Munich sentence example

munich
  • His lectures and poems had now made him famous, and he was summoned to Munich where, in 1638, he became court chaplain to the elector Maximilian I.
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  • He took part in the excavations at Olympia in 1878, became an assistant in the Berlin Museum in 1880, and professor at Berlin (1884) and later at Munich.
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  • He fled from Munich, but found a ready welcome elsewhere.
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  • Aventinus, who has been called the "Bavarian Herodotus," wrote other books of minor importance, and a complete edition of his works was published at Munich (188'- 1886).
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  • That according to which they were set up at Munich was in the main suggested by Cockerell; in the middle of each pediment was a figure of Athena, set well back, and a fallen warrior at her feet; on each side were standing spearmen, kneeling spearmen and bowmen, all facing towards the centre of the composition; the corners were filled with fallen warriors.
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  • In 1901 Professor Furtwangler began a more systematic excavation of the site, and the new discoveries he then made, together with a fresh and complete study of the figures and fragments in Munich, have led to a rearrangement of the whole, which, if not certain in all details, may be regarded as approaching finality.
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  • Furtwangler and others, Aegina, Heiligtum der Aphaia (Munich, 1906), where earlier authorities are collected and discussed.
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  • On leaving school he determined to adopt the profession of engineering, and in the pursuance of this decision went to study in Munich in 1877.
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  • His boyhood was spent at Munich where his father, who owned electro-technical works, settled in the early 'eighties.
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  • Rumford was engaged in superintending the boring of cannon in the military arsenal at Munich, and was struck by the amount of heat produced by the action of the boring bar upon the brass castings.
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  • Goetz of Munich in a study entitled Die Quellen zur Geschichte des hl.
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  • Since then it has been discovered in other botanic gardens in various parts of Europe, its two most recent appearances being at Lyons (1901) and Munich (1905), occurring always in tanks in which the Victoria regia is cultivated, a fact which indicates that tropical South America is its original habitat.
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  • See Lehmann, Geschichte des Herzogtums Zweibriicken (Munich, 1867).
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  • Destined by his parents for the Roman Catholic priesthood, he studied theology at Munich, but felt an ever-growing attraction to philosophy.
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  • It was only after open defiance of the bishop of Regensburg that he obtained permission to continue his studies at Munich.
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  • Public opinion was now keenly excited; he received an ovation from the Munich students, and the king, to whom he owed his appointment, supported him warmly.
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  • In 1879 he was appointed president of the Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften (Academy of Sciences) at Vienna, and in 1896 succeeded von Sybel as chairman of the historical commission at Munich.
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  • He resigned all his appointments in 1874, and on the 7th of October 1876 died at Munich while attending the sittings of the historical commission.
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  • In 1823 he was appointed conservator of the physical cabinet at Munich, and in the following year he received from the king of Bavaria the civil order of merit.
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  • He died at Munich on the 7th of June 1826, and was buried near Reichenbach, whose decease had taken place eight years previously.
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  • Loserth, Geschichte des spateren Mittelalters (Munich and Berlin, 1903).
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  • After studying at the university of Munich he served in the Bavarian army from 1859 to 1872, when he retired with the rank of captain.
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  • In 1843 he became doctor of philosophy at Munich Observatory, where he was made professor in 1859.
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  • He was also a member of the Academies of Berlin and Munich.
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  • He was a strong Lutheran and exercised a powerful influence in that direction as court preacher in Dresden and as president of the Protestant consistory at Munich.
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  • King Ludwig of Bavaria was much struck with it, and in 1864 invited Wagner, who was then at Stuttgart, to come to Munich and finish his work there.
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  • On the 10th of June 1865 at Munich, Tristan and Isolde was produced for the first time, with Herr and Frau Schnorr in the principal parts.
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  • Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, first sketched in 1845, was completed in 1867 and first performed at Munich under the direction of Hans von Billow on the 21st of June 1868.
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  • The scheme for building a new theatre at Munich having been abandoned, there was no opera-house in Germany fit for so colossal a work.
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  • Having obtained the leave of the British government to accept the prince's offer, he received the honour of knighthood from George III., and during eleven years he remained at Munich as minister of war, minister of police, and grand chamberlain to the elector.
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  • In one day he caused no fewer than 2600 of these outcasts and depredators in Munich and its suburbs alone to be arrested by military patrols, and transferred by them to an industrial establishment which he had prepared for their reception.
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  • But he was quickly recalled to Bavaria, Munich being threatened at once by an Austrian and a French army.
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  • In 1834 the family moved to Munich, where the parents took leading roles in the classical German drama, until they retired from the stage: the mother in 1865 and the father in 1878.
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  • Felix Dahn studied law and philosophy in Munich and Berlin from 1849 to 1853.
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  • His first works were in jurisprudence, Ober die Wirkung der Klagver- :dhrung bei Obligationen (Munich, 1855), and Studien zur Geschichte der germanischen Gottesurteile (Munich, 1857).
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  • In 1857 he became docent in German law at Munich university, and in 1862 professor-extraordinary, but in 1863 was called to Wiirzburg to a full professorship. In 1872 he removed to the university of Konigsberg, and in 1888 settled at Breslau, becoming rector of the university in 1895.
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  • After a successful course of study at the College Rollin, he proceeded to Munich, where he attended the lectures of Schelling, and took his degree in philosophy in 1836.
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  • 1, and his review of "Les Evangiles synoptiques" in Das zwanzigste Jahrhundert (Munich, May 3, 1908) are full of facts and of deep thought; Fr.
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  • Munich, Erlangen, Coire and Leipzig became for brief successive intervals his home.
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  • With approximate certainty may be ascribed also to Tamas and Balint the original of the still extant transcript, by George Nemeti, of the Four Gospels, the Jciszay or Munich Codex (finished at Tatros in Moldavia in 1466).
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  • These remarkable researches of Fraunhofer, carried out in the years 1817-1823, are republished in his Collected Writings (Munich, 1888).
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  • In 1777 on the extinction of the other branch of the house of Wittelsbach, he became elector of Bavaria, and the Palatinate was henceforward united with Bavaria, the elector's capital being Munich.
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  • He was elected a full academician in 1888, and an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Munich.
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  • The first clinical laboratory seems to have been that of Von Ziemssen (1829-1902) at Munich, founded in 1885; and, although his example has not yet been followed as it ought to have been, enough has been done in this way, at Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere, to prove the vital importance of the system to the progress of modern medicine.
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  • Bavaria and Saxony, both Roman Catholic states, have no special spiritual hierarchy; in Bavaria, the archbishop of Munich and Freysing is ex officio bishop of the army.
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  • He remained at Giessen for twenty-eight years, until in 1852 he accepted the invitation of the Bavarian government to the ordinary chair of chemistry at Munich university, and this office he held, although he was offered the chair at Berlin in 1865, until his death, which occurred at Munich on the 10th of April 1873.
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  • The Munich MS., formerly at Bamberg, begins at line 85, and has many lacunae, but continues the history down to the last verse of St Luke's Gospel, ending, however, in the middle of a sentence.
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  • Stieve, Die Reichsstadt Kaufbeuren and die bayrische Restaurationspolitik (Munich, 1870); and Schroder, Geschichte der Stadt and Katholischen Pfarrei Kaufbeuren (Augsburg, 1903).
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  • Muraviev, who already carried his nomination in his pocket, resented this condescension, and relegated Isvolsky to Belgrade and to Munich, where he had the rank of a minister plenipotentiary.
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  • Munich lies at the centre of an important network of railways connecting it directly with Strassburg (for Paris), Cologne, Leipzig, Berlin, Rosenheim (for Vienna) and Innsbruck (for Italy via the Brenner pass), which converge in a central station.
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  • Munich is divided into twenty-four municipal districts, nineteen of which, including the old town, lie on the left bank of the Isar, while the suburban districts of Au, Haidhausen, Giesing, Bogenhausen and Ramersdorf are on the opposite bank.
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  • The old town, containing many narrow and irregular streets, forms a semicircle with its diameter towards the river, while round its periphery has sprung up the greater part of modern Munich, including the handsome Maximilian and Ludwig districts.
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  • The walls with which Munich was formerly surrounded have been pulled down, but some of the gates have been left.
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  • Munich owes its architectural magnificence largely to Louis I.
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  • Most of the modern buildings have been erected after celebrated prototypes of other countries and eras, so that, as has been said by Moriz Carriere, a walk through Munich affords a picture of the architecture and art of two thousand years.
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  • The architectural style which has been principally followed in the later public buildings, among them the law courts, finished in 1897, the German bank, St Martin's hospital, as well as in numerous private dwellings, is the Italian and French Rococo, or Renaissance, adapted to the traditions of Munich architecture in the 17th and 18th centuries.
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  • A large proportion of the most notable buildings in Munich are in two streets, the Ludwigstrasse and the Maximilianstrasse, the creations of the monarchs whose names they bear.
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  • It is imposing from its size, and interesting as one of the few examples of indigenous Munich art.
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  • Among the other churches of Munich the chief place is due to St Boniface's, an admirable copy of an early Christian basilica.
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  • St Peter's is interesting as the oldest church in Munich (12th century), though no trace of the original basilica remains.
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  • In addition to the museum of plaster casts, the Antiquarium (a collection of Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities under the roof of the new Pinakothek) and the Maillinger collection, connected with the historical museum, Munich also contains several private galleries.
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  • At the head of the educational institutions of Munich stands the university, founded at Ingolstadt in 1472, removed to Landshut in 1800, and transferred thence to Munich in 1826.
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  • Munich contains several gymnasia or grammar-schools, a military academy, a veterinary college, an agricultural college, a school for architects and builders, and several other technical schools, and a conservatory of music. The general prison in the suburb of Au is considered a model of its kind; and there is also a large military prison.
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  • The population of Munich in 1905 was 538,393.
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  • Munich is the seat of the archbishop of Munich-Freising and of the general Protestant consistory for Bavaria.
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  • Munich has long been celebrated for its artistic handicrafts, such as bronze-founding, glass-staining, silversmith's work, and wood-carving, while the astronomical instruments of Fraunhofer and the mathematical instruments of Traugott Lieberecht von Ertel (1778-1858) are also widely known.
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  • Lithography, which was invented at Munich at the end of the 18th century, is extensively practised here.
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  • Four important markets are held at Munich annually.
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  • The Bavarian dukes of the Wittelsbach house occasionally resided at Munich, and in 1255 Duke Louis made it his capital, having previously surrounded it with walls and a moat.
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  • In 1632 Munich was occupied by Gustavus Adolphus, and in 1705, and again in 1742, it was in possession of the Austrians.
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  • Munich's importance in the history of art is entirely of modern growth, and may be dated from the acquisition of the Aeginetan marbles by Louis I., then crown prince, in 1812.
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  • Among the eminent artists of this period whose names are more or less identified with Munich were Leo von Klenze (1784-1864), Joseph Daniel Ohlmiiller (1791-1839), Friedrich von Gartner (1792-1847), and Georg Friedrich Ziebland (1800-1873), the architects; Peter von Cornelius (1783-1867), Wilhelm von Kaulbach (1804-1874), Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld (1794-1872), and Karl Rottmann, the painters; and Ludwig von Schwanthaler, the sculptor.
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  • Munich is still the leading school of painting in Germany, but the romanticism of the earlier masters has been abandoned for drawing and colouring of a realistic character.
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  • Pecht, Geschichte der munchener Kunst im 19 Jahrhundert (Munich, 1888); and Trautwein, Fuhrer durch Munchen (20th ed., 1906).
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  • In south Germany appeared the Wurttembergische Nebenstunden (1718), and the Parnassus boicus, first published at Munich in 1722.
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  • Gersdorf's Repertorium, the Gelehrte Anzeigen of Gottingen and of Munich, Sand the Heidelbergische Jahrbucher were the sole survivors.
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  • The bishops, in their turn, had to exercise their temporal rights through lay vassals, of whom the most powerful in the course of the 12th century were the lords of Andechs, near Munich.
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  • Stein, Kulmbach and die Plassenburg in alter and newer Zeit (Kulmbach, 1903); Huther, Kulmbach and Umgebung (Kulmbach, 1886); and C. Meyer, Quellen zur Geschichte der Stadt Kulmbach (Munich, 1895).
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  • Stephani Frisingenses (15th century), which formerly belonged to the abbey of Weihenstephan, and is now at Munich, the childhood of Charlemagne is practically the same as that of many mythic heroes.
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  • In 1882 he resigned his professorship and utilized his thus increased leisure by travelling in Palestine and Egypt, and showed his interest in the Old Catholic movement by visiting Dellinger at Munich.
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  • Of these there are 8 in the British Museum, two at Vienna, 13 in the great Paris library, 15 at Munich.
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  • The Epistolae, which for the modern reader greatly exceed his other works in interest, have been edited by Demetriades (Vienna, 1792) and by Glukus (Venice, 1812), the Calvitii encomium by Krabinger (Stuttgart, 1834), the De providentia by Krabinger (Sulzbach, 1835), the De regno by Krabinger (Munich, 1825), and the Hymns by Flach (Tubingen, 1875).
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  • He received his general education at the City of London School, and his scientific education at the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, and at the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich.
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  • During 1883-6 he held the position of Privatdocent in the university of Munich.
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  • Lady Duff-Gordon published in 1861 an English translation of part of this book, to which are added lectures on the crusades delivered in Munich in 1858, under the title History and Literature of the Crusades.
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  • In 1856, on the recommendation of Ranke, Sybel accepted the post of professor at Munich, where King Maximilian II.
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  • (Munich, 1889-1894), a work of great importance, for he was allowed to use the Prussian state papers, and was therefore enabled to write a history of the greatest events of his own time with full access to the most secret sources of information.
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  • Some of Sybel's numerous historical and political essays have been collected in Kleine historische Schriften (3 vols., 1863, 1869, 1881; new ed., 1897); Vortrage and Aufscitze (Berlin, 1874); and Vortrage and Abhandlungen, published after his death with a biographical introduction by C. Varrentrapp (Munich, 1897).
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  • Declining calls to Breslau, Tubingen, and thrice to Bonn, Hug continued at Freiburg for upwards of thirty years, taking an occasional literary tour to Munich, Paris or Italy.
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  • The course of the journey was first northwards to Plombieres, then by Basel to Augsburg and Munich, then through Tirol to Verona and Padua in Italy.
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  • In 1807 he became professor of chemistry and mineralogy at the university of Landshut, and in 1823 conservator of the mineralogical collections at Munich, where he was appointed professor of mineralogy three years later, on the removal thither of the university of Landshut.
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  • He retired in 1852, was ennobled by the king of Bavaria in 1854, and died at Munich on the 5th of March 1856.
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  • His collected works, including Ober den Einfluss der Chemie and Mineralogie (1824), Die Naturgeschichte des Mineralreichs (1842), Ober die Theorien der Erde (1844), were published at Munich in 1856.
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  • In conjunction with other scholars Waitz took a leading part in the publication of the Forschungen zur deutschen Geschichte (Munich, 1862 seq.), and in the Nordalbingische Studien, published in the Proceedings of the Schleswig-Holstein Historical Society (Kiel, 1844-1851).
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  • Revolutions broke out in Paris, Vienna, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Naples, Venice, Munich, Dresden and Budapest.
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  • The controversies excited by his Symbolik (1832) proved so unpleasant that in 1835 he accepted a call to the university of Munich.
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  • Out of nearly 700 current motor meters of various makes tested at Munich in 1902, only 319 had an error of less than 4%, whilst 259 had errors varying from 42 to io%.
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  • When in 1805 the principalities became part of Bavaria, Lang entered the Bavarian service (1806), was ennobled in 1808 and from 1810 to 1817 held the office of archivist in Munich.
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  • Lang's character, as can be gathered especially from a consideration of his behaviour at Munich, is darkened by many shadows.
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  • Maurer, Die Bekehrung des norwegischen Stammes (2 vols., Munich, 1855-1856); Bang, Udsigt over den norske Kirkes historie under Katholicismen (Christiania, 1887); P. Gams, Series episcoporum ecclesiae catholicae (Regensburg, 1873); C. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica medii aevi (2 vols., Munster, 1898, 1901); P. Hinschius, System des kath.
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  • His eldest Son, William Henry Perkin, who was born at Sudbury, near Harrow, on the 17th of June 1860, and was educated at the City of London School, the Royal College of Science, and the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich, became professor of chemistry at the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh, in 1887, and professor of organic chemistry at Owens College, Manchester, in 1892.
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  • The design, by August von Kreling (1819-1876), embraces fifteen bronze figures, all cast at the royal bronze foundry in Munich, the chief being a female figure with outstretched arms, from whose fingers the water falls in a fine spray.
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  • He then took his doctor's degree, and in 1826 became professor of theology at Munich, where he spent the rest of his life.
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  • About this time Dbllinger brought upon himself the animadversion of Heine, who was then editor of a Munich paper.
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  • In 1847, in consequence of the fall from power of the Abel ministry in Bavaria, with which he had been in close relations, he was removed from his professorship at Munich, but in 1849 he was invited to occupy the chair of ecclesiastical history.
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  • In some speeches delivered at Munich in 1861 he outspokenly declared his view that the maintenance of the Roman Catholic Church did not depend on the temporal sovereignty of the pope.
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  • It was in connexion with this question that Dollinger published his Past and Present of Catholic Theology (1863) and his Universities Past and Present (Munich, 1867).
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  • They were written by D6llinger in conjunction with Huber and Friedrich, afterwards professor at Munich.
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  • He headed a protest by forty-four professors in the university of Munich, and gathered together a congress at Nuremberg, which met in August 1870 and issued a declaration adverse to theVatican decrees.
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  • Dellinger was almost unanimously elected rector-magnificus of the university of Munich, and Oxford, Edinburgh and Marburg universities conferred upon him the honorary degree of doctor of laws and Vienna that of philosophy.
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  • He died in Munich, on the 14th of January 1890, at the age of ninety-one.
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  • During the dozen or more years he spent in Germany he was entrusted with several honourable and difficult missions, which brought him into contact with the courts of Dresden,Vienna, Munich and Wurttemberg, as well as with Napoleon.
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  • Other leading works are - in Munich, the "Virgin" sinking on her knees in adoration of the Divine Infant, who is lying in a garden within a rose trellis; in the Borghese gallery, Rome, a Peter Martyr; in Bologna, the frescoes in the church of St Cecilia, illustrating the life of the saint, all of them from the design of Raibolini, but not all executed by himself.
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  • He studied at Munich, and at an early age joined the Canons Regular at Polling, where, shortly after his ordination in 1717, he taught theology and philosophy.
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  • The succession of life from the earliest times as it was known at the close of the last century was treated by the same author in his Handbuch der Palciontologie (5 vols., Munich and Leipzig, 1876-1893).
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  • His architectural education was carried out successively in Hamburg, where later, upon his return from Greece, he built the Donner Museum, in Berlin, in Dresden, in Paris under Gau and in Munich under Gartner; afterwards he visited Italy and Greece.
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  • In Munich, to which he removed in 1806, he found a quiet residence.
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  • During the long stay at Munich (1806-1841) Schelling's literary activity seemed gradually to come to a standstill.
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  • His correspondence with Herwart von Hohenburg, unearthed by C. Anschiitz at Munich, was printed at Prague in 1886.
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  • He was successively on the editorial staff of the orwaerts in Berlin1898-1905and of other socialist newspapers at Nurnberg and Munich.
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  • 1918 Kurt Eisner was prosecuted at Munich on a charge of treason for inciting munition workers to strike.
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  • He was released from prison on the ground that he was a candidate for the Reichstag, and recovered his liberty in time to arrange the mass meeting on the Theresienwiese at Munich on Nov.
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  • A red-haired Jew, he possessed a magnetic and artistic temperament, and had various special methods of arousing and restraining the revolutionary masses, including orchestral and vocal concerts of high excellence in the formerly royal theatres and the opera house of Munich.
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  • This crime was speedily followed by the Bolshevist chaos into which Munich was for a brief period plunged in April.
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  • Plummer, 1871); "Janus," Der Pabst and das Konzil (Munich, 1869; Eng.
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  • In 1894 he retired from active work, and on the 10th of February 1901 he shot himself in a fit of depression at his home on the Starnberger See, near Munich.
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  • His attention was drawn to this subject about 1850 by the unhealthy condition of Munich.
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  • The handsome Roman Catholic cathedral for the diocese of Raphoe occupies a commanding site, and cost a large sum, as it contains carving from Rome, glass from Munich and a pulpit of Irish and Carrara marble.
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  • In 1852 he became professor of astronomy at the university of Munich, and held both these posts till his death, which took place on the 6th of August 1879.
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  • Fresh material having come to light, a new edition of the poems (Die Gedichte des Paulus Diaconus) has been edited by Karl Neff (Munich, 1908).
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  • Bluntschli, Geschichte des allgemeinen Staatsrechts (Munich, 1864).
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  • (Munich, 1901), §§ 49 0 -494.
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  • The foundations of St Anne of Munich and of St Anne of Wiirzburg for ladies are not properly orders.
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  • Faber, I Zur Hydrographie des Maingebiets (Munich, 1895), and Lill, Mainthal, Main and Mainschiffahrt (Berlin, 1904).
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  • � Ammianus Marcellinus, passim; Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum, book ii.; C. Zeuss, Die Deutschen and die Nachbarstc mme (Munich, 18 37), P p. 3 0 3 ff.
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  • In 1902 Prutz resigned the chair of history in the university of Konigsberg, which he had held since 1877, and took up his residence at Munich.
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  • Sow salading every ten days; also carrots, onions and radishes for drawing young; and chicory for salads; sow endive for a full crop. In the first week sow Early Munich and Golden Ball turnips for succession, and in the third week for a full autumn crop. Sow scarlet and white runner beans for a late crop, and cabbages for coleworts.
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  • The Isar does not become navigable till it has passed Munich; and the Lech is a stream of a similar size.
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  • Almost a quarter of the inhabitants live in towns, of which Munich and Nuremberg have populations exceeding 100,000, Augsburg, Wurzburg, Furth and Ludwigshafen between 50,000 and 100.,000, while twenty-six other towns number from 10,000 to 50,000 inhabitants.
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  • Among the Protestants the highest authority is the general consistory of Munich.
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  • The state has two Roman Catholic universities, Munich and Wurzburg, and a Lutheran, Erlangen; in Munich there are a polytechnic, an academy of sciences and an academy of art.
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  • The chief centres of industry are Munich, Nuremberg, Augsburg, Furth, Erlangen, Aschaffenburg, Regensburg, Wurzburg, Bayreuth, Ansbach, Bamberg and Hof in Bavaria proper, and in the Palatinate Spires and the Rhine port of Ludwigshafen.
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  • The main centres of the hardware industry are Munich, Nuremberg, Augsburg and Furth; the two first especially for locomotives and automobiles, the last for tinfoil and metal toys.
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  • Aschaffenburg manufactures fancy goods, Augsburg and Hof produce excellent cloth, and Munich has a great reputation for scientific instruments.
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  • Brewing forms an important industry, the best-known breweries being those of Munich, Nuremberg, Erlangen and Kulmbach.
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  • The royal family is Roman Catholic, and the seat of government is Munich, the capital.
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  • The upper house of the Bavarian parliament (Kammer der Reichsrdte) is composed of (I) the princes of the blood royal (being of full age), (2) the ministers of the crown, (3) the archbishops of Munich, Freising and Bamberg, (4) the heads of such noble families as were formerly "immediate" so long as they retain their ancient possessions in Bavaria, (5) of a Roman Catholic bishop appointed by the king for life, and of the president for the time being of the Protestant consistory, (6) of hereditary counsellors (Reichsreite) appointed by the king, and (7) of other counsellors appointed by the king for life.
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  • It consists, on a peace footing, of three army corps, Ist, IInd and IIIrd Royal Bavarian (each of two divisions), the headquarters of which are in Munich, Nuremberg and Wurzburg respectively.
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  • In 1392, when all the lines except those of Stephen and Albert had died out, an important partition took place, by which the greater part of the duchy was divided among Stephen's three sons, Stephen III., Frederick and John II., who founded respectively the lines of Ingolstadt, Landshut and Munich.
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  • The towns, assuming a certain independence, became strong and wealthy as trade increased, and the citizens of Munich and Regensburg were often formidable antagonists to the dukes.
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  • Both brothers were then engaged in warfare with the other branches of the family and with the citizens of Munich.
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  • His court at Munich was the resort of artists of all kinds, and the city was enriched with splendid buildings; while artistic works were collected from Italy and elsewhere.
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  • The price he had to pay, however, was the occupation of Bavaria itself by Austrian troops; and, though the invasion of Bohemia in 1744 by Frederick II of Prussia enabled him to return to Munich, at his death on the 20th of January 1745 it was left to his successor to make what terms he could for the recovery of his dominions.
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  • In 1792 the revolutionary armies overran the Palatinate; in 1795 the French, under Moreau, invaded Bavaria itself, advanced to Munich - where they were received with joy by the long-suppressed Liberals - and laid siege to Ingolstadt.
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  • But with the collapse of France the old fear and jealousy of Austria had revived in full force, and Bavaria only agreed to these cessions (treaty of Munich, April 16th, 1816) on Austria promising that, in the event of the powers ignoring her claim to the Baden succession in favour of that of the line of the counts of Hochberg, she should receive also the Palatinate on the right bank of the Rhine.
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  • At the congress of Aix (1818) the question of the Baden succession was settled in favour of the Hochberg line, without the compensation stipulated for in the treaty of Munich; and by the treaty of Frankfurt, signed on behalf of the four great powers on the 10th of July 1819, the territorial questions at issue between Bavaria and Austria were settled, in spite of the protests of the former, in the general sense of the arrangement made at Vienna.
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  • On the 13th of October 1825, he was succeeded by his son, Louis I, an enlightened patron of the arts and sciences, who transferred the university of Landshut to Munich, which, by his magnificent taste in building, he transformed into one of the most beautiful cities of the continent.
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  • Munich University, where Dollinger was professor, became the centre of the opposition to the new dogma, and the "old Catholics" were protected by the king and the government.
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  • In 1609 an English lady, Mary Ward, founded at Munich the " Institute of Mary," the nuns of which were not bound to enclosure.
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  • When the author was preparing to return from Berlin, the Royal Academy made him their guest at a public dinner, an unprecedented honour; and the universities of Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich united in a testimonial of regard.
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  • The same year he was appointed secretary to the Congregation super negotiis ecclesiae extraordinariis, in 1889 became papal nuncio at Munich and in 1892 at Vienna.
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  • The Bavarian system embraces 4642 m., and is controlled and managed, apart from the general direction in Munich, by ten traffic boards, in Augsburg, Bamberg, Ingolstadt, Kempten, Munich, Nuremberg, Regensburg, Rosenheim, Weiden and Wurzburg.
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  • On this point it must be borne in mind that the population of the larger towns, on account of the greater mobility of the population since the introduction of railways and the abolition of restrictions upon free settlement, has become more mixedBerlin, Leipzig, Hamburg, &c., showing proportionally more Roman Catholics, and Cologne, Frankfort-onMain, Munich more Protestants than formerly.
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  • As regards theology, Bonn, Breslau and Tubingen have both a Protestant and a Catholic faculty; Freiburg, Munich, Munster and Wurzburg are exclusively Catholic; and all the rest are Protestant.
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  • These schools are as follows: Berlin (Charlottenburg), Munich, Darmstadt, Karlsruhe, Hanover, Dresden, Stuttgart, Aix-la-Chapelle, Brunswick and Danzig; in 1908 they were attended by 14,149 students (2531 foreigners), and had a teaching staff of 753.
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  • For instruction in agriculture there are agricultural schools attached to several universitiesnotably Berlin, Halle, Göttingen, Konigsberg, J ena, Poppelsdorf near Bonn, Munich and Leipzig.
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  • For military science there are the academies of war (Kriegsakademien) in Berlin and Munich, a naval academy in Kid, and various cadet and non-commissioned officers schools.
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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
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  • 870 1606 sciences at Munich, 57 211 I 322 648 founded in 1759,
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  • Some large cities, notably Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg, Dresden, Leipzig and Munich, have, however, newspapers with a daily circulation of over 100,000 copies, and in the case of some papers in Berlin a million copies is reached.
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  • The picture galleries of Dresden, Munich and Cassel still rival that at Berlin, though the latter is rapidly becoming one of the richest in the world in works of the great masters, largely at the cost of the private collections of England.
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  • For the same reason the country is very well provided with excellent schools of painting and music. Of the art schools the most famous ar~ those of Munich, Dsseldorf, Dresden and Berlin, but there are others, e.g.
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  • Of these the most important are the conservatoires of Leipzig, Dresden, Berlin, Munich and Frankforton-Main.
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  • The coinage takes place in the six mints belonging to the various states thus Berlin (Prussia), Munich (Bavaria), Dresden (in the Muldenerhtte near Freibcrg, Saxony), Stuttgart (WUrttemberg), Karlsruhe (Baden) and Hamburg (for the state of Hamburg).
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  • Also articles by the above and others, chiefly in Zeitschrift fr Ethnologie (Berlin); Archin fr Anthropotogie (Brunswick); Globus (Brunswick); Westdeutsche Zeitschrift (Trier); Schriften der physikalischkonomischen Gesellschaft (Konigsberg); Nachrichten ber deutsche Altertumskunde (Berlin); Verhandlungen der Berliner Gesellschaft fr Ant hropologie, &c.; Beitrdge zur Ant hropologie Bayerns (Munich); and Zeitschrift fr deutsches Altertum (Berlin).
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  • This was founded at Munich in July 1609.
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  • In April he defeated Tilly at the crossing of the Lech, the imperialist general being mortally wounded during this fight, and then he took possession of Augsburg and of Munich.
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  • Having quickly assembled this, h drove the Saxons from Bohemia, and then marched towards Franconia, with the intention of crossing swords with his only serious rival, Gustavus Adolphus, who had left Munich when he heard that this foe had taken the field.
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  • The archbishop of Munich had published the Vatican decrees without the Regium placetum, which was re~iuired by the constitution, and the government continued to treat Old Catholics as members of the Church.
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  • They demanded ~fut I additional taxation on the vast shops and stores, the stane growth of which in Berlin, Munich and other towns poliflk.
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  • Simonsfeld has written a life of Andrea Dandolo in German (Munich, 1876).
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  • In Ardnaree is the Roman Catholic cathedral (diocese of Killala), with an east window of Munich glass, and the ruins of an Augustinian abbey (1427) adjoining.
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  • Besides these the museums of Edinburgh, Liverpool, Manchester and Oxford are noteworthy in Great Britain for their Egyptian antiquities, as are those of St Petersburg, Vienna, Marseilles, Munich, Copenhagen, Palcrmo and Athens; there are also collections in most of the British colonies.
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  • Entering the university of Erlangen in 1843, he soon began to devote his attention to the history of the German language and literature, and in 1848 went to Munich, where he remained five years, and diligently availed himself of the use of the government library for the purpose of prosecuting his historical studies.
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  • Other panel portraits of the period are three small ones of members of the Tucher family at Weimar and Cassel, and the striking, restlessly elaborated half-length of Oswald Krell at Munich.
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  • In some devotional pictures of the time Diirer seems to have been much helped by pupils, as in the two different compositions of the Marks weeping over the body of Christ preserved respectively at Munich and Nuremberg.
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  • In an altarpiece at Ober St Veit and in the scattered wings of the Jabach altarpiece severally preserved at Munich, Frankfort and Cologne, the workmanship seems to be exclusively that of journeymen working from his drawings.
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  • The period is closed, so far as paintings are concerned, by two examples of far higher value than those above named, that is to say the Paumgartner altarpiece at Munich, with its romantically attractive composition of the Nativity with angels and donors in the central panel, and the fine armed figures of St George and St Eustace (lately freed from the over-paintings which disfigured them) on the wings; and the happily conceived and harmoniously finished "Adoration of the Magi" in the Uffizi at Florence.
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  • It is possible, though not certain, that to this date also belongs the famous portrait of himself at Munich bearing a false signature and date, 150o; in this it has been lately shown that the artist modified his own lineaments according to a preconceived scheme of facial proportion, so that it must be taken as an ideal rather than a literal presentment of himself to posterity as he appeared in the flower of his early middle age.
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  • This altarpiece was afterwards replaced at Frankfort (all except the protraits of the donors, which remained behind) by a copy, while the original was transported to Munich, where it perished by fire in 1674.
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  • An interval of five years separates the Vienna "Madonna" from the two fine heads of the apostles Philip and James in the Uffizi at Florence, the pair of boys' heads painted in tempera on linen in the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris, the "Madonna with the Pink" at Augsburg, and the portrait of Wolgemut at Munich, all of 1516.
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  • This unequalled treasure of German art and invention has in later times been broken up, the part executed by Diirer being preserved at Munich, the later sheets, which were decorated by other hands, having been transported to Besancon.
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  • To the same period belong a pleasing but somewhat weak "Madonna and Child" at Florence; and finally, still in the same year 1526, the two famous panels at Munich embodying the only one of the great religious conceptions of the master's later years which he lived to finish.
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  • The Louvre also possesses some good examples, and many others are dispersed in various public collections, as in the Musee Bonnat at Bayonne, at Munich, Hamburg, Bremen, Frankfort, Dresden, Basel, Milan, Florence and Oxford, as well as in private hands all over Europe.
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  • Of the numerous paintings of Henry none is by Holbein, who, however, executed the striking chalk-drawing of Henry's head, now at Munich, and the famous but decaying cartoon at Devonshire House.
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  • Together with Dellinger, Alzog was instrumental in convoking the famous Munich assembly of Catholic scholars in 1863.
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  • An important series of tests was made in 1883 and 1887 at Munich by Professor Johann Bauschinger.
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  • He was a warm friend of learning, and in 1826 transferred the university of Landshut to Munich, where he placed it under his special protection.
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  • He was especially anxious to obtain works of art, mainly sculpture, for the famous Munich collections which he started, and in this he had the advantage of the assistance of the painter Martin Wagner.
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  • Not only did he erect the Propylcien at Munich in her honour, but he also helped her in the most generous way both with money and diplomatic resources.
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  • This was due to the king's relations with the Spanish dancer Lola Montez, who appeared in Munich in October 1846, and soon succeeded by her beauty and wit in fascinating the king, who was always susceptible to feminine charms. The political importance of this lay in the fact that the royal mistress began to use her great influence against the clerical policy of the Abel ministry.
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  • Meanwhile, the criticism and opposition of the people, and especially of the students, was turned against the new leader of the court of Munich.
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  • To him Munich owes her finest art collections and most remarkable buildings.
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  • To him Munich owes the acquisition of the famous Rhenish collection of the Boisseree brothers.
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  • As visible signs of his permanent services to art Munich possesses the Walhalla, the Glyptothek, the two Pinakotheken, the Odeon, the University, and many other magnificent buildings both sacred and profane.
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  • He died on the 28th of February 1868 at Nice, and on the 9th of March was buried in Munich, amid demonstrations of great popular feeling.
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  • He travelled by way of Munich, the Brenner and Lago di Garda to Verona and Venice, and from thence to Rome, where he arrived on the 29th of October 1786.
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  • He was trained, partly at Paris, for the profession of architect, but his opportune assistance to two German nobles in a tavern brawl obtained for him a nomination to the military school of Munich.
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  • From 1800 to 1826 the university, formerly at Ingolstadt and now at Munich, was located at Landshut.
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  • See Staudenraus, Chronik der Stadt Landshut, (Landshut 1832); Wiesend, Topographische Geschichte von Landshut (Landshut, 1858); Rosenthal, Zur Rechtsgeschichte der Steidle Landshut and Straubing (Wiirzberg, 1883); Kalcher, Fiihrer durch Landshut (Landshut, 1887); Haack, Die gotische Architektur and Plastik der Stadt Landshut (Munich, 1894); and Geschichte der Stadt Landshut (Landshut, 1835).
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  • It has an arcade with frescoes, restored by modern Munich artists, and contains a magnificent hall - the Fiirstensaalrichly decorated with wood-carving and stained-glass windows.
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  • Bavaria has four cellular prisons, the chief being at Munich and Nuremberg, but the collective system also obtains.
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  • Donauwdrth grew up in the course of the I ith and 12th centuries under the protection of the castle of Mangoldstein, became in the 13th a seat of the duke of Upper Bavaria, who, however, soon withdrew to Munich to escape from the manes of his wife Maria of Brabant, whom he had there beheaded on an unfounded suspicion of infidelity.
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  • In 1856 he became a Privat-docent, and in 1858 extraordinary professor at Leipzig; in 1861 professor of philology and archaeology at Tubingen; in 1864 professor of classical antiquities at Zurich; in 1869 at Jena, where he was also director of the archaeological museum; in 1874 at Munich, where he remained until his death on the 21st of September 1883.
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  • He studied theology at Göttingen, Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich, and was ordained priest in 1844.
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  • It is an important junction for railways to all parts of Germany, and is on the main line from Cologne and Frankfort-on-Main to Munich, Vienna and Eger.
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  • In 1835 he communicated to the Munich academy of sciences his researches on the physiology of generation and development, including the famous discovery of the germinal vesicle of the human ovum.
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  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.
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  • C. Rntgen of Munich made in 1896 his remarkable discovery of the so-called X or Rntgen rays, a class of radiation produced by the impact of the cathode particles against an impervious metallic screen or anticathode placed in the vacuum tube.
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  • Naue, Die vorroniischen Schwerter (Munich, 1903), p. 25.
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  • In 1805 he became professor of classical literature in the university of Landshut, where he remained till 1826, when it was transferred to Munich.
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  • After spending the winter at Florence and Rome, he left in the spring of 1823 for Munich, where he stayed for nearly a year, the prey of illness and isolation.
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  • It has extensive breweries and vies in the amount of the output of this production with Munich.
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  • In music Berlin is not able to vie with Leipzig, Dresden or Munich, yet it is well represented by the Conservatorium, with which the name of Joachim is connected, while the more modern school is represented by Xaver Scharwenka.
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  • Having studied jurisprudence and political economy at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg, Munich and Berlin, he entered the legal career at Cologne, and immediately devoted his attention to financial and commercial questions.
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  • Zeuss, Die Deutschen and die Nachbarstamme (Munich, 1837).
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  • He and his companions - Michael of Cesena, general of the order, and Bonagratiamanaged to escape, and found their way to Munich, where they aided Louis IV.
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  • He probably died at Munich in 1349.
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  • Five years later he was appointed professor of chemistry at Strassburg, and in 1875 he migrated in the same capacity to Munich.
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  • Finally, all idea of the divine vanished, and the artists merely presented her as the type of a beautiful woman, with oval face, full of grace and charm, languishing eyes, and laughing mouth, which replaced the dignified severity and repose of the older forms. The most famous of her statues in ancient times was that at Cnidus, the work of Praxiteles, which was imitated on the coins of that town, and subsequently reproduced in various copies, such as the Vatican and Munich.
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  • Prosperous villages and handsome villas stud its shores, and it is one of the most frequented summer resorts in the vicinity of Munich.
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  • The landscape, with its mysterious spiry mountains and winding waters, is very Leonardesque both in this picture and in another contemporary product of the workshop, or as some think of Leonardo's hand, namely a very highly and coldly finished small "Madonna with a Pink" at Munich.
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  • There he organized a school which, under him, soon became one of the most flourishing in the north of Europe, but a disagreement with Marshal Munich led him, in spite of the empress's offers of high advancement, to return to central Europe in 1765.
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  • Not merely in Spain, but in every land where Spanish is spoken, and in cities as remote from Madrid as Munich and Stockholm, he has met with an appreciation incomparably beyond that accorded to any other Spanish dramatist of recent years.
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  • In 1779 he visited Munich as member of the privy council, but after a short stay there differences with his colleagues and with the authorities of Bavaria drove him back to Pempelfort.
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  • Soon after his return to Germany, Jacobi received a call to Munich in connexion with the new academy of sciences just founded there.
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  • The loss of a considerable portion of his fortune induced him to accept this offer; he settled in Munich in 1804, and in 1807 became president of the academy.
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  • The following year Cousin went to Munich, where he met Schelling for the first time, and spent a month with him and Jacobi, obtaining a deeper insight into the Philosophy of Nature.
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  • Coming of a Roman Catholic family, young Acton was educated at Oscott till 1848 under Dr (afterwards Cardinal) Wiseman, and then at Edinburgh, and at Munich under Dellinger, whose lifelong friend he became.
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  • As early as August 1862, Cardinal Wiseman publicly censured the Review; and when in 1864, after D0111nger's appeal at the Munich Congress for a less hostile attitude towards historical criticism, the pope issued a declaration that the opinions of Catholic writers were subject to the authority of the Roman congregations, Acton felt that there was only one way of reconciling his literary conscience with his ecclesiastical loyalty, and he stopped the publication of his monthly periodical.
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  • In 1872 he had been given the honorary degree of doctor of philosophy by Munich University; in 1888 Cambridge gave him the honorary degree of LL.D., and in 1889 Oxford the D.C.L.; and in 1890 he was made a fellow of All Souls.
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  • Nationalokonomik (Munich, 1874), pp. 21-28; and works quoted under Scholasticism.
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  • The Munich collection was presented to the king of Bavaria by Clot Bey, the chief physician in the Egyptian army during its occupation of Syria; and for a number of the other manuscripts we are indebted to the elder Niebuhr.
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  • In 1802 the see was secularized, the bulk of its territories being assigned to Bavaria and the rest to Salzburg, of which Freising had been a suffragan bishopric. In 1817 an archbishopric was established at Freising, but in the following year it was transferred to Munich.
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  • The occupant of the see is now called archbishop of Munich and Freising.
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  • Weber, Das Thal Passeyr and seine Bewohner mit besonderer Riicksicht auf Andreas Hofer and das Jahr 180p (Innsbruck, 1851); Rapp, Tirol im Jahr 1809 (Innsbruck, 1852); Weidinger, Andreas Hofer and seine Kampfgenossen (3rd ed., Leipzig, 1861); Heigel, Andreas Hofer (Munich, 1874); Stampfer, Sandwirt Andreas Hofer (Freiburg, 1874); Schmolze, Andreas Hofer and seine Kampfgenossen (Innsbruck, 1900).
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  • The noble collection of paintings which formerly adorned the Dusseldorf gallery was removed to Munich in 1805, and has not since been restored; but there is no lack of artistic treasures in the town.
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  • The Rondanini Medusa at Munich is a famous specimen of this conception.
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  • Below Munich the stream is 140 to 350 yards wide, and is studded with islands.
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  • On its banks lie the cities of Munich and Landshut, and the venerable episcopal see of Freising, and the inhabitants of the district it waters are reckoned the core of the Bavarian race.
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  • See C. Gruber, Die Isar nach ihrer Entwickelung and ihren hydrologischen Verhaltnissen (Munich, 1889); and Die Bedeutung der Isar als Verkehrsstrasse (Munich, 1890).
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  • He entered the diplomatic service in 1895 and after having been Prussian minister at Munich, German ambassador at Rome, and German minister at The Hague, was appointed in 1913 Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
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  • In 1920 he published a memorandum endeavouring to justify his policy during the war, and he followed it with interesting disclosures regarding the attitude of the Vatican in 1917 and the mission of the papal legate in Munich, Pacelli, to Berlin.
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  • In 1826, when the new university was opened at Munich, he was appointed professor of philosophy and speculative theology.
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  • It was a few years since the most numerously attended of any university in Germany, but it has since been outstripped by those of Berlin and of Munich.
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  • He became professor of mathematics in the Jesuits' college at Cologne in 1817 and in the polytechnic school of Nuremberg in 1833, and in 1852 professor of experimental physics in the university of Munich, where he died on the 7th of July 1854.
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  • In 1853 he was appointed professor at the university of Munich, where he lectured mainly on aesthetics.
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  • He died in Munich on the 19th of January 1895.
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  • A full account of the diplomatic history from 1863 to 1866 is given by Sybel in Die Begriindung des deutschen Reichs (Munich, 1889-1894), written with the help of the Prussian archives.
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  • Of German biographies may be mentioned Hans Blum, Bismarck and seine Zeit (6 vols., Munich, 1894-1895), with a volume of appendices, &c. (1898); Heyck, Bismarck (Bielefeld, 1898); Kreutzer, Otto von Bismarck (2 vols., Leipzig, 1900); Klein-Hattingen, Bismarck and seine Welt, 1815-1871, Bd.
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  • The society has never thriven in Germany, though a few houses have been founded there, in Munich and Vienna.
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  • On the downfall of the Napoleonic regime Eugene retired to Munich, where he continued to reside, with the title duke of Leuchtenberg and prince of Eichstadt.
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  • In 1870 the subject of refrigeration was investigated by Professor Carl Linde of Munich, who was the first to consider the question from a thermodynamic point of view.
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  • The results are published in Vergleichende Versuche an Kdltemaschinen, by Schroeter, Munich, 1890, and in Nos.
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  • The most powerful party in Bavaria, the Bavarian Volkspartei, was then in a state of much anxiety as a result of the experiences of Bolshevism, anarchy and violence through which Munich had passed in the spring of 1919.
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  • The Kapp coup in Berlin, which in some of its aspects sprang from similar anxieties in Prussia, gave the signal for political action in Munich, and at a midnight sitting the Bavarian Socialist Ministry was somewhat unceremoniously hustled out of office - it is alleged under military pressure - and a Coalition Cabinet under von Kahr installed.
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  • Gustavus then liberated and garrisoned the long-oppressed Protestant cities of Augsburg and Ulm, and in May occupied Munich.
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  • Police said they had arrested 45 demonstrators who tried to enter Munich to join the ad-hoc protests.
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  • Given the subject matter, Munich is a huge disappointment.
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  • Great title from the man credited with starting the US running boom with his apparently effortless 1972 Olympic title in Munich.
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  • If Venus had looked inconsolable in New York, she looked positively narked in Munich.
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  • This seemed odd, given that the game was taking place in Munich.
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  • Paris Munich the company is.
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  • The Royal Ballet has a very interesting repertory, and so does the ballet company of the Bavarian State Opera in Munich.
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  • Chants included We beat the scum, Munich song, Marching on together, we are Leeds.
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  • In Munich too, a spontaneous upsurge was developing.
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  • This method of observation was very successfully employed, under Seeliger at Munich, in an extensive series of meridian observations, and, under the auspices of the Geodetic Institute at Potsdam, in telegraphic longitude operations.
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  • The most distinguished among the latter was D6llinger, who resisted all the advances of Mgr Scherr, archbishop of Munich, was excommunicated on the 17th of April 1871, and died unreconciled, though without joining any separate group. After him must be mentioned Friedrich of Munich, several professors of Bonn, and Reinkens of Breslau, who was the first bishop of the " Old Catholics."
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  • Heinrich Wilhelm August, Freiherr von Gagern (1799-1880), the third son, was born at Bayreuth on the 20th of August 1 799, educated at the military academy at Munich, and, as an officer in the service of the duke of Nassau, fought at Waterloo.
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  • Little was known of the history of the empire of Trebizond until the subject was taken in hand by Professor Fallmerayer of Munich, who discovered the chronicle of Michael Panaretus among the books of Cardinal Bessarion, and from that work, and other sources of information which were chiefly unknown up to that time, compiled his Geschichte des Kaiserthums von Trapezunt (Munich, 1827).
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  • Fallmerayer, Geschichte des Kaiserthums von Trapezunt (Munich, 1827); also Fragmente aus dem Orient, vol.
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