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muffs

muffs Sentence Examples

  • They are excellent for trimmings of evening mantles and for children's ties, muffs and perambulator aprons.

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  • Used for ladies' coats, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings.

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  • The fur is excellent for stoles, boas, collars, cuffs, muffs and trimmings.

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  • The best are the pale bluish greys, and are chiefly used for ladies' coats, stoles, muffs and hats.

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  • The tails when split into two or three, with small strips of narrow tape so as to separate the otherwise dense fur, formerly made very handsome sets of trimmings, ties and muffs, and the probabilities are, as with other fashions, such use will have its period of revival.

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  • About 1870 in England it was dyed dark brown or black and used for boas, muffs and trimmings, but until recently has been neglected on the continent.

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  • Their fur is pretty, warm and as yet inexpensive, and is useful for rugs, coat linings, stoles, muffs, trimmings and perambulator aprons.

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  • Used for cloak linings, stoles, muffs and trimmings, also for embellishment of British state, parliamentary and legal robes.

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  • The flanks are usually cut off and made into muffs and stoles.

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  • Astrachan, Shiraz and Bokharan lambs, size 22 by 9 in., are of a coarser, looser curl, and chiefly used for coat linings, while the Persians are used for outside of garments, collars, cuffs, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings and gloves.

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  • Skins of a pale bluish tone are generally used in their natural state for stoles, boas and muffs, but the less clear coloured skins are dyed in beautiful shades similar in density to the dark and valuable sables from Russia, and are the most effective skins that can be purchased at a reasonable price.

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  • I can close my eyes and see the hustle-bustle of the village, the children playing, the pack mules and miners, the ladies decked out in long dresses and fur muffs.

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  • Used for muffs, trimmings, boas, and carriage 1 The measurements given are from nose to root of tail of average large sizes after the dressing process, which has a shrinking tendency.

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  • Used for collars, cuffs, boas, muffs, trimmings, coat linings and carriage aprons, and is of a most durable nature, in addition to having a rich and good appearance.

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  • The tails are almost black and make up most handsomely into trimmings, muffs, &c. Tails worked separately in these forms are as rich and fine and more durable than any other fur suitable for a like purpose.

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  • Occasionally, where something very marked is wanted, skating jackets and carriage aprons are made from the softest and flattest of skins, but usually they are made into settee covers, floor rugs and foot muffs.

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  • It is dyed for the cheap trade for boas and muffs, but it is not an attractive fur at the best of times.

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  • The skins were in 1850 very fashionable in England for stoles, muffs and trimmings, and in America also as recently as 1890.

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  • If the colour were less motley and the joins between the skins could be made less noticeable, it would be largely in demand for stoles, ties and muffs.

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  • They are excellent for men's coat linings and the outside of ladies' coats, for stoles, muffs, collars and cuffs.

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  • Formerly the fur was only used for hatters' felt, but with the rise in prices of furs these skins have been more carefully removed and-with improved dressing, unhairing and silvering processes-the best provides a very effective and suitable fur for ladies' coats, capes, stoles, muffs, hats and gloves, while the lower qualities make very useful, light-weighted and inexpensive linings for men's or women's driving coats.

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  • The skins are not obtained in any numbers, but being brought over by travellers as curiosities and used for muffs, collars and cuffs, &c., they are included here for reference.

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  • The very finest skins are chiefly used for stoles and muffs, and the general run for coachmen's capes and carriage rugs, which are very handsome when the tails, which are marked with rings of dark and light fur alternately, are left on.

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  • The worst coloured skins are dyed black or brown and are used for British military busbies, or caps, st(des, boas, muffs and coachmen's capes.

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  • The best skins also provide excellent material for coats, capes, stoles, ties, collars, cuffs, gloves, muffs, hoods and light-weight carriage aprons.

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  • The best are a species of raccoon usually sold as fox, and, being of close long quality of fur, they are serviceable for boas, collars, muffs and carriage aprons.

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  • I can close my eyes and see the hustle-bustle of the village, the children playing, the pack mules and miners, the ladies decked out in long dresses and fur muffs.

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  • What do you call a polar bear wearing ear muffs?

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  • Extremely comfortable, no pressure points behind the ears, cannot fall off, ensures compatibility with helmet mounted ear muffs.

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  • Accessories - We can supply all types of visors and ear protection (including ear muffs to fix on to safety helmets ).

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  • Split frame pickup using 2mm Assoc system with tufnol block frame spacers, 2mm Assoc gears and axle muffs.

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  • The fur (q.v.) of this rodent was prized by the ancient Peruvians, who made coverlets and other articles with the skin, and at the present day the skins are exported in large numbers to Europe, where they are made into muffs, tippets and trimmings.

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  • Used for muffs, trimmings, boas, and carriage 1 The measurements given are from nose to root of tail of average large sizes after the dressing process, which has a shrinking tendency.

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  • Used for collars, cuffs, boas, muffs, trimmings, coat linings and carriage aprons, and is of a most durable nature, in addition to having a rich and good appearance.

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  • Used for ladies' coats, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings.

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  • Used for cloak linings, stoles, muffs and trimmings, also for embellishment of British state, parliamentary and legal robes.

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    0
  • The tails are almost black and make up most handsomely into trimmings, muffs, &c. Tails worked separately in these forms are as rich and fine and more durable than any other fur suitable for a like purpose.

    0
    0
  • The flanks are usually cut off and made into muffs and stoles.

    0
    0
  • Astrachan, Shiraz and Bokharan lambs, size 22 by 9 in., are of a coarser, looser curl, and chiefly used for coat linings, while the Persians are used for outside of garments, collars, cuffs, stoles, muffs, hats and trimmings and gloves.

    0
    0
  • The best are the pale bluish greys, and are chiefly used for ladies' coats, stoles, muffs and hats.

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    0
  • Occasionally, where something very marked is wanted, skating jackets and carriage aprons are made from the softest and flattest of skins, but usually they are made into settee covers, floor rugs and foot muffs.

    0
    0
  • The tails when split into two or three, with small strips of narrow tape so as to separate the otherwise dense fur, formerly made very handsome sets of trimmings, ties and muffs, and the probabilities are, as with other fashions, such use will have its period of revival.

    0
    0
  • It is dyed for the cheap trade for boas and muffs, but it is not an attractive fur at the best of times.

    0
    0
  • Skins of a pale bluish tone are generally used in their natural state for stoles, boas and muffs, but the less clear coloured skins are dyed in beautiful shades similar in density to the dark and valuable sables from Russia, and are the most effective skins that can be purchased at a reasonable price.

    0
    0
  • The skins were in 1850 very fashionable in England for stoles, muffs and trimmings, and in America also as recently as 1890.

    0
    0
  • If the colour were less motley and the joins between the skins could be made less noticeable, it would be largely in demand for stoles, ties and muffs.

    0
    0
  • They are excellent for men's coat linings and the outside of ladies' coats, for stoles, muffs, collars and cuffs.

    0
    0
  • Formerly the fur was only used for hatters' felt, but with the rise in prices of furs these skins have been more carefully removed and-with improved dressing, unhairing and silvering processes-the best provides a very effective and suitable fur for ladies' coats, capes, stoles, muffs, hats and gloves, while the lower qualities make very useful, light-weighted and inexpensive linings for men's or women's driving coats.

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    0
  • About 1870 in England it was dyed dark brown or black and used for boas, muffs and trimmings, but until recently has been neglected on the continent.

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  • Their fur is pretty, warm and as yet inexpensive, and is useful for rugs, coat linings, stoles, muffs, trimmings and perambulator aprons.

    0
    0
  • The skins are not obtained in any numbers, but being brought over by travellers as curiosities and used for muffs, collars and cuffs, &c., they are included here for reference.

    0
    0
  • The very finest skins are chiefly used for stoles and muffs, and the general run for coachmen's capes and carriage rugs, which are very handsome when the tails, which are marked with rings of dark and light fur alternately, are left on.

    0
    0
  • The worst coloured skins are dyed black or brown and are used for British military busbies, or caps, st(des, boas, muffs and coachmen's capes.

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    0
  • The fur is excellent for stoles, boas, collars, cuffs, muffs and trimmings.

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  • The best skins also provide excellent material for coats, capes, stoles, ties, collars, cuffs, gloves, muffs, hoods and light-weight carriage aprons.

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  • They are excellent for trimmings of evening mantles and for children's ties, muffs and perambulator aprons.

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    0
  • The best are a species of raccoon usually sold as fox, and, being of close long quality of fur, they are serviceable for boas, collars, muffs and carriage aprons.

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  • You will need: gloves with a good grip, safety glasses, a hard hat, chaps or leggings that can resist scratches, ear protection (plugs or muffs), and steel toe shoes.

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  • White tuxedos are popular, and bridesmaids may carry fur muffs instead of flowers.

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  • Muffs used to be de rigueur, despite the concern that they were one more thing for a child to lose.

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  • You can still get matching muffs, although they are much less common - precisely because they are less practical both for warmth and for keeping than mittens.

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  • Other Devices: There are many other snore blocker products designed for people who sleep next to snorers, including ear muffs and headsets.

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  • Cold weather accessories such as cabled tights and faux fur muffs and scarves can also enhance the layered look of a dress.

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  • Besides, these films are all about the kids having a good time and about the parents not having to worry about covering their eyes or telling them to put on their "ear muffs."

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  • The fur (q.v.) of this rodent was prized by the ancient Peruvians, who made coverlets and other articles with the skin, and at the present day the skins are exported in large numbers to Europe, where they are made into muffs, tippets and trimmings.

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  • Widely distributed in North America, the best come from Canada, are costly and are used for military caps, boas, muffs, trimmings, carriage rugs and coachmen's capes, and the fur wears exceedingly well.

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  • Widely distributed in North America, the best come from Canada, are costly and are used for military caps, boas, muffs, trimmings, carriage rugs and coachmen's capes, and the fur wears exceedingly well.

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