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munster

munster

munster Sentence Examples

  • Cologne and the Westphalian towns, the most important of which were Dortmund, Soest and Munster, had long controlled this commerce but now began to feel the competition of the active traders of the Baltic, opening up that direct communication by sea from the Baltic to western Europe which became the essential feature in the history of the League.

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  • Armagh, nor were the Irish swordsmen or soldiers transplanted into Connaught and Munster from this and some other counties.

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  • In 1252 the countship was sold to the bishops of Munster; but their rule soon became little more than nominal, and in Emden itself the family of Abdena, the episcopal provosts and castellans, established their practical independence.

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  • The interesting ruins of Clare Abbey, founded in 1194 by Donnell O'Brien, king of Munster, are half-way between Ennis and the village of Clare Castle.

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  • MUNSTER, a town of Germany, in the district of Upper Alsace, 16 m.

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  • Munster (Basel, 1541).

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  • Volk), Herzog Wilhelm von Aquitanien (Munster, 1865),; P. Paris, in Hist.

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  • At the same time a corps under Marshal Luxemburg, composed of Louis' German allies (Cologne and Munster) moved from Westphalia towards Over-Yssel and Groningen.

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  • Munster (Basel, 1541).

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  • In 1650 he succeeded Ferdinand of Bavaria, archbishop of Cologne, as bishop of Munster.

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  • There is in the British Museum a poem printed in 1666, entitled Letter to the bishop of Munster containing a Panegyrick of his heroick achievements in heroick verse.

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  • Reinke's Commentary (Munster, 1868) is the work of a scholarly Roman Catholic. Haggai has generally been treated in works on all the prophets, as by Ewald (2nd ed., 1868; Eng.

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  • Next year Cromwell penetrated into Munster.

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  • Krebs, Zur Kritik Alberts von Aachen (Munster, 1881); B.

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  • Sebastian Munster, on the other hand, in his Cosmographia universalis of 1544, paid no regard to the mathematical basis of Munster.

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  • des 13ten Jahrhunderts (Munster, 1891); P. Piacenza, Compendio della storia del b.

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  • In 1578 he was created baron of Clogher and earl of Clanconnell for life; but on the outbreak of rebellion in Munster his attitude again became menacing, and for the next few years he continued to intrigue against the English authorities.

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  • He served with the English against Desmond in Munster in 1580, and assisted Sir John Perrot against the Scots of Ulster in 1584.

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  • Tyrone continued to concert measures with the Irish leaders in Munster, and issued a manifesto to the Catholics of Ireland summoning them to join his standard; protesting that the interests of religion were his first care.

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  • After an inconclusive campaign in Munster in January 1600, he returned in haste to Donegal, where he received supplies from Spain and a token of encouragement from Pope Clement VIII.

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  • The appearance of a Spanish force at Kinsale drew Mountjoy to Munster in 1601; Tyrone followed him, and at Bandon joined forces with O'Donnell and with the Spaniards under Don John D'Aquila.

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  • MUNSTER AM Stein, a watering-place of Germany, in the Prussian Rhine province, on the Nahe, 21m.

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  • See Welsch, Das Soland Thermalbad Munster am Stein (Kreuznach, 1886) and Messer, Fohrer durch Bad Kreuznach and Munster am Stein (Kreuznach, 1905).

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  • Higher education is given at the Royal College of Science, Dublin; the Albert Agricultural College, Glasnevin; and the Munster Institute, Cork, for female students, where dairying and poultry-keeping are prominent subjects.

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  • of Dortmund on the railway to Munster.

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  • The most prominent building in the city is the cathedral or Munster, built of deep red sandstone, on a terrace high above the Rhine.

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  • The new maps of the Basel edition of 1540, twenty-one in number, are by Sebastian Munster; Jacob Gastaldo supplied the Venice edition of 1548 with 34 modern maps, and these with a few additions are repeated in Girolamo Ruscelli's Italian translation of Ptolemy published at Venice in 1561.

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  • Glockedon, the author of an interesting road-map of central Europe (1soi), Sebastian Munster (1489-1552), Elias Camerarius, whose map of the mark of Brandenburg won the praise of Mercator; Wolfgang Latz von Lazius, to whom we are indebted for maps of Austria and Hungary (1561), and Philip Apianus, who made a survey of Bavaria (1553-1563), which was published 1568 on the reduced scale of 1:144,000, and is fairly described as the topographical masterpiece of the 16th century.

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  • Only we must not form our ideas of the great apocalyptic and chiliastic movement of the first decades of the 16th century from the rabble in Munster.

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  • In 1199-1201 he was supporting in turn Cathal Carrach and Cathal Crovderg for the native throne, but he was expelled from Limerick in 1203, and, losing his Connaught, though not his Munster estates, died in 1205.

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  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

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  • (Munster, 1896); N.

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  • Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Ulm (Stuttgart, 1863); Pressel, Ulmisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1873) and Ulm and sein Munster (Ulm, 1877); Schultes, Chronik von Ulm (Stuttgart, 1881 and 1886); Hassler, Ulms Kunstgeschichte im Mittelalter (Stuttgart, 1872); and Das rote Buch der Stadt Ulm, edited by C. Mollvo (1904).

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  • Nineteen of these, comprising 22,180 acres, were to have been allotted to the church, and forty-two, amounting to 55,620 acres, to English and Scottish colonists, servitors, native Irish and four corporate towns - the swordsmen to be dispersed throughout Connaught and Munster.

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  • There were now among the so-called Anabaptists four parties, the favourers of the Munster faction, the Batenburgers, extremists, the Melchiorites and the Obbenites.

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  • Before the year was out, yielding to the prayer of six or eight persons who had freed themselves from the Munster spell, he agreed to become their minister, and was set apart (January 1537) to the eldership at Groningen, with imposition of hands by Obbe Philipsz, who is regarded as the actual founder of the Mennonite body.

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  • A great battle is said to have been fought near Birr in the 3rd century between Cormac, son of Cond of the Hundred Battles, and the people of Munster.

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  • Vosges in summer, and large quantities of cheese (Munster cheese) are made and exported.

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  • The Dutch had the right to make this levy under treaties going back to the treaty of Munster in 1648, and they clung to it still more tenaciously after Belgium separated herself in 1830-1831 from the united kingdom of the Netherlands - the London conference in 1839 fixing the toll payable to Holland at I.

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  • Maurer, Die Bekehrung des norwegischen Stammes (2 vols., Munich, 1855-1856); Bang, Udsigt over den norske Kirkes historie under Katholicismen (Christiania, 1887); P. Gams, Series episcoporum ecclesiae catholicae (Regensburg, 1873); C. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica medii aevi (2 vols., Munster, 1898, 1901); P. Hinschius, System des kath.

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  • Other records left by contemporaries are those of Munster, D.

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  • ROBERT BOYLE (1627-1691), English natural philosopher, seventh son and fourteenth child of Richard Boyle, the great earl of Cork; was born at Lismore Castle, in the province of Munster, Ireland, on the 25th of January 1627.

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  • In 1842 Domett emigrated to New Zealand where he filled many important administrative posts, being colonial secretary for New Munster in 1848, secretary for the colony in 1851, and prime minister in 1862.

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  • DROSTE - VISCHERING, CLEMENS AUGUST, Baron Von (1773-1845), German Roman Catholic divine, was born at Munster on the 21st of January 1773.

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  • At the moment of his accession to power the negotiations for a separate treaty of peace with Spain were almost concluded, and peace was actually signed at Munster on the 30th of January 1648.

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  • It represented in the Old Testament a thorough and independent revision of the text of the Great Bible with the help of the Hebrew original, the Latin versions of Leo Judd (1543), Pagninus (1528), Sebastian Munster (1534-1535), and the French versions of Olivetan.

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  • To use sections and divisions in the text as Pagnine in his translation useth, and for the verity of the Hebrew to follow the said Pagnine and Munster specially, and generally others learned in the tongues.

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  • In 1014 Brian Boroihme, king of Munster, attacked the enemy and fought the battle of Clontarf, in which he and his son and 11,000 of his followers fell.

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  • Thus the former duchy of Westphalia and the bishoprics of Munster and Paderborn which remained in ecclesiastical hands are almost entirely Roman Catholic, while the secularized bishopric of Minden and the former counties of Ravensberg and Mark, which fell or had fallen to Brandenburg, and the Siegen district, which belonged to Nassau, are predominantly Protestant.

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  • The province is divided into the three governmental departments (Regierungsbezirke) of Minden, Munster and Arnsberg.

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  • Munster is the seat of government and of the provincial university.

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  • When Duke Henry the Lion of Saxony fell under the ban of the empire in 1 i 80, and his duchy was divided, the bishops of Munster and Paderborn became princes of the empire, and the archbishop of Cologne, Philip of Heinsberg, received from the emperor Frederick I.

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  • By the settlement of 1803 the church lands were secularized, and Prussia received the bishopric of Paderborn and the eastern part of Munster, while the electoral duchy of Westphalia was given to Hesse-Darmstadt.

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  • Wilmans, Die Kaiserurkunden der Provinz Westfalen (2 vols., Munster, 1867-1881); M.

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  • Servieres, L'Allemagne francaise sous Napoleon I er (Paris, 1904); Haselhoff, Die Entwickelung der Landeskultur in der Provinz Westfalen im 19ten Jahrhundert (Munster, 1900).

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  • Hugues (Munster, 18 57); O.

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  • Hecker, Die Stadt and das Tal zu Munster im St Gregoriental (Munster, 1890).

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  • Munster, Germany (Capital) >>

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  • The Roman Catholics are mostly gathered around the episcopal sees of Hildesheim and Osnabruck and close to Munster (in Westphalia) on the western border, and the Jews in the towns.

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  • Represented at the congress of Vienna by Ernest, Count Munster, the elector was granted the title of king; but the British ministers wished to keep the interests of Great Britain distinct from those of Hanover.

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  • The revolution of that year compelled George's brother and successor, William, to dismiss Count Munster, who had been the actual ruler of the country, and to name his own brother, Adolphus Frederick, duke of Cambridge, a viceroy of Hanover; one of the viceroy's earliest duties being to appoint a commission to draw up a new constitution.

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  • FAMILISTS, a term of English origin (later adopted in other languages) to denote the members of the Familia Caritatis (Hus der Lieften; Huis der Liefde; Haus der Liebe; " Family of Love"), founded by Hendrik Niclaes (born on the 9th or 10th of January 1501 or 1502, probably at Munster; died after 1570, not later than 1581, probably in 1580).

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  • There are six Roman Catholic and two Protestant churches, the most important of which is the Munster (minster), an imposing edifice of grey stone, in the Romanesque and Transition styles, surmounted by five towers, of which the central, rising to a height of 315 ft., is a landmark in the Rhine valley.

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  • (Munster i.

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  • Among Reuchlin's own pupils were Melanchthon, Oecolampadius and Cellarius, while Sebastian Munster in Heidelberg (afterwards professor at Basel), and Buchlein (Fagius) at Isny, Strasburg and Cambridge, were pupils of the liberal Jewish scholar Elias Levita.

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  • (Munster, 1887).

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  • Hubinger, Die Verfassung der Stadt Paderborn im Mittelalter (Munster, 1899); and J.

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  • Wilmans (Munster 1874-1880); and W.

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  • Umbrail Pass or Wermserjoch (Munster Valley to the Stelvio road), carriage road Passo di Val Viola (Bernina road to Bormio), bridle path Giufplan Pass (Ofen road to Fraele), bridle path.

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  • Scarl Pass (Scarl to Santa Maria Munster), carriage road.

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  • Dossradond Pass (Santa Maria Munster to Fraele), bridle path..

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  • On the other hand, the Grisons won in 1512 the Valtellina, with Bormio and Chiavenna, but in 1797 these regions were finally lost to it as well as to the Swiss Confederation, though the Grisons retained the valleys of Mesocco, Bregaglia and Poschiavo, while in 1762 it had bought the upper bit of the valley of Munster that lies on the southern slope of the Alps.

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  • In 1672 the town was besieged by the bishop of Munster, but it was successfully defended, and in 1698 its fortifications were improved under Coehoorn's direction.

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  • The treaty was signed at Munster on the 30th of January 1648.

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  • With the conclusion of the peace of Munster and the death of the veteran stadholder the struggle for predominance in the Union between the Orangefederalist and the Hollander States-rights parties was certain to be renewed.

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  • of the treaty of Munster.

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  • de Wicquefort, Histoire des provinces des Pays-Bas depuis la paix de Munster (1648-1658) (2 vols., 1719-1743); in these volumes will be also found a rich collection of original documents; R.

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  • Elias Levita wrote Hebrew explanations, and Sebastian Munster translated it into Latin.

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  • (Munster, 1902), pp. 2 4-43.

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  • He studied theology and Oriental languages at Munster, was parish priest at Berkum near Bonn from 1833 to 1839, and professor of Old Testament theology in the Catholic faculty at Breslau from 1839 to his death on the 28th of September 1856.

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  • Conches), its chief village being Munster, while Fiesch, lower down, is well known to most Swiss travellers.

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  • By the treaty of Munster in 1648 the Dutch obtained the right to close the Scheldt to navigation, and they clung tenaciously to it for over two centuries.

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  • Hefte 2-4 (Munster, 1892); The Improvement of the Moral Qualities [Arabic and English] ed.

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  • Heft 1, Munster, 1905).

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  • It was the centre of a system, established by Charles Bianconi (1786187S) in 1815 and subsequently, for the conveyance of travellers on light cars, extending over a great part of Leinster, Munster and Connaught.

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  • of Munster and 35 m.

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  • Saale, Hanover, Cassel, Kattowitz, Cologne, Konigsberg, Magdeburg, Munster, Posen, Saarbrucken and Stettin.

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  • All have four faculties except Munster, which has no faculty of medicine.

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  • As regards theology, Bonn, Breslau and Tubingen have both a Protestant and a Catholic faculty; Freiburg, Munich, Munster and Wurzburg are exclusively Catholic; and all the rest are Protestant.

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  • Munster 1902 95 278 4

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  • MUnster (Westphalia); VIII.

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  • By a treaty signed at Hamburg in December 1641 it was agreed that peace conferences should meet The peace at Munster and at Osnabruck in March 1642, the ha1i5

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  • The Roman Catholic princes of the Empire were to be represented at Munster and the Protestants at Osnabruck.

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  • From 11°6 till its conquest by the English in 1174 it was the seat of the kings of Thomond or North Munster, and, although in 1179 the kingdom of Limerick was given by Henry II.

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  • Pigge, Die Staatstheorie Friedrichs des Grossen (Munster, 1904); T.

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  • A second and more determined attempt to establish a theocracy was made at Munster, in Westphalia (1532-1535).

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  • Vigorous preparations were at once made, not only to hold what had been gained, but to proceed from Munster as a centre to the conquest of the world.

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  • As a natural consequence of such licence, Munster was for twelve months a scene of unbridled profligacy.

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  • The outbreak at Munster was the crisis of the Anabaptist movement.

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  • The fact that, after the Munster insurrection the very name Anabaptist was proscribed in Europe, is a source of twofold confusion.

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  • The enforced adoption of new names makes it easy to lose the historical identity of many who really belonged to the Minster Anabaptists, and, on the other hand, has led to the classification of many with the Munster sect who had no real connexion with it.

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  • The Mennonites, for example, have been identified with the earlier Anabaptists, on the ground that they included among their number many of the fanatics of Munster.

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  • But the continuity of a sect is to be traced in its principles, and not in its adherents, and it must be remembered that Menno and his followers expressly repudiated the distinctive doctrines of the Munster Anabaptists.

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  • In English history frequent reference is made to the Anabaptists during the 16th and 17th centuries, but there is no evidence that any considerable number of native Englishmen ever adopted the principles of the Munster sect.

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  • Ottius, Annales Anabaptistici (Basileae, 1772); Karl Rembert, Die Wiedertdufer in Herzogtum Julich (Munster, 1873); Universal Lexicon, art.

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  • Glossner, Nikolaus von Cusa and Marius Nizolius als Vorldufer der neueren Philosophie (Munster, 1891); F.

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  • He was employed at the congress of Munster, where he remained after the signing of peace in 1648 as charge d'affaires until his death on the 5th of October of the next year.

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  • See Stoy, Kurzer Abriss der Geschichte Mindens (Minden, 18 79); BSlische, Skizzen aus Mindens Vergangenheit (Minden, 1897); Holscher, Beschreibung des vormaligen Bistumes Minden (Munster, 1 877).

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  • The crossing of the river here was guarded and disputed from the earliest times, and, the name of the town is derived from a king of Munster killed here in the 2nd century.

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  • in Kirchengeschichtliche Studien (Munster, 1903); F.

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  • Frankfurt has a good prison on the Pentonville (London) plan; so has Hamburg; and new buildings have been erected at Wohlan, Siegburg, Breslau and Munster.

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  • Schluter (Munster, 1838); and in Floss's Opera omnia; there is a German translation by Ludwig Noack, Johannes Scotus Erigena fiber die Eintheilung der Natur (3 vols., 1874-1876).

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  • In Germany there are the Westphalian Aa, rising in the Teutoburger Wald, and joining the Werre at Herford, the Munster Aa, a tributary of the Ems, and others.

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  • Of its edifices the most remarkable are the Roman Catholic parish church of St Martin, known also as the Munster, dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, the Lutheran parish church (15th century), the former Dominican monastery (1232-1289), known as "Unterlinden" and now used as a museum, the Kaufhaus (trade-hall) of the 15th century, and the handsome government offices (formerly the Prefecture).

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  • The principal medieval building in Bern is the (now Protestant) Munster, begun in 1421 though not completed till 1573.

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  • Heft (Munster, 1903), reprints Processus legationis in Angliam.

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  • (34 vols., Munster i.w., beginning 1890); Handbooks on the History of Religions, ed.

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  • One of the most notable of these radical anti-ecclesiastical movements was that of the Zwickau prophets, (Marcus Stiibner, Nikolaus Storch and Thomas Munzer): the most vigorous and notorious that of the Munster Anabaptists.

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  • But if they are not typical of Anabaptism, still less are the later representatives of the movement in the last sad months at Munster.

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  • In the second place, the persecution deprived the Anabaptists of the noble leaders who had preached non-resistance and at the same time provoked others to an attitude of vengeance which culminated in the horrors of Munster.

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  • 1534) by name, who, prophesying a speedy end of the world and establishment of the kingdom of heaven, obtained many adherents, and despatched Boekebinder and de Kniper to Munster.

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  • All who did not embrace Anabaptism were driven from Munster (1533), and Bernt Knipperdolling (ca.

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  • John (Johann Bockelson) of Leiden (1510-1536) took his place and the town became the scene of the grossest licence and cruelty, until in 1535 it was taken by the besieging bishop. Unhappily the Anabaptists have always been remembered by the crimes of John of Leiden and the revelry of Munster.

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  • After Munster had fallen the harassed remnants of the Anabaptists were gathered together under Menno Simonis, who joined them in 1537.

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  • Georg, Count Munster >>

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  • Steinmann, takes a wider survey in a pamphlet on the north Galatian side of the controversy (Die A bfassungszeit des Galaterbrief es, Munster, i.

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  • Schafer (Munster, 1890) and F.

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  • The Jansenist and Gallican influence was also strongly felt in Italy and in Germany, where Breviaries based on the French models were published at Cologne, Munster, Mainz and other towns.

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  • by rail of Osnabruck, and at the junction of main lines to Munster, Rotterdam and Emden.

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  • In order to improve his knowledge of the Roman ritual he spent four years with Malchus, bishop of Lismore (in Munster), a strong advocate of Romanism.

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  • After the sack of that place by the king of Ulster he withdrew into Munster; here he was kindly received by Cormac MacCarthy, with whose assistance he built the monastery of Ibrach (in Kerry).

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  • At the congress of Munster (1643) he refused to make the independence of Portugal a condition of 1 Philip I., II.

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  • Schafer (Munster, 1891) and Cornely (Paris, 1896) may be added.

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  • The Crawford School of Science (1885); and the Munster Dairy and Agricultural School, 1 m.

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  • The principal clubs are the County and the Southern in South Mall, and the City in Grand Parade; while for sport there are the Cork Golf Club, Little Island, three rowing clubs, and the Royal Munster and Royal Cork Yacht clubs, the latter located at Queenstown.

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  • (Munster, 1902) is dreary but epoch-making; Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, Jahrgang 166, 857-869 (Berlin, 1904); R.

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  • for the peace of Munster (1648) in spite of his opposi tion.

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  • Supported by several septs of Munster and Connaught, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnel he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane.

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  • In 1537 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald and his five uncles were executed for rebellion in Munster, and the English government made every effort to lay hands also on Gerald, the youthful heir to the earldom of Kildare, a boy of twelve years of age who was in the secret custody of his aunt Lady Eleanor McCarthy.

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  • While Hugh Roe was attempting to retake the latter place in 1601, he heard that a Spanish force had landed in Munster.

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  • AUGUST POTTHAST (1824-1898), German historian, was born at Hbxter on the 13th of August 1824, and was educated at Paderborn, Munster and Berlin.

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  • 1539), duke of Cleves and count of La Marck, whose male line became extinct with the death of John William, bishop of Munster, in 1609.

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  • A few of his followers who landed were cut off, and he went on to Ireland to join the earl of Desmond in Munster.

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  • That such terms could be imposed shows the strength of Poynings arm, and his vigour was equally evident when Warbeck came ashore in Munster in July 1493.

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  • landed near Waterford, and he here received the hostages of the people of Munster.

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  • At the same time, and as part of the same general plan, a canal, the Dortmund-Ems Canal, was dug to connect the river (from Munster) with Herne in the Westphalian coal-field.

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  • St Mary Magdalen's, Munster Square, in London.

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  • The Antrim Presbytery gradually became Arian; the same type of theology affected more or less the Southern Association, known since 1806 as the Synod of Munster.

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  • In 1910 the Antrim Presbytery, Remonstrant Synod and Synod of Munster were united as the General Synod of the non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland.

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  • (d) Munster (southwestern division): Counties Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary, Waterford.

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  • This is further borne out by the percentages given in the above table, from which it will be seen that the greatest proportional decrease of population has occurred in the two provinces of Munster and Connaught, which may be regarded as almost purely agricultural.

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  • The "Golden Vale" in Munster, which stretches from Cashel in Tipperary to near Limerick, probably forms the most fertile part of the country.

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  • Of the total holdings under 30 acres considerably more than one-third are in Ulster, and of the holdings over 30 acres more than one-third are in Munster.

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  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

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  • The growing of these crops is confined almost entirely to Leinster and Munster.

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  • They also reorganized the Albert Agricultural College at Glasnevin for young men who have neither the time nor the means to attend the highly specialized courses at the Royal College of Science; and the Munster Institute at Cork is now devoted solely to the instruction of girls in such subjects as butter-making, poultry-keeping, calf-rearing, cooking, laundry-work, sewing and gardening.

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  • Perhaps the chief success of the society was seen in the establishment of creameries, which at the end of 1905 numbered 275-123 in Ulster, 102 in Munster, 20 in Leinster and 30 in Connaught.

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  • Under this act between 1885 and 1902, when further proceedings were suspended, the number of loans issued was 2 5,3 6 7 (4221 in Leinster; 5204 in Munster; 12,954 in Ulster, and 2988 in Connaught) and the amount was £9,99 2, 53 6.

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    0
  • Between August 1891 and April 1906, the number of loans issued under the acts of 1891 and 1896 was 40,395 (7838 in Leinster; 7512 in Munster; 14,955 in Ulster, and 10,090 in Connaught) and the amount was £11,573,952.

    0
    0
  • The newcomers probably overran the whole island, subduing but not exterminating the older race with which they doubtless intermarried freely, as pre-Celtic types are frequent among the populations of Connaught and Munster at the present day.

    0
    0
  • Munster and W.

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    0
  • Munster) appears to be older than the historical period, and may be due to the Goidels.

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    0
  • The Iverni must have been a nation of considerable importance, as they play a prominent part in the historical period, where they are known as the Ernai or Eraind of Munster.

    0
    0
  • A third band, the Firbolg proper, took possession of Munster.

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    0
  • However, after two battles the newcomers succeeded in overcoming the older race; and two brothers, Eber Find and Eremon, divided the island between them, Eber Find taking east and west Munster, whilst Eremon received Leinster and Connaught.

    0
    0
  • Lugaid, son of the brother of Miled, took possession of south-west Munster.

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    0
  • A grandson of Tuathal's, the famous Conn Cetchathach (" the hundred-fighter "), whose death is placed in the year 177 after a reign of about twenty years, was constantly at war with the Munster ruler Eogan Mor, also called Mog Nuadat, of the race of Eber Find.

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    0
  • Eogan had subdued the Ernai and the Corco Laigde (descendants of Lugaid son of Ith) in Munster, and even the supreme king was obliged to share the island with him.

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    0
  • They settled in Munster where their name still survives in the barony of Decies (Co.

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    0
  • In this connexion it may be noted that practically all the Milesian pedigrees converge on three ancestors in the 2nd century - Conn Cetchathach king of Tara, Cathair Mor of Leinster, and Ailill Aulom of Munster, - whilst in scarcely any of them are mythological personages absent when we go farther back than A.D.

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    0
  • the Eraind and Corcu Loegdi of Munster and the Ulidians with the Milesians of Tara.

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  • These divisions were: Ulster with Emain Macha as capital, Connaught with Cruachu as residence, north Munster from Slieve Bloom to north Kerry, south Munster from south Kerry to Waterford, and Leinster consisting of the two kingdoms of Tara and Ailinn.

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    0
  • The relationship of Munster and Leinster to the Tara dynasty is not so easy to define.

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    0
  • When we turn to Munster we find that Cashel was the seat of power in historical times.

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    0
  • The legendary account attributes the subjugation of the various peoples inhabiting Munster to Mog Nuadat, and the pedigrees are invariably traced up to ` his son Ailill Aulom.

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    0
  • The allegiance of the rulers of Munster to Niall and his descendants can at the best of times only have been nominal.

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    0
  • These were (1) Munster with Cashel as centre, (2) Connaught, (3) Ailech, (4) Oriel, (5) Ulidia, (6) Meath, (7) Leinster, (8) Ossory.

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    0
  • Wellknown fairy queens are Clidna (south Munster) and Aibell (north Munster).

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    0
  • For instance, Fedilmid, king of Munster and archbishop of Cashel, took the opportunity of the misfortunes of the country to revive the claims of the Munster dynasty to be kings of Ireland.

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    0
  • If evidence were needed it is only necessary to point to the names of three of the Irish provinces, Ulster, Leinster, Munster, which are formed from the native names (Ulaid, Laigin, Muma-n) with the addition of Norse staor; and the very name by which the island is now generally known is Scandinavian in form (Ira-land, the land of the Irish).

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    0
  • We have already seen that the dominant race in Munster traced descent from Ailill Aulom.

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    0
  • About the year 920 a Viking named Tomrair, son of Elgi, had seized the lower Shannon and established himself in Limerick, from which point constant incursions were made into all parts of Munster.

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    0
  • Receiving the support of several of the native tribes, he felt himself in a position to attack the settlements of the foreigners in Munster.

    0
    0
  • This decisive victory gave the Dalcais Limerick, which they sacked and burnt, and Mathgamain then took hostages of all the chiefs of Munster.

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    0
  • A conspiracy was formed between Ivar and his son Dubcenn and the two Munster chieftains Donoban and Maelmuad.

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    0
  • After this battle Brian was acknowledged king of all Munster (978).

    0
    0
  • During these years there were frequent trials of strength between the ardri and the king of Munster.

    0
    0
  • In 992 Brian invaded Meath, and four years later Maelsechlainn defeated Brian in Munster.

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    0
  • When everything was ready he entered Mag Breg with an army consisting of his own troops, those of Ossory, his South Connaught vassals and the Norsemen of Munster.

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    0
  • To meet such formidable opponents, Brian, now an old man unable to lead in person, mustered all the forces of Munster and Connaught, and was joined by Maelsechlainn in command of the forces of Meath.

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    0
  • However, the effects of Brian's revolution were permanent; the prescriptive rights of the Hy Neill were disputed, and from the battle of Clontarf until the coming of the Normans the history of Ireland consisted of a struggle for ascendancy between the O'Brians of Munster, the O'Neills of Ulster and the O'Connors of Connaught.

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    0
  • Munster and Meath were repeatedly ravaged, and in 11 51 he crushed Tordelbach (Turlough) O'Brian, king of Thomond, at Moanmor.

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    0
  • The Irish writers tell little about these great !events, except that the king of the Saxons took the hostages of Munster at Waterford, and of Leinster, Ulster, Thomond and Meath at Dublin.

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    0
  • He bridled Connaught by a castle at Athlone, and Munster by a garrison at Leighlin Bridge.

    0
    0
  • Seizing the opportunity, English adventurers proposed to plant a military colony in the western half of Munster, holding the coast from the Shannon to Cork harbour.

    0
    0
  • Sir Peter had great but undefined claims in Munster also, and the people there took warning.

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    0
  • The presidency of Munster, an office the creation of which had long been contemplated, was then conferred on Sir John Perrot, who drove James "Fitzmaurice" Fitzgerald into the mountains, reduced castles everywhere, and destroyed a Scottish contingent which had come from Ulster to help the rebels.

    0
    0
  • The colonizing scheme was dropped, and the first presidency of Munster left the Desmonds and their allies in possession.

    0
    0
  • Sir William Drury in Munster hanged four hundred persons in one year, Sir Nicholas Malby in reducing the Connaught Burkes spared neither young nor old, and burned all corn and houses.

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    0
  • Roused at last, Elizabeth sent over Ormonde as general of Munster, and after long delay gave him the means of conducting a campaign.

    0
    0
  • Sir John Norris, famed in the Netherland wars, was president of Munster, and so impressed the Irish that they averred him to be in league with the devil.

    0
    0
  • The colonization of the Munster forfeitures was undertaken at this time.

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    0
  • Tyrone more than held his own in the north, completely defeated Sir Henry Bagnal in the battle of the Yellow Ford (1598), invaded Munster, and ravaged the lands of Lord Barrymore, who had remained true to his allegiance.

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    0
  • In 1600 Sir George Carew became president of Munster, and, as always happened when the crown was well served, the rebellion was quickly put down.

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    0
  • The Connaught g g y g tr and Munster landowners were shamelessly forced to Strafford.

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    0
  • The following description by a resident in Munster was published in The Times of the 5th of November 1885: " Boycotting means that a peaceable subject of the queen is denied food and drink, and that he is ruined in his business; that his cattle are unsaleable at fairs; that the smith will not shoe his horse, nor the carpenter mend his cart; that old friends pass him by on the other side, making the sign of the cross; that his children are hooted at the village school; that.

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    0
  • Baumgartner, Die Philosophie des Alanus de Insulis (Munster, 1896).

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    0
  • Ziegler, Irenaeus, der Bischof von Lyon (Berlin, 1871); Friedrich Loofs, Irenaeus-Handschriften (Leipzig, 1888); Johannes Werner, Der Paulinismus des Irenaeus (Leipzig, 1889); Johannes Kunze, Die Gotteslehre des Irenaeus (Leipzig, 1891); Ernst Klebba, Die Anthropologie des heiligen Irenaeus (Munster, 1894); Albert Dufourcq, Saint Irenee (Paris, 1904); Franz Stoll, Die Lehre des Heil.

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    0
  • The diet of Regensburg, under the mediation of Maximilian of Bavaria, decided in favor of peace with France, and on the25th of December 1641 the preliminary settlement at Hamburg fixed the opening of negotiations to take place at Munster and Osnabruck.

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    0
  • 809), the first bishop of Munster.

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  • "ALEXANDER VON KLUCK (1846-), Prussian general, was born May 20 1846 at Munster in Westphalia.

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    0
  • There was conspicuous bravery at Munster Alley on the 6th of August 1916.

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    0
  • For most conspicuous bravery at Munster Alley on the 6th August 1916.

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    0
  • presbyterys initially an Independent element in the Southern Association but in 1809, the two presbyteries joined in the Synod of Munster.

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  • roundabout at the junction of Lillie Road, Munster Road & Dawes Road.

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    0
  • In 1650 he succeeded Ferdinand of Bavaria, archbishop of Cologne, as bishop of Munster.

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    0
  • After restoring some degree of peace and prosperity in his principality, Galen had to contend with a formidable insurrection on the part of the citizens of Munster; but at length this was crushed, and the bellicose bishop, who maintained a strong army, became an important personage in Europe.

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  • von Galen (Munster, 1865); P. Corstiens, Bernard van Galen, VorstBisschop van Munster (Rotterdam, 1872); A.

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    0
  • von Galen (Munster, 1887); and C. Brinkmann in the English Historical Review, vol.

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  • There is in the British Museum a poem printed in 1666, entitled Letter to the bishop of Munster containing a Panegyrick of his heroick achievements in heroick verse.

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    0
  • Reinke's Commentary (Munster, 1868) is the work of a scholarly Roman Catholic. Haggai has generally been treated in works on all the prophets, as by Ewald (2nd ed., 1868; Eng.

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  • Next year Cromwell penetrated into Munster.

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    0
  • Krebs, Zur Kritik Alberts von Aachen (Munster, 1881); B.

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    0
  • The earliest evidence of the reincarnation of a sound theoretical geography is to be found in the text-books by Peter Apian and Sebastian Munster.

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    0
  • Sebastian Munster, on the other hand, in his Cosmographia universalis of 1544, paid no regard to the mathematical basis of Munster.

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  • Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries the rapidly accumulating store of facts as to the extent, outline and mountain and river systems of the lands of the earth were put in order by the generation of cartographers of which Mercator was the chief; but the writings of Apian and Munster held the field for a hundred years without a serious rival, unless the many annotated editions of Ptolemy might be so considered.

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  • des 13ten Jahrhunderts (Munster, 1891); P. Piacenza, Compendio della storia del b.

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  • In 1578 he was created baron of Clogher and earl of Clanconnell for life; but on the outbreak of rebellion in Munster his attitude again became menacing, and for the next few years he continued to intrigue against the English authorities.

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    0
  • He served with the English against Desmond in Munster in 1580, and assisted Sir John Perrot against the Scots of Ulster in 1584.

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    0
  • Tyrone continued to concert measures with the Irish leaders in Munster, and issued a manifesto to the Catholics of Ireland summoning them to join his standard; protesting that the interests of religion were his first care.

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    0
  • After an inconclusive campaign in Munster in January 1600, he returned in haste to Donegal, where he received supplies from Spain and a token of encouragement from Pope Clement VIII.

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  • The appearance of a Spanish force at Kinsale drew Mountjoy to Munster in 1601; Tyrone followed him, and at Bandon joined forces with O'Donnell and with the Spaniards under Don John D'Aquila.

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  • MUNSTER AM Stein, a watering-place of Germany, in the Prussian Rhine province, on the Nahe, 21m.

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  • See Welsch, Das Soland Thermalbad Munster am Stein (Kreuznach, 1886) and Messer, Fohrer durch Bad Kreuznach and Munster am Stein (Kreuznach, 1905).

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  • Higher education is given at the Royal College of Science, Dublin; the Albert Agricultural College, Glasnevin; and the Munster Institute, Cork, for female students, where dairying and poultry-keeping are prominent subjects.

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  • MacDaire, the famous Munster warrior, and the children of Calatin Dana, in revenge for their father's death (see Celt: Irish Literature).

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  • of Dortmund on the railway to Munster.

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  • The most prominent building in the city is the cathedral or Munster, built of deep red sandstone, on a terrace high above the Rhine.

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  • The new maps of the Basel edition of 1540, twenty-one in number, are by Sebastian Munster; Jacob Gastaldo supplied the Venice edition of 1548 with 34 modern maps, and these with a few additions are repeated in Girolamo Ruscelli's Italian translation of Ptolemy published at Venice in 1561.

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  • Glockedon, the author of an interesting road-map of central Europe (1soi), Sebastian Munster (1489-1552), Elias Camerarius, whose map of the mark of Brandenburg won the praise of Mercator; Wolfgang Latz von Lazius, to whom we are indebted for maps of Austria and Hungary (1561), and Philip Apianus, who made a survey of Bavaria (1553-1563), which was published 1568 on the reduced scale of 1:144,000, and is fairly described as the topographical masterpiece of the 16th century.

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  • The "everlasting gospel" of Joachim of Floris was a different thing from the announcement of Christ's glorious return in the clouds of heaven; the "age of the spirit" which mystics and spiritualists expected contained traits which must be characterized as "modern"; and the "kingdom" of the Anabaptists in Munster was a Satanic caricature of that kingdom in which the Christians of the 2nd century looked for a peaceful Sabbath rest.

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  • Only we must not form our ideas of the great apocalyptic and chiliastic movement of the first decades of the 16th century from the rabble in Munster.

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  • In 1199-1201 he was supporting in turn Cathal Carrach and Cathal Crovderg for the native throne, but he was expelled from Limerick in 1203, and, losing his Connaught, though not his Munster estates, died in 1205.

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  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

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  • (Munster, 1896); N.

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  • Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Ulm (Stuttgart, 1863); Pressel, Ulmisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1873) and Ulm and sein Munster (Ulm, 1877); Schultes, Chronik von Ulm (Stuttgart, 1881 and 1886); Hassler, Ulms Kunstgeschichte im Mittelalter (Stuttgart, 1872); and Das rote Buch der Stadt Ulm, edited by C. Mollvo (1904).

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  • Volk), Herzog Wilhelm von Aquitanien (Munster, 1865),; P. Paris, in Hist.

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    0
  • Cologne and the Westphalian towns, the most important of which were Dortmund, Soest and Munster, had long controlled this commerce but now began to feel the competition of the active traders of the Baltic, opening up that direct communication by sea from the Baltic to western Europe which became the essential feature in the history of the League.

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  • Here was a fortress-palace of Munster, originally called Dun-iasgach, the suffix signifying "abounding in fish."

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  • Nineteen of these, comprising 22,180 acres, were to have been allotted to the church, and forty-two, amounting to 55,620 acres, to English and Scottish colonists, servitors, native Irish and four corporate towns - the swordsmen to be dispersed throughout Connaught and Munster.

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  • Armagh, nor were the Irish swordsmen or soldiers transplanted into Connaught and Munster from this and some other counties.

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  • In 1252 the countship was sold to the bishops of Munster; but their rule soon became little more than nominal, and in Emden itself the family of Abdena, the episcopal provosts and castellans, established their practical independence.

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  • The interesting ruins of Clare Abbey, founded in 1194 by Donnell O'Brien, king of Munster, are half-way between Ennis and the village of Clare Castle.

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  • At the same time a corps under Marshal Luxemburg, composed of Louis' German allies (Cologne and Munster) moved from Westphalia towards Over-Yssel and Groningen.

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    0
  • A war of manoeuvre on the middle Rhine ended in favour of the French, and the allies then turned against the territories of Cologne and Munster, while William, disappointed in his hopes of joining forces with his friends, made a bold, but in the end unsuccessful, raid on Charleroi (September-December 1672).

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  • The troops of Cologne and Munster formed part of his army, other friends of Louis were preparing to take the field, and after a severe winter campaign, the elector, defeated in combat and manoeuvre, was forced back to the Weser, and being but weakly supported by the Imperialists, found himself compelled to make a separate peace (June 6th, 1673).

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  • This fortress fell on the 12th of November, and the troops of the coalition gained possession of an unbroken line from Amsterdam to the Breisgau, while Louis' German allies (Cologne and Munster), now isolated, had to make peace at once.

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  • There were now among the so-called Anabaptists four parties, the favourers of the Munster faction, the Batenburgers, extremists, the Melchiorites and the Obbenites.

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  • Before the year was out, yielding to the prayer of six or eight persons who had freed themselves from the Munster spell, he agreed to become their minister, and was set apart (January 1537) to the eldership at Groningen, with imposition of hands by Obbe Philipsz, who is regarded as the actual founder of the Mennonite body.

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  • A great battle is said to have been fought near Birr in the 3rd century between Cormac, son of Cond of the Hundred Battles, and the people of Munster.

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  • Vosges in summer, and large quantities of cheese (Munster cheese) are made and exported.

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  • The Dutch had the right to make this levy under treaties going back to the treaty of Munster in 1648, and they clung to it still more tenaciously after Belgium separated herself in 1830-1831 from the united kingdom of the Netherlands - the London conference in 1839 fixing the toll payable to Holland at I.

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  • Maurer, Die Bekehrung des norwegischen Stammes (2 vols., Munich, 1855-1856); Bang, Udsigt over den norske Kirkes historie under Katholicismen (Christiania, 1887); P. Gams, Series episcoporum ecclesiae catholicae (Regensburg, 1873); C. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica medii aevi (2 vols., Munster, 1898, 1901); P. Hinschius, System des kath.

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  • Other records left by contemporaries are those of Munster, D.

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  • ROBERT BOYLE (1627-1691), English natural philosopher, seventh son and fourteenth child of Richard Boyle, the great earl of Cork; was born at Lismore Castle, in the province of Munster, Ireland, on the 25th of January 1627.

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  • In 1842 Domett emigrated to New Zealand where he filled many important administrative posts, being colonial secretary for New Munster in 1848, secretary for the colony in 1851, and prime minister in 1862.

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  • DROSTE - VISCHERING, CLEMENS AUGUST, Baron Von (1773-1845), German Roman Catholic divine, was born at Munster on the 21st of January 1773.

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    0
  • At the moment of his accession to power the negotiations for a separate treaty of peace with Spain were almost concluded, and peace was actually signed at Munster on the 30th of January 1648.

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    0
  • It represented in the Old Testament a thorough and independent revision of the text of the Great Bible with the help of the Hebrew original, the Latin versions of Leo Judd (1543), Pagninus (1528), Sebastian Munster (1534-1535), and the French versions of Olivetan.

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  • To use sections and divisions in the text as Pagnine in his translation useth, and for the verity of the Hebrew to follow the said Pagnine and Munster specially, and generally others learned in the tongues.

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  • In 1014 Brian Boroihme, king of Munster, attacked the enemy and fought the battle of Clontarf, in which he and his son and 11,000 of his followers fell.

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  • Thus the former duchy of Westphalia and the bishoprics of Munster and Paderborn which remained in ecclesiastical hands are almost entirely Roman Catholic, while the secularized bishopric of Minden and the former counties of Ravensberg and Mark, which fell or had fallen to Brandenburg, and the Siegen district, which belonged to Nassau, are predominantly Protestant.

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  • The province is divided into the three governmental departments (Regierungsbezirke) of Minden, Munster and Arnsberg.

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    0
  • Munster is the seat of government and of the provincial university.

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    0
  • When Duke Henry the Lion of Saxony fell under the ban of the empire in 1 i 80, and his duchy was divided, the bishops of Munster and Paderborn became princes of the empire, and the archbishop of Cologne, Philip of Heinsberg, received from the emperor Frederick I.

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  • By the settlement of 1803 the church lands were secularized, and Prussia received the bishopric of Paderborn and the eastern part of Munster, while the electoral duchy of Westphalia was given to Hesse-Darmstadt.

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    0
  • Wilmans, Die Kaiserurkunden der Provinz Westfalen (2 vols., Munster, 1867-1881); M.

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    0
  • Servieres, L'Allemagne francaise sous Napoleon I er (Paris, 1904); Haselhoff, Die Entwickelung der Landeskultur in der Provinz Westfalen im 19ten Jahrhundert (Munster, 1900).

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  • Hugues (Munster, 18 57); O.

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  • MUNSTER, a town of Germany, in the district of Upper Alsace, 16 m.

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    0
  • Hecker, Die Stadt and das Tal zu Munster im St Gregoriental (Munster, 1890).

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  • Munster, Germany (Capital) >>

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  • The Roman Catholics are mostly gathered around the episcopal sees of Hildesheim and Osnabruck and close to Munster (in Westphalia) on the western border, and the Jews in the towns.

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    0
  • Represented at the congress of Vienna by Ernest, Count Munster, the elector was granted the title of king; but the British ministers wished to keep the interests of Great Britain distinct from those of Hanover.

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  • The revolution of that year compelled George's brother and successor, William, to dismiss Count Munster, who had been the actual ruler of the country, and to name his own brother, Adolphus Frederick, duke of Cambridge, a viceroy of Hanover; one of the viceroy's earliest duties being to appoint a commission to draw up a new constitution.

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  • FAMILISTS, a term of English origin (later adopted in other languages) to denote the members of the Familia Caritatis (Hus der Lieften; Huis der Liefde; Haus der Liebe; " Family of Love"), founded by Hendrik Niclaes (born on the 9th or 10th of January 1501 or 1502, probably at Munster; died after 1570, not later than 1581, probably in 1580).

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  • There are six Roman Catholic and two Protestant churches, the most important of which is the Munster (minster), an imposing edifice of grey stone, in the Romanesque and Transition styles, surmounted by five towers, of which the central, rising to a height of 315 ft., is a landmark in the Rhine valley.

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  • (Munster i.

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  • Among Reuchlin's own pupils were Melanchthon, Oecolampadius and Cellarius, while Sebastian Munster in Heidelberg (afterwards professor at Basel), and Buchlein (Fagius) at Isny, Strasburg and Cambridge, were pupils of the liberal Jewish scholar Elias Levita.

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  • (Munster, 1887).

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    0
  • Hubinger, Die Verfassung der Stadt Paderborn im Mittelalter (Munster, 1899); and J.

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  • Wilmans (Munster 1874-1880); and W.

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  • Umbrail Pass or Wermserjoch (Munster Valley to the Stelvio road), carriage road Passo di Val Viola (Bernina road to Bormio), bridle path Giufplan Pass (Ofen road to Fraele), bridle path.

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  • Scarl Pass (Scarl to Santa Maria Munster), carriage road.

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  • Dossradond Pass (Santa Maria Munster to Fraele), bridle path..

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  • On the other hand, the Grisons won in 1512 the Valtellina, with Bormio and Chiavenna, but in 1797 these regions were finally lost to it as well as to the Swiss Confederation, though the Grisons retained the valleys of Mesocco, Bregaglia and Poschiavo, while in 1762 it had bought the upper bit of the valley of Munster that lies on the southern slope of the Alps.

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  • In 1672 the town was besieged by the bishop of Munster, but it was successfully defended, and in 1698 its fortifications were improved under Coehoorn's direction.

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    0
  • The treaty was signed at Munster on the 30th of January 1648.

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    0
  • With the conclusion of the peace of Munster and the death of the veteran stadholder the struggle for predominance in the Union between the Orangefederalist and the Hollander States-rights parties was certain to be renewed.

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  • of the treaty of Munster.

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  • de Wicquefort, Histoire des provinces des Pays-Bas depuis la paix de Munster (1648-1658) (2 vols., 1719-1743); in these volumes will be also found a rich collection of original documents; R.

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  • Elias Levita wrote Hebrew explanations, and Sebastian Munster translated it into Latin.

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  • (Munster, 1902), pp. 2 4-43.

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  • He studied theology and Oriental languages at Munster, was parish priest at Berkum near Bonn from 1833 to 1839, and professor of Old Testament theology in the Catholic faculty at Breslau from 1839 to his death on the 28th of September 1856.

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  • Conches), its chief village being Munster, while Fiesch, lower down, is well known to most Swiss travellers.

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  • By the treaty of Munster in 1648 the Dutch obtained the right to close the Scheldt to navigation, and they clung tenaciously to it for over two centuries.

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  • Hefte 2-4 (Munster, 1892); The Improvement of the Moral Qualities [Arabic and English] ed.

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  • Heft 1, Munster, 1905).

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  • It was the centre of a system, established by Charles Bianconi (1786187S) in 1815 and subsequently, for the conveyance of travellers on light cars, extending over a great part of Leinster, Munster and Connaught.

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  • of Munster and 35 m.

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  • Saale, Hanover, Cassel, Kattowitz, Cologne, Konigsberg, Magdeburg, Munster, Posen, Saarbrucken and Stettin.

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  • All have four faculties except Munster, which has no faculty of medicine.

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  • As regards theology, Bonn, Breslau and Tubingen have both a Protestant and a Catholic faculty; Freiburg, Munich, Munster and Wurzburg are exclusively Catholic; and all the rest are Protestant.

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  • Munster 1902 95 278 4

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  • MUnster (Westphalia); VIII.

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  • By a treaty signed at Hamburg in December 1641 it was agreed that peace conferences should meet The peace at Munster and at Osnabruck in March 1642, the ha1i5

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  • The Roman Catholic princes of the Empire were to be represented at Munster and the Protestants at Osnabruck.

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  • From 11°6 till its conquest by the English in 1174 it was the seat of the kings of Thomond or North Munster, and, although in 1179 the kingdom of Limerick was given by Henry II.

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  • Pigge, Die Staatstheorie Friedrichs des Grossen (Munster, 1904); T.

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  • A second and more determined attempt to establish a theocracy was made at Munster, in Westphalia (1532-1535).

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  • Vigorous preparations were at once made, not only to hold what had been gained, but to proceed from Munster as a centre to the conquest of the world.

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  • As a natural consequence of such licence, Munster was for twelve months a scene of unbridled profligacy.

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  • The outbreak at Munster was the crisis of the Anabaptist movement.

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  • The fact that, after the Munster insurrection the very name Anabaptist was proscribed in Europe, is a source of twofold confusion.

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  • The enforced adoption of new names makes it easy to lose the historical identity of many who really belonged to the Minster Anabaptists, and, on the other hand, has led to the classification of many with the Munster sect who had no real connexion with it.

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  • The Mennonites, for example, have been identified with the earlier Anabaptists, on the ground that they included among their number many of the fanatics of Munster.

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  • But the continuity of a sect is to be traced in its principles, and not in its adherents, and it must be remembered that Menno and his followers expressly repudiated the distinctive doctrines of the Munster Anabaptists.

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  • They have never aimed at any social or political revolution, and have been as remarkable for sobriety of conduct as the Munster sect was for its fanaticism (see Mennonites).

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  • In English history frequent reference is made to the Anabaptists during the 16th and 17th centuries, but there is no evidence that any considerable number of native Englishmen ever adopted the principles of the Munster sect.

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  • Ottius, Annales Anabaptistici (Basileae, 1772); Karl Rembert, Die Wiedertdufer in Herzogtum Julich (Munster, 1873); Universal Lexicon, art.

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  • Glossner, Nikolaus von Cusa and Marius Nizolius als Vorldufer der neueren Philosophie (Munster, 1891); F.

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  • He was employed at the congress of Munster, where he remained after the signing of peace in 1648 as charge d'affaires until his death on the 5th of October of the next year.

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  • See Stoy, Kurzer Abriss der Geschichte Mindens (Minden, 18 79); BSlische, Skizzen aus Mindens Vergangenheit (Minden, 1897); Holscher, Beschreibung des vormaligen Bistumes Minden (Munster, 1 877).

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  • The crossing of the river here was guarded and disputed from the earliest times, and, the name of the town is derived from a king of Munster killed here in the 2nd century.

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  • in Kirchengeschichtliche Studien (Munster, 1903); F.

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  • Frankfurt has a good prison on the Pentonville (London) plan; so has Hamburg; and new buildings have been erected at Wohlan, Siegburg, Breslau and Munster.

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  • Schluter (Munster, 1838); and in Floss's Opera omnia; there is a German translation by Ludwig Noack, Johannes Scotus Erigena fiber die Eintheilung der Natur (3 vols., 1874-1876).

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  • In Germany there are the Westphalian Aa, rising in the Teutoburger Wald, and joining the Werre at Herford, the Munster Aa, a tributary of the Ems, and others.

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  • Of its edifices the most remarkable are the Roman Catholic parish church of St Martin, known also as the Munster, dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, the Lutheran parish church (15th century), the former Dominican monastery (1232-1289), known as "Unterlinden" and now used as a museum, the Kaufhaus (trade-hall) of the 15th century, and the handsome government offices (formerly the Prefecture).

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  • The principal medieval building in Bern is the (now Protestant) Munster, begun in 1421 though not completed till 1573.

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  • Heft (Munster, 1903), reprints Processus legationis in Angliam.

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  • (34 vols., Munster i.w., beginning 1890); Handbooks on the History of Religions, ed.

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  • One of the most notable of these radical anti-ecclesiastical movements was that of the Zwickau prophets, (Marcus Stiibner, Nikolaus Storch and Thomas Munzer): the most vigorous and notorious that of the Munster Anabaptists.

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  • But if they are not typical of Anabaptism, still less are the later representatives of the movement in the last sad months at Munster.

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  • In the second place, the persecution deprived the Anabaptists of the noble leaders who had preached non-resistance and at the same time provoked others to an attitude of vengeance which culminated in the horrors of Munster.

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  • 1534) by name, who, prophesying a speedy end of the world and establishment of the kingdom of heaven, obtained many adherents, and despatched Boekebinder and de Kniper to Munster.

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  • All who did not embrace Anabaptism were driven from Munster (1533), and Bernt Knipperdolling (ca.

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  • John (Johann Bockelson) of Leiden (1510-1536) took his place and the town became the scene of the grossest licence and cruelty, until in 1535 it was taken by the besieging bishop. Unhappily the Anabaptists have always been remembered by the crimes of John of Leiden and the revelry of Munster.

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  • After Munster had fallen the harassed remnants of the Anabaptists were gathered together under Menno Simonis, who joined them in 1537.

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  • Georg, Count Munster >>

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  • Steinmann, takes a wider survey in a pamphlet on the north Galatian side of the controversy (Die A bfassungszeit des Galaterbrief es, Munster, i.

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  • Schafer (Munster, 1890) and F.

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  • The Jansenist and Gallican influence was also strongly felt in Italy and in Germany, where Breviaries based on the French models were published at Cologne, Munster, Mainz and other towns.

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  • by rail of Osnabruck, and at the junction of main lines to Munster, Rotterdam and Emden.

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  • In order to improve his knowledge of the Roman ritual he spent four years with Malchus, bishop of Lismore (in Munster), a strong advocate of Romanism.

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  • After the sack of that place by the king of Ulster he withdrew into Munster; here he was kindly received by Cormac MacCarthy, with whose assistance he built the monastery of Ibrach (in Kerry).

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  • At the congress of Munster (1643) he refused to make the independence of Portugal a condition of 1 Philip I., II.

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  • Schafer (Munster, 1891) and Cornely (Paris, 1896) may be added.

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  • The Crawford School of Science (1885); and the Munster Dairy and Agricultural School, 1 m.

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  • The principal clubs are the County and the Southern in South Mall, and the City in Grand Parade; while for sport there are the Cork Golf Club, Little Island, three rowing clubs, and the Royal Munster and Royal Cork Yacht clubs, the latter located at Queenstown.

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  • (Munster, 1902) is dreary but epoch-making; Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, Jahrgang 166, 857-869 (Berlin, 1904); R.

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  • for the peace of Munster (1648) in spite of his opposi tion.

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  • Supported by several septs of Munster and Connaught, and assisted also by English contingents and by the MacDonnells of Antrim, O'Neill took the castle of Ballyshannon, and after devastating a large part of Tyrconnel he encamped at Knockavoe, near Strabane.

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  • In 1537 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald and his five uncles were executed for rebellion in Munster, and the English government made every effort to lay hands also on Gerald, the youthful heir to the earldom of Kildare, a boy of twelve years of age who was in the secret custody of his aunt Lady Eleanor McCarthy.

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  • While Hugh Roe was attempting to retake the latter place in 1601, he heard that a Spanish force had landed in Munster.

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  • AUGUST POTTHAST (1824-1898), German historian, was born at Hbxter on the 13th of August 1824, and was educated at Paderborn, Munster and Berlin.

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  • 1539), duke of Cleves and count of La Marck, whose male line became extinct with the death of John William, bishop of Munster, in 1609.

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  • A few of his followers who landed were cut off, and he went on to Ireland to join the earl of Desmond in Munster.

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  • That such terms could be imposed shows the strength of Poynings arm, and his vigour was equally evident when Warbeck came ashore in Munster in July 1493.

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  • landed near Waterford, and he here received the hostages of the people of Munster.

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  • At the same time, and as part of the same general plan, a canal, the Dortmund-Ems Canal, was dug to connect the river (from Munster) with Herne in the Westphalian coal-field.

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  • St Mary Magdalen's, Munster Square, in London.

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  • The Antrim Presbytery gradually became Arian; the same type of theology affected more or less the Southern Association, known since 1806 as the Synod of Munster.

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  • In 1910 the Antrim Presbytery, Remonstrant Synod and Synod of Munster were united as the General Synod of the non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland.

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  • (d) Munster (southwestern division): Counties Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary, Waterford.

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  • This is further borne out by the percentages given in the above table, from which it will be seen that the greatest proportional decrease of population has occurred in the two provinces of Munster and Connaught, which may be regarded as almost purely agricultural.

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  • The "Golden Vale" in Munster, which stretches from Cashel in Tipperary to near Limerick, probably forms the most fertile part of the country.

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  • Of the total holdings under 30 acres considerably more than one-third are in Ulster, and of the holdings over 30 acres more than one-third are in Munster.

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  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

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  • The growing of these crops is confined almost entirely to Leinster and Munster.

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  • They also reorganized the Albert Agricultural College at Glasnevin for young men who have neither the time nor the means to attend the highly specialized courses at the Royal College of Science; and the Munster Institute at Cork is now devoted solely to the instruction of girls in such subjects as butter-making, poultry-keeping, calf-rearing, cooking, laundry-work, sewing and gardening.

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  • Perhaps the chief success of the society was seen in the establishment of creameries, which at the end of 1905 numbered 275-123 in Ulster, 102 in Munster, 20 in Leinster and 30 in Connaught.

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  • Under this act between 1885 and 1902, when further proceedings were suspended, the number of loans issued was 2 5,3 6 7 (4221 in Leinster; 5204 in Munster; 12,954 in Ulster, and 2988 in Connaught) and the amount was £9,99 2, 53 6.

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  • Between August 1891 and April 1906, the number of loans issued under the acts of 1891 and 1896 was 40,395 (7838 in Leinster; 7512 in Munster; 14,955 in Ulster, and 10,090 in Connaught) and the amount was £11,573,952.

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  • The newcomers probably overran the whole island, subduing but not exterminating the older race with which they doubtless intermarried freely, as pre-Celtic types are frequent among the populations of Connaught and Munster at the present day.

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  • Munster and W.

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  • Munster) appears to be older than the historical period, and may be due to the Goidels.

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  • The Iverni must have been a nation of considerable importance, as they play a prominent part in the historical period, where they are known as the Ernai or Eraind of Munster.

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  • A third band, the Firbolg proper, took possession of Munster.

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  • However, after two battles the newcomers succeeded in overcoming the older race; and two brothers, Eber Find and Eremon, divided the island between them, Eber Find taking east and west Munster, whilst Eremon received Leinster and Connaught.

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  • Lugaid, son of the brother of Miled, took possession of south-west Munster.

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  • A grandson of Tuathal's, the famous Conn Cetchathach (" the hundred-fighter "), whose death is placed in the year 177 after a reign of about twenty years, was constantly at war with the Munster ruler Eogan Mor, also called Mog Nuadat, of the race of Eber Find.

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  • Eogan had subdued the Ernai and the Corco Laigde (descendants of Lugaid son of Ith) in Munster, and even the supreme king was obliged to share the island with him.

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  • They settled in Munster where their name still survives in the barony of Decies (Co.

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  • In this connexion it may be noted that practically all the Milesian pedigrees converge on three ancestors in the 2nd century - Conn Cetchathach king of Tara, Cathair Mor of Leinster, and Ailill Aulom of Munster, - whilst in scarcely any of them are mythological personages absent when we go farther back than A.D.

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  • the Eraind and Corcu Loegdi of Munster and the Ulidians with the Milesians of Tara.

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  • These divisions were: Ulster with Emain Macha as capital, Connaught with Cruachu as residence, north Munster from Slieve Bloom to north Kerry, south Munster from south Kerry to Waterford, and Leinster consisting of the two kingdoms of Tara and Ailinn.

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  • The relationship of Munster and Leinster to the Tara dynasty is not so easy to define.

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  • When we turn to Munster we find that Cashel was the seat of power in historical times.

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  • The legendary account attributes the subjugation of the various peoples inhabiting Munster to Mog Nuadat, and the pedigrees are invariably traced up to ` his son Ailill Aulom.

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  • The allegiance of the rulers of Munster to Niall and his descendants can at the best of times only have been nominal.

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  • These were (1) Munster with Cashel as centre, (2) Connaught, (3) Ailech, (4) Oriel, (5) Ulidia, (6) Meath, (7) Leinster, (8) Ossory.

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  • Wellknown fairy queens are Clidna (south Munster) and Aibell (north Munster).

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  • For instance, Fedilmid, king of Munster and archbishop of Cashel, took the opportunity of the misfortunes of the country to revive the claims of the Munster dynasty to be kings of Ireland.

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  • If evidence were needed it is only necessary to point to the names of three of the Irish provinces, Ulster, Leinster, Munster, which are formed from the native names (Ulaid, Laigin, Muma-n) with the addition of Norse staor; and the very name by which the island is now generally known is Scandinavian in form (Ira-land, the land of the Irish).

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  • We have already seen that the dominant race in Munster traced descent from Ailill Aulom.

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  • About the year 920 a Viking named Tomrair, son of Elgi, had seized the lower Shannon and established himself in Limerick, from which point constant incursions were made into all parts of Munster.

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  • Receiving the support of several of the native tribes, he felt himself in a position to attack the settlements of the foreigners in Munster.

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  • This decisive victory gave the Dalcais Limerick, which they sacked and burnt, and Mathgamain then took hostages of all the chiefs of Munster.

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  • A conspiracy was formed between Ivar and his son Dubcenn and the two Munster chieftains Donoban and Maelmuad.

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  • After this battle Brian was acknowledged king of all Munster (978).

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  • During these years there were frequent trials of strength between the ardri and the king of Munster.

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  • In 992 Brian invaded Meath, and four years later Maelsechlainn defeated Brian in Munster.

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  • When everything was ready he entered Mag Breg with an army consisting of his own troops, those of Ossory, his South Connaught vassals and the Norsemen of Munster.

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  • To meet such formidable opponents, Brian, now an old man unable to lead in person, mustered all the forces of Munster and Connaught, and was joined by Maelsechlainn in command of the forces of Meath.

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  • However, the effects of Brian's revolution were permanent; the prescriptive rights of the Hy Neill were disputed, and from the battle of Clontarf until the coming of the Normans the history of Ireland consisted of a struggle for ascendancy between the O'Brians of Munster, the O'Neills of Ulster and the O'Connors of Connaught.

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  • Munster and Meath were repeatedly ravaged, and in 11 51 he crushed Tordelbach (Turlough) O'Brian, king of Thomond, at Moanmor.

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  • The Irish writers tell little about these great !events, except that the king of the Saxons took the hostages of Munster at Waterford, and of Leinster, Ulster, Thomond and Meath at Dublin.

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  • He bridled Connaught by a castle at Athlone, and Munster by a garrison at Leighlin Bridge.

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  • Seizing the opportunity, English adventurers proposed to plant a military colony in the western half of Munster, holding the coast from the Shannon to Cork harbour.

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  • Sir Peter had great but undefined claims in Munster also, and the people there took warning.

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  • The presidency of Munster, an office the creation of which had long been contemplated, was then conferred on Sir John Perrot, who drove James "Fitzmaurice" Fitzgerald into the mountains, reduced castles everywhere, and destroyed a Scottish contingent which had come from Ulster to help the rebels.

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  • The colonizing scheme was dropped, and the first presidency of Munster left the Desmonds and their allies in possession.

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  • Sir William Drury in Munster hanged four hundred persons in one year, Sir Nicholas Malby in reducing the Connaught Burkes spared neither young nor old, and burned all corn and houses.

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  • Roused at last, Elizabeth sent over Ormonde as general of Munster, and after long delay gave him the means of conducting a campaign.

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  • Sir John Norris, famed in the Netherland wars, was president of Munster, and so impressed the Irish that they averred him to be in league with the devil.

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  • The colonization of the Munster forfeitures was undertaken at this time.

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  • Tyrone more than held his own in the north, completely defeated Sir Henry Bagnal in the battle of the Yellow Ford (1598), invaded Munster, and ravaged the lands of Lord Barrymore, who had remained true to his allegiance.

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  • In 1600 Sir George Carew became president of Munster, and, as always happened when the crown was well served, the rebellion was quickly put down.

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  • The Connaught g g y g tr and Munster landowners were shamelessly forced to Strafford.

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  • The following description by a resident in Munster was published in The Times of the 5th of November 1885: " Boycotting means that a peaceable subject of the queen is denied food and drink, and that he is ruined in his business; that his cattle are unsaleable at fairs; that the smith will not shoe his horse, nor the carpenter mend his cart; that old friends pass him by on the other side, making the sign of the cross; that his children are hooted at the village school; that.

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  • Baumgartner, Die Philosophie des Alanus de Insulis (Munster, 1896).

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  • Ziegler, Irenaeus, der Bischof von Lyon (Berlin, 1871); Friedrich Loofs, Irenaeus-Handschriften (Leipzig, 1888); Johannes Werner, Der Paulinismus des Irenaeus (Leipzig, 1889); Johannes Kunze, Die Gotteslehre des Irenaeus (Leipzig, 1891); Ernst Klebba, Die Anthropologie des heiligen Irenaeus (Munster, 1894); Albert Dufourcq, Saint Irenee (Paris, 1904); Franz Stoll, Die Lehre des Heil.

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  • The diet of Regensburg, under the mediation of Maximilian of Bavaria, decided in favor of peace with France, and on the25th of December 1641 the preliminary settlement at Hamburg fixed the opening of negotiations to take place at Munster and Osnabruck.

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  • See Boost, Die Weissagungen des Monchs Hermann zu Lehnin (Augsburg, 1848); Hilgenfeld, Die Lehninische Weissagung (Leipzig, 1875); Sabell, Literatur der sogenannten Lehninschen Weissagung (Heilbronn, 1879) and Kampers, Die Lehninsche Weissagung iiber das Haus Hohenzollern (Munster, 1897).

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  • 809), the first bishop of Munster.

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  • "ALEXANDER VON KLUCK (1846-), Prussian general, was born May 20 1846 at Munster in Westphalia.

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  • Behind the pub at the roundabout at the junction of Lillie Road, Munster Road & Dawes Road.

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  • The Wisconsin Dairy Artists suggest pairing merlot with mild-flavored cheeses such as Swiss, Monterey Jack, and Munster cheese.

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  • While there are many forms of Irish dance culturally, one in particular has captured the attention of audiences - the Munster form from southern Ireland.

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  • A war of manoeuvre on the middle Rhine ended in favour of the French, and the allies then turned against the territories of Cologne and Munster, while William, disappointed in his hopes of joining forces with his friends, made a bold, but in the end unsuccessful, raid on Charleroi (September-December 1672).

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  • The troops of Cologne and Munster formed part of his army, other friends of Louis were preparing to take the field, and after a severe winter campaign, the elector, defeated in combat and manoeuvre, was forced back to the Weser, and being but weakly supported by the Imperialists, found himself compelled to make a separate peace (June 6th, 1673).

    0
    1
  • This fortress fell on the 12th of November, and the troops of the coalition gained possession of an unbroken line from Amsterdam to the Breisgau, while Louis' German allies (Cologne and Munster), now isolated, had to make peace at once.

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  • Anabaptism of the Munster type repelled him.

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  • Anabaptism of the Munster type repelled him.

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