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muscular

muscular

muscular Sentence Examples

  • She clung to his muscular shoulders, returning his ardent embrace.

  • The moonlight formed shadows on his muscular chest.

  • The warmth of his muscular chest was like a magnet.

  • She ran her fingers along his muscular forearm.

  • He didn't wear a coat today and his shirtsleeves were rolled up to reveal brown muscular forearms.

  • The man was in his prime with silver hair and dark eyes, a handsome face, and a body as muscular as Talon's.

  • Even his hands were muscular, and she couldn't help comparing his light touch to Talon's brutal grip.

  • Cocoa skin, soulful dark eyes, exotic features, and brilliant tattoos over his exposed, muscular arms.

  • He looked like a professional wrestler with his muscular physique, tattoos, and long braid.

  • He was built from the same mold—large and muscular, the kind of man more fitted to military special forces or UFC prizefighting than financial planning.

  • His hair was silver, his body broad-shouldered and muscular.

  • He leaned back in a chair across from her with muscular, feline grace, managing to appear both at ease and ready to pounce.

  • Beautiful women that rivaled Claire and men so handsome, even age couldn't diminish their muscular bodies or riveting looks.

  • As he spoke, he peeled off his shirt to reveal a whip-like, muscular upper body coated by a thin layer of tan skin.

  • The death dealer stripped off his shirt and weapons to display a muscular body.

  • Death was a dark, towering, muscular figure in the living area of her apartment, clothed in black and wearing an expression that mirrored what she felt.

  • He wore black pants that hugged his lower body to reveal the lean hips and long, muscular legs.

  • Just under seven feet tall and muscular, he wore all black with weapons strapped to various parts of his body.

  • His silver gaze was wary and his muscular frame only slightly smaller than Gabriel's.

  • Muscular and dark-skinned, Tamer was hunched over the table in the center of the room, putting the final magic touches on a new compass.

  • With his chiseled features and muscular frame, he was without a doubt the sexiest man she'd ever seen.

  • He wore jeans and a snug t-shirt that outlined his muscular frame.

  • His muscular frame and direct gaze made her uneasy.

  • Hallucinations, incurable pain, loss of muscular control, cognitive dysfunction.

  • His elbows were propped on his knees, the trench falling back to show a lean body, flat stomach and muscular thighs outlined by the soft material of his pants.

  • Startled, Deidre's gaze went from the muscular legs to his face.

  • The speaker crouched, a muscular man with liquid silver eyes.

  • Gazing at the muscular man who freely admitted to killing for a living, Deidre couldn't help thinking she never wanted to see something he couldn't handle.

  • He wore silk pajama bottoms and was barefoot, his muscular upper body on display.

  • The muscular frame, black gaze, dark clothes all looked the same.

  • His lean torso, narrow hips and the outline of muscular thighs reminded her too well why she wasn't able to get him out of her mind.

  • He was muscular and buff beneath the trench.

  • response as she sagged against him or of the muscular form that lifted her from the floor and carried her away.

  • He was muscular and tall, clothed in dark jeans, a snug grey T-shirt that hugged his biceps and stretched across his chest and back and then sagged at his slender torso and hips, and a round black medallion that fell from his T-shirt as he leaned over her.

  • Any other day, she'd have stared at his hard body and the way his jeans hugged his muscular thighs and the round globes of his backside, or the T-shirt that fit so well.

  • It was not a stretch, not with his muscular body pressed against her and his rugged features so close.

  • They came in all colors and complexions, some slender and graceful like dancers while others were muscular.

  • He pulled out a small stack of clothing from the backpack and peeled off his shirt, displaying the lean, muscular body beneath.

  • His snow cloud-colored eyes were piercing, his muscular frame making her warm from the inside out.

  • Her eyes swept over his muscular form, from his shapely shoulders and wide back to the thick thighs outlined by the sweats.

  • "I didn.t expect to see you here," Rhyn said, taking in Gabriel.s muscular form as he fought the sparring dummies behind the Sanctuary.

  • His thick arms were around her, his muscular chest at her back.

  • To run her hands over the washboard abs or twirl her fingertips through the tight hairs dusting his chest …Or better yet, to feel his large hands and muscular body against hers ...

  • She moved away from the gate, tearing her gaze from his lean muscular thighs.

  • She ran a hand along his sleek neck and patted the muscular shoulder.

  • The muscular woman, with short blond hair and clad in black tactical gear, stood in a stark white hallway.

  • Brady stretched a muscular arm across the table beside him to tug the box out of his other uniform.

  • Lana struggled hard without being able to dislodge the muscular man.

  • She stood over him, staring again at his muscular back.

  • In a blink, she was pinned on top of his warm body, his arms locked around her and his muscular legs wrapped around hers.

  • She moved his weapons, pushed his heavy body out of the way to see if he hid them beneath one of his muscular thighs.

  • Her breath caught at the sight of his wide, muscular chest, and the pants that dropped dangerously low on his hips.

  • Elise peeled off her shirt to reveal a snug undershirt that outlined the shape of her muscular upper body.

  • Lana wrapped her arms around his muscular frame, breathing in his familiar scent.

  • She watched him pace, his long, muscular legs drawing her eyes.  A familiar ache filled her, one that made her want to launch herself into his arms and never leave the dream world.

  • Kris looked at him, anger building.  The muscular half-demon was bleeding from a wound in his chest.  His dark eyes glowed like a demon's, though his face was still that of an Immortal.

  • Katie fought back a smile at the irritated look on Rhyn's face.  He was in raw form: bloodied, drenched with underworld rain, disheveled, in need of a good shave.  His thick frame was still on edge, as if he expected one of the Sanctuary's nuns to turn into a demon and fly at them.  He looked every bit the muscular, powerful, glowering half-demon the nuns wanted to throw out of the Sanctuary.

  • Indigo jeans outlined the long lean muscles in his thighs, and the sleeves of his western shirt were rolled up to reveal tanned muscular forearms.

  • That was the way it started, but the warmth of his body, the smell of his cologne and the feel of his muscular back begged her to linger.

  • Warm muscular arms slipped around her waist and she leaned her head back against his bare chest, gazing up into the sweet chocolate eyes.

  • Alex was in short sleeves today, his brown muscular arms exposed to the warm sun.

  • The indigo jeans fit snugly against his lean hips and muscular thighs.

  • The towering, muscular man who held her until she fell asleep every night and made love to her as if she was the only woman he'd ever known was no more.

  • She found herself remembering what his body looked like when he stripped down to spar with her, how the muscular length of him felt against her own body when they were locked in combat.

  • He watched as she stripped off the tunic to reveal a muscular, firm back.

  • The lanky youth had grown into a muscular man with icy green eyes, curly black hair, and chiseled features as cold as his father's.

  • The muscular man turned at his name, staring hard into the brush where she hid.

  • He was clean and well-dressed for the first time, his tailored clothing enhancing his muscular, lean build.

  • She straightened, allowing Alex to pull her back against his warm muscular body.

  • He had an athletic build, muscular and well proportioned.

  • It didn't look like there was an ounce of fat on her muscular frame.

  • His arms and chest were more muscular than they used to be.

  • "Maybe you should put it on my desk," he concluded, folding muscular arms across his chest and gazing down at her fondly.

  • His actions were far too bold, and yet the feel of his warm muscular torso was comforting.

  • His muscular back glistened with perspiration as he swung the ax, expertly splitting a chunk of wood.

  • She glanced at his muscular frame, trying to keep her mind on the business at hand - supper, wasn't it?

  • She pressed closer, snuggling against the firmness of his muscular chest.

  • The warmth of his muscular chest under the soft knit of his shirt, and the strength in the arms that gently coaxed her close again, tempted her to acquiesce.

  • His muscular body took up the doorway, hands on his hips and strange red contacts glowing.

  • Agitated by him and the fire he caused, she was also awed by how small and delicate his muscular frame made her feel.

  • Xander's muscular body drew her gaze.

  • The two thugs a few feet behind them were dressed in dark clothes and muscular.

  • Xander's muscular frame was tense enough that she saw the veins on his biceps.

  • Two tall, muscular men stood there.

  • "So all these people have magical powers," she said as they passed a muscular man jogging with his ear buds in.

  • His muscular frame was relaxed.

  • His muscular frame was tense, and moonlight played across his chiseled features.

  • His dark hair was tied at his neck, his muscular frame at ease.

  • in the dead animal, and for its great elasticity and power of muscular contraction while living.

  • They are typical Berbers in physique, tall, well made and muscular, with European features and fair skins bronzed by the sun.

  • As a psychologist de Tracy deserves credit for his distinction between active and passive touch, which developed into the theory of the muscular sense.

  • The idea of force is one of those obscure conceptions which originate in an obscure region, in the sense of muscular power.

  • Strange as it may appear, I would refer to an Australian as the finest model of the human proportions I have ever met; in muscular development combining perfect symmetry, activity and strength, while his head might have compared with the antique bust of a philosopher."

  • Physically the typical Australian is the equal of the average European in height, but is inferior in muscular development,.

  • It grows in small rings, which give it the appearance of growing in tufts, though it is really closely and evenly distributed over the whole scalp. The figures of the men are muscular and well-formed and generally pleasing; a straight, well-formed nose and jaw are by no means rare, and the young men are often distinctly good-looking.

  • Belonging primarily to the epithelial layer, the muscular cells may become secondarily sub-epithelial.

  • The muscular tissue consists primarily of processes from the bases of the epithelial cells, processes which are contractile in nature and may be distinctly striated.

  • A further stage in evolution is that the muscle-cells lose their connexion with the epithelium and come to lie entirely beneath it, forming a sub-epithelial contractile layer, developed chiefly in the tentacles of the polyp. The of the evolution of the ganglioncells is probably similar; an epithelial cell develops processes of nervous nature from the base, which come into connexion with the bases of the sensory cells, with the muscular cells, and with the similar processes of other nerve-cells; next the nerve-cell loses its connexion with the outer epithelium and becomes a sub-epithelial ganglion-cell which is closely connected with the muscular layer, conveying stimuli from the sensory cells to the contractile elements.

  • 6), from the bases of which arise contractile muscular processes lying in the plane of the transverse section of the body.

  • The mesogloea in the hydropolyp is a thin elastic layer, in which may be lodged the muscular fibres and ganglion cells mentioned above, but which never contains any connective tissue or skeletogenous cells or any other kind of special mesogloeal corpuscles.

  • The ectoderm furnishes the general epithelial covering of the body, and the muscular tissue, nervous system and sense-organs.

  • external epithelium is flat on the ex-umbral surface, more columnar on the sub-umbral surface, where it forms the muscular tissue of the sub-umbrella and the velum.

  • The muscle-fibres arise as processes from the bases of the epithelial cells; such cells may individually become sub-epithelial in position, as in the polyp; or, in places where muscular tissue is greatly developed, as in the velum or sub-umbrella, the entire muscular epithelium may be thrown into folds in order to increase its surface, so that a deeper sub-epithelial muscular layer becomes separated completely from a more superficial bodyepithelium.

  • Maas in Results of In its arrangement the muscular tissue the "Albatross " Expedition, forms two s stems: the one composed Museum of Comparative Y P Zoology, Cambridge, Masse, of striated fibres arranged circularly, that U.S.A. is to say, concentrically round the central FIG.

  • - Muscular Cells of Medusae (Lizzia).

  • The uppermost is a purely muscular cell from the sub-umbrella; the two lower are epidermo-muscular cells from the base of a tentacle; the upstanding nucleated portion forms part of the epidermal mosaic on the free surface of the body.

  • m, Muscular processes of the ectoderm-cells in cross section.

  • The active contraction of muscular tissue has no counterpart in the plant.

  • The extent of the area affected and of the variation in the turgor depends upon many circumstances, but we have no doubt that in the process of modifying its own permeability by some molecular change we have the counterpart of muscular contractibility.

  • Muscular System.

  • The whole wing is a unique modification, deeply affecting the skeletal, muscular and tegumentary structures, but fluttering, skimming, sailing, soaring are motions much more akin to one another than climbing and grasping, running, scratching, paddling and wading.

  • The chief muscular mass, arising from the sternum in the shape of a U, is the pectoralis muscle; its fibres converge into a strong tendon, which is inserted upon the greater tubercle and upper crest of the humerus, which it depresses and slightly rotates forwards during the downstroke.

  • Here, alone, at the distal portion of the tendon, occur muscular fibres, but these are unstriped, belonging to the category of cutaneous muscles.

  • Owing to the elasticity of the humerocarpal band the wing remains closed without any special muscular exertion, while, when the wing is extended, this band assists in keeping it taut.

  • Borelli (De motu animalium, Rome, 1680), explained that birds are enabled to grasp the twig on which they rest whilst sleeping, without having to make any muscular exertion, because the weight of the body bends the knee and ankle-joints, over both of which pass the tendons of this compound muscle.

  • It is, however, fair to state that his system was not built entirely upon these muscular variations, but rather upon a more laborious combination of anatomical characters, which were so selected that they presumably could not stand in direct correlation with each other, notably the oil-gland, caeca, carotids, nasal bones and above all, the muscles of the thigh.

  • The atria are comparatively small, the walls being thin, especially those of the right, which possesses numerous muscular ridges projecting into the cavity presenting a honeycombed appearance.

  • The communication with the atrium is guarded by a valvula cardiaca dextra, which only in function represents the mammalian tricuspid; it consists of an oblique reduplication of the muscular fibres together with the endocardiac lining of the right ventricle, while the opposite wall is convex and forms neither a velum nor papillary muscles, nor chordae tendineae.

  • On the other hand, the diacromyodian type can have been developed only from a strong muscular basis which could split into a dorsal and a ventral mass; moreover, no Passeres are known to be intermediate between those that are diacromyodian and those that are not.

  • Figures slim, muscular and bony, action impetuous but of arrested energy, tawny landscape, gritty with littering pebbles, mark the athletic hauteur of his style.

  • The natives of Bali, though of the same stock as the Javanese, and resembling them in general appearance, exceed them in stature and muscular power, as well as in activity and enterprise.

  • The investigation of Carpenter on unconscious cerebration and of Faraday on unconscious muscular action showed early in the movement that it was not necessary to look outside the medium's own personality for the explanation of even intelligent communications unconsciously conveyed through table-tilting, automatic writing and trance-speaking - provided the matter communicated was not beyond the range of the medium's own knowledge or powers.

  • One of the possibilities to be allowed for is that of exceptional muscular endowment or anatomical peculiarity in the medium.

  • Usually they do not extend outwards of the muscular layers of the body wall.

  • - " Errant" Polychaetes with well-marked prostomium possessing tentacles and palps with evident and locomotor parapodia, supported (with few exceptions) by strong spines, the aciculi; muscular pharynx usually armed with jaws; septa and nephridia regularly metameric and similar throughout body; free living and predaceous.

  • The muscular layers are thinner in the aquatic forms, which possess only a single row of longitudinal fibres, or (Enchytraeidae) two layers.

  • This may be associated with mud-eating habits; but it is not wholly certain that this is the case; for in Chaetogaster and Agriodrilus, which are predaceous worms, there is no protrusible pharynx, though in the latter the oesophagus is thickened through its extent with muscular fibres.

  • The foot of the limpet is a nearly circular disk of muscular tissue; in front, projecting from and raised above it, are the head and neck (figs.

  • i, Interspaces between the muscular bundles of the root of the foot, causing the separate areae seen in fig.

  • (Lankester.) c, Muscular bundles forming the root of the foot, and adherent to the shell.

  • The muscular columns (c) attaching the foot to the shell form a ring incomplete in front, external to which is the free mantleskirt.

  • Muscular substance forming the root of the foot.

  • 12, and forms a large sac on half of the upper surface of the muscular mass of the foot.

  • The odontophore is powerfully developed; the radular sac is extraordinarily long, lying coiled in a space between the mass of the liver and the muscular foot.

  • As in all such introand e-versible organs, eversion of the Gastropod proboscis is effected by pressure communicated by the muscular body-wall to the liquid contents (blood) of the body-space, accompanied by the relaxation of the muscles which directly pull upon either the sides or the apex of the tubular organ.

  • mc, Columella muscle (muscular process grasping the shell).

  • The foot of the Pectinibranchia, unlike the simple muscular disk of the Isopleura and Aspidobranchia, is very often divided into lobes, a fore, middle and hind lobe (pro-, mesoand meta-podium, see figs.

  • The vascular system is not extensive, the arteries soon ending in the well-marked spongy tissue which builds up the muscular foot, parapodia, and dorsal body-wall.

  • The male duct vd becomes fleshy and muscular near its termination at the genital pore, forming the penis p. Attached to it is a diverticulum fl, in which the spermatozoa which have descended from the ovo-testis are stored and modelled into sperm ropes or spermatophores.

  • re, Stiebel's canal (left side), tge, Mesoblastic (skeletotrophic probably an evanescent and muscular) cells invest embryonic nephridium.

  • The body-cavity and the muscular, fibrous and vascular tissues are traced partly to two symmetrically disposed " mesoblasts," which bud off from the invaginated arch-enteron, partly to cells derived from the ectoderm, which at a very early stage is connected by long processes with the invaginated endoderm.

  • - From the mesoderm most of the organs of the body - muscular, circulatory, reproductive - take their origin.

  • One of them is said to be " irritability," and, though this is explained to mean, not " muscular strength alone, but vivacity and activity generally," ' it does not seem to form a character that can be easily appreciated either as to quantity or quality; in fact, most persons would deem it quite immeasurable, and, as such, removed from practical consideration.

  • The recognition of these, minute and fragmentary as many were, and the referring them to their proper place, rendered necessary an attentive study of the comparative osteology and myology of birds in general, that of the " long bones," whose sole characters were often a few muscular ridges or depressions, being especially obligatory.

  • on muscular anatomy, making the two major divisions of Aves (his Homalogonatae and Anomalogonatae, depend in the first instance on the presence or absence of a peculiar muscular slip in the leg, known as the ambiens, although indeed he expressly stated that this was not on account of the intrinsic importance of the muscle in question, but because of its invariable association with other peculiarities.

  • numbers on the mud flats at the mouths of rivers in the tropics, skipping about by means of the muscular, scaly base of their pectoral fins, with the head raised and bearing a pair of strongly projecting versatile eyes close together.

  • Therefore the flesh, especially of the larger kinds, is of a red colour; and the energy of their muscular action causes the temperature of their blood to be several degrees higher than in other fishes.

  • The first three orders, which have a double muscular layer, external circular and internal longitudinal, are sometimes grouped together as the Dimyaria; the Heteronemertini, in which a third coat of longitudinal muscles arises outside the circular layer, are then placed in a second branch, the Trimyaria.

  • - Anterior portion tirely upon contraction of the muscular of the body of a Nemer walls of the space just mentioned, the tine.

  • It is worthy of notice that in those Nemertines which make a very free use of their proboscis, and in which it is seen to be continually protruded and retracted, the walls of the proboscidian sheath are enormously muscular.

  • The proboscis, which is thus an eminently muscular organ, is composed of two or three, sometimes powerful, layers of muscles - one of longitudinal and one or two of circular fibres.

  • At the circular insertion of the proboscis in front of the brain the muscular fibres belonging to the anterior extremity of the body and those connected with the proboscis are very intimately interwoven, forming a strong attachment.

  • - Proboscis with stylet, " reserve " sacs and muscular bulb of a Hoplonemertine.

  • Internally the muscular layers are lined by an epithelium.

  • Superiorly the sheath either closely adheres to the muscular bodywall, with which it may even be partly interwoven, or it hangs freely in the connective tissue which fills the space between the intestine and the muscular body-wall.

  • 8) from the following - that is, from a layer in which longitudinal muscular fibres are largely intermixed with tortuous glands, which by reason of their deeper situation communicate with the exterior by a much longer and generally very narrow duct.

  • The passage from this tegumentary layer to the subjacent longitudinal muscular one is gradual, no membrane separating them.

  • In Carinella, Cephalothrix, Polia and the Metanemertines the two tegumentary layers with their different glandular elements are fused into one; a thick layer of connective tissue is situated beneath them (instead of between them) and keeps the entire cutaneous system more definitely separate from the muscular (fi g s.

  • The muscular layers by which the body-wall is constituted have been very differently and to some extent confusingly described by the successive authors on Nemertean anatomy.

  • The fact is that not only have the larger subdivisions a different arrangement and even number of the muscular layers, but even within the same genus, nay, in the same species, well-marked differences occur.

  • I, outer circular, and long., longitudinal layer of muscular tissue; circ. 2, long.

  • The situation of the lateral nervestems in the different genera with respect to the muscular layers lends definite support to the interpretation of their homologies here given and forms the basis of Burger's classification.

  • In Carinella, Cephalothrix and Polia, as well as in all Metanemertines, the basement membrane of the skin already alluded to is particularly strong and immediately applied upon the muscular layers.

  • The connective tissue of the integument and basement membrane imperceptibly merges into that which surrounds the muscular bundles as they are united into denser and definite layers, and this is especially marked in those forms (Akrostomum) where the density of the muscular body-wall has considerably diminished, and the connective tissue has thus become much more prominent.

  • It can then at the same time be observed, too, that the compact mass of connective tissue (" reticulum," Barrois) which lies between the muscular bodywall and the intestine is directly continuous with that in which the muscular layers are embedded.

  • In Polia the connective tissue enclosed in the external muscular layer is eminently vacuolar - all the intermediate stages between such cells in which the vacuole predominates and the nucleus is peripheral and those in which the granular protoplasm still entirely fills them being moreover present.

  • In addition to the musculature of the proboscis and proboscidian sheath, longitudinal muscular fibres are found in the walls of the oesophagus, whilst transverse ones are numerous and united into vertical dissepiments between the successive intestinal caeca, thus bringing about a very regular internal metamerization.

  • In Carinella, where the longitudinal nerve-stems are situated exteriorly to the muscular layers, this plexus, although present, is much less dense, and can more fitly be compared to a network with wide meshes.

  • In the Metanemertini, where the longitudinal stems lie inside the muscular body-wall, definite and metamerically placed nerve branches spring from them and divide dichotomously in the different tissues they innervate.

  • The oesophagus is the anterior portion of the digestive canal; its walls are folded longitudinally, comparatively thick and provided with longitudinal muscular fibres.

  • In certain cases, however, the walls of the oesophagus appear to be very closely applied to the muscular body-wall and this vascular space thereby considerably reduced.

  • Anteriorly it finally communicates with the lacunae just mentioned, which surround the oesophagus, bathe the posterior lobes of the brain, pass through the nerve ring together with the proboscidian sheath, and are generally continued in front of the brain as a lacunar space in the muscular tissue, one on each side.

  • The blood fluid does not flow in any definite direction; its movements are largely influenced by those of the muscular body-wall.

  • In transverse sections the nephridia can be shown to be generally situated in the region limited by (I) the proboscidian sheath, (2) the upper wall of the intestine, (3) the muscular body-wall.

  • A, Circular muscular layer.

  • A', Longitudinal muscular layer.

  • The people themselves are described as of " middle height, broadchested and muscular, with remarkably large hands and feet, the eyes large, the forehead round, and not narrow or receding in many instances, the nose broad, the mouth large and disfigured with betel."

  • In their minute structure the muscular fibres resemble those of Nematodes.

  • c, Retractor muscles of the pro- i, Longitudinal muscular layer.

  • j, Circular muscular layer.

  • Each consists of a prolongation of the syncytial material of the proboscis skin, penetrated by canals and sheathed with a scanty muscular coat.

  • The men are taller and more muscular than the Siamese and Annamese, while the women are small and inclined to stoutness.

  • The name has reference to the tongue-shaped muscular proboscis by which the animal works its way through the sand.

  • The third body region or trunk may attain a great length, one or two feet, or even more, and is also muscular, but the truncal muscles are of subordinate importance in locomotion, serving principally to promote the peristaltic contractions of the body by which the food is carried through the gut.

  • Interior of dorsal valve, showing muscular impressions and labial appendages.

  • On the inner surface of both valves several well-defined muscular, vascular and ovarian impressions are observable; they form either indentations of greater or less size and depth, or occur as variously shaped projections.

  • In Discinisca they are provided with a muscular valve placed at their point of origin.

  • teriors; k, middles; 1, g, Umbonal muscular impresoutsiders), enabling the sions (open valves).

  • The nervous system of BrachioDiagram showing the muscular pods has, as a rule: maintained system.

  • The symptoms of acute poisoning are pain and diarrhoea, owing to the setting up of an active gastro-enteritis, the foeces being black (due to the formation of a sulphide of lead), thirst, cramps in the legs and muscular twitchings, with torpor, collapse, convulsions and coma.

  • The action of aconitine on the circulation is due to an initial stimulation of the cardio-inhibitory centre in the medulla oblongata (at the root of the vagus nerves), and later to a directly toxic influence on the nerve-ganglia and muscular fibres of the heart itself.

  • Muscular fibres connected with the suctorial pharynx are in Limulus inserted into the entosternite, and the activity of the two organs may be correlated.

  • In both animals the wall of the pericardial sinus is connected by vertical muscular bands to the wall of the ventral venous sinus (its lateral expansions around the lung-books in Scorpio) in each somite through which the pericardium passes.

  • Those of Limulus were described and figured by Alphonse Milne-Edwards, but he called them merely " transparent ligaments," and did not discover their muscular structure.

  • They are figured and their importance for the first time recognized in the memoir on the muscular and skeletal systems of Limulus and Scorpio by Lankester, Beck and Bourne (4).

  • ps, Muscular suctorial en largement of the pharynx.

  • Concentration of the organ-systems by fusion of neighbouring regions (prosoma, mesosoma, metasoma), pre viously distinct, has frequently occurred, together with obliteration of the muscular and chitinous structures indicative of distinct somites.

  • True hypertrophy is commonly found in the hollow muscular organs such as the heart, bladder and alimentary canal.

  • As a result of these various degenerations the functions of the body deteriorate, the faculties become blunted, and the muscular energy of the body is below what it was in earlier life, while the secreting glands in certain instances become functionally obsolescent.

  • overnutrition with lack of muscular energy, beer-drinking, castration, lactation, disturbed metabolism, some forms of insanity, and may follow on some fevers.

  • - Pudic artery showing calcified areas which have taken into their protoin the muscular coat of the vessel.

  • Haller's definition of irritability as a property of muscular tissue, and its distinction from sensibility as a property of nerves, struck at the root of the prevailing hypothesis respecting animal activity.

  • No aid to the trained eye was necessary for such observations, and for many other such; yet, if we take Sir Thomas Watson (1792-1882) as a modern Sydenham, we may find in his lectures no suspicion that there may be a palsy of muscular co-ordination apart from deprivation of strength.

  • Indeed, it does not seem to have occurred to any one to compare the muscular strength in the various kinds of paraplegia.

  • A well-developed cellular parenchyma forms a matrix in which the muscular, excretory and generative organs are imbedded.

  • The scolex is usually a conical muscular structure.

  • The sheath terminates in an elongated muscular bulb.

  • The mass of the body consists of richly branched stellate cells - the mesenchyma - and imbedded in this plasmic tissue are the nervous, excretory, muscular and generative organs.

  • The thicker portion develops a terminal muscular rostellum and two or four suckers, the thinner end (" tail ") is vesicular, more or less elongated, and contains the six embryonic hooks.

  • (From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology, part iv.) the base of the tail; nervous and muscular systems arise; and finally the rostellum and suckers become completely enclosed in the sac formed by the lateral extension of the " hind-body."

  • sodium nitrite, ethyl nitrite, amyl nitrite) cause relaxation of involuntary muscular fibre and therefore relieve the asthmatic attacks, which depend upon spasm of the involuntary muscles in the bronchial tubes.

  • The Nilotic Nubians are on the whole a strong muscular people, essentially agricultural, more warlike and energetic than the Egyptians.

  • Jalap is a typical hydragogue purgative, causing the excretion of more fluid than scammony, but producing less stimulation of the muscular wall of the bowel.

  • Thus in the recently discovered arctic genus Prosorhynchus the muscular and glandular extremity is protrusible, but in the allied Gasterostomum this organ is represented by a sucker with fimbriated or tentacular margins.

  • The excretory system is highly developed and opens at the posterior extremity by a paired muscular bladder.

  • The tail may be a simple hollow muscular process or provided with stiff bristles set in transverse rows, or divided into two equally long processes, or finally it may form a large vesicular structure.

  • Prisms are of great value in cases of double vision due to a slight tendency to squinting, caused by weakness or over-action of the muscular apparatus of the eyeball.

  • Body-wall not muscular.

  • Body-wall uncalcified and muscular.

  • In the Phylactolaemata the outermost layer of the bodywall is a flexible, uncalcified cuticle or "ectocyst," beneath which follow in succession the ectoderm, the muscular layers and the coelomic epithelium.

  • Even the ectoderm can rarely be recognized as an obvious epithelium except in regions where budding is taking place, while muscular layers are always absent and a coelomic epithelium can seldom be observed.

  • Thus in the Phylactolaemata the contraction of the muscular body-wall exerts a pressure on the fluid of the body-cavity and is the cause of the protrusion of the polypide.

  • The head of the insect contains a muscular pharynx by means of which the blood from the wound inflicted by the proboscis (labium) is pumped into the alimentary canal and the so-called sucking-stomach.

  • Reiun sculptured simply a man poised on the toes of one foot, the other foot raised, the ar-rn extended, and the body straining forward in strong yet elastic muscular effort.

  • In short, the little chisel becomes in his fingers a painters brush, and when it is remembered that, the basis upon which he works being simply a thread of silk, his hand must be trained to such delicacy of muscular effort as to be capable of arresting the edge of the knile at varying depths within the diameter of the tiny filament, the difficulty of the achievement will be understood.

  • Many alcoholic liniments are therefore employed for the relief of pain, especially muscular pains, as in lumbago and other forms of so-called "muscular rheumatism."

  • Given internally in small quantities and in sufficient dilution, alcohol causes dilatation of;he gastric blood-vessels, increased secretion of gastric juice, and greater activity in the movements of the muscular layers in the wall of the stomach.

  • The mouth opens at the tip of the retractile proboscis; it leads into a short thin-walled tube which opens into an oval muscular gizzard lined with a thick cuticle; at the posterior end of this are some minute glands and then follows a large stomach slightly sacculated in each segment, this tapers through the rectum to the terminal anus.

  • It hardly affects the small intestine, but markedly stimulates the muscular coat of the large intestine, causing purging in about fifteen hours.

  • Behind this point there is a muscular pharynx or gizzard, which communicates with the wide intestinal tract.

  • It was said to exceed all other American mammals in ferocity of disposition and muscular strength.

  • The body-wall is highly muscular and, except in a few probably specialized cases, possesses chitinous spines, the setae, which are secreted by the ectoderm and are embedded in pits of the skin.

  • By means of this muscular foot the cockle burrows rapidly in the muddy sand of the sea-shore, and it can also when it is not buried perform considerable leaps by suddenly bending the foot.

  • The severed part retains its muscular irritability for a short time, wriggling as if it were a living creature.

  • Correlated with the well-developed muscular system and sense-organs of the medusa, we find also a distinct nervous system, either, when there is no velum, in the form of concentrations of nervous matter in the vicinity of each sense-organ, or, when a velum is present, as two continuous rings running round the margin of the umbrella, one external to the velum (exumbral nerve-ring, n.r l, see fig.

  • 3 in., but they are of muscular and sturdy build.

  • The stomach is generally large; its wall consists of a layer of very large ciliated cells, which often contain fat globules and yellowish-green or brown particles, and outside these a connective tissue membrane; muscular fibrillae have also been described.

  • Each pair has a single insertion on the inner wall - the one pair near the free extremity of the limb, the other near its attachment; the bands run up, one of each pair on each side, and run right round the body forming an incomplete muscular girdle, the ends approximating in the median line.

  • It presents a single pair of muscles attached along its inner wall which run up and form a muscular girdle round the body in its posterior third.

  • Moreover, the body cavity of the rotifers is a primitive archicoele; the persistent or accrescent cleft between epiblast and hypoblast, traversed by mesenchymal muscular bands.

  • (c) Pedalionidae, foot represented by two styles, sometimes ciliated; body provided with six hollow-jointed muscular fins for swimming and leaping.

  • In appearance the various Guatemalan tribes differ very little; in almost all the characteristic type of Indian is short but muscular, with low forehead, prominent cheek-bones and straight black hair.

  • The distress is due to spasmodic muscular contraction, and it comes on at intervals, each attack increasing the patient's misery.

  • u, The thickened muscular pallial margin which adheres to the shell and forms the pallial line of the left side.

  • The valves of the shell have been removed by severing their adhesions to the muscular areae h, i, k, 1, m, u.

  • Muscular substance of the foot.

  • i [i]) is called the umbonal area; the great anterior muscular surface h is that of the anterior adductor muscle, the posterior similar surface i is that of the posterior adductor muscle; the long line of attachment u is the simple " pallial muscle," - a thickened ridge which is seen to run parallel to the margin of the mantle-skirt in this Lamellibranch.

  • In removing the valves of the shell from an Anodonta, it is necessary not only to cut through the muscular attachment of the body-wall 4 ?"

  • The foot thus exposed in Anodonta is a simple muscular tongue-like organ.

  • lrf, Fibrous, possibly muscular, substance of the interfilamentar junctions.

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