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.museum

.museum

.museum Sentence Examples

  • I heard we had a nice museum in the cellar.

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  • "I guess the sisters spent the day at the museum," Cynthia said.

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  • "I guess the sisters spent the day at the museum," Cynthia said.

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  • It is a completely viable state, with a ski museum and a McDonald's.

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  • I'm sure the museum will be grateful and help us in our research all they can.

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  • The museum can't open for hours, Dean asked his wife as he helped clean up the dining room.

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  • So what do you want me to do, make a museum out of this place?

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  • We did some digging in old records at the museum as well.

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  • The museum will get a big kick out of it.

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  • However, if one designs to construct a dwelling-house, it behooves him to exercise a little Yankee shrewdness, lest after all he find himself in a workhouse, a labyrinth without a clue, a museum, an almshouse, a prison, or a splendid mausoleum instead.

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  • "Let's see if the brick building has a museum or historical collection of some kind," Betsy said as we approached the building.

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  • The museum was the first institution of its kind in Greece, but the collection was transferred to Athens in 1834.

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  • I'd already told Miss Worthington down at the museum she could have the pen and ink bottle.

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  • Fred returned to the courthouse, museum, and library for further research.

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  • Ensconced lights glowed in the midday, and antique furniture, rare paintings, elegant marble sculptures befitting a museum, silk Persian rugs underfoot, and many other priceless displays of prestige lined the wide hall.

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  • Ensconced lights glowed in the midday, and antique furniture, rare paintings, elegant marble sculptures befitting a museum, silk Persian rugs underfoot, and many other priceless displays of prestige lined the wide hall.

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  • He took part in the excavations at Olympia in 1878, became an assistant in the Berlin Museum in 1880, and professor at Berlin (1884) and later at Munich.

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  • Then you can talk to 'em but I imagine if it was a gift to the museum, they'll be obligated to hold on to the original.

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  • Among the public buildings are the town hall, classic in style; the market house, and literary and scientific institution, with a museum containing a fossil collection from the limestone of the locality.

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  • The museum in the same building contains pictures and other objects of art.

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  • "Miss Worthington let me take it out of the museum so's you could see it," Fred said as he presented a curled, cardboard sepia image.

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  • "The museum has already helped with this," he said, presenting the picture of Rev. Martin and his wife.

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  • Fred O'Connor, back from his second stint at the library and historical museum, was now poring over the newspaper and circling the Saturday garage sales in the classified ads.

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  • Then he added, I've got to stay on the good side of them museum folks.

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  • Denver has an art museum and a zoological museum.

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  • Denver has an art museum and a zoological museum.

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  • Fred and his juvenile helpers had located a picture of Reverend Martin and his wife in an old museum collection of early Ouray papers and photos.

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  • He invited me to visit his museum in Salem the next time I go to Boston.

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  • They still have the hand-operated machine from the 1940s that was used to make the first Legos, but it is of course now a museum piece.

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  • She had previously obtained permission from General Loring, Supt. of the Museum, for me to touch the statues, especially those which represented my old friends in the "Iliad" and "Aeneid."

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  • When she was at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston she stood on a step-ladder and let both hands play over the statues.

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  • There is also the Ostergotland Museum, with an art collection.

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  • Representations of apotheoses occur on several works of art; the most important are the apotheosis of Homer on a relief in the Townley collection of the British Museum, that of Titus on the arch of Titus, and that of Augustus on a magnificent cameo in the Louvre.

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  • From this town we have a very interesting though brief inscription dating probably from early in the 3rd century B.C.; it is cut upon a small bronze plate (now in the Naples Museum), which must have once been fixed to some votive object, dedicated to the god Declunus (or the goddess Decluna).

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  • du museum, xiii.

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  • "The more time that Claire spends in the museum, the better, as far as I'm concerned," Dean said.

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  • "The more time that Claire spends in the museum, the better, as far as I'm concerned," Dean said.

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  • The museum of art comprises a picture gallery, a collection of casts of Thorvaldsen's works and a cabinet of engravings.

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  • The numerous facts, geological, geographical and biological, which when linked together lend great support to this theory, have been well worked out in Australia by Mr Charles Hedley of the Australian Museum, Sydney.

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  • There is in the British Museum a poem printed in 1666, entitled Letter to the bishop of Munster containing a Panegyrick of his heroick achievements in heroick verse.

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  • Dr Burmeister was afterwards placed in charge of the provincial museum of Buenos Aires, and devoted himself to the acquisition of a collection of fossil remains, now in the La Plata museum, which ranks among the best of the world.

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  • The last houses the provincial antiquarian museum and the municipal library of 70,000 volumes.

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  • In 1849 it was purchased by the town for £53,000, and is devoted to various public uses, containing a museum, assembly-rooms and picture-galleries.

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  • Then he added magnanimously, "I'm donating the school book and ink bottle to the museum, seeing as Miss Worthington helped in locating the buyers and all."

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  • Near the barracks is the Royal Artillery Institution, with a fine museum and a lecture hall.

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  • Near the barracks is the Royal Artillery Institution, with a fine museum and a lecture hall.

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  • The town hall, Athenaeum and museum are noteworthy buildings, the last having a fine biological collection.

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  • The same evening your picture from the museum turned up missing.

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  • in the court of the museum of the plastic arts; and a large monumental fountain in the Eugensplatte.

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  • To these may be added the industrial museum, the cabinet of coins, the museum of natural history, the collection of majolica vases in the new palace, and the Wurttemberg museum of antiquities.

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  • A tusk in the British Museum measures io ft.

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  • As patron of the Arts and Crafts Museum (1862-98), and as curator of the Academy of Sciences, he won a high reputation.

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  • There are several fine public buildings, as the governor's palace, the new opera-house, the public library and museum of Maltese antiquities, and the auberges or lodges of the Knights of Malta (especially the Auberge de Castile) which are now used for military offices, club-rooms, and other purposes.

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  • There is a museum of natural history; the collection is reminiscent of the famous naturalist Gilbert White, of Selborne in this vicinity.

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  • Thomas, Catalogue of Monotremata and Marsupialia in the British Museum (1888); "On Caenolestes, a Survivor of the Epanorthidae," Proc. Zool.

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  • A tusk in the British Museum measures io ft.

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  • As patron of the Arts and Crafts Museum (1862-98), and as curator of the Academy of Sciences, he won a high reputation.

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  • Of the largest pair in the possession of the British Museum, which belonged to an elephant killed in 1866 by Colonel G.

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  • There are a theatre, an interesting museum of antiquities, natural history and art; and a picturesque park (Bjergsted).

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  • of the British Museum and entitled Chevelere assigne.

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  • The mines were known to the Carthaginians, as discoveries of lamps, coins, &c. (now in the museum at Cagliari), testify.

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  • In the Queen Anne range is the Royal Naval Museum, containing models, relics of Nelson and of Franklin, and other objects.

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  • In the town hall (1507) are the library and a small museum with two pictures by the 17th century artist Caesar van Everdingen, who with his more celebrated brother Allart van Everdingen was a native of the town.

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  • Two important educational establishments are the Indian Institute for the education of civil service students for thecolonies, to which is attached an ethnographical museum; and the Royal Polytechnic school, which almost ranks as a university, and teaches, among other sciences, that of diking.

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  • 26), who had seen a specimen in the Lisbon museum; and, though knowing it had already been received into scientific nomenclature, he called it anew Microdactylus marcgravii.

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  • There is an archaeological museum with prehistoric antiquities from the lake-dwellings on an island in the Lake of Varese.

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  • Didn't the Boston ladies have any interest in the other items you're donating to the museum?

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  • You'll be wanting to spend lots of time at the library and museum.

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  • Well, I think it's best you take that up with the museum.

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  • It's the picture from the museum.

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  • He was in his stocking feet, snowy boots left by the back door after his day at the library and museum.

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  • Does Claire have the museum's picture of Rev. Martin and his wife?

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  • My God, this is better than going to a museum.

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  • Among modern buildings may be mentioned the Bakewell and High Peak Institute, and the town hall and museum.

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  • Educated at Leipzig and Berlin, he became extraordinary professor in 1883 and ordinary professor in 1892 of Egyptology in the university of Berlin, and in 1885 he was appointed director of the Egyptian department of the royal museum.

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  • The many important objects found in these excavations are preserved in the local museum.

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  • Among the most curious relics of the art of the period is a group of bronze statuettes, some found at Uta near Cagliari and others near Teti, west of Fonni, in the centre of the island, of which many specimens are now preserved in the museum at Cagliari.

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  • a considerable amount was done (the objects are now in the Lateran museum).

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  • A slightly idealized portrait of Pericles as strategus is preserved to us in the British Museum bust, No.

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  • c. 1550) are preserved in the British Museum.

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  • It is now used as a William of Orange Museum.

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  • The royal university of Parma, founded in 1601 by Ranuccio I., and reconstituted by Philip of Bourbon in 1768, has faculties in law, medicine and natural science, and possesses an observatory, and natural science collections, among which is the Eritrean Zoological Museum.

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  • There are no ruins of any importance on the site of either Ialysus or Camirus, but excavations at the latter place have produced valuable and interesting results in the way of ancient vases and other antiquities, which are now in the British Museum.

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  • He was elected fellow of Balliol in 1850 and Savilian professor of geometry in 1861, and in 1874 was appointed keeper of the university museum.

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  • From Holland he was invited to England by the duke of Montague, who employed him, together with other French painters, to paint the walls of his palace, Montague House (on the site of which is now the British Museum).

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  • During the last few years of his life Boole was constantly engaged in extending his researches with the object of producing a second edition of his Differential Equations much more complete than the first edition; and part of his last vacation was spent in the libraries of the Royal Society and the British Museum.

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  • It stands in a large park, the whole property being acquired by the corporation of Birmingham in 1864, when the mansion became a museum and art gallery.

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  • The museum (a state institution), formerly housed in the same building as the library, was transferred in 1897 to a new building in the suburb of Mustapha Superieur.

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  • In the museum are some of the ancient sculptures and mosaics discovered in Algeria, together with medals and Algerian money.

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  • LEOPOLDO NOBILI (1784-1835), Italian physicist, born at Reggio nell' Emilia in 1784, was in youth an officer of artillery, but afterwards became professor of physics in the archducal museum at Florence, the old habitat of the Accademia del Cimento.

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  • To the north-east of Marienbad lies the small watering-place of KOnigswart; near it is a castle belonging since 1618 to the princes of Metternich, which contains an interesting museum, created by the famous Austrian statesman in the first part of the 19th century.

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  • His fine collections of manuscripts and coins was purchased by the British Museum.

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  • It contains an important museum of Etruscan and Roman antiquities.

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  • Besides these we have in the same period the spark telegraph of Reiser, of Don Silva, and of Cavallo, the pith ball telegraph of Francis Ronalds (a model of which is in the collection of telegraph apparatus in the Victoria and Albert Museum), and several others.

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  • British Museum for various pamphlets.

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  • His Political Memoranda were edited by Oscar Browning for the Camden Society in 1884, and there are eight volumes of his official correspondence in the British Museum.

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  • Of the four two are in the British Museum.

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  • Both came into the possession of the Museum with the valuable collection of papers which had belonged to Sir Robert Cotton, who had obtained possession of both.

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  • Both were written evidently in a less hurried fashion than those in the British Museum, and the one at Lincoln was regarded as the most perfect by the commissioners who were responsible for the appearance of the Statutes of the Realm in 1810.

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  • The British Museum also contains the original parchment of the Articles of the Baron.

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  • of the Proceedings of the National Museum, U.S.A.); A.

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  • Maas in Results of In its arrangement the muscular tissue the "Albatross " Expedition, forms two s stems: the one composed Museum of Comparative Y P Zoology, Cambridge, Masse, of striated fibres arranged circularly, that U.S.A. is to say, concentrically round the central FIG.

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  • The Provincial Museum (1885-1889) contains many Roman and medieval antiquities.

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  • Naturalists who deal specially with museum collections have been compelled, it is true, for other reasons to attach an increasing importance to what is called the type specimen, but they find that this insistence on the individual, although invaluable from the point of view of recording species, is unsatisfactory from the point of view of scientific zoology; and propositions for the amelioration of this condition of affairs range from a refusal of Linnaean nomenclature in such cases, to the institution of a division between master species for such species as have been properly revised by the comparative morphologist, and provisional species for such species as have been provisionally registered by those working at collections.

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  • Of the original 12 panels, taken to France during the Revolutionary Wars, only 4 are now here, 6 being in the Berlin museum and two in that of Brussels.

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  • In the park is also situated the Museum of Fine Arts, completed in 1902.

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  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.

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  • A school of pharmacy was instituted, and a museum and library were started.

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  • The chemical laboratory in connexion with the school was, when first instituted, the only one in England for teaching purposes, and the museum is now reputed to be the best pharmaceutical one in the world, the library now containing about 13,000 volumes.

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  • The museum contains one of the best existing collections of Maori art.

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  • Part of the building, used by the poet's father as a wool-shop, is fitted as a museum.

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  • This first design, the model for which is preserved in the South Kensington Museum, is very inferior to what Wren afterwards devised.

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  • Only a few of the principal ones can be mentioned: - the Custom House, the Royal Exchange, Marlborough House, Buckingham House, and the Hall of the College of Physicians - now destroyed; others which exist are - at Oxford, the Sheldonian theatre, the Ashmolean museum, the Tom Tower of Christ Church, and Queen's College chapel; at Cambridge, the library of Trinity College and the chapel of Pembroke, the latter at the cost of Bishop Matthew Wren, his uncle.

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  • Educated at Harrow, Brasenose College, Oxford, and Göttingen, he was elected fellow of Brasenose and in 1884 keeper of the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford, holding this post till 1908.

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  • A portrait was taken of the head of the body found therein, now in the museum of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland.

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  • - Remains of head of Odontopteryx, from the original in the British Museum; side view; natural size.

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  • (From specimens in the British Museum.

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  • Museum, 1891; K.

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  • Sharpe increases their number to about 15,000 in the New Hand-List of Birds, published by the British Museum.

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  • (From specimen in the British Museum.

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  • Books in the British Museum (London, 1867; continued by van Straalen, London, 1894).

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  • in the British Museum (London, 1899, &c.).

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the konak or governor's residence, the Roman Catholic and Orthodox cathedrals, the hospital, the townhall and the museum, with fine antiquarian and natural history collections.

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  • The art association of Indianapolis was founded in 1883; and under its auspices is conducted an art school (1902) in accordance with the bequest of John Herron (1817-1895), the school and museum of the association being housed in the John Herron Art Institute, dedicated in 1906.

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  • Of the principal mosques the large Buyuk Djamia, with nine metal cupolas, has become the National Museum; the Tcherna Djamia or Black Mosque, latterly used as a prison, has been transformed into a handsome church; the Banyabashi Djamia, with its picturesque minaret, is still used by Moslem worshippers.

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  • From it came the three archaic metopes now in the museum at Palermo, which are of great importance in the history of the development of art, showing Greek sculpture in its infancy.

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  • It is famous for its fine metopes now in the museum at Palermo, belonging to the beginning of the 5th century B.C.

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  • The Michaelskirche, 12th-century Romanesque (restored), on the Michaelsberg, was formerly the church of a Benedictine monastery secularized in 1803, which now contains the Biirgerspital, or alms-house, and the museum and municipal art collections.

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  • Only few remains of it are, now standing; but of the pillars, several are in Paris, one is in the museum at Wiesbaden and another on the Schillerplatz in Mainz.

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  • (excavations); Cyprus Museum Catalogue (Oxford, 18 99), p. 5-6; 1 531 55; Index (Antiquities); G.

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  • There are several good palaces of the early Renaissance, a fine theatre (1857) and a museum containing important palaeo-ethnological collections, ancient and medieval sculptures, and the natural history collection of Spallanzani.

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  • Cnidus (q.v.) was excavated at the same time, when the "Cnidian Lion," now in the British Museum, was found crowning a tomb near the site of the old city (C. T.

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  • as a refuge from the malaria, which prevailed at Classe itself, with fine 17th-century cloisters, contains the important museum, which has Roman and Byzantine antiquities, inscriptions, sculptures, jewelry, &c. - including the possible remains of a suit of gold armour of Theodoric - and a collection of Italian woodcuts; also the library with rare MSS.

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  • The Demeter of Cnidus in the British Museum, of the school of Praxiteles, apparently shows her mourning for the loss of her daughter.

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  • In the Industrial Museum there is (besides collections of various kinds) some good painted glass of the 16th century, taken from the neighbouring Benedictine monastery of Muri (founded 1027, suppressed 1841 - the monks, are now quartered at Gries, near Botzen, in Tirol).

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  • It held its meetings at first in the church of the monastery of the Cordeliers, - the name given in France to the Franciscan Observantists, - now the Dupuytren museum of anatomy in connexion with the school of medicine.

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  • A stone inauguration chair of the O'Neills is preserved in the Belfast Museum.

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  • Of this second division of John's History, in which he had probably incorporated the socalled Chronicle of Joshua the Stylite, considerable portions are found in the British Museum MSS.

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  • 14640, a British Museum MS. of the 7th century.

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  • He presented to the Ashmolean museum, Oxford, a variety of fossils and antiquities, which he had described in his works, and received the thanks of the university and the degree of LL.D.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall, a fine and commodious house on the site of the old tolbooth; the Falconer museum, containing among other exhibits several valuable fossils, and named after Dr Hugh Falconer (1808-1865), the distinguished palaeontologist and botanist, a native of the town; the mechanics' institute; the agricultural and market hall; Leanchoil hospital and Anderson's Institution for poor boys.

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  • text) that others were brought with it, and that one of them was given to the Edinburgh Museum.

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  • On the 21st day of the sale of Bullock's Museum in 1819, Lot 38 is entered in the Catalogue as "The Tail Feather of a magnificent undescribed Trogon," and probably belonged to this species.

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  • Museum at Budapest, where he became distinguished for his archaeological researches.

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  • Candia, the former capital and the see of the archbishop of Crete (pop. in 1900, 22,501), is officially styled Herakleion; it is surrounded by remarkable Venetian fortifications and possesses a museum with a valuable collection of objects found at Cnossus, Phaestus, the Idaean cave and elsewhere.

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  • 14 a account of these is preserved in a MS. description of the island drawn up under the Venetians about 1538, and existing in the library of St Mark (published by Falkener, Museum of Classical Antiquities, ii.

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  • The most important addition to the educational and artistic life of the community was the Museum of Art, located in Wade park.

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  • By reason of collections already made and additional gifts, the museum at once took high rank.

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  • He edited the Didascalia apostolorum syriace (1854), and other Syriac texts collected in the British Museum and in Paris.

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  • There are four Evangelical churches, a Roman Catholic church, a synagogue, several schools, a natural science museum, containing a collection of Harz minerals, the Fenkner museum of antiquities and a number of small foundations.

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  • iii.) in the British Museum, often ascribed to the 10th or early 11th century, he judges from the form of the pallium and dalmatic to have been produced at the end of the 11th century " at earliest."

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  • In the Victoria and Albert Museum.

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  • Among other institutions in Holborn, the British Museum, north of New Oxford Street, is pre-eminent.

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  • The varied collections of Sir John Soane, accumulated at his house in Lincoln's Inn Fields, are open to view as the Soane Museum.

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  • There may also be mentioned the Royal College of Surgeons, Lincoln's Inn Fields, with museum; the Royal Colleges of Organists, and of Veterinary Surgeons, the College of Preceptors, the Jews' College, and the Metropolitan School of Shorthand.

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  • In the centre of the town stand the Place de la Republique, a spacious square overlooked by the hotel de ville, the museum, and the old cathedral of St Trophime, the finest Romanesque church in Provence.

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  • The museum, occupying an old Gothic church, is particularly rich in Roman remains and in early Christian sarcophagi; there is also a museum of Provencal curiosities.

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  • Close to it is the archaeological museum, the most important in the island.

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  • The Cloisters (The Metropolitan Museum, N.Y.) displays the twelfth century limestone bust.

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  • Connected with it are a library of 150,000 volumes and Boo MSS., a chemical laboratory, a zoological museum, a gynaecological institute, an ophthalmological school, a botanical garden and at Eldena (a seaside resort on the Baltic) an agricultural school.

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  • The greater portions of his original materials have been preserved, and are included in the Lansdowne manuscripts in the British Museum.

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  • The Old Stone House (the oldest building in the city) was erected as a residence in 1737, and is now used for a museum.

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  • The Executive Mansion of the Confederate States of America, built in 1819, purchased by the city in 1862, and leased to the Confederate government and occupied by President Jefferson Davis in 1862-65, was acquired in 1890 by the Confederate Memorial Library Society, and is now a Confederate Museum with a room for each state of the Confederacy and a general library in the " Solid South " room; it has valuable historical papers, collected by the Southern Historical Society, and the society has published a Calendar of Confederate Papers (1908).

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  • Libby Prison, which stood on the northern bank of a canal, near the river, in the eastern part of the city, was taken down in 1888-89, and its materials removed to Chicago, where it was reconstructed, in as nearly as possible its original form, and became the Libby Prison War Museum.'

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  • The Valentine Museum is in a house on Eleventh and Clay Streets, in which Aaron Burr was entertained while he was on trial, and which with $50,000 and his collections was devised to a board of trustees in 1892.

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  • The museum includes 3300 books, many being of the 15th and 16th centuries, a department of engravings, a Virginia Room with portraits and relics, some tapestries, an excellent collection of casts and valuable American archaeological specimens.

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  • Similar spraying is recom- (From a specimen in the British Museum.) mended for pear-leaf blister Pear Scab (Fusicladium pyrinum).

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  • At the Cape excellent works and papers are prepared and issued by the government entomologist, Dr Lounsbury, under the auspices of the Agricultural Department; while from India we have Cotes's Notes on Economic Entomology, published by the Indian Museum in 1888, and other works, especially on tea pests.

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  • It was designed to control all the educational institutions of France, both public and private; and it did so with two exceptions, the Museum and the College de France.

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  • Wroth, Catalogue of the Coins of Parthia in the British Museum (London, 1903), who carefully revised the statements of his predecessors.

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  • Biliotti many fine painted vases of styles which were called later the third and fourth "Mycenaean"; but these, bought by John Ruskin, and presented to the British Museum, excited less attention than they deserved, being supposed to be of some local Asiatic fabric of uncertain date.

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  • From 1886 dates the finding of Mycenaean sepulchres outside the Argolid, from which, and from the continuation of Tsountas's exploration of the buildings and lesser graves at Mycenae, a large treasure, independent of Schliemann's princely gift, has been gathered into the National Museum at Athens.

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  • Richter in Catalogue of the Cyprus Museum) shows more than five-and-twenty settlements in and about the Mesaorea district alone, of which one, that at Enkomi, near the site of Salamis, has yielded the richest Aegean treasure in precious metal found outside Mycenae.

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  • Molean Museum).

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  • The richness of the Aegean capitals and columns may be judged by those from the "Treasury of Atreus" now set up in the British Museum; and of the friezes we have examples in Mycenaean and Cnossian fragments, and Cnossian paintings.

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  • occur in the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, the Bibliotheque Nationale of France, and also in Rome, Weimar and Berlin.

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  • The provincial museum contains antiquities and especially coins from the ancient cities of Magna Graecia, and a few pictures.

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  • Only two of the volumes are known to be in existence; one is a copy of John of Salisbury's works in the British Museum, and the other some theological treatises by Anselm and others in the Bodleian.

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  • Museum, Wien, i., 1886) R.

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  • A fragmentary fresco taken from a tomb at Medum was desposited some years ago, though in a decaying condition, in the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, Cairo.

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  • The British Museum had been formed, and he had access to everything it contained in addition to the abundant materials afforded him by the private museum of Sir Ashton Lever.'

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  • In 1792 Shaw began the Museum Leverianum in illustration of this collection, which was finally dispersed by sale, and what is known to remain of it found its way to Vienna.

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  • Of the specimens in the British Museum described by Latham it is to be feared that scarcely any exist.

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  • Only two copies are believed to exist in England, one in the British Museum, the other in Private hands.

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  • Of still wider interest are the accounts of Cook's three famous voyages, though unhappily much of the information gained by the naturalists who accompanied him on one or more of them seems to be irretrievably lost: the original observations of the elder Forster were not printed till 1844, and the valuable collection of zoological drawings made by the younger Forster still remains unpublished in the British Museum.

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  • p. 187, note), the skeleton of a fowl to which was attached the head of a hornbill was for a long time exhibited in the Museum of Comparative Anatomy at Paris !

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  • No real second edition ever appeared, but in anticipation of it Sir Thomas Browne prepared in or about 1671 (?) his " Account of Birds found in Norfolk," of which the draft, now in the British Museum, was printed in his collected works by Wilkin in 1835.

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  • The chief object of the author, who had been naturalist to the Niger Expedition, and curator to the Museum of the Zoological Society of London, was to figure the animals contained in its gardens or described in its Proceedings, which until the year 1848 were not illustrated.

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  • The plates, which show no improvement in execution on those of Martinet, are after drawings by Huet and Pretre, the former being perhaps the less bad draughtsman of the two, for he seems to have had an idea of what a bird when alive looks like, though he was not able to give his figures any vitality, while the latter simply delineated the stiff and dishevelled specimens from museum shelves.

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  • It is a tradition that, this work not being favourably regarded by the authorities of the Paris Museum, its draughtsman and author were refused closer access to the specimens required, and had to draw and describe them through the glass as they stood on the shelves of the cases.

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  • British Museum, began with A List of the Genera of Birds Gray.

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  • In 1855 Gray brought out, as one of the Museum publications, A Catalogue of the Genera and Subgenera of Birds, a handy little volume, naturally founded on the larger works.

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  • ornithologiae, also in three volumes, published between 1872 and 1877, is a slight advance, but both works have been completely superseded by the British Museum Catalogue of Birds, the twenty-seventh and final volume of which was published in 1895, and by the compact and invaluable British Museum HandList, the four volumes of which were completed by Dr R.

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  • It is to be remarked, however, that the wealth of the Paris Museum, which he enjoyed to the full, placed him in a situation incomparably more favourable for arriving at results than that which was occupied by Merrem, to whom many of the most remarkable forms were wholly unknown, while L'Herminier had at his disposal examples of nearly every type then known to exist.

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  • This fact was fastened upon by Geoffroy in his reply, which was a week later presented to the Academy, but was not published in full until the following year, when it appeared in the Annales du Museum (ser.

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  • Its line to some extent may be partly made out - very clearly, for the matter of that, so far as its details have been published in the series of papers to which reference has been given - and some traces of its features are probably preserved in his Catalogue of the specimens of birds in the museum of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, which, after several years of severe labour, made its appearance at Calcutta in 1849; but, from the time of his arrival in India, the onerous duties imposed upon Blyth, together with the want of sufficient books of reference, seem to have hindered him from seriously continuing his former researches, which, interrupted as they were, and born out of due time, had no appreciable effect on the views of systematisers generally.

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  • To begin with, 1 Though not relating exactly to our present theme, it would be improper to dismiss Nitzsch's name without reference to his extraordinary labours in investigating the insect and other external parasites of birds, a subject which as regards British species was subsequently elaborated by Denny in his Monographia Anoplurorum Britanniae (1842) and in his list of the specimens of British Anoplura in the collection of the British Museum.

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  • Yet it is said, on good authority, that Nitzsch had the patience so to manipulate the skins of many rare species that he was able to ascertain the characters of their pterylosis by the inspection of their inside only, without in any way damaging them for the ordinary purpose of a museum.

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  • In 1862 the slabs containing the remains were acquired by the British Museum, and towards the end of that year Sir R.

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  • 3 Perhaps this may be partially explained by the fact that the Museum of the College of Surgeons, in which these investigations were chiefly carried on, like most other museums of the time, contained a much larger series of the heads of birds than of their entire skeletons, or of any other portion of the skeleton.

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  • Further examination of the enormous collections gathered by the author, and preserved in the Museum of Yale University at New Haven, Connecticut, showed him that this last bird, and another to which he gave the name of Apatornis, had possessed welldeveloped teeth implanted in sockets in both jaws, and induced him to establish (v.

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  • Sclater published in the Ibis a classification which was mainly a revision of the system of Huxley, modified by the investigations of Garrod and Forbes and by his own large acquaintance with museum specimens.

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  • Both the central library and museum and the Akroyd museum and art gallery occupy buildings which were formerly residences, the one of Sir Francis Crossley (1817-1872) and the other of Mr Edward Akroyd.

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  • Indeed, the building has been compared to the treasure den of a gang of "sea sharkers," and from a museum of sculpture of the most varied kind, nearly every century from the 4th down to the latest Renaissance being represented.

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  • Inside the fortress lies the old Protestant burying-ground, with tombs of Sackville, of John Murray, of Sir Francis Vincent, last ambassador but one from Great Britain to the republic, of Consul Smith, whose collection of books forms the nucleus of the King's library in the British Museum, and of Catherine Tofts, the singer, Smith's first wife.

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  • The space thus cleared has been used for the rearrangement of the Archaeological and Artistic Museum.

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  • The reorganization of the Archaeological and Artistic Museum and of the Royal Gallery of Ancient Art coincided with the inauguration in April 1895 of a series of biennial International Art Exhibitions, arranged in order to celebrate the silver wedding of the king and queen of Italy.

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  • His liberalism in politics having brought him into conflict with the university authorities of Giessen, he exchanged that university for Göttingen in 1816, and three years later received a chair at the new university of Bonn, where he established the art museum and the library, of which he became the first librarian.

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  • are: - (1) The extensive work on the fundamental notions of physics, called Communia Naturalium, which is found in the Mazarin library at Paris, in the British Museum, and in the Bodleian and University College libraries at Oxford; (2) on the fundamental notions of mathematics, De Cornmunibus Mathematicae, part of which is in the Sloane collection, part in the Bodleian; (3) Baconis Physica, contained among the additional MSS.

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  • in the British Museum; (4) the fragment called Quinta Pars Compendii Theologiae, in the British Museum; (5) the Compendium Studii Theologiae, in the British Museum; (6) the logical fragments, such as the Summulae Dialectices, in the Bodleian, and the glosses upon Aristotle's physics and metaphysics in the library at Amiens.

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  • In 1846 he made his first appearance in Boston as Sir Lucius O'Trigger in The Rivals at the Howard Athenaeum, and in the next season he became a member of the Boston Museum, in which stock company he remained for thirty-five years.

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  • Copley Square, in the Back Bay, is finely disti guished by a group of exceptional buildings: Trinity church, th old Museum of Fine Arts, the public library and the new Old South church.

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  • The old Museum of Fine Arts (1876) is a red brick edifice in modern Gothic style, with trimmings of light stone and terra-cotta.

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  • The new Old South (the successor of the Old South, which is now a museum) is a handsome structure of Italian Gothic style, with a fine campanile.

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  • Here, too, is the new building (1908) of the Museum of Fine Arts.

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  • The Museum of Fine Arts was founded in 1870 (though there were art exhibits collected from 1826 onward) and its present building was erected in 1908.

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  • Rogers, the first president; Boston University (chartered in 1869; Methodist Episcopal; co-educational); the New England Conservatory of Music (co-educational; private; 1867, incorporated 1880), the largest in the United States, having 2400 students in 1905-1906; the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (1852); the Massachusetts Normal Art School (1873); the School of Drawing and Painting (1876) of the Museum of Fine Arts; Boston College (1860), Roman Catholic, but open to all denominations; St John's Theological Seminary (1880), Roman Catholic; Simmons College (1899) for women, and several departments of Harvard University.

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  • The dramatic history of the city is largely associated with the Boston Museum, built in 1841 by Moses Kimball on Tremont Street, and rebuilt in 1846 and 1880; here for half a century the principal theatrical performances were given.

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  • Montgomery Field, until in 1903 the famous Boston Museum was swept away, as other interesting old places of entertainment (the old Federal Street theatre, the Tremont theatre, &c.) had been, in the course of further building changes.

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  • A later king of the same name is commemorated by two inscribed bracelets of gold now in the Metropolitan Museum of New York.

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  • Bishop Memorial Training School for nurses, the Berkshire Home for aged women, the Berkshire Athenaeum, containing the public library, the Crane Art Museum and a Young Men's Christian Association.

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  • Archiv fiir Zoologie, ii.; Id., " The Genera of European Nemerteans critically revised," Notes from the Leyden Museum (1879); Id., " Zur Anatomie u.

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  • Millspaugh's Flora of the Sand Keys of Florida (Chicago, 1907), a Field Columbian Museum publication, are of value.

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  • In the museum is a fine collection of works of art by Holbein (who lived in Basel from 1528 to 1531), while the historical museum (in the old Franciscan church) contains many treasures, and among them the fragments of the famous Dance of Death, wrongly attributed to Holbein.

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  • In the Leiden museum there are a number of papyri which were found in a tomb at Thebes, written probably in the 3rd century A.D., though their matter is older.

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  • at the British Museum, partly written in Syriac, partly in Arabic with Syriac characters.

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  • Berthelot gives reproductions of the British Museum MSS.

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  • The city has a Memorial Hall, erected in honour of the soldiers and sailors of Winnebago county, and in charge of the Grand Army of the Republic; a soldiers' memorial fountain; a Carnegie library, containing 51,340 volumes in 1909; and the Velie Museum of natural history.

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  • Mr Peppe presented the coffer and vases with specimens of the jewelry to the museum at Calcutta where they still are.

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  • The conspicuous monument which crowns the Museum Hill was erected as the mausoleum of Antiochus Philopappus of Commagene, grandson of Antiochus Epiphanes, in A.D.

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  • The National Museum, founded in 1866, is especially rich in archaic sculptures and in sepulchral and votive reliefs.

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  • The Epigraphical Museum contains an immense number of inscriptions arranged by H.

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  • The Acropolis Museum (opened 1878) possesses a singularly interesting collection of sculptures belonging to the " archaic " period of Greek art, all found on the Acropolis; here, too, are some fragments of the pedimental statues of the Parthenon and several reliefs from its frieze, as well as the slabs from the balustrade of the temple of Nike.

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  • The Polytechnic Institute contains a museum of interesting objects connected with modern Greek life and history.

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  • There is a small museum of antiquities at the Peiraeus.

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  • The Carnegie Institute in the decade increased the extent of its service to the community; its central library, with 464,313 volumes, had 8 branches, 16 stations, 128 school stations, 10 club stations and 8 playground stations, with a circulation of 1,363,365 books; both the scientific museum and the art department added greatly to their collections; in the school of technology the enrolment grew from 2,102 students in 1909 to 4,982 students in 1920, including those in the departments of science and engineering, arts, industries and the Margaret Morrison school for women.

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  • Swinhoe obtained no fewer than 65 different kinds of timber from a large yard in Taiwanfu; and his specimens are now to be seen in the museum at Kew.

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  • The tax rate for 1920-I was $2.55 per $loo assessed valuation, divided as follows: state purposes, $o.18; public schools, $0.78; municipal government, $1.51; public library, $0.04; art museum, $0.02; zoological park, $0.02.

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  • The hôtel-de-ville with a municipal museum and library occupy the remains of the abbey buildings (18th century).

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  • Etienne (16th century) and the Benedictine liqueur distillery,' a modern building which also contains a museum, are of some interest.

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  • The choir-screen was sold to the South Kensington Museum in London for goo, this sum being devoted to the work of modern restoration.

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  • It also includes a museum of local antiquities.

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  • In the Provincial museum are interesting Roman, German and Frankish antiquities.

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  • The city has a public library containing (1907) 107,600 volumes and an historical museum.

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  • The buildings, mostly of wood, include the town-hall and a museum, which contains a good zoological collection.

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  • It has been in large part rebuilt since a fire in 1836, and possesses a castle, with various collections, a museum of antiquities, an old town hall and churches.

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  • The scene where she is holding the clue to Theseus occurs on a very early vase in the British Museum.

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  • There is a statue of the sleeping Ariadne in the Vatican Museum.

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  • The excavations carried out for the British Museum at Shahrein by R.

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  • The great bronze head of Augustus Caesar, now in the British Museum, is one of the trophies of this excavation, and is very interesting as being either a trophy of war carried off perhaps from Syene, or was actually set up at Meroe by the independent native ruler in honour of the Emperor.

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