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music

music

music Sentence Examples

  • Would you start the music for me?

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  • The muffled beats of music thumped through her open windows.

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  • I'm going up to the music room for a while.

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  • In the same way her response to music is in part sympathetic, although she enjoys it for its own sake.

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  • She pulled a folder from her bag and they headed to the music room.

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  • Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.

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  • He turned on some music with weak intentions of continuing his sheriff reading but instead just sat there, finishing the last of the merlot.

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  • Music began to play, and with the first chord, Jackson recognized the accompaniment to Etta James' "At Last".

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  • Music began to play, and with the first chord, Jackson recognized the accompaniment to Etta James' "At Last".

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  • Nations will maintain their own traditions, holidays, music, idioms, diets, and a thousand things that make them different from other nations.

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  • The bombshell blonde always threw good dinner parties with fun themes; this theme had been Disco Night, complete with lava lamps, disco ball, tacky '70s music that still jammed out the open windows, and costumes for those who chose to wear them.

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  • The music blared louder, the smoke became thicker, and the scent of food intermingled with body odor.

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  • Just think—handsome gamblers, rich miners, everyone dancing with music and liquor and lively fun every night!

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  • There was time for quiet evenings, some jazz and classical music in the Dean's quarters, country and western in Fred's and some totally incomprehensible noise from the small room where Martha Boyd and her boom box now dwelt.

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  • She leaned back, the audible sound of her breath catching music to his ears.

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  • I'll hang the spring and winter landscapes in my music room; maybe you can help me decide where to put the still life.

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  • He spent some time in the music room, but was unable to concentrate, so ended up downstairs at 2:30 a.m., wondering where she could be and whether or not she felt lonely.

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  • There was to be music and dancing; and Cyrus was to invite as many guests as he chose.

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  • Miss M was much nettled when I told her I'd no longer dance to her music and I saw her talking about me to the man who owns this dreadful place.

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  • She heard the blaring trance music before she opened the car door and smelled the unmistakable scent of marijuana mixed with incense and body odor.

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  • If we respected only what is inevitable and has a right to be, music and poetry would resound along the streets.

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  • The mood was Victorian, and the music was classic.

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  • Across the street, right behind the Western Hotel, you had The Bird Cage, The Bon Ton, The Temple of Music and then Ashenfelter's stables that Annie mentions hearing the men loading the pack animals.

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  • The two shared their music with each other often.

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  • The two shared their music with each other often.

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  • They are always asking: What does this beauty or that music mean to you?

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  • The music was every bit as masculine and warrior as she remembered him.

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  • The music was every bit as masculine and warrior as she remembered him.

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  • Elisabeth's art moved him deeply, much as his music did.

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  • Elisabeth's art moved him deeply, much as his music did.

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  • We will consider what kind of music they are like.

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  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.

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  • Jonathan rarely asked for anything and the idea of having someone in the house playing music was appealing.

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  • Why don't we turn the bedroom next to my music room into a studio for you?

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  • He longed to share his music with Elisabeth, yet worried she might not appreciate it; think it boring.

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  • Effie Quincy rushed in the door while Dean was drumming his fingers, listening to waltz music on hold.

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  • It was the sound I hated more on a telephone that Henri Mancini's version of Theme from Moon Glow or any other top one hundred hits of elevator music was, 'would you please hold'?

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  • The home, now known as Eight Maples Farm, had been a gathering place for travelers seeking good music and refreshments, over two hundred years ago.

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  • Damian turned down the stereo blasting trance music and faced her, crossing his arms as she closed the door.

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  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.

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  • The last item on Dean's list of pleasurable activities was punching one if you want this and two if you want that buttons, then sitting on hold while listening to elevator music from some bureaucratic office.

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  • Besides, if you buy a cheap one, you get discouraged when you can't get the quality of music that you want.

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  • The visions were less invasive than those from others, like background music at a department store.

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  • What he did not understand was that she found his music to be cathartic.

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  • There will be music and dancing, and many fine people will be there.

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  • The wing housed an indoor basketball court, indoor pool, a small game room, and a huge theatre room where music blared from some action movie.

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  • Jackson then led her to the music room.

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  • Even music may be intoxicating.

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  • When the music stopped, he cupped one of her elbows and led her back to their table.

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  • A band tooted practice blasts, someone was yelling directions through an old fashioned megaphone, which were ignored, and Suzanne, whose nightly music show serenaded the tourists, warmed up the Star Spangled Banner in a voice that needed no mike.

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  • As he opened the door and she caught a glimpse of the music room, he heard her sharp intake of breath.

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  • A band tooted practice blasts, someone was yelling directions through an old fashioned megaphone, which were ignored, and Suzanne, whose nightly music show serenaded the tourists, warmed up the Star Spangled Banner in a voice that needed no mike.

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  • In the music of the harp which trembles round the world it is the insisting on this which thrills us.

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  • The music room had raised panel cherry walls and a coffered ceiling with intricately carved beams.

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  • He truly lost himself in music and the hard mask of self-control gave way to softening features.

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  • She gave him his love of music and schooled him in all the proper ways a noble man should behave.

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  • Sarah was listening downstairs, and when she knew they were in the music room, she grabbed Connor's hand.

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  • She picked up a piece of sheet music from the stand and could see it required a far greater command of the piano than he was exhibiting.

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  • She turned to the sheet music and saw it had been written in pencil.

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  • She gave him his love of music and schooled him in all the proper ways a noble man should behave.

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  • I guess I'll have to bring some sheet music for you then.

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  • In fact, the sheet music was unnecessary.

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  • I guess I'll have to bring some sheet music for you then.

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  • In the Italian Renaissance, only a thin veneer of society's elites participated in the creation or ownership of the frescos, music, statues, and paintings; most were only passive observers.

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  • Before recorded music, the best musicians made a good living but weren't extremely wealthy.

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  • Education will bring light and music into Tommy's soul, and then he cannot help being happy.

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  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.

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  • He went back and forth with the canvas from his bedroom to the music room, unsure where to hang it.

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  • He often thought, If Beethoven or Chopin had centuries to compose music, imagine the treasures we would have.

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  • Jackson glanced at the sheet music then at her through dark lashes "This is a far cry from 'Happy Birthday'."

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  • Tables are adorned with candlelight and jazz music fills the air.

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  • He finally settled on the mantle across from his bed, deciding to buy something for the music room on Friday.

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  • I planned to work on some music tonight anyway.

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  • She walked to the music cabinets and ran her hands across the top.

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  • On Wednesday, he was in his music room playing, when Elisabeth called.

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  • The music still played throughout the house, and the studio was far enough away from the living room so noise wasn't an issue.

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  • Yep. Sarah and Connor are going to Maine today and we have a date in my music room, remember?

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  • He felt ecstatic that she heard in his music what he saw in her art.

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  • British music is known and loved around the world, as is its comedy and royalty.

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  • Beyond there is light, and music, and sweet companionship; but I may not enter.

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  • It is amusing to read in one of the magazines of 1895 that Miss Keller "has a just and intelligent appreciation of different composers from having literally felt their music, Schumann being her favourite."

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  • All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their music at sunrise.

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  • Prince Andrew shrugged his shoulders and frowned, as lovers of music do when they hear a false note.

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  • At last the Emperor stopped beside his last partner (he had danced with three) and the music ceased.

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  • Then the king again shouted to the sound of music, and they all began singing.

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  • Each instrument--now resembling a violin and now a horn, but better and clearer than violin or horn--played its own part, and before it had finished the melody merged with another instrument that began almost the same air, and then with a third and a fourth; and they all blended into one and again became separate and again blended, now into solemn church music, now into something dazzlingly brilliant and triumphant.

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  • But perhaps it's music of my own.

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  • "That's delightful music!" said he.

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  • "Pumpkin Green was a fan of heavy metal music," Cynthia offered.

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  • Four of the music cabinets housed Jackson's works, the remaining two held other composers' music.

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  • Elisabeth could hear the music playing; it sounded dark and melancholy.

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  • When the couple returned, they heard the music, and Sarah said, "He's not taking this very well, is he?"

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  • Her voice was soft and full of music.

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  • The room, in near total darkness, held a barely audible hum for background music.

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  • The interior of the church was packed with bodies writhing to the deafening, throbbing music.

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  • She sucked in a deep breath and turned to face the music.

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  • Jackson possessed a true passion for music.

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  • He wondered if she felt as possessive of her art as he did his music.

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  • It suddenly occurred to him that he wasn't sure if she even liked music.

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  • Do you like classical music?

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  • I love all kinds of music.

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  • He wondered what she would think if she knew he had never tried to publish a single piece of music.

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  • She had chosen soft dinner music.

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  • He relaxed quickly and lost himself in the music.

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  • She was not merely singing; she was experiencing the music.

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  • They chose a restaurant with a bar and music.

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  • He slunk down to the holding cell to face the music.

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  • When singing, Elisabeth chose music that expressed her feelings for Jackson.

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  • They would entertain Connor and Sarah occasionally, yet, when doing so, always chose less personal music.

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  • Upon entering the music room, she grabbed her throw pillow, sat in her usual chair and cooed, "Pleeeeze do that one about the clouds, the one you always lock the door for?"

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  • He enjoyed listening, though music did not feed his soul as it did the other three.

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  • She opened the antique music cabinet Jackson had purchased for her, and brought a piece to him.

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  • The simplicity of vocal sheet music encouraged Jackson to improvise a great deal.

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  • He was so tuned in to Elisabeth's voice, that just by scanning a piece of music, he knew where to change the composition to compliment her, and where to back off to let her shine.

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  • After breaking Sarah's embrace, she asked, "You love music so much, why don't you sing or play an instrument?"

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  • I'm going to work on some music, how long do you plan to be here?

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  • She moved in rhythm with the music, brushing the floor softly as she hummed along.

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  • They dipped and whirled and danced around the dairy floor until the music ended.

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  • Sweet music to my ears.

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  • Punching the buttons on his car radio, he finally found music that didn't assault his senses and pushed ahead toward Parkside, ready to call it a day.

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  • He and Fred did not enjoy the same music so when both were home the five-disc machine usually contained two jazz selections for Dean, two country and western for Fred, and a pop group neither liked but both could tolerate.

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  • Fred's answer came just as the music switched to a shrill voice pleading for her lover to come back to the hills.

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  • The conniv­ing old son-of-a-bitch had probably told her the soft jazz was his choice and the barnyard music Dean's.

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  • He played that boom, boom, boom classical music all the time.

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  • He was resigned to quietly reading a book until Mrs. Porter the housekeeper showed up a day early, accommodating a family wedding, and Dean's peace began competing with the sounds of a vacuum cleaner and Mrs. Porter's radio music, even worse junk than Fred's usual selections.

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  • That'll give you more gas than the Hindenberg, Dean said but he couldn't be sure he was heard over the din of music and vacuum.

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  • You're dancing to different music.

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  • In spite of his love of music, no pocket recorder filled Dean's head with voices, strings or horns through tiny toy earphones— he'd leave that to the bikers who pedaled unaware of the sounds of birds and springtime around them.

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  • They turned your music up loud and started tearing the place apart but then someone rang the bell and they hightailed it out the back.

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  • She had stopped by that afternoon but when she heard the music and the doorbell went unanswered, she assumed Fred was entertaining the competition.

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  • He should have guessed something was up—the old man wasn't even playing his twangy music.

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  • Patience wasn't his strong suit and Mrs. Lincoln and jazz music somehow weren't sufficient evening entertainment.

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  • As Dean entered the house, Sherlock Holmes was lecturing Watson in a voice sounding very much like Basil Rathbone while a radio across the room was play­ing soft music.

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  • Bad enough the kitty has to suffer without any good country music to listen to, now she doesn't have any company either.

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  • And I wouldn't be sitting here in this elegant room, listening to classical guitar music and sipping manhattans with the light of my life, Dean thought.

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  • The music started as Katie pulled the veil forward.

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  • The soft music and light clinking of glass were soothing.

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  • For a few minutes they moved as one to the music.

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  • Carmen gazed up at him as they swayed to the sound of the music.

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  • As we swayed to the music and held to each other, I fell in love with you.

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  • Music drifted in from the tack room.

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  • On the verandah, soft music was playing and several couples were dancing.

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  • They moved as one with the music and it struck her again that they were made for each other.

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  • A hushed silence fell over the verandah and the strains of an old song filtered soft music through the air.

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  • "Didn't I tell you?" she shouted over the music.

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  • Music blared from the rooms of both cousins, as it did every afternoon when they were studying before dinner.

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  • The interior of the house was romantically lit by candles, and the soft electronica music and sounds of talk added to the dark, spirited ambiance.

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  • The city also contains numerous excellent educational establishments, although the state university is not here but at Tubingen, and its conservatorium of music has long been renowned.

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  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

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  • " She will be fortunate," said the aunt, " she was born among the roses to the sound of music."

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  • At odd hours of lessons she picked up a smattering of Latin, music and natural science, but most days were holidays and spent in country rambles and games with village children.

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  • He enjoyed music and the theatre, art and poetry, the masterpieces of the ancients and the wonderful creations of his contemporaries, the spiritual and the witty - life in every form.

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  • Music >>

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  • It also has lycees and training colleges for both sexes, ecclesiastical seminaries, a preparatory school of medicine and pharmacy, schools of architecture, music, commerce and industry, museums of art and antiquities and natural history and a library.

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  • In 1721 he entered Merton College, Oxford, as a gentleman commoner, and studied philosophy, mathematics, French, Italian and music. He afterwards studied law at the Inner Temple, but was never called to the bar.

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  • He knew something of six languages, and could discuss art, music, literature or theology.

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  • Yet it would seem there had been a still higher pitch used in the old ecclesiastical music. Upon this interesting question Praetorius is confused and difficult to understand, but he never wavers about the transposition of a fourth.

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  • The most important educational institutions are the Birmingham medical college and college of pharmacy; the Birmingham dental college; a school of art and a conservatory of music. At East Lake station, in the north-east of the city, is Howard College (Baptist; founded at Marion, Perry county, in 1841 as an academy; granted first collegiate degrees in 1848; opened in East Lake in 1887); and 2 m.

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  • Scarcely any member of the Arabian circle of the sciences, including theology, philology, mathematics, astronomy, physics and music, was left untouched by the treatises of Avicenna, many of which probably varied little, except in being commissioned by a different patron and having a different form or extent.

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  • Somewhat reluctantly it was accepted by Scottish Presbyterianism as a substitute for an older version with a greater variety of metre and music. "Old Hundred" and "Old 124th" mean the moth and 124th Psalms in that old book.

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  • Schools of art and conservatories of music are also maintained in the large cities, where there are, besides, many private schools.

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  • In the provinces there are national schools of fine art and of music and other establishments and free subventioned schools.

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  • The Morelianos are noted for their love of music, and musical competitions are held each year, the best band being sent to the city of Mexico to compete with similar organizations from other states.

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  • He was fond of music and of art, and kept statues in Hampton Court Gardens which scandalized good puritans.

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  • The narrower term "orchestration" is applied to the instrumentation of orchestral music. Since the most obvious differences of timbre are in those of various instruments, the art which blends and contrasts timbre is most easily discussed as the treatment of instruments; but we must use this term with philosophic breadth and allow it to include voices.

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  • Practically every law of harmony in 16th-century music may be equally well regarded as a law of vocal effect.

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  • The free use of discords and of wider intervals, together with the influence of the florid elements of solo-singing, enlarged the bounds of choral expression almost beyond recognition, while they crowded into very narrow quarters the subtleties of 16th-, century music. These, however, by no means disappeared; :and such devices as the crossing of parts in the second Kyrie of Bach's B Minor Mass (bars 7, 8, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50) abundantly show that in the hands of the great masters artistic truths are not things which a change of date can make false.

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  • The greater richness of tone of the modern pianoforte is a better compensation for any bareness that may be imputed to pure two-part or three-part writing than a filling out which deprives the listener of the power to follow the essential lines of the music. The same holds good, though in a lesser degree, of the resources of the harpsichord in respect of octavestrings.

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  • His music is highly polyphonic, and modern in its instrumental treatment throughout.

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  • As music becomes more polyphonic the inner parts of the orchestra become more and more emancipated.

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  • These instruments thus produced, in Haydn's and Beethoven's times, a very remarkable but closely limited series of effects, which, as Sir George Macfarren pointed out in the article "Music" in the 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, gave them a peculiar character and function in strongly asserting the main notes of the key.

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  • There is hardly one of Wagner's orchestral innovations which is not inseparably connected with his adaptation of music to the re q uirements of drama; and modern conductors, in treating Wagner's orchestration, as the normal standard by which all previous and contemporary music must be judged, are doing their best to found a tradition which in another fifty years will be exploded as thoroughly as the tradition of symphonic additional accompaniments is now exploded in the performances of Bach and Handel.

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  • The complainer entirely overlooks the fact that this is the kind of music in which such a phrase will certainly be heard again before we have time to forget it; and as a matter of fact the strings promptly repeat it fortissimo in a position which nothing can overpower.

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  • art of music. Something has been said above as to its earlier aspects, in the time of Haydn.

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  • Richard Strauss, in his edition of Berlioz's works on Instrumentation, paradoxically characterizes the classical orchestral style as that which was derived from chamber-music. Now it, is true that in Haydn's early days orchestras were small and generally private; and that the styles of orchestral and chamber music were not distinct; but surely nothing is clearer than that the whole history of the rise of classical chamber-music lies in its rapid differentiation from the coarse-grained orchestral style with which it began.

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  • "He led them forth like sheep," in Israel in Egypt, and the music of the Witch of Endor, and the appearance of Samuel's spirit in Saul) are as modern as Gluck's.

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  • Mozart imports from church music 3 trombones for special passages in his operas.

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  • Thus there was quite as much important solo music for the flute as for the violin; and almost more music for the viola da gamba than for the violoncello.

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  • Experiments bearing on this subject were subsequently made by a great number of investigators.4 Page's discovery is of considerable importance in connexion with the theory of action of various forms of telephone, and was a very important feature in the early attempts by Reis to transit music and speech.

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  • Reis's object was to reproduce at a distance not only music but also human speech; but that he did not wholly succeed is clear from the following extract from his lecture: - " Hitherto it has not been possible to reproduce human speech with sufficient distinctness.

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  • The application of this apparatus to the transmission of music was described by Gray.'

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  • Pregnant hints are given respecting a natural development of language which has its germs in sounds of quadrupeds and birds, of religious ideas out of dreams and waking hallucinations, and of the art of music by help of the suggestion of natural sounds.

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  • He became a Salian priest at the age of eight, and soon knew by heart all the forms and liturgical order of the official worship, and even the sacred music. In the earliest statue we have he is a youth offering incense; he is a priest at the sacrificial altar in the latest triumphal reliefs.

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  • There are an opera-house and an academy of music. The Auckland University College and the grammar school are the principal educational establishments.

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  • A zarzuela, entitled Guerta a muerte, for which Emilio Arrieta composed the music, belongs to 1855, and to the same collaboration is due El Agente de Matrimonios.

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  • From the 6th century onwards he was looked upon as one of the chief poets and musicians of antiquity, the inventor or perfecter of the lyre, who by his music and singing was able not only to charm the wild beasts, but even to draw the trees and rocks from their places, and to arrest the rivers in their course.

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  • Orpheus went down to the lower world and by his music softened the heart of Pluto and Persephone, who allowed Eurydice to return with him to earth.

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  • James was a cultured prince with a taste for music and architecture, but was a weak and incapable king.

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  • He first devoted his attention to painting, but afterwards took up the serious study of music. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, but did not remain there long, because he had espoused too warmly the cause of Wagner against his professor.

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  • He also wrote incidental music to Hamlet, a symphony, and other works.

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  • Joncieres, however, adhered to the recognized forms of the French opera and did not model his works according to the later developments of the Wagnerian "music drama."

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  • His work on music also is not a translation from Pythagoras, who left no writing behind him.

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  • They thought that it was not sufficient to trust to the ear alone, to determine the principles of music, as did practical musicians like Aristoxenus, but that along with the ear, physical experiments should be employed.

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  • It long remained a text-book of music in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • It is still very valuable as a help in ascertaining the principles of ancient music, and gives us the opinions of some of the best ancient writers on the art.

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  • Alembert was much interested in music both as a science and as an art, and wrote Elements de musique theorique et pratique (1779), which was based upon the system of P. Rameau with important modifications and differences.

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  • The ordinary Hebrew nabhi' still remained not the reflective visionary, stirred at times by music into strange raptures (2 Kings iii.

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  • Take away from me the clamour of your songs; and the music of your viols I will not hear.

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  • 1863) and Lasker in politics, Auerbach in literature, Rubenstein and Joachim in music, Traube in medicine, and Lazarus in psychology.

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  • Solomon, R.A.) in music (Julius Benedict and Frederick Hymen Cowen).

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  • After the death of her father in 1767 she obtained permission to learn millinery and dressmaking with a view to earning her bread, but continued to assist her mother in the management of the household until the autumn of 1772, when she joined her brother William, who had established himself as a teacher of music at Bath.

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  • He took great interest in music and painting, and added to the collection of art treasures at Dresden.

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  • There, too, he acquired that skill in music which led to his first introduction to Saul (I Sam.

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  • He guided it through the controversies as to Robertson Smith's heresies, as to the use of hymns and instrumental music, and as to the Declaratory Act, brought to a successful issue the union of the Free and United Presbyterian Churches, and threw the weight of the united church on the side of freedom of Biblical criticism.

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  • It is true that he looked upon general society as a waste of time and that he disliked poetry as "misrepresentation"; but he intensely enjoyed conversation, gave good dinners and delighted in music, in country sights and in making others happy.

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  • In each was a piano, the eccentric master of the whole being fond of music as the recreation of his literary hours.

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  • - (Residence at the Court of London, p. 286.) Bentham's love of flowers and music, of green foliage and shaded walks, comes clearly out in this pleasant picture of his home life and social surroundings.

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  • The ruins are scanty, but the east window is preserved, and the present church incorporates remains of the ancient resthouse for pilgrims. The church has a peculiar music gallery, entered from without.

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  • He was extremely fond of music, and was himself a fair pianist.

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  • In addition to these he compiled several volumes of excerpts from ancient authors, and wrote a number of works on geography, music and other subjects, many of which still exist in MS. in various European libraries.

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  • It is the seat of Missouri Valley College (opened 1889; coeducational), which was established by the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and includes a preparatory department and a conservatory of music. The court-house (1883), a Roman Catholic convent and a high school (1907) are the principal buildings.

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  • He wrote both words and music in a fit of patriotic excitement after a public dinner.

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  • Rouget de Lisle wrote a few other songs of the same kind, and in 1825 he published Chants frangais, in which he set to music fifty songs by various authors.

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  • In Huntington Avenue, at its junction with Massachusetts Avenue, is another group of handsome new buildings, including Horticultural Hall, Symphony Hall (1900) and the New England Conservatory of Music. In the Back Bay Fens, reclaimed swamps laid out by F.

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  • Brown library of music (9886 vols.), a very full collection on the anthropology and ethnology of Europe, and more than 10o,000 volumes on the history, biography, geography and literature of the United States.

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  • Rogers, the first president; Boston University (chartered in 1869; Methodist Episcopal; co-educational); the New England Conservatory of Music (co-educational; private; 1867, incorporated 1880), the largest in the United States, having 2400 students in 1905-1906; the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (1852); the Massachusetts Normal Art School (1873); the School of Drawing and Painting (1876) of the Museum of Fine Arts; Boston College (1860), Roman Catholic, but open to all denominations; St John's Theological Seminary (1880), Roman Catholic; Simmons College (1899) for women, and several departments of Harvard University.

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  • There are large numbers of private schools, in art, music and academic studies.

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  • This orchestra has done much for music not only in Boston but in the United States generally.

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  • Beneficent social work out of the more usual type is directed by the music and bath departments of the city government.

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  • After some hesitation between music and philosophy, he decided to make the latter the serious work of his life, and in 1867 the university of Rostock conferred on him the degree of doctor of philosophy.

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  • Mr and Mrs Barnett worked hard for the poor of their parish, opening evening schools for adults, providing them with music and reasonable entertainment, and serving on the board of guardians and on the managing committees of schools.

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  • Into these divans where figures of this kind moved to the music of Saracen instruments, there entered an inevitable voluptuousness and corruption of manners.

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  • The theory of proportion, and the study of acoustics and music were considerably advanced by his investigations.

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  • In painting, sculpture and music he considered himself the equal of specialists.

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  • Stetson University at De Land (Baptist); Rollins College (1885) at Winter Park (non-sectarian), with a collegiate department, an academy, a school of music, a school of expression, a school of fine arts, a school of domestic and industrial arts, and a business school; Southern College (1901), at Sutherland (Methodist Episcopal, South); the Presbyterian College of Florida (1905), at Eustis; Jasper Normal Institute (1890), at Jasper, and the Florida Normal Institute at Madison.

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  • 4 may refer to the old man's inability to make or hear music: in the house there is no sound of birds 1 or of singers, there are none of the artistic delights of a well-to-do household; further (v.

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  • Oberlin is primarily an educational centre, the seat of Oberlin College, named in honour of Jean Frederic Oberlin, and open to both sexes; it embraces a college of arts and sciences, an academy, a Theological Seminary (Congregational), which has a Slavic department for the training of clergy for Slavic immigrants, and a conservatory of music. In 1909 it had twenty buildings, and a Memorial Arch of Indiana buff limestone, dedicated in 1903, in honour of Congregational missionaries, many of them Oberlin graduates, killed in China in 1900.

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  • east-northeast of Atlanta, is the Agnes Scott College (1890) for white girls; connected with the college is a school of music, art and expression, and an academy.

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  • His first music master was Gottlieb Muller, who thought him self-willed and eccentric; and his first production as a composer was an overture, performed at the Leipzig theatre in 1830.

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  • Suddenly I felt something like compassion that the music should never sound from off the death-pale paper.

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  • But the music was delayed until the strange incident of a message from the emperor of Brazil encouraged Wagner to complete it in 18J9.

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  • More than £8000 was expended upon the venture; and the work was performed for the first time in the French language and with the new Venusberg music on the 13th of March 1861.

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  • The music was begun in the following year, and completed at Palermo on the 13th of January 1882.

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  • T.) In the articles on Music and Opera, Wagner's task in musicdrama is described, and it remains here to discuss his progress in the operas themselves.

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  • This progress has perhaps no parallel in any art, and certainly none in music, for even Beethoven's progress was purely an increase in range and power.

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  • Now Wagner's excellent teacher Weinlig did certainly, as Wagner himself testifies, teach him more of good music than Beethoven, Haydn and Mozart could have seen in their youth; for he showed him Beethoven.

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  • But this would not help Wagner to feel that contemporary music was really a great art; indeed it could only show him that he was growing up in a pseudo-classical time, in which the approval of persons of " good taste " was seldom directed to things of vital promise.

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  • Again, he began with far greater facility in literature than in music, if only because a play can be copied ten times faster than a full score.

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  • Wagner was always an omnivorous reader, and books were then, as now, both cheaper than music and easier to read.

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  • Moreover, the higher problems of rhythmic movement in the classical sonata forms are far beyond the scope of academic teaching; which is compelled to be contented with a practical plausibility of musical design; and the instrumental music which was considered the highest style of art in 18 3 0 was as far beyond Wagner's early command of such plausibility as it was obviously already becoming a mere academic game.

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  • The step from Rienzi to Der fliegende Hollander is without parallel in the history of music, and would be inexplicable if Rienzi contained nothing good and if Der fliegende Hollander did not contain many reminiscences of the decline of Italian opera; but it is noticeable that in this case the lapses into vulgar music have a distinct dramatic value.

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  • The weakest passages in Der fliegende Hollander are not so helpless as the original recitatives of Venus in the first act; or Tannhauser's song, which was too far involved in the whole scheme to be ousted by the mature " New Venusberg music " with which Wagner fifteen years later got rid both of the end of the overture and what he called his " Palais-Royal " Venus.

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  • Not until the third act does the great Wagner arbitrate in the struggle between amateurishness and theatricality in the music, though at all points his epoch-making stagecraft asserts itself with a force that tempts us to treat the whole work as if it were on the Wagnerian plane of Tannhauser's account of his pilgrimage in the third act.

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  • But the history of mid-19thcentury music is unintelligible until we face the fact that, when the anti-Wagnerian storm was already at its height, Wagner was still fighting for the recognition of music which was most definite just where it realized with ultra-Meyerbeerian brilliance all that Wagner had already begun to detest.

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  • These features established the work in a position which it will always maintain by its unprecedented dramatic qualities and by the glory reflected from Wagner's later achievements; but we shall not appreciate the marvel of its nobler features if we continue at this time of day to regard the bulk of the music as worthy of a great composer.

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  • The crowning complication in the effect of Der fliegende Hollander, Tannhauser and Lohengrin on the musical thought of the 10th century was that the unprecedented fusion of their musical with their dramatic contents revealed some of the meaning of serious music to ears that had been deaf to the classics.

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  • The faults make analysis exceptionally difficult, for they are no longer commonplace; indeed, the gravest dangers of modern Wagnerism arise from the fact that there is hardly any non-musical aspect in which Wagner's later work is not important enough to produce a school of essentially non-musical critics who have no notion how far Wagner's mature music transcends the rest of his thought, nor how often it rises where his philosophy falls.

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  • Wagner's choice of subjects had from the outset shown an imagination far above that of any earlier librettist; yet he had begun with stories which could attract ordinary minds, as he dismally realized when the libretto of Der fliegende Hollander so pleased the Parisian wire-pullers that it was promptly set to music by one of their friends.

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  • Be this as it may, we may confidently date the purification of Wagner's music at the moment when he set to work on a story which carried him finally away from that world of stereotyped operatic passions into which he had already breathed so much disturbing life.

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  • The conflict between her passionate fascination and her disgust at her father's vulgarity is finely realized both in music and drama; but, if we are able to appreciate it, then the operatic convention by which Senta avows her passion becomes crude.

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  • Again, the appeal to " God's judgment " in the trial by battle in Lohengrin is a subject of which no earlier librettist could have made more than a plausible mess - which is the best that can be said for the music as music. But as dramatist Wagner compels our respect for the power that without gloss or apology brings before us the king, a model of royal fair-mindedness and good-nature, acquiescing in Telramund's monstrous claim to accuse Elsa without evidence, simply because it is a hard and self-evident fact that the persons of the drama live in an age in which such claims seemed reasonable.

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  • In Lohengrin we take leave of the early music that obscured Wagner's ideals, and in the Ring we come to the music which transcends all other aspects of Wagnerism.

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  • Genuinely dramatic music, even if it seem as purely musical as Mozart's, must always be approached through its drama; and Wagner's masterpieces demand that we shall use this approach; but, as with Mozart, we must not stop on the threshold.

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  • But with Wagner, just as there are people who have never tried to follow a sonata but who have been awakened by his music-dramas to a sense of the possibilities of serious music, so there are lovers of music who avow that they owe to Wagner their appreciation of poetry.

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  • If we wish to know what Wagner means, we must fight our way through his drama to his music; and we must not expect to find that each phrase in the mouth of the actor corresponds word for note with the music. That sort of correspondence Wagner leaves to his imitators; and his views on " Leit-motifhunting," as expressed in his prose writings and conversation, are contemptuously tolerant.

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  • He believes that he is once more with Briinnhilde on the Valkyries' mountain height; and the harmonies of her awakening move in untroubled splendour till the light of life fades with the light of day and the slain hero is carried to the Gibichung's hall through the moonlit mists, while the music of love and death tells in terrible triumph more of his story than he ever knew.

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  • In his next work, Die Meistersinger, Wagner ingeniously made poetry and drama out of an explicit manifesto to musical critics, and proved the depth of his music by developing its everyday resources and so showing that its vitality does not depend on that extreme emotional force that makes Tristan and Isolde almost unbearably poignant.

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  • But in music he had no more to learn, and Parsifal, while the most solemn and concentrated of all Wagner's dramas, is musically not always unsuggestive of old age.

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  • Its harmonic style is, except in the Grail music, even more abstruse than in Tristan; and the intense quiet of the action is far removed from the forces which in that tumultuous tragedy carry the listener through every difficulty.

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  • A wide consensus regards Wagner's last work as his loftiest, both in music and poetry.

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  • It was so early recognized as characteristic of Chopin that a magnificent example may be seen at the end of Schumann's little tone-portrait of him in the Carnaval: a very advanced Wagnerian passage on another principle constitutes the bulk of the development in the first movement of Beethoven's sonata Les Adieux; while even in the " Golden Age " of music, and within the limits of pure diatonic concord, the unexpectedness of many of Palestrina's chords is hardly less Wagnerian than the perfect smoothness of the melodic lines which combine to produce them.

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  • We have seen (in the articles on Harmony and Music) how harmonic music originated in just this habit of regarding combinations of sound as mere sensations, and how for centuries the habit opposed itself to the intellectual principles of contrapuntal harmony.

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  • These intellectual principles are, of course, not without their own ground in physical sensation; but it is evident that Debussy appeals beyond them to a more primitive instinct; and on it he bases an almost perfectly coherent system of which the laws are, like those of i 2th-century music, precisely the opposite of those of classical harmony.

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  • This is of constant occurrence in classical pianoforte music, in which thick chords are subjected to polyphonic laws only in their top and bottom notes, while the inner notes make a solid mass of sound in which numerous consecutive fifths and octaves are not only harmless but essential to the balance of tone.

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  • They are an extension of the principle on which gongs and cymbals and all instruments without notes of determinate pitch are employed in otherwise polyphonic music.

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  • The present influence of Wagnerian harmony is, then, somewhat indefinite, since the most important real phenomena of later music indicate a revolt both from it and from earlier classical methods.

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  • Lohengrin: romantische Oper; 3 acts (libretto, 1845; music, 1846-1848).

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  • Das Rheingold, prologue in 4 scenes to Der Ring des Nibelungen; ein Buhnenfestspiel (poem written last of the series, which was begun in 1848 and finished in 1851-1852; music, 1853 - 1854).

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  • Tristan and Isolde; 3 acts (poem written in 1857; music, 1857-1859).

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  • Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg; 3 acts (sketch of play, 1845 poem, 1861-1862; music, 1862-1867).

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  • Parsifal: ein Buhnenweihfestspiel (a solemn stage festival play), 3 acts (poem, 1876-1877; music, 1877-1882, Charfreitagszauber already sketched in 1857).

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  • Wagner's retouching of Gluck's Iphigenie en Aulide and his edition of Palestrina's Stabat Mater demand mention as important services to music, by no means to be classified (as in some catalogues) with the hack-work with which he kept off starvation in Paris.

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  • Their importance will never be comparable to that of his music; but, just as the reaction against Ruskin's ascendancy as an art-critic has coincided with an increased respect for his ethical and sociological thought, so the rebellious forces that are compelling Wagnerism to grant music a constitution coincide with a growing admiration of his general mental powers.

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  • See also ARIA, HARMONY, INSTRUMENTATION, MUSIC, OPERA, and OVERTURE.

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  • In remembrance of these victims of popular wrath Jalal-uddin founded the order of the Maulawi (in Turkish Mevlevi) dervishes, famous for their piety as well as for their peculiar garb of mourning, their music and their mystic dance (sama), which is the outward representation of the circling movement of the spheres, and the inward symbol of the circling movement of the soul caused by the vibrations of a Sufi's fervent love to God.

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  • It has abandoned its peculiarities of dress and language, as well as its hostility to music and art, and it has cultivated a wider taste in literature.

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  • Broadly speaking, the " smaller body" is characterized by a rigid adherence to old forms of dress and speech, to a disapproval of music and art, and to an insistence on the " Inward Light " which, at times, leaves but little room for the Scriptures or the historic Christ, although with no definite or intended repudiation of them.

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  • ARISTOXENUS, of Tarentum (4th century B.C.), a Greek peripatetic philosopher, and writer on music and rhythm.

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  • He was taught first by his father Spintharus, a pupil of Socrates, and later by the Pythagoreans, Lamprus of Erythrae and Xenophilus, from whom he learned the theory of music. Finally he studied under Aristotle at Athens, and was deeply annoyed, it is said, when Theophrastus was appointed head of the school on Aristotle's death.

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  • His writings, said to have numbered four hundred and fifty-three, were in the style of Aristotle, and dealt with philosophy, ethics and music. The empirical tendency of his thought is shown in his theory that the soul is related to the body as harmony to the parts of a musical.

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  • p. 43) In music he held that the notes of the scale are to be judged, not as the Pythagoreans held, by mathematical ratio, but by the ear.

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  • See Peripatetics, Pythagoras (Music) and art.

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  • "Greek Music" in Grove's Dict.

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  • of Music (1904).

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  • He used to invite the contadini who had served Cosimo to a banquet on the day of Saints Cosimo and Damiano (the patron saints of the Medici), and entertained them with music and singing.

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  • They have the same love for poetry, music and romance; the same intense pride in their race and history; many of the same superstitions and customs. The Christians retain the Servian costume, modified in detail, as by the occasional use of the turban or fez.

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  • Up till his thirtieth year he dabbled in verse, but he had little ear for metrical music, and he lacked the spiritual impulsiveness of the true poet.

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  • The college has departments for arts, pure and applied science and technology, medicine, public health, music, and for the training of men and women teachers for elementary and secondary schools.

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  • They were famous for their skill in music and literature.

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  • Orpheus, Linus, Thamyris and Eumolpus were theirs, and in later days the Dardanii were noted for their love of music as well as for their uncleanliness.

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  • There must also be mentioned the fine public zoological gardens, Hagenbeck's private zoological gardens in the vicinity, the schools of music and navigation, and the school of commerce.

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  • The preacher had recourse to the Surrey Gardens music hall, where his congregation numbered from seven to ten thousand.

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  • The Eastern Maine Music Festival is held in Bangor in October of each year.

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  • Besides the ordinary studies of the monastic scholar, he devoted himself to mathematics, astronomy and music, and constructed watches and instruments of various kinds.

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  • He studied ancient theories of music, and is said to have invented the thirteen-syllable verse known subsequently as versi martelliani.

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  • Dunkirk is the seat of a sub-prefect; its public institutions include tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a board of trade-arbitrators, an exchange, a branch of the Bank of France and a communal college; and it has a school of drawing, architecture and music, a library and a rich museum of paintings.

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  • The Brazilian people have the natural taste for art, music and literature so common among the Latin nations of the Old World.

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  • From this beginning resulted the Academia de Bellas Artes of a later date, to which was added a conservatory of music in 1841.

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  • The Brazilian composer Carlos Gomes (1839-1896) is the best known of those who have adopted music as a profession, his opera Il Guarani having been produced at most of the European capitals.

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  • In the Music Hall in George Street, Carlyle, as lord rector of the university, delivered his stimulating address on books to the students, and Gladstone addressed the electors in his Midlothian campaigns.

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  • Classical concerts and concerts of the better sort, chiefly held in the M ` Ewan and Music Halls, are well attended, and lectures are patronized to a degree unknown in most towns.

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  • Variety entertainments are also in vogue, and in Nicolson Street and elsewhere there are good music halls.

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  • Its educational establishments include the university with its faculties of science and letters and a preparatory school of medicine and pharmacy, an artillery school, the lycee Victor Hugo for boys, a lycee for girls, an ecclesiastical seminary, training colleges for teachers, and schools of watch-making, art, music and dairywork.

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  • There are besides an adequate number of training institutes for teachers, a great number of schools of commerce, several art schools - for design, painting, sculpture, music, &c. Most of these special schools are of recent origin, and are almost entirely maintained by the state or the communes.

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  • SAINT CECILIA, in the Catholic Church the patron saint of music and of the blind.

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  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

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  • Educational institutions include the Trinity and the Victoria Colleges of Music, in Manchester Square and Berners Street respectively; the Bedford College for women, and the Regent's Park Baptist College.

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  • Studying in his youth for the Church, he was admitted to the minor orders in 1539 and ordained deacon in 1541 at Venice; but he soon devoted himself entirely to the study of music under the guidance of Adrian Willaert, then choirmaster at St Mark's.

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  • Though now remembered chiefly for invaluable contributions to the theory of music, it is evident that he must have been famous both as a practical musician and as a composer; for, notwithstanding the limited number of his printed works, consisting of a volume entitled Modulationes Sex Vocum (Venice, 1566), and a few motets and madrigals scattered through the collections of Scotto and other contemporary publishers, he both produced and superintended the public performance of some important pieces in the service of the republic. First among these was the music written to celebrate the battle of Lepanto (on the 7th of October 1571).

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  • cf France passed through Venice on his return from Poland in 1574, Zarlino directed on board the "Bucentaur" the performance of an ode for which he himself had composed the music, to verses supplied by Rocco Benedetti and Cornelio Frangipani.

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  • The ode was followed by a solemn service in St Mark's, in which Zarlino's music formed a prominent feature, and the festival concluded with the representation of a dramatic piece entitled Orfeo composed by Zarlino.

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  • The Istitutioni and Dimostrationi Armoniche deal, like most other theoretical works of the period, with the whole science of music as it was understood in the 16th century.

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  • the greater tone, lesser tone, and diatonic semitone of modern music. 2 Ptolemy set forth this system as one of eight possible forms of the diatonic scale.

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  • Obviously the word r ' must refer to something in the music; and inasmuch as the cymbals were for the purpose of producing a volume of sound (v'#r), it is reasonable to suppose that the 1 The threefold division of the singers appears in the same list according to the Hebrew text of verse 17, but the occurrence of Jeduthun as a proper name instead of a musical note is suspicious, and makes the text of LXX.

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  • But there is no difficulty in supposing that each division of the Levitical musicians had its own traditional music, certain instruments being peculiar to the one and certain to the other, in which case the assignment of a psalm to the Asaphites or Korahites will merely denote the sort of music to which it is set.

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  • 16), or, since the Chronicler ascribes to David the initiation of the Temple music, " in the oldest traditional mode."

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  • This does not necessarily prove that " the technical terms of the Temple music had gone out of use, presumably because they were already become unintelligible, as they were when the Septuagint version was made "; for it does not follow that technical musical terms which had originated in the Temple at Jerusalem and were intelligible in Palestine would have been understood in Egypt.

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  • xviii., for example, but there is no evidence that in early times David was regarded as the author of any of the psalms. Even the Chronicler, though he regarded David as the great founder of the Temple music, does not quote any psalm as composed by him, and the Chronicler's omission of 2 Sam.

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  • Certainly in happier times, when the worst period of storm and stress was over, there would be a desire to enliven the services with music, which would naturally be borrowed from the traditional music of the great national sanctuary.

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  • The original music of the psalms was therefore apparently based on popular melodies.

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  • The music of the temple attracted the attention of Theophrastus (ap. Porph.

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  • In company with his two patrons Gerbert visited Rome, where the pope, hearing of his proficiency in music and astronomy, induced him to remain in Italy, and introduced him to the emperor Otto I.

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  • More extraordinary still was his knowledge of music - an accomplishment which seems to have been his earliest recommendation to Otto I.

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  • Hardy, simple and industrious, fond of music, kind-hearted, and with a strangely artistic taste in dress, these people possess in a wonderful degree the secret of cheerful contentment.

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  • The percussion instruments were pushed up against the wall in the music room.

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  • of Tenbury, are St Michael's church and college (1858), founded and partially endowed by the Rev. Sir Frederick Gore Ouseley, in which the ordinary preparatory education of boys is combined with a school for choristers and instruction in ecclesiastical music.

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  • The faculties are theology, arts, law, music, medicine, science, engineering and economics.

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  • Music. - The principal educational institutions are - the Royal Academy of Music, Tenterden Street, Hanover Square; the Royal College of Music, South Kensington; Guildhall School, City, near the Victoria Embankment; London College, Great Marlborough Street; Trinity College, Manchester Square; Victoria College, Berners Street; and the Royal College of Organists, Bloomsbury.

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  • The principal music halls (variety theatres) are in Shaftesbury Avenue, Piccadilly Circus, Leicester Square and the Strand.

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  • Theatres, music halls, concert halls and other places of entertainment are licensed by the County Council, except that the licence for stage-plays is granted by the lord chamberlain under the Theatres Act 1843.

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  • He studied music under G.

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  • The mystery in which the composition was long enshrouded, no single copy being allowed to reach the public, the place and circumstances of the performance, and the added embellishments of the singers, account to a great degree for much of the impressive effect of which all who have heard the music speak.

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  • This view is confirmed by the fact that, when the music was performed at Venice by permission of the pope, it produced so little effect that the emperor Leopold I., at whose request the manuscript had been sent, thought that something else had been substituted.

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  • The entire music performed at Rome in Holy Week, Allegri's Miserere included, has been issued at Leipzig by Breitkopf and Hertel.

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  • Besides the Istituto di studii superiori there is the Istituto di scienze sociali "Cesare Alfieri," founded by the marchese Alfieri di Sostegno for the education of aspirants to the diplomatic and consular services, and for students of economics and social sciences (about 50 students); an academy of fine arts, a conservatoire of music, a higher female training-college with 150 students, a number of professional and trade schools, and an academy of recitation.

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  • The art of the Meistersingers has been immortalized by Richard Wagner in his music drama, Die Meistersinger (1868).

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  • There are also a theatre, an institute of music, a library, a museum, a zoological garden, and numerous scientific societies.

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  • There is excellent boating and bathing here, and there are mineral springs in the Park, where in the summer there are a Chautauqua course lasting for six weeks, a normal school, a Bible school, a Bible conference, a school of missions, an International Training School for Sunday School Workers, a conference of temperance workers and nature study and other regular summer school courses; and in other months of the year courses are given here by the Winona Normal School and Agricultural Institute, Winona Academy (for boys) and Winona Conservatory of Music, and the Winona Park School for Young Women.

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  • Gungl (1810-1889) gives name to a "school" of waltz and other dance music. Opera, especially in its lighter form, flourishes, and the actors of Vienna maintain with success a traditional reputation of no mean order.

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  • Munich contains several gymnasia or grammar-schools, a military academy, a veterinary college, an agricultural college, a school for architects and builders, and several other technical schools, and a conservatory of music. The general prison in the suburb of Au is considered a model of its kind; and there is also a large military prison.

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  • is given up to mathematics, under which head are included music, geometry, astronomy, astrology, weights and measures, and metaphysics.

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  • Even as a boy he had intense pleasure in reading St Thomas Aquinas and the Arab commentators of Aristotle, was skilled in the subtleties of the schools, wrote verses, studied music and design, and, avoiding society, loved solitary rambles on the banks of the Po.

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  • Adrian is the seat of Adrian College (1859; co-educational), controlled by the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1859-1867 and since 1867 by the Methodist Protestant Church, and having departments of literature, theology, music, fine arts, commerce and pedagogy, and a preparatory school; and of St Joseph's Academy (Roman Catholic) for girls; and 1 m.

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  • It is odd that this irregular poem, with its copious and varied music, its splendid sweep of emotion, its unfailing richness of texture - this poem in which Tennyson rises to heights of human sympathy and intuition which he reached nowhere else, should have been received with bitter hostility, have been styled "the dead level of prose run mad," and have been reproved more absurdly still for its "rampant and rabid bloodthirstiness of soul."

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  • He went on quite calmly, however, sure of his mission and of his music. His next volume (1872), Gareth and Lynette and The Last Tournament, continued, and, as he then supposed, concluded The Idylls of the King, to the great satisfaction of the poet, who had found much difficulty in rounding off the last sections of the poem.

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  • Beyond this, he eloquently pleaded the cause of painting as a distinct art, which Lessing in his desire to mark off the formative arts from poetry and music had confounded with sculpture.

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  • There may also be mentioned the Industrial Art Exhibition of the Polytechnic Association and two conservatories of music. Among the scientific institutions the first place belongs to the Senckenberg'sches naturhistorische Museum, containing valuable collections of birds and shells.

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  • It is the seat of a Greek-Orthodox bishop, and possesses a Greek-Orthodox theological seminary, two training schools for teachers - one Hungarian, and the other Rumanian - and a conservatoire for music. The town played an important part in the Hungarian revolution of 1848-49, and possesses a museum containing relics of this war of independence.

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  • Other buildings are the orphanage, the hospital, a house of correction for women and a music hall.

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  • Its educational establishments include faculties of law, of science and of letters, a preparatory school of medicine and pharmacy, a higher school of commerce, a school of fine art, a conservatoire of music, lycees and training colleges, and there is a public library with about 100,000 volumes.

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  • Historical journalism was first represented by Electa juris publici (1709), philology by Neue acerra philologica (1715-1723), philosophy by the Ada philosophorum (1715-1727), medicine by Der patriotische Medikus (1725), music by Der musikalische Patriot (1725), and education by Die Matrone (1728).

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  • Current periodicals are Hollandsche revue, monthly; De Gids (1837), monthly; De nieuwe Gids (1886), monthly; De Architect, bi-monthly; Caecilia (for music); Tijdschrift voor Strafrecht; Museum, for philology (1893), monthly; Tijdschrift voor nederlandsche taal en letterkunde; Nederlandsch Archievenblad; De Paleograaf; Elseviers geillustreerd Maandschrift, monthly; Groot Nederland, monthly.

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  • and S.B.; it has a school of music, a school of art and an academy; in 1908 there were 267 students.

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  • He was an accomplished musician, and assisted in the selection and arrangement of music in the Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes.

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  • of Beaver Falls; it has a preparatory and a collegiate department, departments of music, oratory and art, and a physical department, and in 1907-1908 had 13 instructors and 235 students.

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  • His next picture, exhibited in 1856, was "The Triumph of Music: Orpheus by the Power of his Art redeems his Wife from Hades."

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  • He had much taste and love for music, and considerable gifts as an orator of a florid type.

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  • It was nevertheless proscribed in the next year at the instance of the Montagnard deputy Albitte, for an anti-anarchical hemistich (Des lois et non du sang!); Fenelon (1793) was suspended after a few representations; and in 1794 his Timoleon, set to Etienne Mehul's music, was also proscribed.

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  • The metre was also employed in commemorative poems, accompanied with music, which were sung at funeral banquets in celebration of the exploits and virtues of distinguished men.

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  • The latest and probably the most important of these rude and inchoate forms was that of dramatic saturae (medleys), put together without any regular plot and consisting apparently of contests of wit and satiric invective, and perhaps of comments on current events, accompanied with music (Livy vii.

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  • We find now only imitative echoes of the old music created by Virgil and others, as in Statius, or powerful declamation, as in Lucan and Juvenal.

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  • There is a deterioration in the diction as well as in the music of poetry.

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  • The doubt already suggested as to language applies still more to such characteristics as Dorian music and other forms of art, and to Dorian customs generally.

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  • The archbishop also continues to grant degrees in the faculties of theology, music and law, which are known as Lambeth degrees.

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  • Affiliated with the university is a school of music. The university's income is derived from the proceeds of invested funds and lands originally given by the United States, from permanent appropriations by the state and from the proceeds of a one-fifth mill tax to be used for buildings alone.

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  • SALVATION ARMY, a religious philanthropic organization founded by William Booth, who in 1865 began to hold meetings for preaching in the streets in London and in tents, music halls, theatres and other hired buildings.

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  • Music is universally employed.

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  • Des Moines is the seat of Des Moines College, a Baptist institution, co-educational, founded in 1865 (enrolment, 1907-1908, 21 4); of Drake University (co-educational; founded in 1881 by the Disciples of Christ; now non-sectarian), with colleges of liberal arts, law, medicine, dental surgery and of the Bible, a conservatory of music, and a normal school, in which are departments of oratory and commercial training, and having in 1907-1908 -1764 students, of whom 520 were in the summer school only; of the Highland Park College, founded in 1890; of Grand View College (Danish Lutheran), founded in 1895; and of the Capital City commercial college (founded 1884).

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  • The peasants are famous for their devotion to the Roman Catholic religion, their fervent loyalty to the House of Austria, their excellent marksmanship, and their love of singing and music, the zither being the national instrument.

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  • Among the best known are "Liitzow's wilde verwegene Jagd," "Gebet wahrend der Schlacht" (set to music by Weber) and "Das Schwertlied."

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  • He was an enthusiast in music and other fine arts; and he habitually practised as an amusement, while deeply studying in theory, all sorts of athletic sports, including swimming and fencing.

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  • The educational establishments include two gymnasia, an episcopal clerical seminary, a seminary for boys and a school of church music. Among the chief manufactures are iron and steel wares, pottery, parquet flooring, tobacco, and lead pencils.

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  • The contents are of a varied character: the natural history of man, the influence of the stars and genii, music, religious rites, astronomy, the doctrines of the Greek philosophers.

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  • The fragments of a work De Natali Institutione, dealing with astronomy, geometry, music and versification, and usually printed with the De Die Natali of Censorinus, are not by him.

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  • He was passionately fond of music, and his own hymns were written to the accompaniment.

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  • the cathedral at Salisbury, and before returning home, would "sing and play his part" at a meeting of music lovers.

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  • of music. These abstract discussions are linked on to the original allegory by the device of personifying each science as a courtier of Mercury and Philologia.

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  • In music he was reputed one of the first organists of the age.

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  • Its educational institutions include a lycee, training colleges, a school of mines, an artillery school, schools of music, agriculture, drawing, architecture, &c., and a national school for instruction in brewing and other industries connected with agriculture.

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  • The government also maintains schools of agriculture, commerce, fine arts, music, pharmacy, technology, and an admirable preparatory or high school, besides a large number of primary and secondary schools for which modern school buildings have been erected.

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  • Holmes, Handbook of the Indians North of Mexico; Alice C. Fletcher, Francis la Flesche and John Comfort Fillmore, "A Study of Omaha Indian Music," Peabody Museum Archaeological and Ethnological Papers, i.

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  • Among the educational establishments are a gymnasium, and Realschule, the Sophienstift (a large school for girls of the better class, founded by the grand-duchess Sophia), the grand-ducal school of art, geographical institutes, a technical school, commercial school, music school, teachers' seminaries, and deaf and dumb and blind asylums. An English church was opened in 1899.

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  • 2 94-3 0 3; for his works on Chinese music see F.

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  • He has by many been called the father of modern music, and a portrait of him in the refectory of the monastery of Avellana bears the inscription Beatus Guido, inventor musicae.

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  • The most important of Guido's treatises, and those which are generally acknowledged to be authentic, are Micrologus Guidonis de disciplina artis musicae, dedicated to Bishop Theodald of Arezzo, and comprising a complete theory of music, in 20 chapters; Musicae Guidonis regulae rhythmicae in antiphonarii sui prologum prolatae, written in trochaic decasyllabics of anything but classical structure; Aliae Guidonis regulae de ignoto cantu, identidem in antiphonarii sui prologum prolatae; and the Epistola Guidonis Michaeli monacho de ignoto cantu, already referred to.

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  • Of the education of Herodotus no more can be said than that it was thoroughly Greek, and embraced no doubt the three subjects essential to a Greek liberal education - grammar, gymnastic training and music. His studies would be regarded as completed when he attained the age of eighteen, and took rank among the eplzebi or eirenes of his native city.

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  • As he was keen at his books and fond of music he was destined for the Church, and when eight years old was sent to school at Wesen, where he lived with his uncle, the dean.

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  • According to Homer, he was brought up by his mother at Phthia with his cousin and intimate friend Patroclus, and learned the arts of war and eloquence from Phoenix, while the Centaur Chiron taught him music and medicine.

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  • Achilles withdrew in wrath to his tent, where he consoled himself with music and singing, and refused to take any further part in the war.

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  • The educational establishments include a Roman Catholic and a Lutheran gymnasium, a Roman Catholic school and college and two technical institutions, the Georgstift for daughters of state servants and a conservatoire of music. Hildesheim is the seat of considerable industry.

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  • He was trained in all manly accomplishments by heroes of the highest renown in each, until in a transport of anger at a reprimand he slew Linus, his instructor in music, with the lyre.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Before his time instrumental music was chiefly written for the Paradiesensaal, and its melody often sacrificed vitality of idea to a ceremonial courtliness of phrase.

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  • His music is in this way singularly expressive; its humour and pathos.

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  • The latter office he held for fortythree years, during which time he wrote over 360 compositions for the church and much instrumental music, which, though unequal, deserves more consideration than it has received.

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  • We shall treat only of the diatonic scale, which is the basis of European music, and is approximated to as closely as is consistent with convenience of construction in key-board instruments, such as the piano, where the eight white notes beginning with C and ending with C an octave higher may be taken as representing the scale with C as the key-note.

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  • Sedley Taylor, Sound and Music (1882), contains a simple and excellent account of Helmholtz's theory of consonance and dissonance.

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  • He was taught Latin orally by servants (a German tutor, Horstanus, is especially mentioned), who could speak no French, and many curious fancies were tried on him, as, for instance, that of waking him every morning by soft music. But he was by no means allowed to be idle.

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  • Music is much cultivated, and there is an opera with a first-rate orchestra, of which Ludwig Spohr was at one time conductor.

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  • The conservatory of music at Leipzig enjoys a world-wide reputation; not less the art collections at Dresden.

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  • Music Of The Spheres >>

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  • Hermes was a patron of music, like Apollo, and invented the cithara; he presided over the games, with Apollo and Heracles, and his statues were common in the stadia and gymnasia.

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  • The uncertainty of the wind might well suggest the trickery of a thief, and its whistling might contain the germ from which a god of music should be developed.

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  • of two oratorios; and a requiem, with some other pieces of church music, are now in Vienna.

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  • The former, of which the three published volumes relate wholly to ancient music, and thus represent a mere fragment of the author's vast plan, exhibits immense reading and industry, but is written in a dry and unattractive style, and is overloaded with matter which cannot be regarded as historical.

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  • Doni's Works; he also published a treatise on The Theory of Numbers as applied to Music. His celebrated canons, published in London, about 1800, edited by Pio Cianchettini, show him to have had a strong sense of musical humour.

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  • He was a prince with a taste for music and literature, whose reign was a time of confusion.

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  • The university includes a college of arts and sciences, a school of commerce, an art depart ment and colleges of law and of music. In 1910 the university had 51 instructors and 385 students.

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  • Other institutions are Concordia College (1881, Lutheran), a state normal school (1880), the Wisconsin College of physicians and surgeons (1893), the national German-American teachers' seminary (normal), Milwaukee academy (1864), Milwaukee University school, Milwaukee school of engineering (1904), Milwaukee Turnverein school of physical culture, one of the largest schools of the sort in the United States, St John's Catholic institute, Our Lady of Mercy academy (Roman Catholic), Wisconsin academy of music, the Wisconsin school of art (art students' league), a Catholic normal school, St Rose's manual training school, the industrial chemical institute (the only technical school for brewers in the United States) and several business and commercial schools.

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  • However, she welcomed Rousseau kindly, thought it necessary to complete his education, and he was sent to the seminarists of St Lazare to be improved in classics, and also to a music master.

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  • Hardly knowing anything of music, he attempted to give lessons and a concert at Lausanne; and he actually taught at Neuchatel.

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  • He had an opera, Les Muses galantes, privately represented; he copied music for money, and received from Madame Dupin and her son-in-law M.

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  • His articles on music in the Encyclopedic deal very superficially with the subject; and his Dictionnaire de musique (Geneva, 1767), though admirably written, is not trustworthy, either as a record of facts or as a collection of critical essays.

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  • He loved music himself, and justified this profane pleasure by the example of Bishop Grosseteste, who lodged his harper in the chamber next his own; but he holds up as a warning to gleemen the fate of the minstrel who sang loud while the bishop said grace, and was miserably killed by a falling stone in consequence.

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  • Their architecture, drawing, goldsmith's work, carving, music and dancing are all highly developed in strict accordance with the traditions of Indo-Chinese art.

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  • The system of music is elaborate but is not written, vocalists and instrumentalists performing entirely by ear.

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  • The interval corresponding to the octave being divided into seven equal parts, each about 14 semitone, it follows that Siamese music sounds strange in Western ears.

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  • Music can be enjoyed every day in the year either out of doors or under cover.

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  • In the numerous churches the music was renowned, the archduke Leopold being passionately given to the art, maintaining at his.

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  • In confinement the brown bear is readily tamed; and advantage has been taken of the facility with which it can sustain itself on the hind feet to teach it to dance to the sound of music. It measures about 12 ft.

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  • The history of modern Czech music commences with the creator of Czech opera, Frederick Smetana.

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  • which enjoyed great popularity among his countrymen and had the good fortune to be set to music by Chopin.

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  • There are, besides, a theological academy, founded in 1615; a society of church archaeology, which possesses a museum built in 1900, very rich in old ikons, crosses, &c., both Russian and Oriental; an imperial academy of music; university courses for ladies; a polytechnic, with 1300 students - the building was completed in 190o and stands on the other side of Old Kiev, away from the river.

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  • Like the story of Perceval that of Tristan has been made familiar to the present generation by Richard Wagner's noble music drama, Tristan and Isolde, founded upon the poem of Gottfried von Strassburg; though, being a drama of feeling rather than of action, the story is reduced to its simple elements; the drinking of the love-potion, the passion of the lovers, their discovery by Mark and finally their death.

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  • They support the Eisteddfod as the promoter and inspirer of arts, letters and music, and are conspicuous among the annual prize winners.

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  • There are also several large hotels and ten theatres (besides halls and auditoriums for concerts and public gatherings), the most notable being Springer music hall.

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  • Art, &c. - The large German population makes the city noteworthy for its music. The first Sangerfest was held in Cincinnati in 1849, and it met here again in 1870, when a new hall was built for its accommodation.

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  • In 1875-1878 was built the large Springer music hall, named in honour of Reuben R.

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  • Springer (1800-1884), its greatest benefactor, who endowed the Cincinnati College of Music (incorporated in 1878), of which Thomas was director in 1878-1881.

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  • The grounds for the music hall were given by the city and are perpetually exempt from taxation.

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  • The great organ in the music hall was dedicated at the third of the May festivals in 1878.

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  • The city has several other musical societies - the Apollo and Orpheus clubs (1881 and 1893), a Liederkranz (1886), and a United Singing Society (1896) being among the more prominent; and there are two schools of music - the Conservatory of Music and the College of Music.

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  • After the abolition of the States of the Church, he was treated by the French as a state prisoner, and lived for some years at the abbey of Monticelli, solacing himself with music and with bird-shooting, pastimes which he did not eschew even after his election as pope.

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  • The fundametal difficulty which confronts those who would distinguish between pleasure and eudaemonia is that all pleasure is ultimately a mental phenomenon, whether it be roused by food, music, doing a moral action or committing a theft.

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  • Athens is the seat of Ohio University (co-educational), a state institution established in 1804, and having in 1908 a college of liberal arts, a state normal college (1902), a commercial college, a college of music and a state preparatory school.

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  • With the prophets it is quite otherwise; they appear not individually but in bands; their prophesying is a united exercise accompanied by music, and seemingly dance-music; it is marked by strong excitement, which sometimes acts contagiously, and may be so powerful that he who is seized by it is unable to stand, 2 and, though this condition is regarded as produced by a divine afflatus, it is matter of ironical comment when a prominent man like Saul is found to be thus affected.

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  • He possessed a just and discriminating taste for the fine arts, and was a great lover of music.

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  • conservatorium of music. The surrounding district is largely devoted to viticulture and fruit-growing.

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  • The university, established in 1855, is undenominational, and grants degrees in the faculties of arts, law, medicine, science, civil engineering and music; instruction in theology is left to the affiliated colleges.

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  • Besides these, the government maintains schools of law, medicine, agriculture and veterinary practice, engineering, mining, commerce and administration, music and fine arts.

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  • In the month of the " diminishing of waters " the rain gods or Tlalocs were propitiated by a procession of priests with music of flutes and trumpets carrying on plumed litters infants with painted faces, in gay clothing with coloured paper wings, to be sacrificed on the mountains or in a whirlpool in the lake.

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  • The of tencited poems attributed to Nezahualcoyotl may not be quite genuine, but at any rate poetry had risen above the barbaric level, while the mention of ballads among the people, court odes, and the chants of temple choirs would indicate a vocal cultivation above that of the instrumental music of drums and horns, pipes and whistles, the latter often of pottery.

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  • Besides the usual duties of local government, and the connexion with the port and docks boards already explained, there should be noticed the connexion of the corporation with such bodies as those controlling the city technical schools, the Royal Irish Academy of Music, and the gallery of modern art.

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  • Cornell College includes a collegiate department, an academy, a conservatory of music, a school of art, a school of oratory and a summer school; in 1907-1908 it had 40 instructors and 755 students.

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  • He is said to have written before Euclid and Ptolemy; and Cassiodorus arranges his Introduction to Music between those of Nicomachus and Gaudentius.

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  • In Glencoe is a fairy hill where the fairy music, vocal and instrumental, is heard in still weather.

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  • Other educational establishments are a school of art, a national conservatory of music, a commercial college, four trades' schools with more than 600 pupils and a national library.

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  • An ingenious, though ineffective, proposal for the reform of the calendar was put forward in his Elenchus Calendarii Gregoriani (Frankfort, 1612); and he published a book on music, Melodiae condendae ratio (Erfurt, 1592), still worth reading.

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  • In the occupations of musicians and teachers of music, and of school-teachers and professors (which together account for seven-eighths of professional women) women preponderate.

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  • It was enlarged and improved, the sale of drink was forbidden, and miscellaneous programmes of music, drama, and lectures were embarked upon.

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  • The college offers classical, philosophical and scientific courses, and has a school of music and an academic department; in 1907-1908 it had 19 instructors and 257 students, of whom 93 were in the college and 97 were in the school of music. Fairfield has a Carnegie library (1892), and a museum with a collection of laces.

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  • Music is a part of moral education; and for this end we should use the most moral harmonies.

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  • He had the keenest love of poetry, music and art.

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  • Ferdinand had good taste for art and music. Some modification of the tight-handed rule of his father was made by the Staatsconferenz during his reign.

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  • Among other educational institutions are a conservatory of music, school of fine arts, normal school, a national library with upwards of 260,000 volumes and a large number of manuscripts, maps, medals and coins, the national observatory on Castle Hill, the national museum now domiciled in the Sao Christovao palace in the midst of a pretty park, a zoological garden in the suburb of Villa Isabel, and the famous Botanical Garden founded by Dom Joao VI.

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  • It was during a reception in the Temple of Music on the Exposition grounds that President McKinley was assassinated (September 6th); he died at the home of John G.

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  • The educational institutions are numerous and of a high order, including a technical high school (with about 1100 students), which enjoys the privilege of conferring the degrees of doctor of engineering, doctor of technical sciences, &c., a veterinary college, a political-economic institution (Gehestiftung), with library, a school of architects, a royal and four municipal gymnasia, numerous lower grade and popular schools, the royal conservatorium for music and drama, and a celebrated academy of painting.

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  • Besides the two royal theatres, Dresden possesses several minor theatres and music halls.

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  • The pride of place in the world of music is held by the orchestra attached to the court theatre.

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  • Symphony and popular concerts are held throughout the year in various public halls, and, during the winter, concerts of church music are frequently given in the Protestant Kreuzand Frauen-Kirchen, and on Sundays in the Roman Catholic church.

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  • The child was brought up under a rigid system of nursing, physical, moral and intellectual; kept without toys, not seldom whipped, watched day and night, but trained from infancy in music, drawing, reading aloud and observation of natural objects.

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  • The music was composed by Rochus Dedler, schoolmaster of the parish in 1814.

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  • Two years after, lack of pupils compelled him to move to Rudolstadt and later to Dresden, where he gave lessons in music. In 1805 his ideal of a universal world-society led him to join the Freemasons, whose principles seemed to tend in the direction he desired.

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  • The effects of resonance were studied by the music students.

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  • Except in the case of a select few, Irving's preaching awakened little interest among the congregation of Chalmers, Chalmers himself, with no partiality for its bravuras and flourishes, comparing it to "Italian music, appreciated only by connoisseurs"; but as a missionary among the poorer classes he wielded an influence that was altogether unique.

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  • One while he devoted himself to the sciences, " perfecting himself in music, arithmetic, geometry and ' Life, P. 93.

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  • She read Latin and Greek, was a proficient in music, and in the sciences so far as they were then accessible.

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  • More was not only a lawyer, a wit, a scholar, and a man of wide general reading; he was also a man of cultivated taste, who delighted in music and painting.

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  • In general it may be said of church architecture, more truly than of any other, that artistically it is " frozen music."

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  • Further, Wundt declares that the psychical compound of sensations, with which, according to him, we actually start, is not a complex sensation, but a compound idea; so that I am expected to believe that, when I hear the chord of D, I am not conscious of single sensations of D, F, A, and have only a compound idea of the chord - as if the hearing of music were merely a series of ideas!

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  • At court much time was given to poetic recitation, often accompanied by music, and accomplished poets received liberal rewards.

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  • It is the seat of the Eastern Hospital for the Insane (1879) a state institution; St Joseph's Seminary (Roman Catholic) and a Conservatory of Music. At Bourbonnais Grove, 3 m.

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  • Their music, dances and.

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  • One of the earliest acts of the new pontificate was to forbid the use in the services of the Church of any music later than Palestrina, a drastic order justified by the extreme degradation into which church music had fallen in Italy, but in general honoured rather in the spirit than in the letter.

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  • It is the seat of Fort Worth University (coeducational), a Methodist Episcopal institution, which was established as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, received its present name in 1889, comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts and sciences, a conservatory of music, a law school, a medical school, a school of commerce, and a department of oratory and elocution, and in 1907 had 802 students; the Polytechnic College (coeducational; Methodist Episcopal, South), which was established in 1890, has preparatory, collegiate, normal, commercial, and fine arts departments and a summer school, and in 1906 had 12 instructors and (altogether) 696 students; the Texas masonic manual training school; a kindergarten training school; St Andrews school (Protestant Episcopal), and St Ignatius Academy (Roman Catholic).

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  • Yet she confessed with her usual candour that she had no taste for painting, sculpture or music. Her supposed love of literature does not appear to have amounted to more than a lively curiosity, which could be satisfied by dipping into a great number of books.

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  • When this was done they all went to the chapel with much music, and the new knight laying his right hand on the altar promised to support and defend the church, and ungirding his sword offered it on the altar.

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  • As a man of education and refinement, fond of music, the fine arts, and polite literature, he was unintelligible to the szlachta, who regarded all artists and poets as either mechanics or adventurers.

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  • The college comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts, a school of expression, a school of commerce, schools of music and of art, and a school of correspondence; and in 1907-1908 had 33 instructors, 575 students and a library of 24, 4 00 volumes.

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  • 4 These phenomena are clearly explained at greater length by Sedley Taylor in Sound and Music (London, 1896), pp. 1 341 53 and pp. 74-86.

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  • 1828) in 1790, a gymnasium, and schools of navigation, art and music. There are learned societies for the study of law (1761) and natural science (1830); an academy of fine arts (1830); an archaeological society; and a central bureau for collecting information concerning the province.

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  • Of the numerous institutions for the encouragement of the sciences and the fine arts, the following are strictly national - the Royal Academy of Sciences (1855), the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (1854), the National Academy of the Plastic Arts, the Royal School of Music, the National Archives, besides various other national collections and museums. Provincial scientific societies exist at Middelburg, Utrecht, 's Hertogenbosch and Leeuwarden, and there are private and municipal associations, institutions and collections in a large number of the smaller towns.

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  • Among societies of general utility are the Society for Public Welfare (Maatschappij tot nut van't algemeen, 1785), whose efforts have been mainly in the direction of educational reform; the Geographical Society at Amsterdam (1873); Teyler's Stichting or foundation at Haarlem (1778), and the societies for the promotion of industry (1777), and of sciences (1752) in the same town; the Institute of Languages, Geography and Ethnology of the Dutch Indies (1851), and the Indian Society at the Hague, the Royal Institute of Engineers at Delft (1848), the Association for the Encouragement of Music at Amsterdam, &c.

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  • The extent and character of Gregory's works in connexion with the liturgy and the music of the church is a subject of dispute.

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  • Ecclesiastical tradition further ascribes to Gregory the compilation of an Antiphonary, the revision and rearrangement of the system of church music, and the foundation of the Roman schola cantorum.

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  • P. Wyatt, St Gregory and the Gregorian Music; and the bibliographies of Gregory in Chevalier, Repertoire des sources historiques du moyen age, and A.

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  • The departments of the institution are a college of arts; schools of engineering (1903), music, and (1906) forestry; and the Cutler Academy, a preparatory school under the control of the college.

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  • Destined by his father to the pursuits of trade, he was allowed, nevertheless, to indulge his fondness for music, and learnt to play at an early age on several instruments, his first teacher being the Tirolean composer, I.

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  • But the failure in business and death of his father, in 1819, compelled him once more to turn to music, and to make that which had been his pastime the serious employment of his life.

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  • In music, there are royal conservatoires at Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, and Liege.

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  • Coblenz has also handsome law courts, government buildings, a theatre, a museum of antiquities, a conservatory of music, two high grade schools, a hospital and numerous charitable institutions.

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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to music.

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  • It is an immense store-house of miscellaneous information, chiefly on matters connected with the table, but also containing remarks on music, songs, dances, games, courtesans.

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  • This song, set to music by Auber, was on the lips of every Frenchman, and rivalled in popularity the Marseillaise.

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  • It has an academy of practical medicine, a commercial high school, a theological seminary, four Gymnasia (classical schools), numerous lower-grade schools, a conservatory of music and several high-grade ladies' colleges.

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  • He had an intelligent interest in art, and studied ecclesiastical music and architecture.

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  • The university includes a college of liberal arts, a department of law, a school of technology, an academy, a normal school, a model school, a business college and a school of music. De Land was founded in 1876 by H.

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  • Free from the yoke of the brewer, she fell in love with a music master, high in his profession, from Brescia, named Gabriel Piozzi, in whom nobody but herself could discover anything to admire.

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  • For the same reason the country is very well provided with excellent schools of painting and music. Of the art schools the most famous ar~ those of Munich, Dsseldorf, Dresden and Berlin, but there are others, e.g.

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  • It is otherwise with the schools of music, which exercise a profound influence far beyond the borders of Germany.

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