted an extraordinary patois, derived from the language of the Tahitian women who accompanied the mutineers of the" Bounty "to Pitcairn Island, although most of the adults can speak the English language fairly well" (R.

  • Murray, Pitcairn (London, 1860), revised to date by C. C. Elcum (1885); Lady Belcher, The Mutineers of the "Bounty" (London, 1870); J.

  • This he did with safety in the face of a large and threatening crowd, and thus dealt the mutineers a heavy blow.

  • In 1857 the Gwalior contingent joined the mutineers; but the maharaja himself remained loyal to the British, and fled from his capital until the place was retaken and his authority restored by Sir Hugh Rose (Lord Strathnairn) on the 19th of June 1858.

  • On arriving at Dufile in August 1888, Emin and Jephson were made prisoners by the Egyptian mutineers.

  • In October Omar-Saleh, the Mahdist commander, took Rejaf and sent messengers to Dufile to summon Emin to surrender; but on the 15th of November the mutineers released both Emin and Jephson, who returned to Lake Albert with some 600 refugees, and joined Stanley in February 1889.

  • In July 1820 a military mutiny broke out at Caserta, led by two officers and a priest, the mutineers demanding a constitution although professing loyalty to the king.

  • He propitiated the mutineers by concessions, but as soon as they had gone; he let matters resume their old course.

  • The mass of the mutineers summoned Ali to the Caliphate, and compelled even Talha and Zobair to do him homage.

  • The scheme broke down through an accident, but in the following year a military rising broke out, the mutineers cheering for the king and the constitution.

  • The substance of the king's defence was that he had been a mere instrument in the hands of the mutineers.

  • In 1857 the raja Binni Singh sent a force of Mussulmans and Rajputs to relieve the British garrison in Agra; the Mussulmans, however, deserted, and the rest were defeated by the mutineers.

  • During the Sepoy war of 1857-1858 the whole of the Bara Banki talukdars joined the mutineers, but offered no serious resistance after the capture of Lucknow.

  • Its capture by the mutineers, its siege, and its subsequent recapture by the British have been often told, and nothing beyond a short notice is called for here.

  • These cast in their lot with the mutineers, and commenced by killing their officers.

  • The magazine was attacked by the mutineers, but the little band defended to the last the enormous accumulation of munitions of war stored there, and, when further defence was hopeless, fired the magazine.

  • Barnard, who had succeeded as commanderin-chief on the death of General Anson, routed the mutineers with a handful of Europeans and Sikhs, after a severe action at Badliki-Serai, and encamped upon the Ridge that overlooks the city.

  • A great struggle took place on the centenary of the battle of Plassey (June 23), and another on the 25th of August; but on both occasions the mutineers were repulsed with heavy loss.

  • On the flight of the mutineers, the king and several members of the royal family took refuge at Humayun's tomb.

  • The mutineers were eventually defeated; but in 1897, while Baron Dhanis was making his way with a large expedition towards the Nile, the Batetelas again revolted, murdered several of their white officers, and took possession of a large area of the eastern portions of the state.

  • Although defeated on several occasions by the Free State forces, the mutineers were not finally dispersed until near the end of 1900, when the last remnants were reported to have crossed into German territory and surrendered their arms. In other parts of the country the state had difficulties with native chiefs, several of whom preserved their autonomy.

  • The Mahommedan zemindars were injured by the reassessment of the land revenue, which was carried through in the interests of the ryots, and the power of the zemindars was formidable, while that of the ryots was negligible; though it must be remembered that the peasantry as a whole gave no assistance to the mutineers.

  • On the 29th of March, two days before its arrival, a sepoy named Manghal Pandi, from whom the mutineers afterwards came to be spoken of as "Pandies," drunk with bhang and enthusiasm, attempted to provoke a mutiny in the 34th Bengal infantry, and shot the adjutant, but Hearsey's personal courage suppressed the danger.

  • A few of the mutineers took part in this work; but the great majority of them, fearing the vengeance of the British troops, hastened to move off, rather a mob than an army, upon the Delhi road.

  • There is a general agreement that if a man like Gillespie or Nicholson had been in command of the station, the strong force at his disposal would have enabled him to strike such a deadly blow at the fleeing mutineers as might have stamped out the Mutiny.

  • But when the mutineers reached Delhi they were at once joined by the city mob and the king's guards in proclaiming a revival of the Mogul empire.

  • The Meerut troops, at last roused from their inaction, joined Barnard on the 7th of June, after a successful affair with the mutineers, and the next day the action of Badli-ki-Serai enabled the British force to occupy the famous Ridge, which they never abandoned till the final assault.

  • The mutineers were completely cowed; the king of Delhi was taken and reserved for trial; and his sons were shot by Catain Hodson, after unconditional surrender, an act which has since been the theme of much reprobation, but which commended itself at the time to Hodson's comrades as wise and justifiable.

  • On the 16th of August he defeated the mutineers at Bithur.

  • Though the two great princes of Central India, Sindhia and Holkar, wisely and fortunately remained true to the British, troops belonging to both of them joined the mutineers.

  • On the 3rd of March he forced the pass of Madanpur, and took the whole of the enemy's defences in rear, throwing them into panic. On the 21st he began the siege of Jhansi, the stronghold of the mutineers in Central India, with a garrison of I i,000 men.

  • But the fighting races of the Punjab saw no reason for casting in their lot with the mutineers, and the great majority of the independent princes who had nothing of which to complain, like Patiala in the Punjab,.

  • The lack of any central principle or common interest was shown in the divided counsels and sporadic action of the mutineers and their allies, which made them an easy prey to the solid and audacious British forces.

  • The disaffection had spread practically to the whole of Admiral Duncans fleet, and by the beginning of June the mutineers were blockading the Thames with no less than 26 vessels.

  • From Meerut the mutineers, after some acts of outrage and murder, moved on Delhi, the capital of the old Mogul empire, which became the headquarters of the mutiny.

  • It was converted into a fort by the mutineers in 1857, and after its capture by the British was of importance in connexion with the military operations around Lucknow.

  • The troops sent against them, under General Pepe, himself a Carbonaro, sympathized with the mutineers, and the king, being powerless to resist, granted the constitution (13th of July), which he swore on the altar to observe.

  • NANA' 'SAHIB, the common designation of Dandu Panth, an adopted son of the ex-peshwa of the Mahrattas, Baji Rao, who took a leading part in the great Indian Mutiny, and was proclaimed peshwa by the mutineers.

  • For hours he stood, or sat on horseback, amid the surging crowd, facing the mutinous soldiers - who had loaded their muskets and formed square - while effort after effort was made to bring them to reason, sometimes at the cost of life - as in the case of Count Miloradovich, military governor of St Petersburg, who was mortally wounded by a;pistol shot while arguing with the mutineers.

  • Thereafter, all that was needed to coerce the mutineers was a large counterforce and the threat of being shot.

  • It contains mutineers, pirates, and a big treasure.

  • The wicked mutineers attack the ship killing one person, shooting them in the head.

  • Astyages's army mutineers and the Cyrus then marches with his own army, and the Medes who have joined him, to Ecbatana.

  • In th.e midst of their deliberations the news arrived that the mutineers had marched from Alost on Antwerp, overpowered the troops of Champagney, and sacked the town with terrible barbarities (Nov.

  • They chose their leader (eletto), marched into Brabant, and established themselves at Alost, where they were joined by other bands of mutineers.

  • Most of the rajas remained loyal; and the capture of the town of Kotah, which had been held by the mutineers of that state, in March 1858, marked the extinction of armed rebellion.

  • Wheeler with his small band of soldiers and the European and Eurasian residents were exposed for 21 days to the fire of the mutineers, is merely a bare field, containing the well where many women and children were shot while getting water.

  • Of the surviving mutineers over twelve hundred were executed, some of them by his own hand, and the entire corps was disbanded.

  • In 1797 he was called on to pacify the mutineers at Spithead, and his great influence with the seamen who trusted him was conspicuously shown.

  • He was expelled in 1311 by his Catalonian mercenaries; the mutineers bestowed the duchy " of Athens and Neopatras " on their leader, Roger Deslaur, and, in the following year, on Frederick of Aragon, king of Sicily.

  • But Abd-ul-Hamid had issued a free pardon to the mutineers, and the committee had now decided that the new regime would never be secure while the sovereign favoured reaction.

  • Zeligowski's so-called mutineers, the matter was taken up by the League of Nations, which strove to establish the fate of Vilna and other dispute I areas by means of a plebis:ite.

  • On the 19th of October a battle was fought between the mutineers and Macdonald's force, in which the former were defeated.

  • Leaving a small column to deal with Mwanga's force in the south, and another with Kabarega, Macdonald pursued the mutineers, overtook them in the swamps of Lake Kioga, and after a couple of successful skirmishes returned to Kampala, leaving Captain (afterwards Colonel) E.

  • Martyr inflicted another heavy defeat on the mutineers at Mruli.

  • remnant of the Sudanese mutineers in 1900-1901.

  • The twenty-five mutineers at first all returned to Tahiti.

  • "They have adopted an extraordinary patois, derived from the language of the Tahitian women who accompanied the mutineers of the" Bounty "to Pitcairn Island, although most of the adults can speak the English language fairly well" (R.

  • Murray, Pitcairn (London, 1860), revised to date by C. C. Elcum (1885); Lady Belcher, The Mutineers of the "Bounty" (London, 1870); J.

  • This he did with safety in the face of a large and threatening crowd, and thus dealt the mutineers a heavy blow.

  • In 1857 the Gwalior contingent joined the mutineers; but the maharaja himself remained loyal to the British, and fled from his capital until the place was retaken and his authority restored by Sir Hugh Rose (Lord Strathnairn) on the 19th of June 1858.

  • On arriving at Dufile in August 1888, Emin and Jephson were made prisoners by the Egyptian mutineers.

  • In October Omar-Saleh, the Mahdist commander, took Rejaf and sent messengers to Dufile to summon Emin to surrender; but on the 15th of November the mutineers released both Emin and Jephson, who returned to Lake Albert with some 600 refugees, and joined Stanley in February 1889.

  • Last of all came Bahadur Shah, who atoned for his association with the mutineers in 1857 by banish ment to Burma.

  • In July 1820 a military mutiny broke out at Caserta, led by two officers and a priest, the mutineers demanding a constitution although professing loyalty to the king.

  • He propitiated the mutineers by concessions, but as soon as they had gone; he let matters resume their old course.

  • The mass of the mutineers summoned Ali to the Caliphate, and compelled even Talha and Zobair to do him homage.

  • The scheme broke down through an accident, but in the following year a military rising broke out, the mutineers cheering for the king and the constitution.

  • The substance of the king's defence was that he had been a mere instrument in the hands of the mutineers.

  • In 1857 the raja Binni Singh sent a force of Mussulmans and Rajputs to relieve the British garrison in Agra; the Mussulmans, however, deserted, and the rest were defeated by the mutineers.

  • During the Sepoy war of 1857-1858 the whole of the Bara Banki talukdars joined the mutineers, but offered no serious resistance after the capture of Lucknow.

  • Its capture by the mutineers, its siege, and its subsequent recapture by the British have been often told, and nothing beyond a short notice is called for here.

  • These cast in their lot with the mutineers, and commenced by killing their officers.

  • The magazine was attacked by the mutineers, but the little band defended to the last the enormous accumulation of munitions of war stored there, and, when further defence was hopeless, fired the magazine.

  • Barnard, who had succeeded as commanderin-chief on the death of General Anson, routed the mutineers with a handful of Europeans and Sikhs, after a severe action at Badliki-Serai, and encamped upon the Ridge that overlooks the city.

  • A great struggle took place on the centenary of the battle of Plassey (June 23), and another on the 25th of August; but on both occasions the mutineers were repulsed with heavy loss.

  • On the flight of the mutineers, the king and several members of the royal family took refuge at Humayun's tomb.

  • The mutineers were eventually defeated; but in 1897, while Baron Dhanis was making his way with a large expedition towards the Nile, the Batetelas again revolted, murdered several of their white officers, and took possession of a large area of the eastern portions of the state.

  • Although defeated on several occasions by the Free State forces, the mutineers were not finally dispersed until near the end of 1900, when the last remnants were reported to have crossed into German territory and surrendered their arms. In other parts of the country the state had difficulties with native chiefs, several of whom preserved their autonomy.

  • The Mahommedan zemindars were injured by the reassessment of the land revenue, which was carried through in the interests of the ryots, and the power of the zemindars was formidable, while that of the ryots was negligible; though it must be remembered that the peasantry as a whole gave no assistance to the mutineers.

  • On the 29th of March, two days before its arrival, a sepoy named Manghal Pandi, from whom the mutineers afterwards came to be spoken of as "Pandies," drunk with bhang and enthusiasm, attempted to provoke a mutiny in the 34th Bengal infantry, and shot the adjutant, but Hearsey's personal courage suppressed the danger.

  • A few of the mutineers took part in this work; but the great majority of them, fearing the vengeance of the British troops, hastened to move off, rather a mob than an army, upon the Delhi road.

  • There is a general agreement that if a man like Gillespie or Nicholson had been in command of the station, the strong force at his disposal would have enabled him to strike such a deadly blow at the fleeing mutineers as might have stamped out the Mutiny.

  • But when the mutineers reached Delhi they were at once joined by the city mob and the king's guards in proclaiming a revival of the Mogul empire.

  • The Meerut troops, at last roused from their inaction, joined Barnard on the 7th of June, after a successful affair with the mutineers, and the next day the action of Badli-ki-Serai enabled the British force to occupy the famous Ridge, which they never abandoned till the final assault.

  • The mutineers were completely cowed; the king of Delhi was taken and reserved for trial; and his sons were shot by Catain Hodson, after unconditional surrender, an act which has since been the theme of much reprobation, but which commended itself at the time to Hodson's comrades as wise and justifiable.

  • On the 16th of August he defeated the mutineers at Bithur.

  • Though the two great princes of Central India, Sindhia and Holkar, wisely and fortunately remained true to the British, troops belonging to both of them joined the mutineers.

  • On the 3rd of March he forced the pass of Madanpur, and took the whole of the enemy's defences in rear, throwing them into panic. On the 21st he began the siege of Jhansi, the stronghold of the mutineers in Central India, with a garrison of I i,000 men.

  • But the fighting races of the Punjab saw no reason for casting in their lot with the mutineers, and the great majority of the independent princes who had nothing of which to complain, like Patiala in the Punjab,.

  • The lack of any central principle or common interest was shown in the divided counsels and sporadic action of the mutineers and their allies, which made them an easy prey to the solid and audacious British forces.

  • Even before the fall of Delhi, Canning had been adversely criticized - "Clemency Canning" he was scornfully called - for announcing his intention to discriminate between the guilt of various classes of mutineers.

  • The disaffection had spread practically to the whole of Admiral Duncans fleet, and by the beginning of June the mutineers were blockading the Thames with no less than 26 vessels.

  • From Meerut the mutineers, after some acts of outrage and murder, moved on Delhi, the capital of the old Mogul empire, which became the headquarters of the mutiny.

  • It was converted into a fort by the mutineers in 1857, and after its capture by the British was of importance in connexion with the military operations around Lucknow.

  • The troops sent against them, under General Pepe, himself a Carbonaro, sympathized with the mutineers, and the king, being powerless to resist, granted the constitution (13th of July), which he swore on the altar to observe.

  • NANA' 'SAHIB, the common designation of Dandu Panth, an adopted son of the ex-peshwa of the Mahrattas, Baji Rao, who took a leading part in the great Indian Mutiny, and was proclaimed peshwa by the mutineers.

  • For hours he stood, or sat on horseback, amid the surging crowd, facing the mutinous soldiers - who had loaded their muskets and formed square - while effort after effort was made to bring them to reason, sometimes at the cost of life - as in the case of Count Miloradovich, military governor of St Petersburg, who was mortally wounded by a;pistol shot while arguing with the mutineers.

  • In it, mutineers take over a generation ship, and knowledge that the ship is, in fact, a ship, is lost to succeeding generations, as inhabitants grow up thinking that their one ship is the entire universe.

Browse other sentences examples →