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multiplicity

multiplicity

multiplicity Sentence Examples

  • From the number of its cheek-teeth, the banded ant-eater has been regarded as related to some of the primitive Jurassic mammals; but this view is disputed by Mr Bensley, who regards this multiplicity of teeth as a degenerate feature.

  • He thus arrives at the principle of Relativity; harmony and unity consist in diversity and multiplicity.

  • These differences have given rise to a supposed multiplicity of species, expressed by the names C. lycaon (Central Europe), C. laniger and C. niger (Tibet), the C. occidentalis, C. nubilus, C. mexicanus, &c., of North America, and the great blackish-brown Alaskan C. pambasileus, the largest of them all.

  • It is enough to point out that we have in his work another proof of the multiplicity of the factors which must be taken into consideration by the systematist, and another proof of the fallacy of trusting to one set of characters alone.

  • The Somali have very little political or social cohesion, and are divided into a multiplicity of rers or fakidas (tribes, clans).

  • Its ten Sephiroth are made up of the grosser elements of the former three worlds; they consist of material substance limited by space and perceptible to the senses in a multiplicity of forms. This world is subject to constant changes and corruption, and is the dwelling of the evil spirits.

  • The results of their experiments embrace a multiplicity of details of which it is impossible to give an adequate summary.

  • These new conceptions of the multiplicity in unity of disease, and of the fluidity and continuity of morbid processes, might have led to vagueness and over-boldness in speculation and reconstruction, had not the experimental method been at hand with clues and tests for the several series.

  • Although modern mercurial pumps have assumed a multiplicity of forms, their actions can be reduced to two principles, one statical, the other hydrodynamical - at the same time instruments have been devised utilizing both these principles.

  • In the case of texts from the oldest historical periods we encounter hundreds of names that are genuinely Sumerian, and here in view of the multiplicity of the phonetic values attaching to the signs used it is frequently difficult definitely to determine the reading of the names.

  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

  • Precision, which was at first unattainable for want of an epoch, was afterwards no less unattainable from the multiplicity, and sometimes the variation, of epochs.

  • The universe, then, is a living cosmos, an infinitely animated system, whose end is the perfect realization of the variously graduated forms. The unity which sunders itself into the multiplicity of things may be called the monas monadum, each thing being a monas or self-existent, living being, a universe in itself.

  • Thus in the Rechtslehre and Sittenlehre, the multiplicity of egos is deduced, and with this deduction the first form of the Wissenschaftslehre appeared to end.

  • Everywhere experience is synthetic: it gives us multiplicity in unity.

  • For a century the Appalachians were a barrier to the westward expansion of the English colonies; the continuity of the system, the bewildering multiplicity of its succeeding ridges, the tortuous courses and roughness of its transverse passes, a heavy forest and dense undergrowth all conspired to hold the settlers on the seaward-sloping plateaus and coastal plains.

  • That the name of 17w was borrowed from the Canaanites appears certain, for that out of the multiplicity of words for soothsayers and the like common to Hebrew and Arabic (either formed from a common root or expressing exactly the same idea - '?Y'!', ' arraf; :h, habir; nisi, r i, hazi; p op, cf.

  • Not only was there in 1918-21 a sharp contrast in policy between the Czechoslovaks and the minority races living within the republic - the Germans and the Magyars - but each nationality was split up into a multiplicity of factions.

  • No decision, however, could be come to as to the successor of the childless king, partly because of the multiplicity of candidates, partly because of Austrian intrigue, and this, the most momentous question of all, was still unsettled when Sigismund II.

  • The works of Wallis are numerous, and relate to a multiplicity of subjects.

  • Beginning with the contemplation of corporeal things in their multiplicity and harmony, it then retires upon itself and withdraws into the depths of its own being, rising thence to the nous, the world of ideas.

  • In addition to a multiplicity of books there was much variety of use.

  • Thus God, the causa sui, manifests himself in an infinite multiplicity of particular modes.

  • A great multiplicity of meanings is also attributed, apparently quite arbitrarily, to the same sign, sound-value or word.

  • It was this multiplicity of activities and interests that proved fatal to him.

  • If they are actually ciphers, the multiplicity of possible explanations at once precludes the hope of a plausible interpretation.

  • This multiplicity of tribunals arises from the fact that, owing to the Capitulations, which apply to Egypt as part of the Turkish empire, foreigners are almost entirely exempt from the jurisdiction of the native courts.

  • And the mystical bent of the Egyptians found satisfaction in the multiplicity of forms that their gods could assume; among the favorite epithets which the hymns apply to divinities are such as mysterious of shapes, multiple of faces.

  • The Gramineae offer a prominent example of a dominant self-pollinated or wind :pollinated family, and this may find explanation in a multiplicity of factors.

  • As a historian, indeed, he left no abiding work; the multiplicity of his interests prevented him from concentrating on any one subject.

  • Neither Melissus nor Zeno seems to have observed that the application of these destructive methods struck at the root not only of multiplicity but also of the One whose existence they maintained.

  • The philosophy of Hegel is idealism, but it is an idealism in which every idealistic unification has its other face in the multiplicity of existence.

  • Appealing to reality it shows that the identity and permanence of forms are contradicted by history; instead of unity it exhibits multiplicity, instead of identity difference, instead of a whole, only parts.

  • The earlier Ionian physicists, Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes, in their attempts to trace the Multiplicity of things to a single material element, had been troubled by no misgivings about the possibility of knowledge.

  • Thus, though, in so far as he asserted his fundamental doctrine without doubt or qualification, he was a dogmatist, in all else he was a sceptic. Again, the Eleatic Parmenides, deriving from the theologian Xenophanes the distinction between E 71'caT77 /, 07 and (W a, conceived that, whilst the One exists and is the object of knowledge, the Multiplicity of things becomes and is the object of opinion; but, when his successor Zeno provided the system with a logic, the consistent application of that logic resolved the fundamental doctrine into the single proposition " One is One," or, more exactly, into the single identity " One One."

  • In seeking for a single material principle underlying the multiplicity of phenomena, the first nature-philosophers, Thales and the rest, did indeed raise the problem of the one and the many, the endeavour to answer which must at last lead to logic. But it is only from a point of view won by later speculation that it can be said that they sought to determine the predicates of the single subject-reality, or to establish the permanent subject of varied and varying predicates.'

  • The multiplicity in unity must be established within thought itself.

  • They are all called " Digger Indians " indiscriminately, although divided by a multiplicity of tongues.

  • In theology the fundamental problems of ontological philosophy were faced; the relationship of unity to multiplicity, of noumenon to phenomena, of God to man.

  • He first, so far as we know, sought to go behind the infinite multiplicity of phenomena in the hope of finding an infinite unity from which all difference has been evolved.

  • Maxwell saw that it was unphilosophical to assume a multiplicity of ethers or media until it had been proved that one would not fulfil all the requirements.

  • He at once proceeded to put fresh life into the despondent and irresolute Conservative party, and the Magyar aristocracy, by gallantly combating in the Vilag the opinions of Kossuth's paper, the Pesti Hirlap. But the multiplicity of his labours was too much for his feeble physique, and he died on the 9th of February 1842, at the very time when his talents seemed most indispensable.

  • Men had become weary of Protestant scholasticism; religious wars had made peaceful thinkers seek to take the edge off dogmatical rancour; and the multiplicity of religious sects, coupled with the complete failure of various attempts at any substantial reconciliation, provoked distrust of the common basis on which all were founded.

  • " To confer on the wings the multiplicity of movements which they require, they are supplied with double hinge or compound joints, which enable them to move not only in an upward, downward, forward and backward direction, but also at various intermediate degrees of obliquity.

  • on the values of the coefficients in the terms multiplied by 0, 0 2, ...; they are thus in some measure arbitrary points as regards the ultimate curve P1 It may be added that we have summits only on the component curves P 1 = o, of a multiplicity a l > 1; the number of summits on such a curve is in general = (a 1 2 - a,)m 1 2.

  • Both Plato and Aristotle devoted much thought to the discussion as to which is most truly real, the finite objects of sense, or the universal idea of each thing laid up in the mind of God; what is the nature of that unity which lies behind the multiplicity and difference of perceived objects ?

  • Besides preaching every day in each alternate week, he taught theology three days in the week, attended weekly meetings of his consistory, read the Scriptures once a week in the congregation, carried on an extensive correspondence on a multiplicity of subjects, prepared commentaries on the books of Scripture, and was engaged repeatedly in controversy with the opponents of his opinions.

  • It is above all the substance of religious feeling, which is the immediate consciousness of the unity of the world, of the absolute oneness behind the infinite multiplicity of contrasts; indeed, it is the religious conviction of the unity which is the best guarantee of the truth of the suppositions of philosophy.

  • The unity of our personal life amidst the multiplicity of its functions is the symbol of God's immanence in the world, though we may not conceive of the Absolute as a person.

  • The divine omnipotence is quantitatively represented by the sum of the forces of nature, and qualitatively distinguished from them only as the unity of infinite causality from the multiplicity of its finite phenomena.

  • This multiplicity of titles was more than a mere formula of the royal chancery.

  • Unfortunately Bradshaw allowed his attention to be distracted by a multiplicity of subjects, so that he has not left any literary work commensurate with his powers.

  • Thus he creates his religious existentialism as a philosophy of multiplicity and emancipation from knowledge, morality and rules of mind and action.

  • In the mining sett (mining boundary) there are a multiplicity of fissure lodes.

  • She modeled a process of ' interrogation ', in a way that helped to reveal the multiplicity of meanings that might be constructed.

  • DEA measures performance in a way which reflects the multiplicity of resources and environmental factors typically used to secure multiple outcomes.

  • The career of Josse De Pauw (1952) actor, writer, theater director and filmmaker demonstrates an impressive artistic multiplicity.

  • To avoid a multiplicity of jobs, these are inevitably generic in nature.

  • More generally however, there is growing recognition of the need to involve a multiplicity of actors in the development process.

  • Soap Cove, unnamed on the maps, is a geologists ' paradise containing a wild multiplicity of rock types.

  • Rural VCOs can find the agenda too complex and be confused by the multiplicity of institutional structures and processes.

  • Among the great multiplicity of details that complete Battlefield 2, there is one minor feature that is both obscure and wonderful.

  • In general some of the bands may collapse into points, which represent eigenvalues of infinite multiplicity of the operator under consideration.

  • The vast multiplicity of possibilities makes anticipation of unknown BW agents in order to protect against them an unlikely scenario.

  • But that very multiplicity of proof which ought to make reply overwhelming makes reply impossible.

  • On the other hand plenty of visual theater acts shout the sheer multiplicity of narrative.

  • multiplicity distributions.

  • spin multiplicity must not change, i.e. D S = 0. Orbital Angular momentum quantum number L may change by 0 or ±1.

  • multiplicity of meanings that might be constructed.

  • multiplicity of different perspectives.

  • multiplicity of shared voices.

  • multiplicity of identities in modern societies is a key focus.

  • multiplicity of possible interpretations.

  • multiplicity of factors makes the " condom solution " of Western countries irrelevant.

  • Protein phosphatases in higher plants: multiplicity of type 2A phosphatases in higher plants: multiplicity of type 2A phosphatases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  • pretext for a war conjured up to serve a multiplicity of ends.

  • Weapons of mass destruction offered little more than a convenient pretext for a war conjured up to serve a multiplicity of ends.

  • refutation of the doctrine of the multiplicity of souls, ascribed to Plato by Thomas Aquinas.

  • Dante gives a refutation of the doctrine of the multiplicity of souls, ascribed to Plato by Thomas Aquinas.

  • The technology seems robust enough to allow for a multiplicity of pedagogical options.

  • win-win ' solutions to a multiplicity of issues.

  • These institutions were concerned with the task of regularizing the game within the territories indicated by their titles, but it soon appeared that the multiplicity of associations was likely to prove a hindrance rather than a help, and with a view, therefore, to reducing the number of clashing jurisdictions and bringing about the establishment of a single legislative authority, the Imperial amalgamated with the English B.A.

  • From the number of its cheek-teeth, the banded ant-eater has been regarded as related to some of the primitive Jurassic mammals; but this view is disputed by Mr Bensley, who regards this multiplicity of teeth as a degenerate feature.

  • He thus arrives at the principle of Relativity; harmony and unity consist in diversity and multiplicity.

  • These differences have given rise to a supposed multiplicity of species, expressed by the names C. lycaon (Central Europe), C. laniger and C. niger (Tibet), the C. occidentalis, C. nubilus, C. mexicanus, &c., of North America, and the great blackish-brown Alaskan C. pambasileus, the largest of them all.

  • The word "pear" or its equivalent occurs in all the Celtic languages, while in Slavonic and other dialects different appellations, but still referring to the same thing, are found - a diversity and multiplicity of nomenclature which led Alphonse de Candolle to infer a very ancient cultivation of the tree from the shores of the Caspian to those of the Atlantic. A certain race of pears, with white down on the under surface of their leaves, is supposed to have originated from P. nivalis, and their fruit is chiefly used in France in the manufacture of Perry (see Cider).

  • It is enough to point out that we have in his work another proof of the multiplicity of the factors which must be taken into consideration by the systematist, and another proof of the fallacy of trusting to one set of characters alone.

  • In adopting a scale for their maps, cartographers will do well to choose a multiple of loon if possible, for such a scale can claim to be international, while in planning an atlas they ought to avoid a needless multiplicity of scales.

  • The Somali have very little political or social cohesion, and are divided into a multiplicity of rers or fakidas (tribes, clans).

  • Its ten Sephiroth are made up of the grosser elements of the former three worlds; they consist of material substance limited by space and perceptible to the senses in a multiplicity of forms. This world is subject to constant changes and corruption, and is the dwelling of the evil spirits.

  • The results of their experiments embrace a multiplicity of details of which it is impossible to give an adequate summary.

  • These new conceptions of the multiplicity in unity of disease, and of the fluidity and continuity of morbid processes, might have led to vagueness and over-boldness in speculation and reconstruction, had not the experimental method been at hand with clues and tests for the several series.

  • Although modern mercurial pumps have assumed a multiplicity of forms, their actions can be reduced to two principles, one statical, the other hydrodynamical - at the same time instruments have been devised utilizing both these principles.

  • In the case of texts from the oldest historical periods we encounter hundreds of names that are genuinely Sumerian, and here in view of the multiplicity of the phonetic values attaching to the signs used it is frequently difficult definitely to determine the reading of the names.

  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

  • Precision, which was at first unattainable for want of an epoch, was afterwards no less unattainable from the multiplicity, and sometimes the variation, of epochs.

  • The universe, then, is a living cosmos, an infinitely animated system, whose end is the perfect realization of the variously graduated forms. The unity which sunders itself into the multiplicity of things may be called the monas monadum, each thing being a monas or self-existent, living being, a universe in itself.

  • Thus in the Rechtslehre and Sittenlehre, the multiplicity of egos is deduced, and with this deduction the first form of the Wissenschaftslehre appeared to end.

  • Everywhere experience is synthetic: it gives us multiplicity in unity.

  • For a century the Appalachians were a barrier to the westward expansion of the English colonies; the continuity of the system, the bewildering multiplicity of its succeeding ridges, the tortuous courses and roughness of its transverse passes, a heavy forest and dense undergrowth all conspired to hold the settlers on the seaward-sloping plateaus and coastal plains.

  • That the name of 17w was borrowed from the Canaanites appears certain, for that out of the multiplicity of words for soothsayers and the like common to Hebrew and Arabic (either formed from a common root or expressing exactly the same idea - '?Y'!', ' arraf; :h, habir; nisi, r i, hazi; p op, cf.

  • Not only was there in 1918-21 a sharp contrast in policy between the Czechoslovaks and the minority races living within the republic - the Germans and the Magyars - but each nationality was split up into a multiplicity of factions.

  • No decision, however, could be come to as to the successor of the childless king, partly because of the multiplicity of candidates, partly because of Austrian intrigue, and this, the most momentous question of all, was still unsettled when Sigismund II.

  • The works of Wallis are numerous, and relate to a multiplicity of subjects.

  • Beginning with the contemplation of corporeal things in their multiplicity and harmony, it then retires upon itself and withdraws into the depths of its own being, rising thence to the nous, the world of ideas.

  • In addition to a multiplicity of books there was much variety of use.

  • The earliest "metaphysicians " concerned themselves with the nature of being (ontology), seeking for the unity which they postulated behind the multiplicity of phenomena (see Ionian School Of Philosophy and articles on the separate thinkers); later thinkers tended to inquire rather into the nature of knowledge as the necessary pre-requisite of ontological investigation.

  • Thus God, the causa sui, manifests himself in an infinite multiplicity of particular modes.

  • A great multiplicity of meanings is also attributed, apparently quite arbitrarily, to the same sign, sound-value or word.

  • It was this multiplicity of activities and interests that proved fatal to him.

  • If they are actually ciphers, the multiplicity of possible explanations at once precludes the hope of a plausible interpretation.

  • This multiplicity of tribunals arises from the fact that, owing to the Capitulations, which apply to Egypt as part of the Turkish empire, foreigners are almost entirely exempt from the jurisdiction of the native courts.

  • And the mystical bent of the Egyptians found satisfaction in the multiplicity of forms that their gods could assume; among the favorite epithets which the hymns apply to divinities are such as mysterious of shapes, multiple of faces.

  • The Gramineae offer a prominent example of a dominant self-pollinated or wind :pollinated family, and this may find explanation in a multiplicity of factors.

  • It follows that "pragmatic" lines of thought may originate from a multiplicity of considerations and in a variety of contexts.

  • This and the Antwerp head of Jerome are perhaps the most striking examples of Diirer's power of forcing into subordination to a general impression such a multiplicity of insistent detail as would have smothered any weaker conception than his.

  • As a historian, indeed, he left no abiding work; the multiplicity of his interests prevented him from concentrating on any one subject.

  • Neither Melissus nor Zeno seems to have observed that the application of these destructive methods struck at the root not only of multiplicity but also of the One whose existence they maintained.

  • Paulsen, The German Universities, pp. 344-345)1; (vii.) examinations of several hundred candidates at a time cannot be rationally conducted so as to be equally fair to the individuality of all candidates; the individual test is the only complete one (it is admitted that examinations on a large scale necessarily involve a margin of error; but this error may be reduced to a minimum, especially by a combination of oral and practical with written work); (viii.) the multiplicity of school examinations required for different reasons produces confusion in our secondary education (there is a growing tendency to admit equivalence of " schoolleaving " and entrance examinations; thus entrance examinations of Oxford, Cambridge and London, and the Northern Universities Joint Board are interchangeable under certain conditions); (ix.) the multiplicity of examinations tends to " underselling " (the success of the London examinations in medicine proves that a high standard attracts candidates as well as a low one; possibly intermediate standards may be killed in the competition; it is by no means obvious that a uniform system of examinations would conduce to efficiency); (x.) examinations produce physical damage to health, especially in the case of women-students (on this point more statistical evidence is needed; see, however, Engelmann quoted by G.

  • The philosophy of Hegel is idealism, but it is an idealism in which every idealistic unification has its other face in the multiplicity of existence.

  • Appealing to reality it shows that the identity and permanence of forms are contradicted by history; instead of unity it exhibits multiplicity, instead of identity difference, instead of a whole, only parts.

  • The obvious defects of this theory, (I) that the senses alone cannot apprehend matter itself, (2) that it is not clear how the multiplicity of phenomena could result from these two forces, and (3) that he adduced no evidence to substantiate the existence of these two forces, were pointed out at the time by his pupil, Patrizzi (see article on PATRIZZI, FRANCESCO).

  • The earlier Ionian physicists, Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes, in their attempts to trace the Multiplicity of things to a single material element, had been troubled by no misgivings about the possibility of knowledge.

  • Thus, though, in so far as he asserted his fundamental doctrine without doubt or qualification, he was a dogmatist, in all else he was a sceptic. Again, the Eleatic Parmenides, deriving from the theologian Xenophanes the distinction between E 71'caT77 /, 07 and (W a, conceived that, whilst the One exists and is the object of knowledge, the Multiplicity of things becomes and is the object of opinion; but, when his successor Zeno provided the system with a logic, the consistent application of that logic resolved the fundamental doctrine into the single proposition " One is One," or, more exactly, into the single identity " One One."

  • In seeking for a single material principle underlying the multiplicity of phenomena, the first nature-philosophers, Thales and the rest, did indeed raise the problem of the one and the many, the endeavour to answer which must at last lead to logic. But it is only from a point of view won by later speculation that it can be said that they sought to determine the predicates of the single subject-reality, or to establish the permanent subject of varied and varying predicates.'

  • (b) The paradox of the one in the many is none, if the idea may be regarded as supplying a principle of nexus or organization to an indefinite multiplicity of particulars.

  • The multiplicity in unity must be established within thought itself.

  • They are all called " Digger Indians " indiscriminately, although divided by a multiplicity of tongues.

  • In theology the fundamental problems of ontological philosophy were faced; the relationship of unity to multiplicity, of noumenon to phenomena, of God to man.

  • He first, so far as we know, sought to go behind the infinite multiplicity of phenomena in the hope of finding an infinite unity from which all difference has been evolved.

  • Human knowledge consists in the comprehension of this all-pervading harmony as embodied in the manifold of perception; the senses are "bad witnesses" in that they report multiplicity as fixed and existent in itself rather than in its relation to the One.

  • Moreover, sadhuism, by the multiplicity of the independent sects which have arisen in India, has engendered and favoured a spirit of tolerance which cannot escape the notice of the most superficial observer."An independent Saiva sect, or, indeed, the only strictly Saiva sect, are the Vira Saivas, more commonly called Lingayats (popularly Lingaits) or Lingavats, from their practice of wearing on their person a phallic emblem of Siva, made of copper or silver, and usually enclosed in a case suspended from the neck by a string.

  • Maxwell saw that it was unphilosophical to assume a multiplicity of ethers or media until it had been proved that one would not fulfil all the requirements.

  • He at once proceeded to put fresh life into the despondent and irresolute Conservative party, and the Magyar aristocracy, by gallantly combating in the Vilag the opinions of Kossuth's paper, the Pesti Hirlap. But the multiplicity of his labours was too much for his feeble physique, and he died on the 9th of February 1842, at the very time when his talents seemed most indispensable.

  • Men had become weary of Protestant scholasticism; religious wars had made peaceful thinkers seek to take the edge off dogmatical rancour; and the multiplicity of religious sects, coupled with the complete failure of various attempts at any substantial reconciliation, provoked distrust of the common basis on which all were founded.

  • " To confer on the wings the multiplicity of movements which they require, they are supplied with double hinge or compound joints, which enable them to move not only in an upward, downward, forward and backward direction, but also at various intermediate degrees of obliquity.

  • After his departure (1587) the advocate of Holland, Oldenbarnevel,dt, became the indispensable statesman of the struggling republic. The multiplicity of his functions gave to the advocate an almost unlimited authority in the details of administration, and for thirty years the conduct of affairs remained in his hands (see Oldenbarneveldt).

  • on the values of the coefficients in the terms multiplied by 0, 0 2, ...; they are thus in some measure arbitrary points as regards the ultimate curve P1 It may be added that we have summits only on the component curves P 1 = o, of a multiplicity a l > 1; the number of summits on such a curve is in general = (a 1 2 - a,)m 1 2.

  • Both Plato and Aristotle devoted much thought to the discussion as to which is most truly real, the finite objects of sense, or the universal idea of each thing laid up in the mind of God; what is the nature of that unity which lies behind the multiplicity and difference of perceived objects ?

  • Besides preaching every day in each alternate week, he taught theology three days in the week, attended weekly meetings of his consistory, read the Scriptures once a week in the congregation, carried on an extensive correspondence on a multiplicity of subjects, prepared commentaries on the books of Scripture, and was engaged repeatedly in controversy with the opponents of his opinions.

  • It is above all the substance of religious feeling, which is the immediate consciousness of the unity of the world, of the absolute oneness behind the infinite multiplicity of contrasts; indeed, it is the religious conviction of the unity which is the best guarantee of the truth of the suppositions of philosophy.

  • The unity of our personal life amidst the multiplicity of its functions is the symbol of God's immanence in the world, though we may not conceive of the Absolute as a person.

  • The divine omnipotence is quantitatively represented by the sum of the forces of nature, and qualitatively distinguished from them only as the unity of infinite causality from the multiplicity of its finite phenomena.

  • This multiplicity of titles was more than a mere formula of the royal chancery.

  • Unfortunately Bradshaw allowed his attention to be distracted by a multiplicity of subjects, so that he has not left any literary work commensurate with his powers.

  • In the sorting through of the facts from a multiplicity of new sources, truth can be determined.

  • And without considering the multiplicity and complexity of the conditions any one of which taken separately may seem to be the cause, he snatches at the first approximation to a cause that seems to him intelligible and says: "This is the cause!"

  • They do not recognize it as a power inherent in heroes and rulers, but as the resultant of a multiplicity of variously directed forces.

  • Dante gives a refutation of the doctrine of the multiplicity of souls, ascribed to Plato by Thomas Aquinas.

  • The technology seems robust enough to allow for a multiplicity of pedagogical options.

  • This genuinely holistic approach searches for ' win-win ' solutions to a multiplicity of issues.

  • Generally, the club does not place rescued English Bulldogs in homes with young children or homes in which the owner travels frequently, or has a multiplicity of pets.

  • Aquarius is also fascinated by Gemini because that sign lives in the world of multiplicity which is a natural component of science.

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