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musical

musical

musical Sentence Examples

  • So, Elisabeth gets her musical talent from you.

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  • Some bells are musical and others are unmusical.

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  • If nothing else, all this upheaval had given him back his musical voice.

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  • If nothing else, all this upheaval had given him back his musical voice.

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  • The natural basis for a standard musical pitch is the voice, particularly the male voice, which has been of greater importance historically.

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  • From 1871 he was musical critic for La Liberte.

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  • Finally it must be remembered that musical euphony and emotional effect are inseparable from considerations of harmony and polyphony.

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  • The musical development of the city was stimulated by the creation of a symphony orchestra.

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  • Joncieres' admiration for Wagner asserted itself rather in a musical than a dramatic sense.

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  • Tannhauser is on a grander scale, but its musical execution is disappointing.

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  • The queer-looking Japanese musical instruments, and their beautiful works of art were interesting.

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  • The date of the evidence, however, has not been fixed with unanimity, and this very The musical service of the temple has no place in the Pentateuch, but was considerably developed under the second temple and attracted the special attention of Greek observers (Theophrastus, apud Porphyry, de Abstin.

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  • Some of her notes are musical and charming.

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  • And as there is no branch of art in which mechanical improvements, and the consequent change in the nature of technical difficulties, bear so directly upon the possibilities and methods of external effect, it follows that an exclusive preponderance of this view is not without serious disadvantage from the standpoint of general musical culture.

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  • And as there is no branch of art in which mechanical improvements, and the consequent change in the nature of technical difficulties, bear so directly upon the possibilities and methods of external effect, it follows that an exclusive preponderance of this view is not without serious disadvantage from the standpoint of general musical culture.

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  • "Oh, he's not a vamp anymore," Yully said with her musical Irish lilt.

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  • The majority of them are addressed to Mersenne, and deal with problems of physics, musical theory (in which he took a special interest), and mathematics.

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  • PITCH The pitch of a musical sound is aurally defined by its absolute position in the scale and by its relative position with regard to other musical sounds.

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  • The pitch of a musical sound depends on the number of cycles passed through by the fluctuations of the pressure per unit of time; the loudness depends on the amount or the amplitude of the fluctuation in each cycle; the quality depends on the form or the nature of the fluctuation in each cycle.

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  • Among the leading and more distinctive items were printing and publishing ($21,023,855 in 1905); sugar and molasses refining ($ 1 5,74 6, 547 in 1900; figures not published in 1905 because of the industry being in the hands of a single owner); men's clothing (in 1900, $8,609,475, in 1905, $11,246,004); women's clothing (in 1900, $3,258,483, in 1905, $5,705,470); boots and shoes (in 1900, $3,882,655, in 1905, $5,575,927); boot and shoe cut stock (in 1905, $5, 211, 445); malt liquors (in 1900, $7,518,668, in 1905, $6,715,215); confectionery (in 1900, $4,455,184, in 1905, $6,210,023); tobacco products (in 1900, $3,504,603, in 1905, $4,59 2, 698); pianos and organs ($3,670,771 in 1905); other musical instruments and materials (in 1905, $231,780); rubber and elastic goods (in 1900, $3,139,783, in 1905, $2,887,323); steam fittings and heating apparatus (in 1900, $2,876,327, in 1905, $3,354, 020); bottling, furniture, &c. Art tiles and pottery are manufactured in Chelsea.

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  • "Oh, he's not a vamp anymore," Yully said with her musical Irish lilt.

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  • If it is true that the violin is the most perfect of musical instruments, then Greek is the violin of human thought.

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  • Its other manufactures include machinery, pianos and other musical instruments, cotton goods, cigars, furniture, leather, paper, colours and chemicals.

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  • Ellis offered the suggestion of a much higher pitch for this Cammerton in his lecture "On the History of Musical Pitch," read before the Society of Arts, London (Journ.

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  • The so-called musical arc of Duddell has been the subject of considerable investigation, and physicists are not entirely in accordance as to the true explanation of the mode of production of the oscillations.

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  • In 1831 Wheatstone by his " magic lyre" experiment showed that, when the sounding-boards of two musical instruments are connected together by a rod of pine wood, a tune played on one will be faithfully reproduced by the other.

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  • This only answers, however, for telephoning musical sounds to short distances.

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  • During his exile Wagner matured his plans and perfected his musical style; but it was not until some considerable time after his return that any of the works he then meditated were placed upon the stage.

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  • Ellis offered the suggestion of a much higher pitch for this Cammerton in his lecture "On the History of Musical Pitch," read before the Society of Arts, London (Journ.

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  • In 1831 Wheatstone by his " magic lyre" experiment showed that, when the sounding-boards of two musical instruments are connected together by a rod of pine wood, a tune played on one will be faithfully reproduced by the other.

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  • This only answers, however, for telephoning musical sounds to short distances.

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  • We essentially view scarcity like the children's game "musical chairs."

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  • Perhaps it requires musical ability or style or sassiness.

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  • Other countries have gradually followed, and, with few exceptions, the low pitch derived from the Diapason Normal may be said to prevail throughout the musical world.

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  • In connexion with the present subject it is important to notice the three characteristics of a musical sound, namely, pitch, loudness and quality.

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  • The Udgatri's duties being mainly confined to the chanting of hymns made up of detached groups of verses of the Rigveda, as collected in the Samaveda-samhita, the more important Brahmanas of this sacerdotal class deal chiefly with the various modes of chanting, and the modifications which the verses have to undergo in their musical setting.

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  • As a musical centre Boston rivals New York.

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  • Other countries have gradually followed, and, with few exceptions, the low pitch derived from the Diapason Normal may be said to prevail throughout the musical world.

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  • In connexion with the present subject it is important to notice the three characteristics of a musical sound, namely, pitch, loudness and quality.

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  • The Udgatri's duties being mainly confined to the chanting of hymns made up of detached groups of verses of the Rigveda, as collected in the Samaveda-samhita, the more important Brahmanas of this sacerdotal class deal chiefly with the various modes of chanting, and the modifications which the verses have to undergo in their musical setting.

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  • As a musical centre Boston rivals New York.

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  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.

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  • They sang at intervals throughout the night, and were again as musical as ever just before and about dawn.

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  • The crowning complication in the effect of Der fliegende Hollander, Tannhauser and Lohengrin on the musical thought of the 10th century was that the unprecedented fusion of their musical with their dramatic contents revealed some of the meaning of serious music to ears that had been deaf to the classics.

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  • The mature Wagner would not have carried out twenty bars in his flattest scenes with so little musical invention.

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  • The Morelianos are noted for their love of music, and musical competitions are held each year, the best band being sent to the city of Mexico to compete with similar organizations from other states.

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  • Our task is simply to furnish the general reader with an account of the types of instrumentation prevalent at various musical periods, and their relation to other branches of the art.

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  • But Boetius belonged to the school of musical writers who based their science on the method of Pythagoras.

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  • The earliest of these phenomena were the raps already spoken of and other sounds occurring without apparent physical cause, and the similarly mysterious movements of furniture and other objects; and these were shortly followed by the ringing of bells and playing of musical instruments.

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  • With all the majesty and stately elaboration and musical rhythm of Milton's finest prose, Taylor's styleis relieved and brightened by an astonishing variety of felicitous illustrations, ranging from the most homely and terse to the most dignified and elaborate.

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  • He erected many temples and public buildings (amongst them the Odeum, a kind of theatre for musical performances) and restored the temple of the Capitol.

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  • Among musical organizations may be mentioned the Handel and Haydn Society (1815), the Harvard Musical Association (1837), the Philharmonic (1880) and the Symphony Orchestra, organized in 1881 by the generosity of Henry Lee Higginson.

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  • Every morning, when the rays of the rising sun touched the statue, it gave forth musical sounds, like the xvIII.

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  • As a complete fusion between dramatic and musical movement, its very crudities point to its immense advance towards the solution of the problem, propounded chaotically at the beginning of the i 7th century by Monteverde, and solved in a simple form by Gluck.

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  • And as the twofold musical and dramatic achievement of one mind, it already places Wagner beyond parallel in the history of art.

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  • Genuinely dramatic music, even if it seem as purely musical as Mozart's, must always be approached through its drama; and Wagner's masterpieces demand that we shall use this approach; but, as with Mozart, we must not stop on the threshold.

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  • Almost as subtle, and much more directly impressive, is the pathos of the death of Siegfried, which is heightened by an unprecedented appeal to a sense of musical form on the scale of the entire tetralogy.

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  • The Morelianos are noted for their love of music, and musical competitions are held each year, the best band being sent to the city of Mexico to compete with similar organizations from other states.

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  • Almost as subtle, and much more directly impressive, is the pathos of the death of Siegfried, which is heightened by an unprecedented appeal to a sense of musical form on the scale of the entire tetralogy.

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  • The naval officer spoke in a particularly sonorous, musical, and aristocratic baritone voice, pleasantly swallowing his r's and generally slurring his consonants: the voice of a man calling out to his servant, Heah!

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  • Just as "Uncle's" pickled mushrooms, honey, and cherry brandy had seemed to her the best in the world, so also that song, at that moment, seemed to her the acme of musical delight.

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  • Petya was as musical as Natasha and more so than Nicholas, but had never learned music or thought about it, and so the melody that unexpectedly came to his mind seemed to him particularly fresh and attractive.

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  • After she had played a little air with variations on the harp, she joined the other young ladies in begging Natasha and Nicholas, who were noted for their musical talent, to sing something.

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  • Two girlish voices sang a musical passage--the end of some song.

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  • When she had finished her first exercise she stood still in the middle of the room and sang a musical phrase that particularly pleased her.

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  • Gold-working, the making of arms and musical instruments, wood-carving, cotton, silk and gold thread weaving are of importance.

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  • The Theseum or temple of Theseus, which lay to the east of the Agora near the Acropolis, was built by Cimon: here he deposited the bones of the national hero which he brought from Scyros about 470 B.C. The only building in the city which can with certainty be assigned to the administration of Pericles is the Odeum, beneath the southern declivity of the Acropolis, a structure mainly of wood, said to have been built in imitation of the tent of Xerxes: it was used for musical contests and the though not established, may be regarded as practically certain, notwithstanding the difficulty presented by the subjects of the sculptures, which bear no relation to Hephaestus.

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  • Beethoven was trained in the greatest and most advanced musical tradition of his time.

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  • Moreover, the higher problems of rhythmic movement in the classical sonata forms are far beyond the scope of academic teaching; which is compelled to be contented with a practical plausibility of musical design; and the instrumental music which was considered the highest style of art in 18 3 0 was as far beyond Wagner's early command of such plausibility as it was obviously already becoming a mere academic game.

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  • In Rienzi Wagner would already have been Meyerbeer's rival, but that his sincerity, and his initial lack of that musical savoir faire which is prior to the individual handling of ideas, put him at a disadvantage.

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  • Moreover, the work was intended to be in one act, and is now so performed at Bayreuth; and, although it is very long for a one-act opera, this is certainly the only form which does justice to Wagner's conception.1 Spohr's appreciation of Der fliegende Hollander is a remarkable point in musical history; and his criticism that Wagner's style (in Tannhauser) " lacked rounded periods " shows the best effect of that style on a well-disposed contemporary mind.

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  • While the hunting party is resting Siegfried tells stories of his boyhood, thus recalling the antecedents of this drama with a charming freshness and sense of dramatic and musical repose.

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  • Gold-working, the making of arms and musical instruments, wood-carving, cotton, silk and gold thread weaving are of importance.

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  • Moreover, the higher problems of rhythmic movement in the classical sonata forms are far beyond the scope of academic teaching; which is compelled to be contented with a practical plausibility of musical design; and the instrumental music which was considered the highest style of art in 18 3 0 was as far beyond Wagner's early command of such plausibility as it was obviously already becoming a mere academic game.

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  • Later followed the appearance of lights; quasi-human voices; musical sounds, produced, it is said, without instruments; the "materialization" or presence in material form of what seemed to be human hands and faces, and ultimately of complete figures, alleged to be not those of any person present, and sometimes claimed by witnesses as deceased relatives; "psychography," or "direct writing and drawing," asserted to be done without human intervention; "spirit-photography," or the appearance on photographic plates of human and other forms when no counterpart was visible before the camera to any but specially endowed seers; 3 unfastening of cords and bonds; elongation of the medium's body; handling of red-hot coals; and the apparent passage of solids through solids without disintegration.

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  • barcaruola, a boat-song), properly a musical term for the songs sung by the Venetian gondoliers, and hence for an instrumental or vocal composition, generally in 6-8 time, written in imitation of their characteristic rhythm.

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  • One brief spring, musical with the song of robin and mocking-bird, one summer rich in fruit and roses, one autumn of gold and crimson sped by and left their gifts at the feet of an eager, delighted child.

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  • Elec. Eng., 1900, 30, p. 232; P. Janet, " On Duddell's Musical Arc."

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  • Elec. Eng., 1900, 30, p. 232; P. Janet, " On Duddell's Musical Arc."

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  • MUSICAL.

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  • The voices of the blackfellows are musical.

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  • Apart from the gain in tragic force resulting from Wagner's masterly development of the character of Brangaene, the raw material of the story was already suggestive of that astounding combination of the contrasted themes of love and death, the musical execution of which involves a harmonic range almost as far beyond that of its own day as the ordinary harmonic range of the 19th century is beyond that of the 16th.

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  • In his next work, Die Meistersinger, Wagner ingeniously made poetry and drama out of an explicit manifesto to musical critics, and proved the depth of his music by developing its everyday resources and so showing that its vitality does not depend on that extreme emotional force that makes Tristan and Isolde almost unbearably poignant.

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  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

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  • In Wagner's harmonic style we encounter the entire problem of modern musical texture.

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  • Wagner effected vast changes in almost every branch of his all-embracing art, from theatrebuilding and stage-lighting to the musical declamation of words.

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  • Wagnerian harmony is, then, neither a side-issue nor a progress per saltum, but a leading current in the stream of musical evolution.

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  • The irrational discords of Strauss are also real phenomena in musical aesthetics.

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  • It has had, however, a marked effect on weaker musical individualities.

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  • Musical public opinion now puts an extraordinary pressure on the young composer, urging him at all costs to abandon " outof-date " styles however stimulating they may be to his invention.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • The very sense of dramatic fitness has temporarily vanished from public musical opinion, together with the sense of musical form, in consequence of another prevalent habit, that of presenting shapeless extracts from Wagner's operas as orchestral pieces without voices or textbooks or any hint that such adjuncts are desirable.

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  • The collected literary works of Wagner in German fill ten volumes, and include political speeches, sketches for dramas that did not become operas, autobiographical chapters, aesthetic musical treatises and polemics of vitriolic violence.

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  • Rapidly as the standard of musical translations was improving before this work appeared, no one could have foreseen what has now been abundantly verified, that the Ring can be performed in English without any appreciable loss to Wagner's art.

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  • Bernard Shaw, though concerned mainly with the social philosophy of the Ring, gives a luminous account of Wagner's mastery of musical movement.

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  • The industries of Breda comprise the 'manufacture of linen and woollen goods, carpets, hats, beer and musical instruments.

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  • His writings, said to have numbered four hundred and fifty-three, were in the style of Aristotle, and dealt with philosophy, ethics and music. The empirical tendency of his thought is shown in his theory that the soul is related to the body as harmony to the parts of a musical.

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  • A musical festival is held triennially.

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  • The industries of Dessau include the production of sugar, which is the chief manufacture, woollen, linen and cotton goods, carpets, hats, leather, tobacco and musical instruments.

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  • Its most striking characteristic lies in the superscription ("A prayer of Habakkuk the prophet, set to Shigionoth"), the subscription ("For the chief musician, on my stringed instruments"), and the insertion of the musical term "Selah" in three places (v.

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  • The principal industries are, the metallurgic and textile industries in all their branches, milling, brewing and chemicals; paper, leather and silk; cloth, objets de luxe and millinery; physical and musical instruments; sugar, tobacco factories and foodstuffs.

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  • The percentage of educated men who have written little volumes of lyrics is surprisingly large, and this may be accounted for by the old Portuguese custom of reciting poetry with musical accompaniment.

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  • Logical in its derivatives and in its grammatical structure, the Magyar language is, moreover, copious in idiomatic expressions, rich in its store of words, and almost musical in its harmonious intonation.

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  • 3 The power of a grating to construct light of nearly definite wavelength is well illustrated by Young's comparison with the production of a musical note by reflection of a sudden sound from a row of palings.

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  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

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  • GIOSEFFO ZARLINO (1517-1540), Italian musical theorist, surnamed from his birthplace Zarlinus Clodiensis, was born at Chioggia, Venetia, in 1517 (not 1540, as Burney and Hawkins say).

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  • His brother, Johann Friedrich Hugo von Dalberg (1752-1812), canon of Trier, Worms and Spires, had some vogue as a composer and writer on musical subjects.

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  • (in the Bible only in titles of psalms), which is applicable to any piece designed to be sung to a musical accompaniment.

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  • Obviously the word r ' must refer to something in the music; and inasmuch as the cymbals were for the purpose of producing a volume of sound (v'#r), it is reasonable to suppose that the 1 The threefold division of the singers appears in the same list according to the Hebrew text of verse 17, but the occurrence of Jeduthun as a proper name instead of a musical note is suspicious, and makes the text of LXX.

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  • the musical titles have entirely disappeared.

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  • This does not necessarily prove that " the technical terms of the Temple music had gone out of use, presumably because they were already become unintelligible, as they were when the Septuagint version was made "; for it does not follow that technical musical terms which had originated in the Temple at Jerusalem and were intelligible in Palestine would have been understood in Egypt.

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  • The musical notes found in the titles of the psalms and occasionally also in the text (Selah, 1 Higgaion) are so obscure that it seems unnecessary to enter here upon the various conjectures that have been made about them.

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  • A good deal is said about the musical services of the Levites in Chronicles, both in the account given of David's ordinances and in the descriptions of particular festival occasions.

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  • The word, which was probably derived from some Greek bandmaster, was presumably an instruction for a musical interlude.

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  • If possible, they are as a race lazier than the western Lao, as they are certainly more musical.

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  • Theatrical and musical entertainments are popular among them.

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  • It is quite impossible to connect with our musical system the utterance of the sounds of which the Chinese and Annamese languages are composed.

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  • Skill in modern laboratory work is as far out of the reach of the untaught as performance on a musical instrument.

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  • GREGORIO ALLEGRI, Italian priest and musical composer, probably of the Correggio family, was born at Rome either in 1560 or in 1585.

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  • Among the musical compositions of Allegri were two volumes of concerti, published in 1618 and 1619; two volumes of motets, published in 1620 and 1621; besides a number of works still in manuscript.

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  • He was for some time tutor of his college; but the most characteristic reminiscence of his university life is the mention made by Anthony Wood that in the musical gatherings of the time "Thomas Ken of New College, a junior, would be sometimes among them, and sing his part."

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  • In the number and variety of its leather and other fancy goods Vienna rivals Paris, and is also renowned for its manufacture of jewelry and articles of precious metals, objets d'art, musical instruments, physical chemicals and optical instruments, and artistic products generally.

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  • The gaiety of Vienna had for centuries depended on the brilliancy of its court, recruited from all parts of Europe, including the nobility of the whole empire, and on its musical, light-hearted and contented population.

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  • Sometimes, especially at early dawn, there is a musical noise in the desert, like the sound of distant drums, which is caused by the eddying of grains of sand in the heated atmosphere, on the crests of the medanos.

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  • The educational and scientific institutions of Mainz include an episcopal seminary, two gymnasia and other schools, a society for literature and art, a musical society, and an antiquarian society.

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  • The principal manufactures are leather goods, furniture, carriages, chemicals, musical instruments and carpets, for the first two of which the city has attained a wide reputation.

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  • His voice is musical, metallic, fit for loud laughter and piercing wail, and all that may lie between; speech and speculation free and plenteous; I do not meet in these late decades such company over a pipe."

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  • Next must be mentioned the Kunstgewerbe (museum of arts and crafts) and the Musical Museum, with valuable MSS.

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  • There are numerous high-grade schools, musical and other learned societies and excellent hospitals.

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  • This difference is probably explained by the fact that the idea of thus modifying the Kagura had its origin in musical recitations from the semi-romantic semi-historical narratives of the 14th century.

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  • Very soon the No came to occupy in the estimation of the military class a position similar to that held by the lanka as a literary pursuit, and the gagaku as a musical, in the Imperial court.

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  • Beet sugar is also largely manufactured, and the inhabitants of the Black Forest have long been celebrated for their dexterity in the manufacture of wooden ornaments and toys, musical boxes and organs.

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  • Among current periodicals in French are the following - Bibliography: Bulletin bibliographique et pedagogique du musee belge (1897); La Revue des bibliotheques et archives de Belgique (1903); Le Glaneur litteraire, musical et bibliographic (1901); Archives des arts et de la bibliographic de Belgique (Tables1833-1853and 18 751894).

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  • Current periodicals include: 0 Archeologo portugues (1895); Jornal de sciencias mathematicas et astronomicas (1877); Revista lusitana, Archivo de estudos philologicos e ethnologicos relativos a Portugal (1887); Ta-ssiYangKuo, Archivos e annaes de extremo oriente portuguez (1899); Portugal artistico, fortnightly; Revista militar; Arte musical, fortnightly; Boletim do agricultor, monthly; Archivo historico portuguez, monthly.

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  • 2 (1899), with note on the musical section of Cassiodorus' Institutiones by C. von Jan.

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  • In the year after the war (240), when the armies had returned and the people were at leisure to enjoy the fruits of victory, Livius Andronicus substituted at one of the public festivals a regular drama, translated or adapted from the Greek, for the musical medleys (saturae) hitherto in use.

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  • The famous inscriptions with hymns to Apollo accompanied by musical notation were found on stones belonging to this treasury.

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  • Thus pitch is a soft and yielding body under steady stress, but a bar of pitch if struck gives a musical note, which shows that it vibrates and is therefore stiff or elastic for high frequency stress.

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  • Zeitz has manufactures of cloth, cottons and other textiles, machinery, wax-cloth, musical instruments, vinegar, cigars, &c.; and wood-carving, dyeing and calico-printing are carried on.

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  • The term is specially applied to the musical setting of the mass.

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  • But the quaint beauty of Herbert's style and its musical quality give The Temple a high place.

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  • However this may be, it is generally admitted that Tyrtaeus flourished during the second Messenian war (c. 650 B.C.) - a period of remarkable musical and poetical activity at Sparta, when poets like Terpander and Thaletas were welcomed - that he nbt only wrote poetry but served in the field, and that he endeavoured to compose the internal dissensions of Sparta (Aristotle, Politics, v.

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  • Under the patronage of Charles Alexander, also, Weimar became a famous musical centre, principally owing to the presence of Franz Liszt, who from 1848 to 1886 made Weimar his principal place of residence.

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  • According to one account, he travelled as far as Bremen, called there by Archbishop Hermann in order to reform the musical service.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Bach, from which he gained his earliest acquaintance with the principles of musical structure.

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  • With the encouragement of a discriminating patron, a small but excellent orchestra and a free hand, Haydn made the most of his opportunity and produced a continuous stream of compositions in every known musical form.

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  • Haydn's place in musical history is best determined by his instrumental compositions.

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  • Bach's sonatas; then the medium itself began to suggest wider horizons and new possibilities of treatment; his position at Eisenstadt enabled him to experiment without reserve; his genius, essentially symphonic in character, found its true outlet in the opportunities of pure musical structure.

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  • The importance of this lies not only in a greater richness of musical colour, but in the effect which it produced on the actual substance and texture of composition.

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  • Experiments, which will be described most conveniently when we discuss methods of determining the frequencies of sources, prove conclusively that for a given note the frequency is the same whatever the source of that note, and that the ratio of the frequencies of two notes forming a given musical interval is the same in whatever part of the musical range the two notes are situated.

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  • Violle and Vautier made some later experiments on the propagation of musical sounds in a tunnel 3 metres in diameter (Ann.

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  • They found that the velocity of propagation of different musical sounds was the same.

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  • In some cases of echo, when the original sound is a compound musical note, the octave of the fundamental tone is reflected much more strongly than that tone itself.

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  • When we are walking past a fence formed by equally-spaced vertical rails or overlapping boards, we may often note that each footstep is followed by a musical ring.

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  • Sounds may be divided into noises and musical notes.

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  • A musical note always arises from a source which has some regularity of vibration, and which sends equally-spaced waves into the air.

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  • The results obtained fully confirm the general law that " pitch," or the position of the note in the musical scale, depends solely on its frequency.

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  • Dove (1803-1879)1879) produced a modification of the siren by which the relations of different musical notes may be more Dove's readily ascertained.

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  • It is not necessary here to deal generally with the various musical scales.

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  • All experiments in frequency show that two notes, forming a definite musical interval, have their frequencies always in the same ratio wherever in the musical scale the two notes are situated.

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  • A determinate musical pitch is not perceived, he says, till about 40 vibrations per second.

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  • Musical Quality or Timbre.

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  • - Though a musical note has definite pitch or frequency, notes of the same pitch emitted by different instruments have quite different quality or timbre.

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  • Elementary Theory of the Transverse Vibration of Musical Strings.

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  • A highly ingenious and instructive method for illustrating the laws of musical strings was contrived by F.

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  • Such bars are used in musical boxes and as free reeds in organ pipes.

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  • As in the case of a musical string, so here we find that the pitch of the note is higher for a given plate the greater the number of ventral segments into which it is divided; but the converse of this does not hold good, two different notes being obtainable with the same number of such segments, the position of the nodal lines being, however, different.

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  • 15 a Thus we learn that two musical notes, of the same pitch, conveyed to the ear through the air, will produce the effect of a single note of the same pitch, but of increased loudness, if they are in the same phase, but may affect the ear very slightly, if at all, when in opposite phases.

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  • In the middle notes of the musical register the maximum harshness occurs when the beats are about 30.

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  • The frequency of beats giving maximum dissonance rises as we rise higher in the musical scale, and falls as we descend.

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  • He became, in fact, the ideal Greek youth, equally proficient in the "musical" and "gymnastic" branches of Greek education.

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  • On the "musical" side he was the special patron of eloquence (Mycos); in gymnastic, he was the giver of grace rather than of strength, which was the province of Heracles.

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  • Padre Martini was a zealous collector of musical literature, and possessed an extensive musical library.

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  • Besides being the author of several controversial works, Martini drew up a Dictionary of Ancient Musical Terms, which appeared in the second volume of G.

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  • Doni's Works; he also published a treatise on The Theory of Numbers as applied to Music. His celebrated canons, published in London, about 1800, edited by Pio Cianchettini, show him to have had a strong sense of musical humour.

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  • The predominance of Germanic influence in the city is evidenced by at least 75 musical clubs and numerous Turnverein societies.

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  • The distinctive industry is the manufacture of mathematical and musical instruments.

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  • The International Exhibition of 1851, the creation of the Museum and Science and Art Department at South Kensington, the founding of art schools and picture galleries all over the country, the spread of musical taste and the fostering of technical education may be attributed, more or less directly, to the commission of distinguished men which began its labours under Prince Albert's auspices.

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  • But a new system of musical notation which he thought he had discovered was unfavourably received by the Academie des sciences, where it was read in August 1742, and he was unable to obtain pupils.

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  • He formed new musical projects, and he was introduced by degrees to many people of rank and influence, among them Madame d'Epinay (q.v.), to whom in 1747 he was introduced by her lover M.

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  • In all these works the imperfection of his musical education is painfully apparent, and his compositions betray an equal lack of knowledge, though his refined taste is as clearly displayed there as is his literary power in the Letters and Dictionary.

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  • Among the natives of Arezzo the most famous are the Benedictine monk Guido of Arezzo, the inventor of the modern system of musical notation (died c. 1050), the poet Petrarch, Pietro Aretino, the satirist (1492-1556), and Vasari, famous for his lives of Italian painters.

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  • There is a university, to which admission is easy and where the fees are moderate, and the Conservatoire provides as good musical teaching as can be found in Europe.

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  • Concerts are held frequently, as the Belgians are a musical people.

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  • Vojan, Modern Musical History of Bohemia (1917); Weiss, La Republique Tchecoslovaque (1919).

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  • Under the leadership of Theodore Thomas (1835-1905), the Cincinnati Musical Festival Association was incorporated, and the first of its biennial May festivals was held in 1873.

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  • The city has several other musical societies - the Apollo and Orpheus clubs (1881 and 1893), a Liederkranz (1886), and a United Singing Society (1896) being among the more prominent; and there are two schools of music - the Conservatory of Music and the College of Music.

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  • The word is particularly used of the cord of a bow, and of the stretched cords of gut and wire upon a musical instrument, the vibration of which.

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  • He wrote Lettres sur l'Algerie (1877) and Promenades japonaises (1880), and also some musical compositions, including a grand opera, Tai-Tsoung (1894).

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  • Among hospitals those of special general interest are the Steevens, the oldest in the city, founded under the will of Dr Richard Steevens in 1720; the Mater Misericordiae (1861),which includes a laboratory and museum, and is managed by the Sisters of Mercy, but relieves sufferers independently of their creed; the Rotunda lying-in hospital (1756); the Royal hospital for incurables, Donnybrook, which was founded in 1744 by the Dublin Musical Society; and the Royal Victoria Eye and Ear hospital, Adelaide Road, which amalgamated (1904) two similar institutions.

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  • But the fantastic relations imagined by him of planetary movements and distances to musical intervals and geometrical constructions seemed to himself discoveries no less admirable than the achievements which have secured his lasting fame.

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  • In the breeding-season the male Dunlin utters a most peculiar and farsounding whistle, somewhat resembling the continued ringing of a high-toned musical bell.

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  • By the exercise of his musical talents he earned money enough for the start, at Helmstadt, of an university career, which the aid of a wealthy patron enabled him to continue at Leipzig.

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  • The city has an annual carnival and a musical festival.

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  • The Roman Catholic church of Our Lady of Victories lies close to Kensington Road, and in Brompton Road is the Oratory of St Philip Neri, a fine building with richly decorated interior, noted for the beauty of its musical services, as is:the Carmelite Church in Church Street.

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  • The "singing beach" is a stretch of white sand, which, when trodden upon, emits a curious musical sound.

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  • Lampman'S Poetry Is, The Most Finished And Musical.

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  • The Best Collection, More Particularly From The Musical Point Of View, Is Les Chansons Populaires Du Canada, Started By Ernest Gagnon (1St Ed.

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  • Among other industries are the manufactures of watches, clocks, toys and musical instruments.

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  • Wheatstone's early training in making musical instruments now bore rich fruit in the continuous designing of new instruments and pieces of mechanism.

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  • In acoustics his principal work was a research on the transmission of sound through solids, the explanation of Chladni's figures of vibrating solids, various investigations of the principles of acoustics and the mechanism of hearing, and the invention of new musical instruments, e.g.

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  • Socrates and Socrates musical " (Met.

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  • Alford was a not inconsiderable artist, as his picture-book, The Riviera (1870), shows, and he had abundant musical and mechanical talent.

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  • The symmetry is remarkable, and the reverberations are strangely musical.

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  • praecentor, from praecinere, to sing before, lead in singing), the title of the principal director of the singing or musical portions of the service in a cathedral or cathedral church.

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  • His musical duties are usually performed by the "succentor," one of the vicars choral.

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  • The chief musical instrument was the harp (hearpe), which is often mentioned.

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  • There are rock quarries here, and the city manufactures sewing machines, musical instruments, especially pianos, foundry and machine shop products, agricultural implements and furniture.

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  • 3 A Descriptive Catalogue of the Musical Instruments in the South Kensington Museum, by Carl Engel (London, 18 74), p. 143.

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  • In 1761 he announced the discovery of an epic on the subject of Fingal, and in December he published Fingal, an Ancient Epic Poem in Six Books, together with Several Other Poems composed by Ossian, the Son of Fingal, translated from the Gaelic Language, written in the musical measured prose of which he had made use in his earlier volume.

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  • Subsequently, towards the close of the 15th century, the refined court of Lodovico Sforza attracted such celebrated men as Bramante, the architect, Gauffino Franchino, the founder of one of the earliest musical academies, and Leonardo da Vinci, from whose school came Luini, Boltraffio, Gaudenzio Ferrari, Marco d'Oggiono, &c. Later, Pellegrino Tibaldi and Galeazzo Alessi of Genoa (the former a man of very wide activity) were the chief architects, and Leone Leoni of Arezzo the chief sculptor.

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  • Milan has long been famous as one of the great musical centres of Europe, and numerous students resort here for their musical education.

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  • Minor industries are represented by workshops for the production of surgical, musical and geodetic instruments; of telephone and telegraph accessories; dynamos, sewing-machines, bicycles and automobiles.

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  • In typography Milan is renowned principally for its musical editions and for its heliotype and zincotype establishments.

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  • Wiesbaden contains numerous scientific and educational institutions, including a chemical laboratory, an agricultural college and two musical conservatoria.

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  • He introduced a regular musical contest in place of the old recitations of the rhapsodes, which were an old standing accompaniment of the festival.

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  • In the musical contests, a golden crown was given as first prize; in the sports, a garland of leaves from the sacred olive trees of Athena, and vases filled with oil from the same.

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  • Among the literary and scientific associations of Copenhagen may be mentioned the Danish Royal Society, founded in 1742, for the advancement of the sciences of mathematics, astronomy, natural philosophy, &c., by the publication of papers and essays; the Royal Antiquarian Society, founded in 1825, for diffusing a knowledge of Northern and Icelandic archaeology; the Society for the Promotion of Danish Literature, for the publication of works chiefly connected with the history of Danish literature; the Natural Philosophy Society; the Royal Agricultural Society; the Danish Church History Society; the Industrial Association, founded in 1838; the Royal Geographical Society, established in 1876; and several musical and other societies.

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  • An Art Union was founded in 1826, and a musical conservatorium in 1870 under the direction of the composers N.

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  • DANIEL FRANCCOIS ESPRIT AUBER (1782-1871), French musical composer, the son of a Paris printseller, was born at Caen in Normandy on the 29th of January 1782.

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  • He had already attempted musical composition, and at this period produced several concertos pour basse, in the manner of the violoncellist, Lamarre, in whose name they were published.

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  • In La Muette de Portici, familiarly known as Masaniello, Auber achieved his greatest musical triumph.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about musical instruments.

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  • 1867) in his Poemes ingenus (I goo) aims at simplicity of form, and seems to have learnt the art of his musical verse direct from Racine.

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  • At Warsaw there is a good musical conservatory.

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  • We learn also that it was permanently covered, and it was probably used for musical entertainments, but in the case of the larger theatre also the arrangements for the occasional extension of an awning (velarium) over the whole are distinctly found.

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  • Firearms, clocks, musical instruments, toys..

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  • Musical instruments - 223 170 3,176 2,780

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  • Musical instruments - -.

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  • Machinery, chemicals, sugar, malt, paper, musical instruments, cotton, straw hats, tobacco, carpets, soap, playing cards, chocolate and dye-stuffs are among the manufactures.

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  • The wandering sophist and rhetorician would find a hearing no less than the musical artist.

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  • The word satura was originally applied to a rude scenic and musical performance, exhibited at Rome before the introduction of the regular drama.

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  • In the oriental quarters of the city the curious shops, the markets of different trades (the shops of each trade being generally congregated in one street or district), the easy merchant sitting before his shop, the musical and quaint street-cries of the picturesque vendors of fruit, sherbet, water, &c., with the ever-changing and many-coloured throng of passengers, all render the streets a delightful study for the lover of Arab life, nowhere else to be seen in such perfection, or with so fine a background of magnificent buildings.

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  • Notwithstanding its condemnation by Mahomet, music is the most favorite recreation of the people; the songs of the boatmen, the religious chants, and the cries in the streets are all musical.

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  • There are male and female musical performers; the former are both instrumental and vocal, the latter (called Alrneh, p1.

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  • There are many kinds of musical instruments.

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  • A large number of utensils, articles of furniture and the like were placed in the burial-chamber for the use of the deadjars, weapons, mirrors, and even chairs, musical instruments and wigs.

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  • Of his works in this connexion the best known is L'Harmonie universelle (1636), dealing with the theory of music and musical instruments.

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  • ASAPH, the eponym of the Asaphite gild of singers, one of the hereditary choirs that superintended the musical services of the temple at Jerusalem in post-exilic times.

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  • Their musical instruments are few and rude - consisting of the drums and flutes already mentioned, and shell trumpets.

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  • river from the forests of other states), whose output increased from 1890 to 1900 nearly 50%, but declined slightly between 1900 and 1905; of furniture ($22,131,846 in 1905; $15,285,475 in 1900; showing an increase of 44.8%), and of musical instruments ($ 1 3,3 2 3,35 8 in 1905; $ 8, 1 5 6, 445 in 1900; an increase of 6 3.3% in the period), in both of which Illinois was second in 1900 and in 1905; book and job printing, in which the state ranked second in 1900 ($28,293,684 in 1905; $19,761,780 in 1900; an increase of 43.2%), newspaper and periodical printing ($28,644,981 in 1905; $ 1 9,4 0 4,955 in 1900; an increase of 47.6%), in which it ranked third in 1900; and the manufacture of clothing, boots and shoes.

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  • It has also important and growing manufactures of ladies' mantles, boots and shoes, machines, furniture, woollen goods, musical instruments, agricultural machinery and implements, leather, tobacco, chemicals, &c. Brewing, bleaching and dyeing are also carried on on a large scale, and there are extensive railway works and a government rifle factory.

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  • He began journalism, through the influence of William Archer, on the reviewing staff of the Pall Mall Gazette in 1885; he then became art and musical critic: writing from 1888 to 1890 for the Star, where his articles were signed "Corno di Bassetto," and then in 1890 to 1894 for the World.

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  • - The composition of musical settings of the Mass plays a part in the history of music which is of special importance up to and including the 1 6th century.

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  • As an art-form the musical Mass is governed to a peculiar degree by the structure of its text.

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  • The next definite stage in the musical history of the Mass was attained by the Neapolitan composers who were first to reach musical coherence after the monodic revolution at the beginning of the 17th century.

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  • It is almost impossible, without asceticism of a radically inartistic kind, to treat with the resources of instrumental music and free harmony such passages as that from the Crucifixus to the Resurrexit, without an emotional contrast which inevitably throws any natural treatment of the Sanctus into the background, and makes the A gnus Dei an inadequate conclusion to the musical scheme.

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  • This makes it all the more remarkable that Beethoven's second and only important Mass (in D, Op. 123) is not only the most dramatic ever penned but is, perhaps, the last classical Mass that is thoughtfully based upon the liturgy, and is not a mere musical setting of what happens to be a liturgic text.

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  • - The Missa pro defunctis or Requiem Mass has a far less definite musical history than the ordinary Mass; and such special musical forms as it has produced have little in common with each other.

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