Multiplications sentence example

multiplications
  • The method which Napier terms "Rabdologia" consists in the use of certain numerating rods for the performance of multiplications and divisions.

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  • The second method, which he calls the "Promptuarium Multiplicationis" on account of its being the most expeditious of all for the performance of multiplications, involves the use of a number of lamellae or little plates of metal disposed in a box.

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  • When algebra had advanced to the point where exponents were introduced, nothing would be more natural than that their utility as a means of performing multiplications and divisions should be remarked; but it is one of the surprises in the history of science that logarithms were invented as an arithmetical improvement years before their connexion with exponents was known.

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  • This rule as to using brackets is not always observed, the convention sometimes adopted being that multiplications or divisions are to be performed before additions or subtractions.

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  • In the course of reducing such expressions as (AB)C, (AB){C(DE)} and the like, where a chain of multiplications has to be performed in a certain order, the multiplications may be all progressive, or all regressive, or partly, one, partly the other.

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  • In 1617 he published a small work entitled Rabdologia relating to mechanical methods of performing multiplications and divisions, and in the same year he died.

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  • It is evident that Wittich's prosthaphaeresis could not be a good method of practically effecting multiplications unless the quantities to be multiplied were sines, on account of the labour of the interpolations.

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  • Involution is a direct process, consisting of successive multiplications; the other two are inverse processes.

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  • As the table of antilogarithms is formed by successive multiplications, so the logarithm of any given number is in theory found by successive divisions.

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  • In multiplications or divisions of any length it is generally convenient to begin by forming a table of the first nine multiples of the multiplicand or divisor, and Napier's bones at best merely provide such a table, and in an incomplete form, for the additions of the two figures in the same parallelogram have to be performed each time the rods are used.

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  • If instead of commencing with I and making successive additions of 1 we commence with any number such as 3 and make successive multiplications by 3, we get a series 3, g, 27,.

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