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mud

mud

mud Sentence Examples

  • Giddon paused at a mud hole and pointed at a track.

  • Like an Avon notice on a doorknob, the tracks in the mud were proof of an unobserved visit.

  • At one point he splashed through a mud puddle, throwing mud and water all over her.

  • The braids had to be untangled in order to shampoo the mud from her hair.

  • I promise not to plaster you with mud this time.

  • She slapped her gloves together to remove some of the mud.

  • Damian's silver-white hair was braided down his back, his thick body causing him to sink two inches into the mud.

  • Her memories wiggled their way out of the mud of her mind, and she sat upright.

  • The excavation was wider here and Dean could see signs of some earlier passage in the mud at the edge.

  • They brushed the mud from their clothes and sat for enough minutes to regain their composure.

  • Her trousers were black with mud front and back, her pant leg torn, and her left knee bloody.

  • Then I slipped trying to rub mud on my pants to cover it up.

  • He hauled himself out of the cold waters and sat on the shore that turned to mud beneath his dripping body.

  • He was well fed, though clothed like he'd been going to make mud pies and not to school like he should have been.

  • She stopped at the edge, where the trail was nothing but mud.

  • She jerked away, surprised, and slid in the mud toward the cliff edge.

  • Rhyn snatched her and wrapped his arm around her, lifting her out of the mud and farther back onto the trail.

  • Later, we complained about Janet's sloppy cleaning when we found traces of mud in an unused room.

  • If I don't get stuck in the mud, I should be able to make it to the highway.

  • The warm wind assisted the sun in melting the snow and most of it was already gone, leaving a trail of sloppy mud to the barn.

  • She kicked her cowboy boots off and pulled the mud boots on.

  • Carmen trudged through the sticky mud toward the chicken shed.

  • Her foot slipped on a large wet rock, spilling her face first into the mud.

  • She glanced down at her clothes, covered with mud, and realized her face was also caked with slime.

  • She grinned as her face warmed the mud.

  • She left him in the coop with the chicken and marched across the yard to the house, her boots making sucking noises each time she lifted her foot from the mud.

  • The rain would pack down the mud and melt the rest of the snow.

  • Katie hit the accelerator and the wheels spun wildly, instantly coating Carmen and Alex with mud.

  • When you push this thing out of the mud, she's going to be plumb through the gate before we can get to it.

  • Carmen sloshed through the mud, and by the time she opened the gate, the car was out of the mud.

  • Caked with mud, they both decided to walk to the house while Katie parked the car.

  • Thunder rumbled again and a cold drop of rain gnawed at the mud on her cheek.

  • In spite of the mud and weather, she felt much better.

  • No, I wasn't talking about the mud and cold.

  • The only sound was the sucking sound their boots made in the mud and the soothing sound of flowing water down at the creek.

  • The raindrops were heavier now, working the mud on her face into a slimy mess.

  • He reached out and touched her face, his fingers sliding in the mud.

  • She stepped back and watched as he excitedly hauled the little mud cat to the shore and released it.

  • She turned to see him motion her towards the jungle surrounding the lake.  His clothing was torn, and blood stained his skin.  He appeared to have been running; his boots were covered in mud that had splashed to his thighs, and his face was flushed.

  • Although Hunter had been born in North Carolina—on 16 acres of red mud, as he described it—he'd moved to Norfolk in high school and never left.

  • In the mud was a deer track, and overlaying it, the paw print of a big cat — too big to be a bobcat.

  • Sure, but the only thing in there is mud cats.

  • Not more than an hour ago you were helping him sling mud at me?

  • Kyaukpyu contains numerous "mud volcanoes," from which marsh gas is frequently discharged, with occasional issue of flame.

  • The mud brought down by it, calculated at 7150 lb an hour at Bagdad, is not deposited in marshes to form alluvium, as in the case of the Euphrates, but although in flood time the river becomes at places an inland sea, rendering navigation extremely difficult and uncertain, the bulk of the mud is deposited in banks, shoals and islands in the bed of the river, and is finally carried out into the Persian Gulf.

  • The new city formed a rectangle, enclosed by a colossal mud rampart, the longer sides of which ran north and south.

  • They reside in small towns and mud forts scattered along the coast.

  • In seasons of drought they are hardly more than swamps and mud flats, which for a time may become a grassy plain, or desolate coast encrusted with salt.

  • This island is joined to the mainland of Friesland by a stone dike constructed in 1873 for the purpose of promoting the deposit of mud.

  • Political agitators, in order to sap the power of the Opportunist party, did not hesitate to drag in the mud one of the greatest citizens of France.

  • The west coast throughout its whole length is covered to a depth of some miles with mangrove swamps, with only a few isolated stretches of sandy beach, the dim foliage of the mangroves and the hideous mud flats presenting a depressing spectacle.

  • The public buildings are mostly constructed of broken stone and mortar, plastered outside and covered with red tiles, but the common dwellings are generally constructed of tapiarough trellis-work walls filled in with mud.

  • They are built of "sun-dried blocks of mud and gravel, about 22 in.

  • They live for some time in water or mud, occasionally entering the bodies of water snails, but undergo no change until they reach the lung of a frog, when the cycle begins anew.

  • To the confusion of his father and brothers he went about dressed in rags, so that his old companions pelted him with mud.

  • The fortress town of Alessandria stopped his progress with those mud walls contemptuously named of straw, while the forces of the league assembled at Modena and obliged him to raise the siege.

  • In Hydra viridis the polyp is of a green colour and produces a spherical egg with a smooth shell which is dropped into the mud.

  • grisea is greyish in tint and produces a spherical egg with a spiky shell, which also is dropped into the mud.

  • with a form such as Corymorpha, which also is not fixed but only rooted in the mud.

  • In conclusion, it is noteworthy that though resorting to utterly fanciful hypotheses respecting the order of the development of the world, Anaximander agrees with modern evolutionists in conceiving the heavenly bodies as arising out of an aggregation of diffused matter, and in assigning to organic life an origin in the inorganic materials of the primitive earth (pristine mud).

  • The primitive cell sends colorless tubelets (rhizoids, rh.) into the mud on which it grows.

  • The stems are frequently characterized by aeration channels, which connect the aerial parts with the parts which are buried in practically airless mud or silt.

  • The plains about Sabzawar are highly cultivated by the Nurzai Duranis, and each village boasts its own little mud fort.

  • It is easy to distinguish the great primitive watercourses from the lateral ducts which they fed, the latter being almost without banks and merely traceable by the winding curves of the layers of alluvium in the bed, while the former are hedged in by high banks of mud, heaped up during centuries of dredging.

  • Flora.-The pastoral wealth of Uruguay, as of the neighbouring Argentine Republic, is due to the fertilizing constitutents of "pampa mud," geologically associated with gigantic antediluvian animals, whose fossil remains are abundant.

  • The former presents an intimate mixture of boulders brought from Finland and Olonets (with an addition of local boulders) with small gravel, coarse sand and the finest glacial mud, - the whole bearing no trace of ever having been washed up and sorted by water in motion, except in subordinate layers of glacial sand and gravel; the size of the boulders decreases on the whole from N.

  • Most of the small closed basins, however, contain "playas," or alkali mud flats, that are overflowed when the tributary streams are supplied with storm water.

  • In 1866 a submarine volcano near the islet of Olosenga was the scene of a violent commotion, discharging rocks and mud to a height of 2000 ft.

  • The streets as originally laid out were wide and spacious, but being unpaved and undrained they were no better than mud tracks diversified by piles of garbage and foul-smelling stagnant pools.

  • The latter class is formed by waters that fall on the barren mountain-sides and rush down in torrents, forming in the valleys shallow bodies of water yellow with the mud held in suspension.

  • in length and only a few inches deep. Such bodies often become nothing but vast sheets of liquid mud, and are called " mud lakes," a term most frequently applied to the sloughs fed by Quinn's river.

  • It is surrounded by a mud wall about 30 ft.

  • The kavirs, or salt depressions, of the Persian desert are more frequently widespread deposits of mud and salt than water-covered areas.

  • Grimsby was an important seaport, but the haven became obstructed by sand and mud deposited by the Humber, and so the access of large vessels was prevented.

  • These islands are little else than low mud banks, barely rising above the water-level.

  • On a group of these mud banks about the middle of the lagoon of Venice stands the city of Venice.

  • The soil is an oozy mud which can only be made capable of carrying buildings by the artificial means of pile-driving; there is no land fit for agriculture or the rearing of cattle; the sole food supply is fish from the lagoon, and there is no drinking-water save such as could be stored from the rainfall.

  • A ditch was cut deep into the mud so as to retain the water at low tide, and there the boats of the fishermen lay.

  • Gradually, as time went on, and probably with the influx of refugees from the mainland, bricks made of lagoon mud came to take the place of wattle and reeds in the construction of the houses.

  • A trench was dug in the soft upper mud until the stratum of stiff blue clay was reached.

  • It is usually affirmed that the state of Venice owes its origin to the barbarian invasions of north Italy; that it was founded by refugees from the mainland cities who sought asylum from the Huns in the impregnable shallows and mud banks of the lagoons; and that the year 452, the year when Attila sacked Aquileia, may be taken as the birth-year of Venice.

  • In spite of the fact that the French field-pieces at once made practicable breaches in the mud walls of the fort, the defenders held out with desperate valour.

  • numbers on the mud flats at the mouths of rivers in the tropics, skipping about by means of the muscular, scaly base of their pectoral fins, with the head raised and bearing a pair of strongly projecting versatile eyes close together.

  • There is historic evidence of mud eruptions in some of the volcanic areas.

  • Such could hardly be obtained in any other way by those worms that have no special respiratory apparatus, and that live in mud and under stones where the natural supply of freshly oxygenated sea-water is practicaily limited.

  • With respect to the sense organs of the Nemertines, we find that eyes are of rather constant occurrence, although many Heteronemertines living in the mud appear to be blind.

  • They live in the mud, which they eat, in comparatively shallow waters up to 50 fathoms.

  • For winter quarters they build more elaborate houses of conical or dome-like form, composed of sedges, grasses and similar materials plastered together with mud.

  • It is an unlovely place, surrounded by mud flats, and a hotbed of malaria.

  • BdXXo, a green bud, on account of a brilliant green line in its spectrum) in the selenious mud of the sulphuric acid manufacture; the chemical affinities of this element, on the one hand approximating to the metals of the alkalis, and on the other hand to lead, were mainly established by C. A.

  • To the south of Rotoiti is Tikitere, a sombre valley abounding in mud volcanoes, springs and other active volcanic phenomena.

  • From this root, which lay horizontally, smaller roots pushed down into the mud, and the stem of the plant sprang up to the height of 4 cubits, being triangular and tapering in form.

  • The mounds were probably formed by some gentle eruptive action like that exhibited in the " mud hills " along the Mississippi below New Orleans; but no explanation is generally accepted.

  • wide and very deep. Its banks are of mud, with no other retaining walls than those formed by the foundations of the houses, which are consequently always liable to be undermined by the action of the water.

  • There may be said to be three or four different modes of life in these larvae: some are fossorial, and form tubes in the mud or clay in which they live; others are found on or beneath stones; while others again swim and crawl freely among water plants.

  • An English translation by the side of the Welsh text of the so-called triads of Dyvnwal Moel Mud is given by Owen, in the The Ancient Laws of Wales.

  • It is spread over an extensive area, being surrounded by mud walls 18 miles in extent.

  • The streets are generally narrow and the houses built of mud.

  • Within four months one hundred houses were built, and surrounded by a mud wall.

  • The immense mud ramparts still stand.

  • The district abounds in geysers, springs, mud volcanoes and other phenomena; some of the waters have petrifying powers, and some of the springs are vividly coloured.

  • The Rhine connects the highest Alps with the mud banks of Holland, and touches in its course the most varied geological periods; but the river valley itself is, geologically speaking, of comparatively recent formation.

  • Bannockburn); further, the deep mud prevented their artillery from taking part, and the crossbowmen were as usual relegated to the rear of the knights and men-at-arms. All were dismounted save a few knights and men-at-arms on the flanks, who were intended to charge the archers of the enemy.

  • The constable himself headed the leading line of dismounted men-at-arms; weighted with their armour, and sinking deep into the mud with every step, they yet reached and engaged the English men-at-arms; for a time the fighting was severe.

  • Mud volcanoes occur at Minbu, but they are not in any sense mountains, resembling rather the hot springs which are found in many parts of Burma.

  • They are merely craters raised above the level of the surrounding country by the gradual accretion of the soft oily mud, which overflows at frequent intervals whenever a discharge of gas occurs.

  • Whether the mud " volcanoes" of the Irrawaddy valley have any connexion with volcanic activity may be doubted.

  • It consists for the most part of mud huts, but there are some houses built of sun-dried bricks.

  • Thus clear liquor alone is run off, and the mud and cloudy liquor at the bottom of the tank are left undisturbed, and discharged separately as required.

  • In a refinery in Nova Scotia a system has been introduced by which a travelling crane above the bag filters lifts up any head bodily with all its bags attached, and runs it to the mud and washing tanks at the end of the battery, while another similar crane drops another head, fitted with fresh bags, into the place of the one just removed.

  • The whole operation of thus changing a filter occupies about ten minutes, and there is no need for anyone to enter the hot cistern to detach the bags, which are removed in the open air above the mud tank.

  • The mud collects at the bottom of the u, and allows the upper part of the bag to filter for a longer time than would be the case if the bottom end were closed and if the bag hung straight like the letter I.

  • They were built up by the gradual accumulation of mud deposits in a shallow bay, separated by dunes from the North Sea.

  • The islands of Schouwen and Duiveland are united owing to the damming of the Dykwater; St Filipsland, or Philipsland, and South Beveland are connected with the mainland of North Brabant by naturally formed mud banks.

  • The mainland of Zeeland-Flanders was formerly also composed of numerous islands which were gradually united by the accumulation of mud and sand, and in this way many once flourishing commercial towns, such as Sluis and Aardenburg, were reduced in importance.

  • The town with its gardens, surrounded by a mud wall, covers a space of 2 m.

  • The streets formerly consisted largely of mud hovels, but since a great fire in 1894, which destroyed large parts of James Town and Ussher Town, more substantial buildings have been erected.

  • The nest is a neat structure of coarse grass and moss, mixed with earth, and plastered internally with mud, and here the female lays from four to six eggs of a blue colour speckled with brown.

  • They are smooth depressed areas (in the case of the largest, the Shat el Jerid, lying a few feet below the level of the Mediterranean), which for more than half the year are expanses of dried mud covered with a thick incrustation of white or grey salt.

  • of water in these shats, which by liquefying the mud makes them perfectly impassable.

  • ust and ash, gave rise to torrents of pasty mud, that flowed p own the slopes and overwhelmed houses and villages.

  • The mud from the Ysel furnishes the material for large brick-works and potteries; there are also a celebrated manufactory of stearine candles, a yarn factory, an oil refinery and cigar factories.

  • On passing a current of electricity, of which the volume and pressure are adjusted to the conditions of the electrolyte and electrodes, the anode slowly dissolves, leaving the insoluble impurities in the form of a sponge, if the proportion be considerable, but otherwise as a mud or slime which becomes detached from the anode surface and must be prevented from coming into contact with the cathode.

  • In 1772 during the proceedings against Crosby and Oliver - a part of the "Wilkes and liberty" agitation - he and Lord North were attacked by a mob and rolled in the mud.

  • § 6) on which a diving animal had placed some mud, received her.

  • The solution may be directly precipitated with copper, the copper passing into solution as copper sulphate, and the silver separating as a mud, termed " cement silvers" Or the silver sulphate may be separated from the solution by cooling and dilution, and then mixed with iron clippings, the interaction being accompanied with a considerable evolution of heat.

  • They occur in mud and on sea-weeds at the bottom of shallow seas below low-water mark and devour organic debris.

  • At this time the town consisted of about 120 houses, mostly built of mud and covered with thatch, while the castle, a twostoreyed building, was roofed with shingles.

  • The ditch was choked, the gates were unprotected; the tumbled mass of irregular mud buildings which constituted the city clung tightly to the walls; there were no gun emplacements.

  • The mud houses in rear of the bazaars are for the most part uninhabited and in ruins, and even the burnt brick buildings are becoming everywhere dilapidated.

  • At the same time, any excessive local rainfall is productive of difficulty and danger from the floods of liquid mud and loose boulders which sweep like an avalanche down the hill sides.

  • He spliced together all the sounding-lines on board, rightly said that since the days of Columbus and Magellan no and with a weight of 1501b attached he found bottom in 683 such revelation regarding the surface of our planet had been fathoms and secured a sample of fine soft blue mud.

  • Similar effects are produced along the boulder-clay cliffs of the Baltic. Where the force of the waves on the beach produces its full effect the coarser material gets worn down to gravel, sand and silt, the finest particles remaining long suspended in the water to be finally deposited as mud in quiet bays.

  • A particularly fine-grained mud is formed on the low coasts of the eastern border of the North Sea by a mixture of the finest sediment carried down by the slow-running rivers with the calcareous or siliceous remains of plankton.

  • Pure calcareous sand and calcareous mud are formed by wave action on the shores of coral islands where the only material available is coral and the accompanying calcareous algae, crustacea, molluscs and other organisms secreting carbonate of lime.

  • Blue mud, according to Murray and Renard, is usually of a blue or slaty or grey-green colour when fresh, the upper surface having, however, a reddish tint.

  • The blue colouring substance is ferrous sulphide, the upper reddish layer contains more ferric oxide, which the predominance of decomposing organic matter in the substance of the mud reduces to ferrous oxide and subsequently by further action to sulphide.

  • Blue mud prevails in large areas of the Pacific Ocean from the Galapagos Islands to Acapulco.

  • Max Weber states that blue mud occurs in the deep basins of the eastern part of the Malay Sea.

  • In the form of volcanic mud it is common round the high volcanic islands of the SouthWestern Pacific.

  • Red mud may be classed as a variety of blue mud, from which it differs on account of the larger proportion of ochreous substance and the absence of sufficient organic matter to reduce the whole of the ferric oxide.

  • Green mud differs to a greater extent from the blue mud, and owes its characteristic nature and colour to the presence of glauconite, which is formed inside the cases of foraminifera, the spines of echini and the spicules of sponges in a manner not yet understood.

  • Green mud abounds off the east coast of North America seawards of Cape Hatteras, also to the north of Cuba, and on the west off the coast of California.

  • When the proportion of calcium carbonate in the blue mud is considerable there results a calcareous ooze, which when found on the continental slope and in enclosed seas is largely composed of remains of deep-sea corals and bottom-living foraminif era, pelagic organisms including pteropods being less frequently represented.

  • Similar formations are found in the Mediterranean, where a dark mud predominates in the western part, passing into a grey, marly slime in the Tyrrhenian Basin and replaced by a typical calcareous ooze in the Eastern Basin.

  • The bottom of the Black Sea is covered by a stiff blue mud in which Sir John Murray found much sulphide of iron,' grains or needles of pyrites making up nearly 50% of the deposit, and there are also grains of amorphous calcium carbonate evidently precipitated from the water.

  • The formation of the blue mud is largely aided by the putrefaction of organic matter, and as a result the water deeper than 120 fathoms is extraordinarily deficient in dissolved oxygen and abounds in sulphuretted hydrogen, the formation of which is brought about by a special bacterium, the only form of life found at depths greater than 120 fathoms in the Black Sea.

  • These peculiarities, combined with the striking absence of mineral constituents, distinguish the eupelagic globigerina ooze from the hemipelagic calcareous mud.

  • The houses are in general made of undressed stone and mud and are flat-topped, the general aspect of the city being Oriental and un-Abyssinian.

  • A fine tamarisk, traces of a church (which is mentioned in the 8th century), and a large reservoir, now filled up with mud, remain.

  • Buonanni, a learned Jesuit of Rome) that they are not generated out of the mud or sand found on the seashore or the beds of rivers at low water, but from spawn, by the regular course of generation; and he maintained the same to be true of the fresh-water mussel (Unio), whose ova he examined so carefully that he saw in them the rotation of the embryo, a phenomenon supposed to have been first discovered long afterwards.

  • Beavers are sociable animals, living in streams, where, so as to render the water of sufficient depth, they build dams of mud and of the stems and boughs of trees felled by their powerful incisor teeth.

  • The mud is 1 The word is descended from the Aryan name of the animal, cf.

  • The materials made use of are driftwood, green willows, birch and poplars; also mud and stones intermixed in such a manner as contributes to the strength of the dam; but there is no particular method observed, except that the work is carried on with a regular sweep, and that all the parts are made of equal strength.

  • The beavers carry the mud and stones with their fore-paws and the timber between their teeth.

  • They cover their houses late every autumn with fresh mud, which, freezing when the frost sets in, becomes almost as hard as stone, so that neither wolves nor wolverines can disturb their repose.

  • The truth is, without doubt, that the dwellings of the lower classes were still built of reeds and mud, and covered the greater part of the city's area, otherwise it is impossible to understand how a mere handful of Spanish soldiers, without tools and explosives, could so easily have levelled it to the ground.

  • The place is resorted to for its salt, mud and brine baths, and its koumiss cures.

  • Whereas most of the species have hoofs of normal shape, in some, such as the nakong, or situtunga (Tragelaphus spekei), these are greatly elongated, in order to be suited for walking in soft mud, and these have accordingly been separated as Limnotragus.

  • It is protected by a mud wall and a citadel.

  • Miller discovered that they undergo a metamorphosis, and that the minute worm-like lamperns previously known under the name of Ammocoetes, and abundant in the sand and mud of many streams, were nothing but the undeveloped young of the river-lampreys and small lamperns.

  • Herons, the brown pelican, bittern, and mud hen frequent the marshes.

  • The most uncommon natural feature of the district, the Pink and White Terraces, was blown up in the eruption of Mount Tarawera in 1886, when for great distances the country was buried beneath mud and dust, and a chasm 9 m.

  • Fine lakes and waterfalls, innumerable pools, in temperature from boiling-point to cold, geysers, solfataras, fumaroles and mud volcanoes still attract tourists in large numbers.

  • Oysters, both mud and rock, are good and plentiful.

  • The platform itself was usually composed of rough layers of unbarked stems, but occasionally it was formed of boards split from larger stems. When the mud was too soft to afford foothold for the piles they were mortised into a framework of tree trunks placed horizontally on the bottom of the lake.

  • Omar was held in check by the mud Expedi- ramparts of Missolonghi; but Dramali, after exacting Lion of fearful vengeance for the massacre of the Turkish Dramali, garrison of the Acropolis at Athens, crossed the 1822.

  • In 1699 Batavia was visited by a terrible earthquake, and the streams were choked by the mud from the volcano of Gunong Salak; they overflowed the surrounding country and made it a swamp, by which the climate was so affected that the city became notorious for its unhealthiness, and was in great danger of being altogether abandoned.

  • The whole is surrounded by a deep and wide ditch, which can be filled from the river, at the risk, however, of bringing down the whole structure, for the walls are of mud, and stand upon a porous sandy soil.

  • Thus Demosthenes in his speech "On the crown" accused Aeschines of having "purified the initiated and wiped them clean with (not from) mud and pitch."

  • of sand and mud.

  • limus, mud, clay), a fertile soil composed of a mixture of sand, clay, and decomposed vegetable matter, the quantity of sand being sufficient to prevent the clay massing together.

  • The sudden swelling of rivers and downpour of rain stopped all movement at once, and the "Mud March" came to an end.

  • The remaining mud of calcium carbonate and hydrate is washed, by decantation, with small instalments of hot water to recover at least part of the alkali diffused throughout it, but this process must not be continued too long or else some of the lime passes into solution.

  • A parcel of dried mud, coming for example from Palestine or Queensland, and after an indefinite interval of time put into water in England or elsewhere, may yield him living forms, both new and old, in the most agreeable variety.

  • Sars (1887) having had the opportunity of raising it from dried Australian mud, found that, unlike other phyllopods, but like the Cladocera, the parent keeps its brood within the shell until their full development.

  • kilometres - about two-thirds of that in the Atlantic. Pteropod ooze occurs only in the neighbourhood of Fiji and other islands of the western Pacific, passing up into fine coral sands and mud.

  • Shaler, state geologist in 1873-1880, " When the rocks whence they flow were formed on the Silurian sea-floors, a good deal of the sea-water was imprisoned in the strata, between the grains of sand or mud and in the cavities of the shells that make up a large part of these rocks.

  • Festschrift zum 70ten Geburtstage von Ernst Haeckel, 19(34) has restored the conditions existing in the lagoons and atoll reefs of the Jurassic sea of Solnhofen in Bavaria; he has traced the process of gradual accumulation of the coral mud now constituting the fine lithographic stones in the inter-reef region, and has recognized the periodic laying bare of the mud surfaces thus formed; he has determined the winds which carried the dust particles from the not far distant land and brought the insects from the adjacent Jurassic forests.

  • Coxcoxtli used the help of the Aztecs against the Xochimilco people; but his own nation, horrified at their bloodthirsty sacrifice of prisoners, drove them out to the islands and swamps of the great salt lagoon, where they are said to have taken to making their chinampas or floating gardens of mud heaped on rafts of reeds and brush, which in later times were so remarkable a feature of Mexico.

  • Streams of rainwater, formed by condensation of exhaled steam often mingled with volcanic ashes so as to produce mud, are known as lava d'acqua, whilst the streams of molten matter are called lava di fuoco.

  • Bueb (Congress of German Gas Industries, March 1900) brings gas (free from tar) into intimate contact with a saturated solution of ferrous sulphate, when a "cyanogen mud" is obtained.

  • or more between highand low-water and is loaded with mud.

  • This is the less improbable because it lies in the neighbourhood of a line of earthquake movement, and both from Thucydides and from Strabo we hear of the northern part of the island being shaken at different periods, and the latter writer speaks of a fountain at Chalcis being dried up by a similar cause, and a mud volcano formed in the neighbouring plain.

  • The foot is commonly a simple cylindrical or ploughshare-shaped organ, used for boring in sand and mud, and more rarely presents a crawling disk similar to that of Gastropoda; in some forms it is aborted.

  • i [I] [2]) so as to issue from the shell, and by its action the Anodonta can slowly crawl or burrow in soft mud or sand.

  • The finer material constituting alluvium, often described as "silt," is sand and mud.

  • Alluvial soils are almost invariably of great fertility; it is due to the alluvial mud annually deposited by the Nile that the dwellers in Egypt have been able to grow their crops for over 4000 years without artificial fertilization.

  • A very heavy rainstorm during the night seriously affected the movements of troops on the following day, but all to Napoleon's advantage, for his more mobile artillery, reinforced by every horse available in and about Dresden, was still able to move where the Allied guns sank in mud.

  • The populace of the Tiber welcomed and expelled him with equal enthusiasm, and when his body was brought back from exile, the mob went before the cortege and threw mud and stones upon the funeral litter.

  • The brine used at Ischl contains about 25% of salt and there are also mud, sulphur and pine-cone baths.

  • wide, badly paved and dirty; the houses and shops are low, mostly of stone, and some of stone and mud.

  • It should be free from dirt - that is to say, free from clay or soft mud, for instance, which prevents the cement adhering to its particles, or again from sewage matter or any substance which will chemically destroy the matrix.

  • Its mud and pantile dwellings are here and there relieved by a mosque tower, but the aspect of the town is far from inviting.

  • In the lower Geyser basin are the Mammoth Paint Pots, a group of mud springs with colours varying according to the mineral ingredients in the steam, which not only colours the mud but also forms it into imitative figures.

  • Near the centre of the park is Mud Caldron, a circular crater about 40 ft.

  • deep with the boiling mud at the bottom.

  • It is believed that the bluish colour of many clays and limestones is referable to the presence of finely divided pyrites, and it is known that certain deposits of blue mud now forming around continental shores owe their colour, in part, to disseminated iron sulphide.

  • While therefore the centre and south of England lay under clear water of moderate depth, the north of the country and the south of Scotland were covered by shallow water, which was continually receiving sand and mud from the adjacent northern land.

  • The extensive sea-arms forming the South Holland and Zeeland archipelago are the Hont or West Scheldt, the East Scheldt, the Grevelingen (communicating with Krammer and the Volkerak) and the Haringvliet, which after being joined by the Volkerak is known as the Hollandsch Diep. These inlets were formerly of much greater extent than now, but are gradually closing up owing to the accumulation of mud deposits, and no longer have the same freedom of communication with one another.

  • The group of islands, Cheduba and others, in the north-east, off the Burmese coast, are remarkable for a chain of mud volcanoes, which are occasionally active.

  • Thus in December 1906 a new island of mud was thrown up, and measured 3 07 by 217 yds.

  • The usual habitation built both by Arabs and Nubas is the tukl, a conical-shaped hut made of stone, mud, wattle and daub or straw.

  • In the chief towns houses are built of mud bricks with flat roofs.

  • (From Photographs by C. Evans.) In a very few years, however, the open pit mining was rendered impossible by the mud rushes, by the falls of the masses of barren rock known as " reef," which were left standing in the mine, and by landslips from the sides, so that in 1883, when the pit had reached a depth of about 400 ft., mining in the Kimberley crater had become almost impossible.

  • Cohen, who regarded the pipes as of the nature of a mud volcano, and the blue ground as a kimberlite breccia altered by hydrothermal action, thought that the diamond and accompanying minerals had been brought up from deep-seated crystalline schists.

  • The shores are for the greater part formed of fine gravel; some yards from the shore the bed is uniformly covered with fine greyish mud.

  • A few lotus trees and some rock-cut tombs are here found beside a miserable mud hamlet on the hill slope, with a modern tombhouse (kubbeh).

  • Here and there are regions occupied by a semi-sedentary population, called Madan, occupying reed huts huddled around mud castles, called meftul.

  • Sir Thomas Roe, who visited it in 1614, found that the houses in the town were "only mud cottages, except the prince's house, the chan's and some few others."

  • Quicker or slower, the water that fills it will wash in sand and mud, and year by year this process will go on till ultimately the whole reservoir is filled up. The embankment is raised, and raised again, but at last it is better to abandon it and make a new tank elsewhere, for it would never pay to dig out the silt by manual labour.

  • below it, and their water is at all seasons very free from silt or mud.

  • Four ways of irrigating land with water are practised in England: (I) bedwork irrigation, which is the most efficient although it is also the most costly method by which currents of water can be applied to level land; (2) catchwork irrigation, in which the same water is caught and used repeatedly; (3) subterraneous or rather upward irrigation, in which the water in the drains is sent upwards through the soil towards the surface; and (4) warping, in which the water is allowed to stand over a level field until it has deposited the mud suspended in it.

  • The size of this depends water is usually preferable for grass land, thick for y P g upon the quantity of water required, but whatever its size its bottom at its origin should be as low as the bed of the river, in order that it may carry down as much as possible of the river mud.

  • The mud is deposited and the waters return with the falling tide to the bed of the river.

  • Spring-tides are preferred, and so great is the quantity of mud in these rivers that from to to 15 acres have been known to be covered with silt from I to 3 ft.

  • When the tide is first admitted the heavier particles, which are pure sand, are first deposited; the second deposit is a mixture of sand and fine mud, which, from its friable texture, forms the most valuable soil; while lastly the pure mud subsides, containing the finest particles of all, and forms a rich but very tenacious soil.

  • Three years may be said to be spent in the process, one year warping, one year drying and consolidating, and one year growing the first crop, which is generally seed-hoed in by hand, as the mud at this time is too soft to admit of horse labour.

  • The silt and mud brought down by these rivers is rich in clay and organic matter, and sometimes when dry contains as much as I% of nitrogen.

  • deep, depositing its mud, and thence at the end of the flood the almost clear water may either be run off directly into the receding river, or cuts may be made in the cross embankments, and it may be allowed to flow from one flat to another and ultimately into the river.

  • In November the waters have passed off; and whenever a man can walk over the mud with a pair of bullocks, it is roughly turned over with a wooden plough, or merely the branch of a tree, and the wheat or barley crop is immediately sown.

  • Mehemet Ali began by deepening the canals of Lower Egypt by this amount, a gigantic and futile task; for as they had been laid out on no scientific principles, the deep channels became filled with mud during the first flood, and all the excavation had to be done over again, year after year.

  • Nothing more solid than strata of sand and mud is to be found for more than 200 ft.

  • He received Johnson's homage with the most winning affability, and requited it with a few guineas, bestowed doubtless in a very graceful manner, but was by no means desirous to see all his carpets blackened with the London mud, and his soups and wines thrown to right and left over the gowns of fine ladies and the waistcoats of fine gentlemen, by an absent, awkward scholar, who gave strange starts and uttered strange growls, who dressed like a scarecrow and ate like a cormorant.

  • But it is not probable that his curiosity would have overcome his habitual sluggishness, and his love of the smoke, the mud, and the cries of London, had not Boswell importuned him to attempt the adventure, and offered to be his squire.

  • Many of these fishes delight in the mud at the bottom of ponds, in which they move like eels.

  • The houses are built of mud, and in the absence of visible remains of antiquity, the identification of the site is questionable.

  • The most conspicuous of these is the long, white alimentary canal, crowded with mud.

  • As is so often the case with animals which eat mud and sand, and extract what little nutriment is afforded by the organic debris therein, the walls of the alimentary canal are thin and apparently weak.

  • All along one side is a microscopic ciliated groove, into which the mud does not seem to enter, and along which a continuous stream of water may be kept up. Possibly this is respiratory - there are no special respiratory organs.

  • Beyond the delta firm ground takes the place of mud and the mangroves disappear.

  • They are nearly all surrounded by strong mud walls and outer dry moats.

  • The eggs, in several layers, are laid near the top. The adults frequently dig long subterranean passages into the banks of streams, and, during dry seasons, they have been found deep in the hardened mud, whence they emerge with the beginning of the rains.

  • The superficial sands of the deserts and the Nile mud form the chief recent formations.

  • The Nile deposits its mud over the valley before reaching the sea, and consequently the Delta receives little additional material.

  • The crier continues his daily rounds, with his former chant, excepting on the Coptic New Years Day, when the cry of the Wefh is repeated, until the Salib, or Discovery of the Cross, the 26th or 27th of September, at which period, the river having attained its greatest height, he concludes his annual employment with another chant, and presents to each house some limes and other fruit, and dry lumps of Nile mud.

  • The Divine Cult.In the midst of every town rose the temple of the local god, a stately building of stone, strongly :ontrasting with the mud and plaster houses in which even the wealthiest Egyptians dwelt.

  • The mud rake for mixing mortar is rather narrower than the modern form.

  • When the attachment is in sand or mud, it often simulates the appearance of a true root as in Chara or Caulerpa.

  • It is clear that where the bottom of a lake or sea consists of oozy mud or shifting sand, it is impossible for algae to secure a foothold.

  • The materials are chalk and Medway mud; in a few works the latter is replaced by gault.

  • Below again are Mycenaean and pre-Mycenaean settlements, with houses built of sticks and mud.

  • For the extraction of the metal from chamber mud, the latter is boiled with water, which extracts the thallium as the sulphate.

  • Differing from the typical oasis, whose fertility depends on water obtained from springs, the cultivated land in the Fayum is formed of Nile mud brought down by the Bahr Yusuf.

  • Considerable deposits of mud, silt and sand are accumulating in many of the estuaries.

  • When the otter "vents" or comes to the surface to breathe, his muzzle only appears above water, and when he is viewed or traced by the mud he stirs up, or by air bubbles, the hounds are laid on.

  • The Imbabura volcano, celebrated for its destructive eruptions of mud and water, stands midway between the two ranges at the northern end of the plateau, and belongs to the transverse ridge of knot (nudo) which unites them.

  • The Guayas or Guayaquil river is in part an estuary extending northward from the Gulf of Guayaquil, bordered by mangrove swamps and mud banks formed by the silt brought down from the neighbouring mountains.

  • There is a low, mountainous ridge, called the Zampo Palo, running through it, and its eastern shores have some moderately high bluffs, otherwise the island is low and swampy, and its shores, except the eastern end, are fringed with mud banks.

  • There are some low, swampy islands, or mud flats, covered with mangrove thickets, in the lower Guayas river, but they are uninhabited and of no importance.

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