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multitude

multitude

multitude Sentence Examples

  • Merrill Cooms was in his early seventies, a widow and the somewhat reclusive owner of a multitude of businesses.

  • Out there in the woods lay a multitude of plants she wanted to see, and no slithering reptile was going to stand in her way.

  • The northern slope of this great plateau is drained by the AraguayaTocantins, Xingu, Tapajos and Guapore-Mamore-Madeira, which flow northward, and, except the first, empty into the Amazon; the southern slope drains southward through a multitude of streams flowing into the Parana and Paraguay.

  • " I take my walk every day through the confusion of a great multitude with as much freedom and quiet as you could find in your rural avenues."

  • The multitude of species and the many intermediate forms render their exact limitation difficult, but those presenting sufficiently marked characters to justify specific rank probably approach 300 in number.

  • He died before it was completed, but it was finished by Sargon, who reduced the city, deported its inhabitants, and established within it a mixed multitude of settlers (who were the ancestors of the modern Samaritans).

  • Despite the multitude of slaves, hired labour was often needed, especially at harvest.

  • multitude enough to occupy the whole peninsula.

  • Thus the titular king of Italy found himself simultaneously at war with those great vassals who had chosen him from their own class, with the turbulent factions of the Roman aristocracy, with unruly bishops in the growing cities and with the multitude of minor counts and barons who occupied the open lands, and who changed sides according to the interests of the moment.

  • Berengar stood alone against a multitude, unanimous in their intolerance of discipline.

  • The tyrants general policy was to favor the multitude at the expense of his own caste.

  • They rested in large measure on the favor of the multitude, Chan~ and pursued a policy of sacrificifig to their interests In type the nobles.

  • The fact - assumed without any attempt at justification by argument - that, in spite of the multitude of logical reasons for scepticism, we do know, truth and beauty, makes Balfour a theist.

  • 3 Leibnitz's doctrine of continuity necessarily led him in the same direction; and, of the infinite multitude of monads with which he peopled the world, each is supposed to be the focus of an endless process of evolution and involution.

  • The Orphic poems also played an important part in the controversies between Christian and pagan writers in the 3rd and 4th centuries after Christ; pagan writers quoted them to show the real meaning of the multitude of gods, while Christians retorted by reference to the obscene and disgraceful fictions by which the former degraded their gods.

  • After this there is a considerable gap before New Guinea, Borneo, Madagascar, Sumatra and the vast multitude of smaller islands descending in size by regular gradations to mere rocks.

  • He built a stately house in the city, and adorned it with a multitude of paintings.

  • In 407 a multitude of Franks, Vandals, &c., burst over Gaul: Roman rule practically ceased and the three kingdoms of the Visigoths, Burgundians and Franks began to form.

  • Arrah is famous for an incident in the Mutiny, when a dozen Englishmen, with 50 Sikhs, defended an ordinary house against 2000 Sepoys and a multitude of armed insurgents, perhaps four times that number.

  • S5) that Elohim as a plural form for the name of the Hebrew deity " can hardly be understood otherwise than as a comprehensive expression for the multitude of gods embraced in the One God of Old Testament religion," in other words that it presupposes an original polytheism.

  • If the consolidation took place with comparative uniformity we might then anticipate the formation of a vast multitude of small planets such as those we actually do find in the region between the orbit of Mars and that of Jupiter.

  • Power by its very nature belongs to no one man but to a multitude of men; and the reason is obvious, since all men are born equal.

  • Wizards and impostors persuaded the multitude to follow them into the desert, and an Egyptian, claiming to be a prophet, led his followers to the Mount of Olives to see the walls of Jerusalem fall at his command.

  • Hawker described the bulk of his parishioners as a "mixed multitude of smugglers, wreckers and dissenters of various hues."

  • "Why is it," he asked, "that the multitude accept implicitly the decisions of the wisest, of the specially skilled, in physical science?"

  • As a natural result of this belief we find the view that the operations of nature are conducted by a multitude of more or less obedient subordinate deities; thus, in Portuguese West Africa the Kimbunda believe in Suku-Vakange, but hold that he has committed the government of the universe to innumerable kilulu good and bad; the latter kind are held to be far more numerous, but Suku-Vakange is said to keep them in order by occasionally smiting them with his thunderbolts; were it not for this, man's lot would be insupportable.

  • The First Crusade, far more than any other, became the theme of a multitude of writings, whose different degrees of value it is allimportant to distinguish.

  • Hildebrand, now pope as Gregory VII., next summoned him to Rome, and, in a synod held there in 1078, tried once more to obtain a declaration of his orthodoxy by means of a confession of faith drawn up in general terms; but even this strong-minded and strong-willed pontiff was at length forced to yield to the demands of the multitude and its leaders; and in another synod at Rome (1079), finding that he was only endangering his own position and reputation, he turned unexpectedly upon Berengar and commanded him to confess that he had erred in not teaching a change as to substantial reality of the sacramental bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.

  • After he had thus established his power, he made a show of resigning it; but his proposal was rejected by the multitude, and he reigned without opposition till his death (478).

  • by 212), the upper portion of which is cut out of the rock, while the lower is enclosed by a semicircular wall of massive masonry; the theory of these scholars, however, that the whole precinct was a sanctuary of the Pelasgian Zeus cannot be regarded as proved, nor is it easy to abandon the generally received view that this was the scene of the popular assemblies of later times, notwithstanding the apparent unsuitability of the ground and the insufficiency of room for a large multitude.

  • Although there was little or no stress laid on either the joys or the terrors of a future life, the movement was not infrequently accompanied by most of those physical symptoms which usually go with vehement appeals to the conscience and emotions of a rude multitude.

  • A multitude of ravines and gullies, filled with torrential streams or dry, according to the season of the year, and characterized by many beautiful cascades, seam the narrow coastal plain and the flanks of the mountains.

  • They descend in parallel ridges of grey Karst limestone, south-westwards to the sea; their last summits reappear in the multitude of rocky islands along the Dalmatian littoral.

  • Lime is, in fact, absorbed to an enormous extent by fishes, molluscs, crustacea, calcareous algae and sponges, starfishes, sea-urchins and feather stars, many polyzoa and a multitude of protozoa (mainly the foraminifera).

  • Only the multitude of small gardens, planted with limes, acacias and lilacs, and the bright costumes of the Servian or Hungarian peasants, remain to distinguish it from a western capital.

  • Owing to Semitic influence every Persian god had in Roman times come to possess a twofold significance - astrological and natural, Semitic and Iranian - the earlier and deeper Iranian significance being imparted by the clergy to the few intelligent elect, the more attractive and :superficial Chaldaean symbolism being presented to the multitude.

  • The multitude, left without a leader, acquiesced, and this important province was secured to the house of Braganza.

  • Thus the government of the prince regent began its career in the new world with dangerous errors in the financial system; yet the increased activity which a multitude of new customers and the increase of circulating medium gave to the trade of Rio, added a new stimulus to the industry of the whole nation.

  • The expression " substantial similarity " is still, however, sufficiently vague to cover a multitude of views.

  • Syracuse rose again out of her desolation - grass, it is said, grew in her streets - and, with an influx of a multitude of new colonists from Greece and from towns of Sicily and Italy, once more became a prosperous city.

  • He found the medical profession of his time split up into a number of sects, medical science confounded under a multitude of dogmatic systems, the social status and moral integrity of physicians degraded.

  • By chemical warnings the defensive processes seem to be awakened, or summoned; and when we think of the infinite variety of such possible phases, and of the multitude of corresponding defensive agents, we may form some dim notion of the complexity of the animal blood and tissues, and within them of the organic molecules.

  • " The Christianity of the Londoners was of an unsatisfactory character, for, after the death of Sebert, his sons who were heathens stirred up the multitude to drive out their bishop. Mellitus became archbishop of Canterbury, and London relapsed into heathenism.

  • In the same year his views found expression in the formation of a society "separate from the multitude" numbering nearly a hundred, and drawn from his own and neighbouring parishes.

  • The Pisan fleet of three hundred sail, commanded by the archbishop Pietro Moriconi, attacked the Balearic Isles, where as many as 20,000 Christians were said to be held captive by the Moslems, and returned loaded with spoil and with a multitude of Christian and Moslem prisoners.

  • Among a multitude of other Japanese wares, space allows us t mention only two, those of Izumo and Yatsushiro.

  • But their skill as decorators was as great as its range was wide, and they produced a multitude of masterpieces on which alone Japans ceramic fame might safely be rested.

  • The political agitation of 1831 led to a further popular demand, and a supply of cheap and healthy serials for the reading multitude commenced with Chambers's Journal (1832), the Penny Magazine (1832-1845) of Charles Knight, and the Saturday Magazine (1832-1844), begun by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.

  • increase in size upwards, and at length become crowded, numerous and petaloid, forming a funnel-shaped blossom, the beauty of which is much enhanced by the multitude of conspicuous stamens which with the pistil occupy the centre.

  • To promote the ends he had in view he suggested non-importation, instituted the Boston committees of correspondence, urged that a Continental Congress be called, sought out and introduced into public service such allies as John Hancock, Joseph Warren and Josiah Quincy, and wrote a vast number of articles for the newspapers, especially the Boston Gazette, over a multitude of signatures.

  • The catechumenate, an old institution, older in most regions than the mysteries themselves, suggested and rendered feasible such wholesale theft, especially in an age in which the sacerdotal class wished to be pre-eminent, and left nothing undone to enhance in the eyes of the multitude the importance and solemnity of rites which it was their prerogative to administer.

  • Owing to the varied and beautiful scenery, this is a favourite summer resort; the game of the forests and the fishing in the streams and in the multitude of lakes serve as further attractions.

  • Other notable falls are those of the Genesee at Portage and at Rochester, Trenton Falls, the Falls of Ticonderoga, and a multitude of falls and rapids in the Adirondack region and along the shores of the upper portions of the Finger Lakes.

  • Hobbes adopted the name as the title of his principal work, applying it to "the multitude so united in one person ...

  • 45 onwards He mainly devotes Himself to the training of the Twelve, while seeking retirement from the multitude; (e) in the districts which he visits: i.

  • But its mixture of real eloquence and apparent cogency is exactly such as always carries a multitude with it, if only for a time.

  • At the least he wrote a great history, one which can never be disregarded by future writers on his period, be their opinions what they may; which attracts and delights a multitude of readers, and is a splendid example of literary form and grace in historical composition.

  • In fact, the Persian religion throughout all its multitude of purifications, observances and expiations was a constant warfare against impurity, death and the devil.

  • 1-19) were translated, and of this recension the actual Greek has survived in a multitude of phrases in the Greek Legend.

  • By multitude they have been, and still are, extremely important.

  • More especially since the middle of the 19th century the decipherment of Egyptian and Assyrian inscriptions and systematic excavation in Palestine and other parts of the East have supplied a multitude of new facts bearing more or less directly on the Old Testament.

  • That the oceanic blacks form one family there can be no doubt, and it is evidence of the immensely remote date at which their dispersion began that they have a multitude of languages often unintelligible except locally, and an extraordinary variety of insular customs: differentiations which must have needed centuries to be effected.

  • Why did it not provide for its mixed multitude of divinities by founding a universal church, in which all the gods of all nations might be worshipped along with the one ineffable Deity?

  • On the other hand the multitude of native American languages suggested that the migration to America took place after the building of the tower of Babel, and Siguenza arrived at the curiously definite result that the Mexicans were descended from Naphtuhim, son of Mizraim and grandson of Noah, who left Egypt for Mexico shortly after the confusion of tongues.

  • to a person, it would have held a population of 175,000; but the extent of the palaces, gardens, &c., forbid us to imagine any such multitude except as refugees during a siege.

  • - Passing westward by rail from the forest-covered Archean with its rugged granite hills, the flat prairie of Manitoba with its rich grasses and multitude of flowers comes as a very striking contrast, introducing the Interior Continental plain in its most typical development.

  • Hence finally he concluded that the good as the one combining with the indeterminate two is directly the cause of all forms as formal numbers, and indirectly through them all of the multitude of individuals in the world.

  • The fertile glens of the Alcaraz district are richly wooded, and often, from their multitude of fruit trees, resemble the huertas or gardens of Alicante; but broad tracts of land are destitute of trees, and suitable only for pasture.

  • In the archives of Paris Du Cange was able to consult charters, diplomas, manuscripts and a multitude of printed documents, which were not to be met.

  • One of the most noteworthy schools of the city is the Lycen de Artes e Officios, located on Rua 13 de Maio, opposite the operahouse; it dates from 1858 and has been the means of giving instruction to a multitude of clerks, artisans and others, through its night classes.

  • Thus, according to him, in the first place reason forms a cosmological " ideal " of a multitude of simple units related; secondly, it forms a psychological " ideal " of a multitude of wills, or substance-generating activities, which communicate with one another by ideas so that will causes ideas in will, while together they constitute a collective will, and it goes on to form the moral ideal of humanity (das sittliche Menschheitsideal); and, thirdly, it forms an ontological " ideal " of God as ground of this moral " ideal," and therewith of all being as means to this end, and an " ideal " of God as world-will, of which the world is development, and in which individual wills participate each in its sphere.

  • 7rXi-j80s), the "multitude," or unprivileged class in the early Roman state.

  • From a distance, the multitude of its gardens, and the turrets and metal-plated or gilded cupolas of its many churches give Bucharest a certain picturesqueness.

  • From the violence of a multitude in which women of the worst class were more furious than the men she was sheltered in the house of the provost, where she repeatedly showed herself at the window, appealing aloud with dishevelled hair and dress to the mercy which no man could look upon her and refuse.

  • All the principal lines of walk should be broad enough to allow at least three persons to walk abreast; the others may be narrower, but a multitude of narrow walks has a puny effect.

  • In response to these appeals Anthony came forth and set himself to organize the life of the multitude of ascetics that had grown up around him.

  • Space is infinite, and there is an illimitable multitude of indestructible, indivisible and absolutely compact atoms in perpetual motion in this illimitable space.

  • He ransacked his father's shelves, dipped into a multitude of books, read what was interesting, and passed over what was dull An ordinary lad would have acquired little or no useful knowledge in such a way; but much that was dull to ordinary lads was interesting to Samuel.

  • They were willing enough to admit the abstract claims of the Empire; but in the world of feudalism there was a multitude of established customs and rights which rudely conflicted with these claims, and in action, remote and abstract considerations gave way before concrete and present realities.

  • The process of division and subdivision which steadily went on broke up Germany into a bewildering multitude of principalities; but as a rule the members of each princely house held together against common enemies, and ultimately they learned to arrange by private treaties that no territory should pass from the family while a single representative survived.

  • In The Wisdom of God, &c., Ray recites innumerable examples of the perfection of organic mechanism, the multitude and variety of living creatures, the minuteness and usefulness of their parts, and many, if not most, of the familiar examples of purposive adaptation and design in nature were suggested by him, such as the structure of the eye, the hollowness of the bones, the camel's stomach and the hedgehog's armour.

  • Although the cults of the old Greek deities in the new cities, with their splendid apparatus of festivals and sacrifice might still hold the multitude, men turned ever in large numbers to alien Art religions, felt as more potent because strange, and the various gods of Egypt and the East began to find larger entrance in the Greek world.

  • The synagogues in the Gentile cities had generally attached to them, in more or less close connexion a multitude of those " who feared God " and frequented the services (Scharer, Gesch.

  • But the multitude of the deities and the variety of the myths that it strove to incorporate prevented the development of a uniform theological system, and the heterogeneous origin of the religion remained irretrievably stamped upon its face.

  • The climax was reached when at a given- moment the curtains of the shrine placed on the boat were withdrawn, and the god was revealed to the eyes of the awe-struck multitude.

  • Each little change in the administration engendered a multitude of others, so that the modest attempts at reform were found to be like the letting out of water.

  • He possessed, however, a strong and fluent genius, which eventually made itself heard in a multitude of volumes, poems, dramas and novels.

  • It shows the pope and emperor, with a lute-playing angel between them, kneeling to right and left of the enthroned Virgin and Child, who crown them with rose garlands, with a multitude of other kneeling saints disposed with free symmetry in the background, and farther in the background portraits of the donor and the painter, and a flutter of wreath-carrying cherubs in the air.

  • Slavonic place-names, still existing in every portion of the Peninsula, bear witness to the multitude of the invaders and the permanency of their settlements.

  • The dirty streets full of petty traders, the gloomy bazaar with its multitude of tiny shops, the market squares, the blind alleys, the little gates in the dead courtyard walls, all give the place the stamp of a Tatar or Turkish town.

  • The park is celebrated for the multitude of its nightingales, and is usually filled with the sound of running water from several fountains and cascades.

  • England was prepared, and on the 23rd of November routed and drove into Solway Moss a demoralized multitude of farm-burning Scots.

  • mainly ex-friars and tradesmen, persevered, and they were summoned to stand their trial in April, but Knox arrived in Perth, where an armed multitude supported their cause.

  • As constable of Dundee he secured the commutation of the death penalty on minor offenders under his jurisdiction, and his expressed maxim was " in the greatest crimes it is thought wisest to pardon the multitude and punish the ringleaders."

  • A multitude of varieties of cultivated plants and domesticated animals existed, and these differed amongst themselves and from their nearest wild allies to an extent that, but for the fact of their domestication, would entitle them to the systematic rank of species.

  • If we reflect on the multitude and complexity of such actions and reactions in operation from the youngest stages to the end of the life of each individual, we cannot be surprised at any correlation.

  • Darwin himself showed that different species in a genus, or varieties in a species, tended to show parallel variations, whilst comparative anatomy has made known a multitude of cases where allied series of animals or plants show successive stages of parallel but independent variations of important organs and functions.

  • The poet Prudentius describes how, on the day of the martyr's death, an innumerable multitude of pilgrims flocked round the site.

  • On the coast, the Ancon de Sardinas bay is so named from the multitude of small fish (sardinas) which inhabit its waters.

  • Godefroy's edition was enriched with a multitude of important notes and historical comments, and became a standard authority on the decadent period of the Western Empire.

  • Again we find Him teaching by the lake, and the pressure of the multitude is still so great that He sits in a boat while they line the shore.

  • He then turned from them to the multitude, and uttered a saying which in effect annulled the Jewish distinction between clean and unclean meats.

  • His return was marked by another miraculous feeding of the multitude, and also by two healing miracles which present unusual features.

  • In both the patient was withdrawn from the multitude and the cure was wrought with the accompaniment of symbolic actions.

  • But while they are excluded, a multitude from all quarters of the earth shall sit down with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and the prophets in the kingdom of God.

  • 14: " Where there is no guidance, a people falls, but in the multitude of counsellors there is safety."

  • The subject is a Glory, Christ with the banner of the Resurrection, and a multitude of saints, including, at the extremities, the saints or beati of the Dominican order; here are no fewer than 266 figures or portions of figures, many of them having names inscribed.

  • He mentions "Canaria, so called from the multitude of dogs of great size," and "Nivaria, taking its name from perpetual snow, and covered with clouds," doubtless Teneriffe.

  • The great multitude was given into his hand, but he was not to be strengthened permanently by his triumph (Dan.

  • Every morning he worshipped the sun in public, as being the representative of the divine soul that animates the universe, while he was himself worshipped by the ignorant multitude.

  • 30) amidst the prostrations of the assembled multitude.

  • In North Africa particularly, and in Khorasan the effect of Omar's proclamation was that a great multitude embraced Islam.

  • The disorder of civil war had caused a multitude of robbers and vagabonds to emerge from the purlieus of Bagdad.

  • Of late years progress has been very intelligent; in earlier years it was gained through a multitude of experiments and failures, and great pecuniary loss, and progress was a testimonial chiefly to courage and perseverance.

  • This beginning is not in the dimness of antiquity nor in a multitude of customs, beliefs, traditions, rites and personalities, as is the case with the so-called " natural " religions.

  • Similar notions present in the ethnic faiths take the Christian facts into their service, the belief of the multitude without essential change remaining vague and undefined.

  • This revolution in the worldview is no longer the possession of philosophers and scholars, but the multitude accepts it in part.

  • Such truth can be apprehended by the multitude only in symbols which guide the will through the imagination, and through historic facts which are embodiment of ideas.

  • The carrying of the alphabet to the Greeks by the Phoenicians at an early period affords no clue to the period when Semitic ingenuity constructed an alphabet out of a heterogeneous multitude of signs.

  • Another form of the Aramaic alphabet, namely, the so-called Estrangela writing which was in use amongst the Christians of northern Syria, was carried by Nestorian missionaries into Central Asia and became the ancestor of a multitude of alphabets spreading through the Turkomans as far east as Manchuria.

  • This effect is due to the multitude and the character of the episodes.

  • These crowd at certain seasons in innumerable multitude to certain islands within the tropics, where they breed, and the wonderful assemblage known as " wideawake fair" on the island of Ascension has been more or less fully described from very ancient times.

  • In these tribes the bold and active habits, the striking colours, or the fantastic diversities of structure,have so long attracted remark that recent investigations, while adding a multitude of new species and supplying the specialist with an infinity of new details, have not materially altered the scientific standpoint.

  • That pagurids must have the usually soft pleon or abdomen protected by the shell of a mollusc is now known to be subject to a multitude of exceptions.

  • (Isopoda), Sars (1896-1899), while their multitude precludes specification of important contributions by Benedict, Bovallius, Chilton, Dohrn, Dollfus, Fraisse, Giard and Bonnier, Harger, Haswell, Kossmann, Miers, M`Murrich, Norman, Harriet Richardson, Ohlin, Studer, G.

  • The French Revolution had supposed itself to be fighting for the " rights of man "; really it was trying to replace an autocratic kingship by an equally autocratic " general will " of the multitude.

  • These various chains are known by a multitude of local names.

  • This was seen by Bacon, and what may be regarded as his final opinion on the question is given in the important letter to Jean Antoine Baranzano 4 (" Redemptus ": 1590-1622)1590-1622): - "With regard to the multitude of instances by which men may be deterred from the attempt, here is my answer.

  • Secondly, the prerogatives of instances, and the mode of experimenting upon experiments of light (which I shall hereafter explain), will diminish the multitude of them very much.

  • Just as the emperor is kami, and provincial officers of rank, so also mountains, rivers, the sea, thunder, winds, and even animals like the tiger, wolf or fox, are all kami.7 The spirits of the dead also become kami, of varying character and position; some reside in the temples built in their honour; some hover near their tombs; but they are constantly active, mingling in the vast multitude of agencies which makes every event in the universe, in the language of Motowori (1730-1801), the act of the Kami.

  • The Yoruba-speaking peoples generalized the spirits of mountain and hill into Oke, god of heights; and the multitude of local sea-gods on the western half of the slave coast was fused into one god of the Ocean, Olokun.

  • The Vedic deities of the nobler sort, the shining devas, the asuras (the " breathers " or living, perhaps to be identified with the Scandinavian cesir) rose above a vast multitude of demonic powers, many of them doubtless derived from the local customs and beliefs of the native races whom the immigrant Aryans subdued.

  • This conception is even reflected in human nature: " Heaven in giving birth to the multitude of the people, to every faculty and relationship affixed its laws " (Shi King, III.

  • At the present day, "usury," if used in the old sense of the term, would embrace a multitude of modes of receiving interest upon capital to which not the slightest moral taint is attached.

  • But while he notes that in Perth the act was that of "the rascal multitude," he was glad to claim in St Andrews the support of the civic "authority"; and indeed the burghs, which were throughout Europe generally in favour of freedom, soon became in Scotland a main support of the Reformation.

  • The league was promised by England; but the army of France was first in the field, and towards the end of the year drove the forces of the "congregation" from Leith into Edinburgh, and then out of it in a midnight rout to Stirling - "that dark and dolorous night," as Knox long afterwards said, "wherein all ye, my lords, with shame and fear left this town," and from which only a memorable sermon by their great preacher roused the despairing multitude into new hope.

  • A new race of politicians was springing up. Since 1719, when the influence of the few great territorial families had been merged in a multitude of needy gentlemen, the first estate had become the nursery and afterwards the stronghold of an opposition at once noble and democratic which found its natural leaders in such men as Count Carl Gyllenborg and Count Carl Gustaf Tessin.

  • Buraeus studied all the sciences then known to mankind, and confounded them all in a sort of Rabbinical cultus of his own invention, a universal philosophy in a multitude of unreadable volumes.

  • The embryos having then reached the condition of "trochospheres" escape from the mantle cavity and swim about freely near the surface of the water among the multitude of other creatures, larval and adult, which swarm there.

  • From this time till 1848 he led a life of comparative quiet - not the quiet of inactivity, however, for his incessant labours within the Academy and the Observatory produced a multitude of contributions to all departments of physical science, - but on the fall of Louis Philippe he left his laboratory to join in forming the provisional government.

  • According to Evelyn he was " debonnaire and easy of access, naturally kind-hearted and possessed an excellent temper," virtues which covered a multitude of sins.

  • Additional decisions were necessitated by the violent disputes which raged within the Franciscan order as to the observance of the rules of St Francis of Assisi, and by the multitude of subordinate questions arising from this.

  • From the elements the one substance is transformed into the multitude of individual things in the orderly universe, which again is itself a living thing or being, and the Pneuma pervading it, and conditioning life and growth everywhere, is its soul.

  • Even to the prosaic religion of old Rome, with its narrow original conception and multitude of.

  • was also empowered to create a multitude of new ecclesiastical dignities, and the archbishop of Lisbon was granted the rank and style of Patriarch ex officio.

  • The froth of soap-suds or beaten-up eggs consists of a multitude of small films which meet each other at angles of I 20°.

  • He is on the whole for the nobles and against the commons; and, though the unfavourable colours in which he paints the leaders of the latter are possibly reflected from the authorities he followed, it is evident that he despised and disliked the multitude.

  • Besides these the group also includes a multitude of related forms which, from their aquatic habits and generally inconspicuous size, and from the fact that they are commonly neither edible nor noxious, are little known except to naturalists and are undistinguished by any popular names.

  • The shipping at Bilbao is mainly Spanish, owing to the multitude of small vessels employed in the coasting trade; but from 1880 onwards the majority of foreign ships were British.

  • These volumes, which called forth a multitude of answers on the Protestant side, exhaust the controversy as it was carried on in those days, and contain a lucid and uncompromising statement of Roman Catholic doctrine.

  • These basins or ` longitudinal folds ' are enclosed on the south by the long high ridge of dark slates, which extends parallel to the crystalline [main] chain from the neighbourhood of Sukhum-Kale to the Krestovaya Gora [pass of Darial.] Behind this slate crest spreads a confused multitude of hills, Jurassic and Cretaceous in their formation..

  • When their master thus died, his disciples buried him with great pomp. A multitude of them built huts near his grave, and remained there, mourning as for a father, for nearly three years; and when all the rest were gone, Tze-kung, the last of his favourite three, continued alone by the grave for another period of the same duration.

  • 6): " The Catarhine and Platyrhine monkeys agree in a multitude of characters, as is shown by their unquestionably belonging to one and the same order.

  • Darwin's summing-up of the evidence as to unity of type throughout the races of mankind is as distinctly a monogenist argument as those of Blumenbach, Prichard or Quatrefages " Although the existing races of man differ in many respects, as in colour, hair, shape of skull, proportions of the body, &c., yet, if their whole organization be taken into consideration, they are found to resemble each other closely in a multitude of points.

  • A multitude of minor and simpler organic compounds, of which carbohydrates and fats are the best known, occur in different protoplasm in varying forms and proportions, and are much less isolated from the inorganic world.

  • Latin a military expedition), a very large gathering of men, armed for war, an army, and so used generally of any multitude.

  • What this is in a given case depends on a multitude of circumstances, external and internal, all contributing to form the " cause " of which the voluntary act and its consequences are the " effect."

  • Of drawings there are very many, including few only for the "Last Supper," many for the Sforza monument, as well as the multitude of sketches, scientific and other, which we find intermingled among the vast body of his miscellaneous MSS., notes and records.

  • Owen to the typical representative of a group of gigantic, armadillo-like, South American, extinct Edentata, characterized by having the carapace composed of a solid piece (formed by the union of a multitude of bony dermal plates) without any movable rings.

  • A prolonged study of the text, which has brought to light a multitude of fresh passages the majority of which can be explained by retranslation into Hebrew, has convinced the present writer' that, whilst the evidence on the whole is in favour of an Aramaic original of vi.-xxxvi., it is just as conclusive on behalf of the Hebrew original of the greater part of the rest of the book.

  • Besides the cutting down for building purposes of the timber trees the jungle was largely cleared for the plantation of vanilla; while a multitude of other tropical plants have been introduced tending to the extermination of the indigenous flora.

  • Soon the irresistible charm of a book which gratified the imagination of the reader with all the action and scenery of a fairy tale, which exercised his ingenuity by setting him to discover a multitude of curious analogies, which interested his feelings for human beings, frail like himself, and struggling with temptations from within and from without, which every moment drew a smile from him by some stroke of quaint yet simple pleasantry, and nevertheless left on his mind a sentiment of reverence for God and of sympathy for man, began to produce its effect.

  • The continuous spectrum leads to no inference, except that of the temperature of the central globe; but the multitude of dark lines by which it is crossed reveal the elements composing pe ct rum o the truly gaseous cloaks which enclose it.

  • The history of this heavenly stone, given by Gabriel to Abraham, does not conceal the fact that it was originally a fetish, the most venerated of a multitude of idols and sacred stones which stood all round the sanctuary in the time of Mahomet.

  • Abhandl., and Palaeontographica); while the multitude of North American palaeozoic crinoids has been attacked by C. Wachsmuth and F.

  • She displayed from the first a dignity and good sense which won the affection of the multitude who merely saw her in public, and the confidence of the advisers who were admitted into her presence.

  • It is formed from a multitude of water-courses which descend the slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes south of the gigantic volcano of Sangay; but it soon reaches the plain, which commences where it receives its Cusulima branch.

  • Special attention has already been called to the fourteen great streams which discharge into this reservoir, but it receives a multitude of secondary rivers, which in any other part of the world would also be termed great.

  • A multitude of churches were destroyed, and most of those which survived were converted into mosques.

  • The measures taken to relieve distress had allured a multitude of needy and desperate men from the surrounding country.

  • Every one of this multitude was liable to instant death if found in French territory.

  • Balzac admired him [James Fenimore Cooper] greatly, but with discrimination; Victor Hugo pronounced him greater than the great master of modern romance, and this verdict was echoed by a multitude of inferior readers, who were satisfied with no title for their favourite less than that of "the American Scott."

  • 26a reflection that the mark or sign of the perfect performance of a particular virtuous act or function is the presence of a characteristic pleasure which always accompanies it, is opposed to the reflection that it is a mark of the highest morality never to rest satisfied, and out of these seemingly contradictory statements of the reflective consciousness might arise a multitude of controversies either concerning pleasure and duty, or the even more difficult and complex conceptions of merit, progress, and the nature of the Supreme Good or Final End.

  • The fact is that any close philosophical analysis of Spencer's system of ethics can only result in the discovery of a multitude of mutually conflicting and for the most part logically untenable theories.

  • Again, the argument that " conduct is good or bad according as its total effects are pleasurable or painful," and that ultimately " pleasure-giving acts are life-sustaining acts," seems to involve Spencer in a multitude of unverified assumptions and contradictory theories.

  • Above its surface tower a great number of volcanoes and several craters, and its waters are alive with water-fowl, a multitude of ducks of various species breeding on its islands.

  • After the Jewish return from exile the population confined itself to Judaea, and Galilee was left in the possession of the mixed multitude of successors established there by the Assyrians.

  • The present central plain itself may be regarded as a vast shallow synclinal, including a multitude of smaller folds.

  • Above Agram the Save is used chiefly for floating rafts of timber; east of Sissek it is navigable by small steamboats, but, despite its great volume, the multitude of its perpetually shifting sandbanks interferes greatly with traffic. Steamers also ply on the Una, the Drave below Barcs, and the Danube.

  • But perhaps the most conclusive proof of its brevity is that it was read publicly to the assembled people immediately before they, as well as their king, pledged themselves to obey it; and not a word is said as to the task of reading it aloud, so as to be heard by such a great multitude, being long or difficult.

  • His personal appearance, his manners, social qualities and liberal opinions, gave him a good standing among the multitude of provincial deputies then thronging into Paris.

  • In the mind, e.g., one form may be placed in reference to a multitude of things, and as thus related will be universal.

  • It soon becomes apparent to the onlooker when the queen has joined the flying multitude of bees in the air, for they are seen to be closing up their ranks, and in a few moments begin to form a solid cluster, usually on the branch of a small tree or bush close to the ground.

  • Apart from the multitude of supposed fossil Algae described as " Fucoids " but usually not of Algal nature, and never presenting determinable characters, very little remains that can be referred to Palaeozoic Brown Algae.

  • The structure is often a complex one, the central region containing an elaborate system of numerous anastomosing steles, accompanied by sclerenchyma; the cortex is permeated or coated by a multitude of adventitious roots, forming a thick envelope to the stem.

  • The ideal and the discipline which he proposed to his defeated country were those of her conqueror - a feudal society, a monarchical government, an elite, which the rest of the nation exists merely to support and nourish; an ideal of honour and duty imposed by a chosen few on the recalcitrant and subject multitude.

  • It would have been much better to permit his exposition of the philosophy of religion to enjoy the same literary rights as his earlier works, since Kant could not be interdicted without first silencing a multitude of theologians who were at least equally separated from positive Christianity.

  • Merrill Cooms was in his early seventies, a widow and the somewhat reclusive owner of a multitude of businesses.

  • Here scores of sponsoring vendors would be displaying and demonstrating their exotic wares to the multitude of visitors.

  • There were two refrigerators for holding blood, needles for drawing, IV tubing for transfusions and a multitude of surgical instruments for removing bullets and knife tips.

  • Out there in the woods lay a multitude of plants she wanted to see, and no slithering reptile was going to stand in her way.

  • Children can lace soft beads and plastic spacers in a multitude of combinations.

  • Now the previously silent, oppressed masses can form a multitude capable of bringing about radical steps in the liberation of humankind.

  • He showed that assigning meaning to the sign of an otherwise homogenous representation of geometry could provide a multitude of benefits.

  • Resonance104.4fm is bringing a multitude of experimental sound, new music, radio art and interaction to the capital's airwaves.

  • For example, a career as a visual artist usually involves being able to juggle a multitude of tasks.

  • assigning meaning to the sign of an otherwise homogenous representation of geometry could provide a multitude of benefits.

  • During July and early August it is also awash with a multitude of Himalayan flowers, including the rare blue poppy.

  • P and me went blackberry picking earlier - she got the easy stuff I got the higher stuff - hence the multitude of scratches.

  • The multitude of creatures created a cacophony of calls that assaulted our ears.

  • This activates a protein kinase cascade, ultimately leading to a multitude of complex effects.

  • colonize the new space along with the rest of the teeming multitude that throngs the Internet Fair.

  • complementary therapist offers a whole multitude of benefits.

  • Choosing the right investment may seen like an impossible task with seemingly countless products available, offering a multitude of options.

  • An added bonus is the multitude of useful cross-references that appear in nearly every spread.

  • There's also a multitude of genre fave cameos that is in all honesty quite a sad experience to view also.

  • Their company has received a multitude of unwanted post, including fire extinguishers and rubbish skips.

  • Great works of art - and such Dawn of the Dead undeniably is - allow a multitude of different and often mutually hostile interpretations.

  • Mr. Hunt ascended the hustings about half-past one o'clock and proceeded to address the immense multitude.

  • innumerable multitude.

  • keystone of the theory of diffusion, and it arises naturally in a multitude of other settings.

  • lace soft beads and plastic spacers in a multitude of combinations.

  • Solutions to complex, and often long-standing problems depend upon a multitude of resources, talents, and expertise.

  • Now the previously silent, oppressed masses ' can form a multitude capable of bringing about radical steps in the liberation of humankind.

  • These it stuffed whole into its great maw, revealing a multitude of ragged teeth.

  • multitude of sins on a concert poster.

  • multitude of seabirds.

  • multitude of combinations.

  • multitude of attractions.

  • multitude of believers did make more congregations than one in the church of Ephesus.

  • The whole mural is surrounded by a multitude of colorful flags.

  • Day 13 We sail south, to the Antarctic, where the ship is again followed by a multitude of seabirds.

  • Humanists must colonize the new space along with the rest of the teeming multitude that throngs the Internet Fair.

  • Cliff Richard stared at the assembled multitude gathered for his forty-eighth Christmas concert.

  • Love is always by very nature hiding a multitude of sins.

  • The beach is made up of fine golden sand & boasts a multitude of facilities including a children's play area & creche.

  • Languages Spoken English American English encompasses a multitude of regional accents of differing degrees of intelligibility.

  • Although a brook may appear crystal-clear, it nevertheless transports more than enough organic matter to feed a multitude of insect inhabitants.

  • An immense multitude had been attracted thither with their wives and children.

  • You feel the fanning of his wings in the breath of this vast multitude.

  • But they are the mixed multitude who are all over the place.

  • Many were persuaded, including a great multitude of devout Greeks.

  • And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense.

  • plaudits of the multitude, while the king ordered the victor to approach the stand.

  • propounded the view that the mass of the people was already organized in a multitude of organizations.

  • BeatLab's Training mode has a multitude of patterns that will help you practice your snare drum rudiments.

  • In effect, a spectrogram is built up from a multitude of power spectra of short, overlapping time segments of the signal.

  • Their company has received a multitude of unwanted post, including fire extinguishers and rubbish skips.

  • swinish multitude ' .

  • A regular session with a complementary therapist offers a whole multitude of benefits.

  • The course of things and their connexion is only thinkable by the assumption of a plurality of existences, the reality of which (as distinguished from our knowledge of them) can be conceived only as a multitude of relations.

  • A final reflection then teaches us that the nature of this universal and all-pervading substance can only be imagined by us as something analogous to our own mental life, where alone we experience the unity of a substance (which we call self) preserved in the multitude of its (mental) states.

  • The northern slope of this great plateau is drained by the AraguayaTocantins, Xingu, Tapajos and Guapore-Mamore-Madeira, which flow northward, and, except the first, empty into the Amazon; the southern slope drains southward through a multitude of streams flowing into the Parana and Paraguay.

  • " I take my walk every day through the confusion of a great multitude with as much freedom and quiet as you could find in your rural avenues."

  • Belisarius remained at Constantinople in tranquil retirement until 559, when an incursion of Bulgarian savages spread a panic through the metropolis, and men's eyes were once more turned towards the neglected veteran, who placed himself at the head of a mixed multitude of peasants and soldiers, and repelled the barbarians with his wonted courage and adroitness.

  • The multitude of species and the many intermediate forms render their exact limitation difficult, but those presenting sufficiently marked characters to justify specific rank probably approach 300 in number.

  • He died before it was completed, but it was finished by Sargon, who reduced the city, deported its inhabitants, and established within it a mixed multitude of settlers (who were the ancestors of the modern Samaritans).

  • Despite the multitude of slaves, hired labour was often needed, especially at harvest.

  • multitude enough to occupy the whole peninsula.

  • Thus the titular king of Italy found himself simultaneously at war with those great vassals who had chosen him from their own class, with the turbulent factions of the Roman aristocracy, with unruly bishops in the growing cities and with the multitude of minor counts and barons who occupied the open lands, and who changed sides according to the interests of the moment.

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