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mucous

mucous

mucous Sentence Examples

  • As the sieve plate grows these non-cellulose regions swell and gradually become converted into the same kind of mucous substance as that contained in the tube; the two cells are thus placed in open communication.

  • forms and in terrestrial genera such as Cyclostoma; (2) the anterior pedal gland opening into the anterior groove of the foot, generally present in aquatic species; (3) dorsal posterior mucous glands in certain Cyclostomatidae.

  • Salicylic acid is now never given internally, being replaced by its sodium salt, which is much cheaper, more soluble and less irritating to mucous membranes.

  • It also yields, by the so-called mucous fermentation, a mucous, gummy mass, mixed with mannitol and lactic acid.

  • Applied externally lead salts have practically no action upon the unbroken skin, but applied to sores, ulcers or any exposed mucous membranes they coagulate the albumen in the tissues themselves and contract the small vessels.

  • Internally lead has an astringent action on the mucous membranes, causing a sensation of dryness; the dilute solution of the subacetate forms an effective gargle in tonsillitis.

  • It is a colourless liquid, with a very pungent smell, and attacks the mucous membrane very rapidly.

  • The vomiting may take place every two or three days, enormous quantities of undigested food mixed with frothy, yeast-like mucous being thrown up. And whilst the stomach is slowly filling up again after one of these uncontrollable emptyings, sudden and violent movements of the individual may cause the fluid to give rise to audible "splashings."

  • The parasites, which cling to the intestinal mucous membrane, draw their nourishment from the blood-vessels of their host, and as they are found in hundreds in the body after death, the disorders of digestion, the increasing anaemia and the consequent dropsies and other cachectic symptoms are easily explained.

  • By mucoid is understood a soft gelatinous substance containing mucin, or pseudomucin, which is normally secreted by the epithelial cells of both the mucous membranes and glands.

  • The free fatty acid radicle then unites with an alkali, and becomes transformed into a soluble soap which is then readily absorbed in this fluid condition by the epithelial cells of the mucous membrane.

  • Certain degenerative changes in the supra-renal glands may lead to Addison's disease, which is characterized by an excessive pigmentary condition of the skin and mucous membranes.

  • After middle life he suffered from the stone, not to mention the common plague of studious men, an irritable mucous membrane.

  • It possesses only slight influence over the heart and respiration, but it has a specific effect on mucous membranes as the elimination of the drug takes place largely through the lungs, where it aids in loosening bronchial secretions.

  • Though ammonium chloride has certain irritant properties which may disorder the stomach, yet if its mucous membrane be depressed and atonic the drug may improve its condition, and it has been used with success in gastric and intestinal catarrhs of a subacute type and is given in doses of io grains half an hour before meals in painful dyspepsia due to hyperacidity.

  • Sodium is excreted by all the mucous surfaces and by the liver and kidneys.

  • They are said to diminish the secretion of the bronchial mucous membrane.

  • Its continued employment may, indeed, so injure the mucous membrane of the stomach as to interfere with digestion and so cause a morbid and dangerous reduction in weight.

  • The canal of the cervix is about an inch long, and is spindle-shaped when looked at from in front; its anterior and posterior walls are in contact, and its lining mucous membrane is raised into a pattern which, from its likeness to a cypress twig, is called the arbor vitae.

  • The vagina is a dilatable muscular passage, lined with mucous membrane, which leads from the uterus to the external generative organs; its direction is, from the uterus, downward and forward, and its anterior and posterior walls are in contact, so that in a horizontal section it appears as a transverse slit.

  • The mucous membrane is raised into a series of transverse folds or rugae, and between it and the muscular wall are plexuses of veins forming erectile tissue.

  • The labia minora are two folds of skin containing no fat, which are usually hidden by the labia majora and above enclose the clitoris, they are of a pinkish colour and look like mucous membrane.

  • The hymen is a fold of mucous membrane which surrounds the orifice of the vagina and is usually only seen in the virgin.

  • The vesiculae seminales are muscular sacs with a mucous lining which is thrown into a series of delicate net-like folds.

  • Into the whole length of the urethra mucous glands (glands of Littre) open, and in the roof of 1 Figs.

  • The most remarkable feature of the genus is, however, the extraordinary development of the zygomatic arches of the skull, which are enormously expanded vertically, forming great convex bony capsules on the sides of the face, enclosing on each side a large cavity lined with mucous membrane internally, and communicating by a small opening with the mouth.

  • Brucine is a local anaesthetic. Strychnine enters the blood as such, being freely absorbed from mucous surfaces or when given hypodermically.

  • An ectodemic invagination forms a large mucous gland on the foot, which is more or less atrophied in adult life.

  • Into the groove open mucous glands, a large one anteriorly and another opening into a posteriorly cloacal, branchial cavity.

  • The hippuric acid in the urine acts as a stimulant and disinfectant to the urinary mucous membrane.

  • Benzoic acid is also excreted by the bronchi and tends to disinfect and stimulate the bronchial mucous membrane.

  • In medicine copper sulphate was employed as an emetic, but its employment for this purpose is now very rare, as it is exceedingly depressant, and if it fails to act, may seriously damage the gastric mucous membrane.

  • They pass more readily through mucous membranes, but almost every one of these is provided not only with a coating of mucus, which obstructs their passage, but with some reflex mechanism which tends to remove them.

  • Where there has been local mischief due to inflammation the dead leucocytes must be removed, and this is done either by their being converted into pus in one mass, and making their way through the tissues to the nearest surface, whether of skin or mucous membrane, from which it can be discharged, or they may undergo a process of fatty degeneration and absorption, leaving behind in some cases cheesy matter, in others hard connective tissue.

  • Poisons formed by microbes are partly eliminated by the kidneys, partly by the mucous membrane of the stomach and intestines, and possibly also by the skin.

  • Thus carbolic acid or carbolized ammonia are sniffed into the nose to destroy the microbes there, or the nose is washed out by an antiseptic solution as a nasal douche; bismuth or morphine are insufflated, or zinc ointment is applied, to cover the mucous membrane, and protect it from further irritation; and various antiseptic gargles, paints and powders applied to the pharynx in order to prevent the microbic inflammation from extending to the pharynx and down the trachea and bronchi, for many a severe bronchitis begins first by sneezing and nasal irritation.

  • In the same way, the reflex act of coughing is useful in removing either foreign bodies or excessive secretion from the air passages; but when the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract is irritated and inflamed, it produces a feeling of tickling and a desire to cough sometimes very violently; yet the coughing simply tends to exhaust the patient, because there is really little or nothing to bring up. The same is the case in inflammation of the lung substance itself.

  • The treatment of inflammation of mucous membrane is based upon the same principles as inflammation of the skin, and there too we usually associate means (I) for removing microbes, (2) for destroying them, (3) for lessening the irritation they produce, and (4) for repairing any mischief they have done.

  • For inflammation of the mouth a similar combination is used as a mouth wash, in the throat as a gargle, and in the nose as a wash and sometimes as an ointment or spray, the ointment possessing the advantage of protecting the delicate nasal mucous membrane from irritation by stopping the entrance of irritant dust into the nasal cavities.

  • After the irritant has been removed either from the stomach or intestine, a feeling of irritation of the mucous membrane may remain, and sickness, diarrhoea or pain may continue in the stomach and intestine although the irritant is no longer present within them, just as the flow of tears and desire to rub may remain in the eye after the piece of grit which has occasioned it may have been removed.

  • For the purpose of checking the inflammatory processes and lessening discharge from mucous membranes astringents are employed.

  • The strength of the astringent application and the mode of its administration are varied according to the delicacy and position of the mucous membrane affected.

  • The whole of the secretion here is poured into the blood and not at all on to a mucous surface, and herein the thyroid gland differs largely from such glands as the pancreas or peptic and intestinal glands.

  • In cases where diarrhoea is very obstinate and lasts for weeks, sulphuric acid is sometimes more efficacious than alkalis; and in chronic colics it may be necessary to treat the mucous membrane by local application of astringent solutions.

  • They are also employed locally as sprays and douches to the nose, throat, vagina and rectum, for catarrhal conditions of the mucous membranes.

  • Thus as it passes out by the bronchial mucous membrane it increases the amount of secretion and so acts as an expectorant.

  • The treatment consists in the use of solutions of common salt, followed by copious draughts of milk or white of egg and water or soap in water, in order to dilute the poison and protect the mucous membranes of the oesophagus and stomach from its action.

  • be less toxic. Glycothymolin is a proprietary preparation, used in the treatment of catarrhal conditions of mucous membranes, while a mixture of naphthalene, camphor and thymol is sold under the name of thymolin.

  • Its physiological effects are much more persistent and injurious than sulphuretted hydrogen, producing temporary paralysis of the olfactory nerves and inflammation of the mucous membrane.

  • This induces a reflex secretion from the salivary and gastric glands, which is followed or accompanied by increased vascularity of the gastric mucous membrane, and by some degree of activity on the part of the muscular wall of the stomach.

  • Given in toxic doses or in strong solution, sulphuric acid is a severe gastro-intestinal irritant, causing intense burning pain, extending from the mouth to the stomach, and vomiting of mucous and coffee-coloured material.

  • The buccal mucous membrane will be greyish, brown or black in colour, due to the corrosive effects of the acid.

  • The anterior part of the palate is composed of mucous membrane tightly stretched over the flat or slightly concave bony layer which separates the mouth from the nasal passages, and is generally raised into a series of transverse ridges, which sometimes, as in ruminants, attain a considerable development.

  • Besides the crypts of Lieberkiihn found throughout the intestinal canal, and the glands of Brunner confined to the duodenum, there are other structures in the mucous membrane, about the nature of which there is still much uncertainty, called " solitary " and " agminated " glands, the latter more commonly known by the name of " Peyer's patches."

  • Externally, it is not absorbed by the unbroken skin, but when applied to the broken skin, sores, ulcers and mucous surfaces, the ferric salts are powerful astringents, because they coagulate the albuminous fluids in the tissues themselves.

  • If iron be given in excess, or if the hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice be deficient, iron acts directly as an astringent upon the mucous membrane of the stomach wall.

  • The second theory is that there is no absorption of iron given by the mouth, but it acts as a local stimulant to the mucous membrane, and so improves anaemia by increasing the digestion of the food.

  • The matters passed from the bowels, which at first resemble those of ordinary diarrhoea, soon change their character, becoming scanty, mucous or slimy, and subsequently mixed with, or consisting wholly of, blood, along with shreds of exudation thrown off from the mucous membrane of the intestine.

  • In the milder forms of the disease there is simply a congested or inflamed condition of the mucous membrane, with perhaps some inflammatory exudation on its surface, which is passed off by the discharges from the bowels.

  • But in the more severe forms ulceration of the mucous membrane takes place.

  • The arsines and arsine chlorides are liquids of overpowering smell, and in some cases exert an extremely irritating action on the mucous membrane.

  • This effect is the same however the drug be administered, as, even after subcutaneous injection, the arsenic is excreted into the stomach after absorption, and thus sets up gastritis in its passage through the mucous membrane.

  • After acute poisoning, the stomach at a post-mortem presents signs of intense inflammation, parts or the whole of its mucous membrane being of a colour varying from dark red to bright vermilion and of ten corrugated.

  • The palate is long and narrow; its mucous surface has seventeen pairs of not very sharply defined oblique ridges, extending as far back as the last molar tooth, beyond which the velum palati extends for about 3 in., having a soft corrugated surface, and ending posteriorly in an arched border without a uvula.

  • Between the mucous membrane and the bone of the hard palate is a dense vascular and nervous plexus.

  • The upper ones are the largest, and are continuous anteriorly with the labial glands, the ducts of which open on the mucous membrane of the upper lip.

  • Over the right part the mucous membrane has a greyish-red colour and a velvety appearance, and contains numerous peptic glands, which are wanting in the cardiac portion.

  • The small intestine is of great length (80 to 90 ft.), its mucous membrane being covered with numerous fine villi.

  • It is lined by mucous membrane continuous with that of the nasal passage; its use is not apparent.

  • They therefore remain for the most part in the intestine, and as they attract and retain large quantities of water, and at the same time slightly stimulate the mucous membrane, they come to have a purgative action and form the well-known group of saline cathartics.

  • The action of tannic acid is strictly local, and depends upon its power of precipitating albumen and of destroying germs. It thus acts as an astringent on all mucous membranes.

  • Those which act upon the alimentary canal: Simple bitters such as quassia wood, columbo root, taraxacum, gentian, chiretta, and many others, irritate gently the mucous membrane of the stomach and bowels, and by increasing the secretions improve the appetite and digestion.

  • The large number of vegetable substances used as purgatives owe their action to an irritating effect upon the mucous membrane and the neuro-muscular apparatus of the bowel, whereby the secretions and peristalsis are more or less increased, as the result of which diarrhoea ensues.

  • On a mucous membrane or a delicate skin it exerts an irritant action, which occurs more quickly than on a thickened epidermis, such as the scalp, and according to the strength and period of application there may result redness, a blister, or an ulcer.

  • When swallowed in small doses they slightly irritate the mouth and gastric mucous membrane, increasing the secretions and producing a feeling of warmth.

  • They are readily absorbed into the blood, and they are excreted chiefly by the kidneys in a more or less altered form, and probably also by the different mucous membranes, and even by the skin.

  • demulcere, soften), soothe the skin or mucous membrane.

  • Other names for IBS Some old-fashioned names for IBS are still in use: irritable colon spastic colon mucous colitis.

  • Mucous membrane graft to the upper lid tarsal conjunctiva can be useful.

  • Available in both an oral and inhaled form, they stabilize eosinophils, reduce bronchial edema and mucous hypersecretion and can reverse epithelial damage.

  • Rarely cervical eversion is associated with excessive mucous discharge warranting treatment.

  • Other triggers cab be changes in host defenses e.g. friction during sexual intercourse inflaming the mucous membranes.

  • In the rest of the bowel the lining is a delicate mucous membrane or mucosa.

  • mucilaginous substance that soothes irritated tissue, especially mucous membranes.

  • For example, your stomach is lined with a layer of mucous membrane called the stomach mucosa.

  • mucous membrane or broken skin.

  • mucous colitis.

  • mucous secretions are excessively thicker than normal, forming a crusty mass.

  • mucous lining to protect it from damage by stomach acid.

  • mucous glands in their skin.

  • mucous plug that evening and immediately started labor.

  • Also dairy produces too much mucous making it more difficult to breathe.

  • The goblet cells and the glands constantly secrete mucous, which serves to moisten the inhaled air and trap dust and bacteria.

  • mucous membranes of the mouth and genitals where it looks like a grayish erosion (shallow ulcer ).

  • mucous membranes of the intestinal tract.

  • mucous membrane of the respiratory system, causing coughing, choking and impaired lung function and exacerbating asthma symptoms.

  • It irritates the mucous membrane of the respiratory system, causing coughing, choking and impaired lung function and exacerbating asthma symptoms.

  • Other triggers cab be changes in host defenses e.g. friction during sexual intercourse inflaming the mucous membranes.

  • The disorder can affect the mucous membranes of the mouth and genitals where it looks like a grayish erosion (shallow ulcer ).

  • Nasal cleansing with Emcur The Emcur Nasal Cleansing System is a medical product for moistening and cleansing the nasal mucous membrane.

  • The author demonstrated a positive reaction of the oral mucous membrane to Primula on himself (Helmke 1937 ).

  • However, be careful to keep the antibiotics from the eyes, nose, mouth, and other mucous membranes.

  • Symptoms: pale mucous membranes, weak and listless.

  • In the rest of the bowel the lining is a delicate mucous membrane or mucosa.

  • mucous membrane in the respiratory tract.

  • Decongestant: removes phlegm and mucous, especially from the respiratory system.

  • Other names for IBS Some old-fashioned names for IBS are still in use: irritable colon spastic colon mucous colitis.

  • stringy mucous discharge.

  • sublingual gland - majority of the glands are mucous secreting.

  • thickening of the mucous layer.

  • Chronic irritation is also likely to cause a thickening of the mucous layer.

  • The mucous membrane of the inferior turbinates may become thickened in patients with rhinitis.

  • Rapid absorption, such as from a very vascular site ie mucous membranes.

  • villous adenoma of the rectum showing the polyp to be lined by clear, mucous secreting cells.

  • As the sieve plate grows these non-cellulose regions swell and gradually become converted into the same kind of mucous substance as that contained in the tube; the two cells are thus placed in open communication.

  • The secretions of the mucous membrane of the nasal cavity, and a pair of naso-lacrymal glands (not to be confounded with the Harderian and the lacrymal glands), moisten and clean the chamber.

  • forms and in terrestrial genera such as Cyclostoma; (2) the anterior pedal gland opening into the anterior groove of the foot, generally present in aquatic species; (3) dorsal posterior mucous glands in certain Cyclostomatidae.

  • Salicylic acid is now never given internally, being replaced by its sodium salt, which is much cheaper, more soluble and less irritating to mucous membranes.

  • It also yields, by the so-called mucous fermentation, a mucous, gummy mass, mixed with mannitol and lactic acid.

  • Applied externally lead salts have practically no action upon the unbroken skin, but applied to sores, ulcers or any exposed mucous membranes they coagulate the albumen in the tissues themselves and contract the small vessels.

  • Internally lead has an astringent action on the mucous membranes, causing a sensation of dryness; the dilute solution of the subacetate forms an effective gargle in tonsillitis.

  • ==Pharmacology of Aconite and Aconitine== Aconite first stimulates and later paralyses the nerves of pain, touch and temperature, if applied to the skin, broken or unbroken, or to a mucous membrane; the initial tingling therefore gives place to a longcontinued anaesthetic action.

  • It is a colourless liquid, with a very pungent smell, and attacks the mucous membrane very rapidly.

  • The vomiting may take place every two or three days, enormous quantities of undigested food mixed with frothy, yeast-like mucous being thrown up. And whilst the stomach is slowly filling up again after one of these uncontrollable emptyings, sudden and violent movements of the individual may cause the fluid to give rise to audible "splashings."

  • The symptoms, as first observed among the negroes, were pain in the stomach, capricious appetite, pica (or dirt-eating), obstinate constipation followed by diarrhoea, palpitations, small and unsteady pulse, coldness of the skin, pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, diminution of the secretions, loss of strength and, in cases running a fatal course, dysentery, haemorrhages and dropsies.

  • The parasites, which cling to the intestinal mucous membrane, draw their nourishment from the blood-vessels of their host, and as they are found in hundreds in the body after death, the disorders of digestion, the increasing anaemia and the consequent dropsies and other cachectic symptoms are easily explained.

  • By mucoid is understood a soft gelatinous substance containing mucin, or pseudomucin, which is normally secreted by the epithelial cells of both the mucous membranes and glands.

  • The free fatty acid radicle then unites with an alkali, and becomes transformed into a soluble soap which is then readily absorbed in this fluid condition by the epithelial cells of the mucous membrane.

  • Certain degenerative changes in the supra-renal glands may lead to Addison's disease, which is characterized by an excessive pigmentary condition of the skin and mucous membranes.

  • After middle life he suffered from the stone, not to mention the common plague of studious men, an irritable mucous membrane.

  • It possesses only slight influence over the heart and respiration, but it has a specific effect on mucous membranes as the elimination of the drug takes place largely through the lungs, where it aids in loosening bronchial secretions.

  • Though ammonium chloride has certain irritant properties which may disorder the stomach, yet if its mucous membrane be depressed and atonic the drug may improve its condition, and it has been used with success in gastric and intestinal catarrhs of a subacute type and is given in doses of io grains half an hour before meals in painful dyspepsia due to hyperacidity.

  • Sodium is excreted by all the mucous surfaces and by the liver and kidneys.

  • They are said to diminish the secretion of the bronchial mucous membrane.

  • Its continued employment may, indeed, so injure the mucous membrane of the stomach as to interfere with digestion and so cause a morbid and dangerous reduction in weight.

  • The Fallopian tubes, like many other tubes in the body, are made chiefly of unstriped muscle, the outer layer of which is longitudinal and the inner circular; deep to this are the submucous and mucous coats, the latter being lined with ciliated epithelium '(see' Epithelial Tissues), and thrown into longitudinal pleats.

  • The canal of the cervix is about an inch long, and is spindle-shaped when looked at from in front; its anterior and posterior walls are in contact, and its lining mucous membrane is raised into a pattern which, from its likeness to a cypress twig, is called the arbor vitae.

  • The vagina is a dilatable muscular passage, lined with mucous membrane, which leads from the uterus to the external generative organs; its direction is, from the uterus, downward and forward, and its anterior and posterior walls are in contact, so that in a horizontal section it appears as a transverse slit.

  • The mucous membrane is raised into a series of transverse folds or rugae, and between it and the muscular wall are plexuses of veins forming erectile tissue.

  • The labia minora are two folds of skin containing no fat, which are usually hidden by the labia majora and above enclose the clitoris, they are of a pinkish colour and look like mucous membrane.

  • The hymen is a fold of mucous membrane which surrounds the orifice of the vagina and is usually only seen in the virgin.

  • The vesiculae seminales are muscular sacs with a mucous lining which is thrown into a series of delicate net-like folds.

  • Into the whole length of the urethra mucous glands (glands of Littre) open, and in the roof of 1 Figs.

  • The most remarkable feature of the genus is, however, the extraordinary development of the zygomatic arches of the skull, which are enormously expanded vertically, forming great convex bony capsules on the sides of the face, enclosing on each side a large cavity lined with mucous membrane internally, and communicating by a small opening with the mouth.

  • Brucine is a local anaesthetic. Strychnine enters the blood as such, being freely absorbed from mucous surfaces or when given hypodermically.

  • An ectodemic invagination forms a large mucous gland on the foot, which is more or less atrophied in adult life.

  • Into the groove open mucous glands, a large one anteriorly and another opening into a posteriorly cloacal, branchial cavity.

  • The hippuric acid in the urine acts as a stimulant and disinfectant to the urinary mucous membrane.

  • Benzoic acid is also excreted by the bronchi and tends to disinfect and stimulate the bronchial mucous membrane.

  • In medicine copper sulphate was employed as an emetic, but its employment for this purpose is now very rare, as it is exceedingly depressant, and if it fails to act, may seriously damage the gastric mucous membrane.

  • They pass more readily through mucous membranes, but almost every one of these is provided not only with a coating of mucus, which obstructs their passage, but with some reflex mechanism which tends to remove them.

  • Even when they have passed through an abrasion in the skin or through the mucous membranes and enter the blood they are met, in some instances, by a toxic action of the blood itself upon them; and in others they are attacked by the white corpuscles, which destroy them, eat them up, and digest them, the process being known as phagocytosis.

  • Where there has been local mischief due to inflammation the dead leucocytes must be removed, and this is done either by their being converted into pus in one mass, and making their way through the tissues to the nearest surface, whether of skin or mucous membrane, from which it can be discharged, or they may undergo a process of fatty degeneration and absorption, leaving behind in some cases cheesy matter, in others hard connective tissue.

  • Poisons formed by microbes are partly eliminated by the kidneys, partly by the mucous membrane of the stomach and intestines, and possibly also by the skin.

  • Thus carbolic acid or carbolized ammonia are sniffed into the nose to destroy the microbes there, or the nose is washed out by an antiseptic solution as a nasal douche; bismuth or morphine are insufflated, or zinc ointment is applied, to cover the mucous membrane, and protect it from further irritation; and various antiseptic gargles, paints and powders applied to the pharynx in order to prevent the microbic inflammation from extending to the pharynx and down the trachea and bronchi, for many a severe bronchitis begins first by sneezing and nasal irritation.

  • In the same way, the reflex act of coughing is useful in removing either foreign bodies or excessive secretion from the air passages; but when the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract is irritated and inflamed, it produces a feeling of tickling and a desire to cough sometimes very violently; yet the coughing simply tends to exhaust the patient, because there is really little or nothing to bring up. The same is the case in inflammation of the lung substance itself.

  • The treatment of inflammation of mucous membrane is based upon the same principles as inflammation of the skin, and there too we usually associate means (I) for removing microbes, (2) for destroying them, (3) for lessening the irritation they produce, and (4) for repairing any mischief they have done.

  • For inflammation of the mouth a similar combination is used as a mouth wash, in the throat as a gargle, and in the nose as a wash and sometimes as an ointment or spray, the ointment possessing the advantage of protecting the delicate nasal mucous membrane from irritation by stopping the entrance of irritant dust into the nasal cavities.

  • After the irritant has been removed either from the stomach or intestine, a feeling of irritation of the mucous membrane may remain, and sickness, diarrhoea or pain may continue in the stomach and intestine although the irritant is no longer present within them, just as the flow of tears and desire to rub may remain in the eye after the piece of grit which has occasioned it may have been removed.

  • For the purpose of checking the inflammatory processes and lessening discharge from mucous membranes astringents are employed.

  • The strength of the astringent application and the mode of its administration are varied according to the delicacy and position of the mucous membrane affected.

  • The whole of the secretion here is poured into the blood and not at all on to a mucous surface, and herein the thyroid gland differs largely from such glands as the pancreas or peptic and intestinal glands.

  • In cases where diarrhoea is very obstinate and lasts for weeks, sulphuric acid is sometimes more efficacious than alkalis; and in chronic colics it may be necessary to treat the mucous membrane by local application of astringent solutions.

  • They are also employed locally as sprays and douches to the nose, throat, vagina and rectum, for catarrhal conditions of the mucous membranes.

  • Thus as it passes out by the bronchial mucous membrane it increases the amount of secretion and so acts as an expectorant.

  • The treatment consists in the use of solutions of common salt, followed by copious draughts of milk or white of egg and water or soap in water, in order to dilute the poison and protect the mucous membranes of the oesophagus and stomach from its action.

  • be less toxic. Glycothymolin is a proprietary preparation, used in the treatment of catarrhal conditions of mucous membranes, while a mixture of naphthalene, camphor and thymol is sold under the name of thymolin.

  • Its physiological effects are much more persistent and injurious than sulphuretted hydrogen, producing temporary paralysis of the olfactory nerves and inflammation of the mucous membrane.

  • This induces a reflex secretion from the salivary and gastric glands, which is followed or accompanied by increased vascularity of the gastric mucous membrane, and by some degree of activity on the part of the muscular wall of the stomach.

  • Given in toxic doses or in strong solution, sulphuric acid is a severe gastro-intestinal irritant, causing intense burning pain, extending from the mouth to the stomach, and vomiting of mucous and coffee-coloured material.

  • The buccal mucous membrane will be greyish, brown or black in colour, due to the corrosive effects of the acid.

  • The anterior part of the palate is composed of mucous membrane tightly stretched over the flat or slightly concave bony layer which separates the mouth from the nasal passages, and is generally raised into a series of transverse ridges, which sometimes, as in ruminants, attain a considerable development.

  • Besides the crypts of Lieberkiihn found throughout the intestinal canal, and the glands of Brunner confined to the duodenum, there are other structures in the mucous membrane, about the nature of which there is still much uncertainty, called " solitary " and " agminated " glands, the latter more commonly known by the name of " Peyer's patches."

  • Externally, it is not absorbed by the unbroken skin, but when applied to the broken skin, sores, ulcers and mucous surfaces, the ferric salts are powerful astringents, because they coagulate the albuminous fluids in the tissues themselves.

  • If iron be given in excess, or if the hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice be deficient, iron acts directly as an astringent upon the mucous membrane of the stomach wall.

  • The second theory is that there is no absorption of iron given by the mouth, but it acts as a local stimulant to the mucous membrane, and so improves anaemia by increasing the digestion of the food.

  • The matters passed from the bowels, which at first resemble those of ordinary diarrhoea, soon change their character, becoming scanty, mucous or slimy, and subsequently mixed with, or consisting wholly of, blood, along with shreds of exudation thrown off from the mucous membrane of the intestine.

  • In the milder forms of the disease there is simply a congested or inflamed condition of the mucous membrane, with perhaps some inflammatory exudation on its surface, which is passed off by the discharges from the bowels.

  • But in the more severe forms ulceration of the mucous membrane takes place.

  • The arsines and arsine chlorides are liquids of overpowering smell, and in some cases exert an extremely irritating action on the mucous membrane.

  • This effect is the same however the drug be administered, as, even after subcutaneous injection, the arsenic is excreted into the stomach after absorption, and thus sets up gastritis in its passage through the mucous membrane.

  • After acute poisoning, the stomach at a post-mortem presents signs of intense inflammation, parts or the whole of its mucous membrane being of a colour varying from dark red to bright vermilion and of ten corrugated.

  • The palate is long and narrow; its mucous surface has seventeen pairs of not very sharply defined oblique ridges, extending as far back as the last molar tooth, beyond which the velum palati extends for about 3 in., having a soft corrugated surface, and ending posteriorly in an arched border without a uvula.

  • Between the mucous membrane and the bone of the hard palate is a dense vascular and nervous plexus.

  • The sublingual is represented by a mass of glands lying just beneath the mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth on the side of the tongue, causing a distinct ridge, extending from the fraenum backwards, the numerous ducts opening separately along the summit of the ridge.

  • The upper ones are the largest, and are continuous anteriorly with the labial glands, the ducts of which open on the mucous membrane of the upper lip.

  • Over the right part the mucous membrane has a greyish-red colour and a velvety appearance, and contains numerous peptic glands, which are wanting in the cardiac portion.

  • The small intestine is of great length (80 to 90 ft.), its mucous membrane being covered with numerous fine villi.

  • It is lined by mucous membrane continuous with that of the nasal passage; its use is not apparent.

  • They therefore remain for the most part in the intestine, and as they attract and retain large quantities of water, and at the same time slightly stimulate the mucous membrane, they come to have a purgative action and form the well-known group of saline cathartics.

  • The action of tannic acid is strictly local, and depends upon its power of precipitating albumen and of destroying germs. It thus acts as an astringent on all mucous membranes.

  • Those which act upon the alimentary canal: Simple bitters such as quassia wood, columbo root, taraxacum, gentian, chiretta, and many others, irritate gently the mucous membrane of the stomach and bowels, and by increasing the secretions improve the appetite and digestion.

  • The large number of vegetable substances used as purgatives owe their action to an irritating effect upon the mucous membrane and the neuro-muscular apparatus of the bowel, whereby the secretions and peristalsis are more or less increased, as the result of which diarrhoea ensues.

  • On a mucous membrane or a delicate skin it exerts an irritant action, which occurs more quickly than on a thickened epidermis, such as the scalp, and according to the strength and period of application there may result redness, a blister, or an ulcer.

  • When swallowed in small doses they slightly irritate the mouth and gastric mucous membrane, increasing the secretions and producing a feeling of warmth.

  • They are readily absorbed into the blood, and they are excreted chiefly by the kidneys in a more or less altered form, and probably also by the different mucous membranes, and even by the skin.

  • demulcere, soften), soothe the skin or mucous membrane.

  • The buccal mucous membrane graft is sutured to the sclera bounded by the insertion of the rectus muscles to create a new ocular surface.

  • The crucial, mucous secreting glands in human CF patients are the serous gland.

  • Some patients complain of a sticky, stringy mucous discharge.

  • Dry mucous membranes in the nose due to a stuffy indoor atmosphere.

  • B: Sublingual gland - majority of the glands are mucous secreting.

  • Chronic irritation is also likely to cause a thickening of the mucous layer.

  • The mucous membrane of the inferior turbinates may become thickened in patients with rhinitis.

  • Rapid absorption, such as from a very vascular site ie mucous membranes.

  • This is a benign villous adenoma of the rectum showing the polyp to be lined by clear, mucous secreting cells.

  • It has mucus around the eyes, spits up mucous and is kind of sickly looking.

  • Although the mucous discharge is not a direct symptom of distemper, the disease lowers a cat's immunity, so it's possible for an affected animal to develop a secondary respiratory infection.

  • This examination is most easily done by two people: one to hold the cat's mouth open, and the other to use a flashlight to examine the mucous membrane in the cat's mouth.

  • It stimulates the mucous membranes to drain and thins out the mucous that is being formed.

  • Unlike typical antibiotics, which disrupt or kill bacteria to cure an infection, goldenseal appears to stimulate certain types of mucous made by the body and inhibit others.

  • It's action appears to be most powerful when taken after the cold has developed and mucous is present.

  • If you consider that the action may be on the mucous membranes themselves and not necessarily on the invading bacteria, you'll understand why you should wait to take goldenseal until your running nose blossoms.

  • Burdock root may also reduce the amount of mucous produced by the body and stimulate the immune system.

  • The mucilage also acts as an expectorant which helps break up any mucous that is present.

  • Mucous from an allergy is clear whereas mucous produced from a viral infection appears yellowish or greenish colored.

  • With its intricate curves and bends and delicate skin (not to mention the sensitive mucous membranes you need to watch out for!), the eye area is deserving of the extra attention.

  • It is said to break down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits.

  • They contain a combination of herbs and enzymes designed to reduce mucous.

  • Symptoms of plant poisoning range from irritation of the skin or mucous membranes of the mouth and throat to nausea, vomiting, convulsions, irregular heartbeat, and even death.

  • They are formed by the accumulation of excess mineral salts and other organic material such as blood or mucous.

  • Conjunctivitis-Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the white part of the eye (sclera) and lining the inside of the eyelids also called pinkeye.

  • Kawasaki syndrome-A syndrome of unknown origin that affects the skin, mucous membranes, and the immune system of infants and young children.

  • Candidiasis can affect the skin, nails, and mucous membranes throughout the body including the mouth (thrush), esophagus, vagina (yeast infection), intestines, and lungs.

  • Sore throat is a painful inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the pharynx.

  • Trachoma, also called granular conjunctivitis or Egyptian ophthalmia, is a contagious, chronic inflammation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

  • The conjunctiva is the clear mucous membrane that lines the inside of the eyelid and covers the white part (sclera) of the eye.

  • Conjunctivitis-Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the white part of the eye (sclera) and lining the inside of the eyelids also called pinkeye.

  • Stomatitis is an inflammation of the mucous lining of the mouth, which may involve the cheeks, gums, tongue, lips, and roof or floor of the mouth.

  • A more severe and less common variety of serum sickness includes several of the following symptoms: malaise, protein in the urine, joint pains, swelling of mucous membranes with hoarseness and cough, vertigo, nausea, and vomiting.

  • Rhinitis-Inflammation and swelling of the mucous membranes that line the nasal passages.

  • Conjunctivitis-Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the white part of the eye (sclera) and lining the inside of the eyelids also called pinkeye.

  • Herpes simplex virus is transmitted by infected body fluids (such as saliva) when they contact breaks in another person's skin or mucous membranes.

  • In addition to PPIs, the doctor may prescribe coating agents, such as sucralfate (Carafe), to cover the sores and mucous membranes of the esophagus and stomach.

  • Mucus-The thick fluid produced by the mucous membranes that line many body cavities and structures.

  • Injury to the mucous membranes of the mouth and gums leaves places where bacteria can grow.

  • Ulcer-A site of damage to the skin or mucous membrane that is characterized by the formation of pus, death of tissue, and is frequently accompanied by an inflammatory reaction.

  • The gingiva is a pink-colored mucous membrane that covers part of the teeth and the alveolar bone.

  • A few days later, a rash appears in the mouth, particularly on the mucous membrane that lines the cheeks.

  • Ulcer-A site of damage to the skin or mucous membrane that is characterized by the formation of pus, death of tissue, and is frequently accompanied by an inflammatory reaction.

  • It is found in mucous secretions and intercellular spaces.

  • Rhinitis-Inflammation and swelling of the mucous membranes that line the nasal passages.

  • Enterobacterial infections in the digestive tract typically start when the organisms invade the mucous tissues that line the digestive tract.

  • Bruises, or ecchymoses, are a discoloration and tenderness of the skin or mucous membranes due to the leakage of blood from an injured blood vessel into the tissues.

  • Conjunctivitis-Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the white part of the eye (sclera) and lining the inside of the eyelids also called pinkeye.

  • Herpes simplex virus-A virus that can cause fever and blistering on the skin and mucous membranes.

  • They can infect various parts of the body, especially the skin and mucous membranes.

  • The side that faces outward into the ear canal is covered with skin and the inside is covered with mucous membrane.

  • Infection usually stems from an upper respiratory infection in which swelling (edema) in the eustachian tube causes fluid and mucous to gather behind the eardrum.

  • Mucus-The thick fluid produced by the mucous membranes that line many body cavities and structures.

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