This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

mould

mould

mould Sentence Examples

  • A bottle mould rises and envelops the mass of molten glass.

    76
    35
  • Glass is blown into an oblong box-shaped iron mould, about 12 in.

    74
    46
  • It is by this time mere vegetable mould and undistinguishable pond shore, through which rushes and flags have pushed up.

    32
    25
  • The mass of glass, yielding, to its own weight and the pressure of air or steam, sinks downwards and adapts itself to any mould or receptacle beneath it.

    17
    16
  • But it has a value of its own inasmuch as it illustrates the permanent tendencies which mould the history of the Jews.

    10
    12
  • Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself?

    10
    12
  • I know that she has remarkable powers, and I believe that I shall be able to develop and mould them.

    10
    13
  • When you have kneaded it well, mould it, and bake it under a cover, that is, in a baking kettle.

    8
    12
  • Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.

    6
    8
  • Rubber mixed in the usual way with about WA of sulphur is now softened by heat, forced into the mould, and retained there by pressure during the operation of curing, which is usually effected in an iron box heated over a gas burner to 140° C.

    6
    9
  • Pythium, Peronospore, Completoria, Vol utelta, Botrytis, &c. That such overturgescence should lead to the bursting of fleshy fruits, such as gooseberries, tomatoes and grapes, is not surprising, nor can we wonder that fermentation and mould Fungi rapidly spread in such fruits; and the same is true for bulbs and herbaceous organs generally.

    6
    10
  • The upward thrust is the same, however thin the metal may be in the interspace between the outer mould and the core inside; and this was formerly considered paradoxical.

    5
    6
  • A non-spherical form can only be produced by blowing the hollow bulb into a mould of the required shape.

    5
    11
  • Moulded glass receives the form of the mould on its interior as well as on its exterior surface.

    4
    5
  • For this reason every piece of pressed glass-ware, as soon as it is liberated from the mould, is exposed to a sharp heat in a small subsidiary furnace in order that the ruffled surface may be removed by melting.

    4
    5
  • But the lessons thus learnt were sufficiently striking to mould his .whole character and policy.

    4
    7
  • As soon as a blowing iron is in connexion with an air jet, the sections of the mould close upon the molten glass, and the compressed air forces the glass to take the form of the mould.

    4
    20
  • Bound hand and foot he was thrown alive into a mould in which a block of concrete was about to be made.

    3
    4
  • If the section of the finished tube is to be a triangle, with the enamel and bore at the base, the molten mass is pressed into a V-shaped mould before it is pulled out.

    3
    4
  • Compressed air admitted through the plunger forces the molten glass to take the form of the bottle mould and completes the bottle.

    3
    4
  • When the glass is being blown in the mould the blowing iron is twisted round and round so that the finished bulb may not be marked by the joint of the mould.

    3
    4
  • Compressed air admitted through the plunger forces the molten glass to take the form of the bottle mould and completes the bottle.

    3
    4
  • In the latter part of his stay at Auxonne (June 1788 - September 1789) occurred the first events of the Revolution which was destined to mould anew his ideas and his career.

    3
    5
  • Stem rot, due to a mould (Botrytis sp.), occurs in wet weather.

    3
    5
  • The technical difference between pressed and moulded glass is that moulded glass-ware has taken its form from a mould under the pressure of a workman's breath, or of compressed air, whereas pressed glass-ware has taken its form from a mould under the pressure of a plunger.

    3
    7
  • When the air has forced the glass to take the form of the mould, the mould is opened and the blower gives the blowing iron with the bottle attached to it to the " wetter off."

    2
    2
  • Again, by raising the temperature, a metal in the solid state can be melted and liquefied, and poured into a mould to assume any form desired, which is retained when the metal cools and solidifies again; the gaseous state of a metal is revealed by the spectroscope.

    2
    3
  • As the molten metal is run in, the upward thrust on the outside mould, when the level has reached PP', is the weight of metal in the volume generated by the revolution of APQ; and this, by a theorem of Archimedes, has the same volume as the cone ORR', or rya, where y is the depth of metal, the horizontal sections being equal so long as y is less than the radius of the outside FIG.

    2
    3
  • If zinc be cast into a mould at a red heat, the ingot produced is laminar and brittle; if cast at just the fusing-point, it is granular and sufficiently ductile to be rolled into sheet at the ordinary temperature.

    2
    3
  • If zinc be cast into a mould at a red heat, the ingot produced is laminar and brittle; if cast at just the fusing-point, it is granular and sufficiently ductile to be rolled into sheet at the ordinary temperature.

    2
    3
  • The preference exhibited by yeast cells for sugar molecules is shared by mould fungi and soluble enzymes in their fermentative actions.

    2
    4
  • high, with hills rising to 600 ft.; their sides are generally steep. The surface is covered with a rich mould unusual in coral islands, mixed towards the sea with sand, and having a substratum of red or blue clay.

    2
    4
  • He therefore adapts himself to his circumstances, and, using the mould rather than the chisel, produces specimens which show tawdry handsomeness and are attractively cheap. It must be admitted, however, that even though foreign appreciative faculty were sufficiently educated, the Japanese artist in metals would still labor under the great difficulty of devising shapes to take the place of those which Europe and America have learned to consider classical.

    2
    5
  • The soil is composed of red ferruginous kankar, with a stratum of clay in the more elevated parts, covered by a thin layer of vegetable mould, or by recent alluvial deposits.

    1
    2
  • In both there are species which form no nest or burrow, others which construct a simple silk-lined tunnel in the soil, and others which close the aperture of the burrow with a hinged door; while both share the habit of lining the burrow with silk to prevent the infall of loose sand or mould; and the species which make an open burrow close the aperture with a sheet of silk in the winter during hibernation and open it again in the spring.

    1
    2
  • In " Root rot," as the name implies, the roots are attacked, the fungus being a species of Ozonium, which envelops the roots in a white covering of mould or mycelium.

    1
    2
  • They may be divided into three classes: the pine lands, which often have a surface of dark vegetable mould, under which is a sandy loam resting on a substratum of clay, marl or limestone - areas of such soil are found throughout the state; the " hammocks," which have soil of similar ingredients and are interspersed with the pine lands - large areas of this soil occur in Levy, Alachua, Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Gadsden, Leon, Madison, Jefferson and Jackson counties; and the alluvial swamp lands, chiefly in E.

    1
    2
  • The cakes when completed are, in order to remove them from the mould, slit open with a sharp knife, which is kept wet, and are hung up to dry.

    1
    2
  • Before it is put in, the article is roughly put together, and the expansion of the included air forces the rubber into contact with the internal surface of the mould, or a little carbonate of ammonia is enclosed.

    1
    2
  • A mass of glass in a viscous state can be rolled with an iron roller like dough; can be rendered hollow by the pressure of the human breath or by compressed air; can be forced by air pressure, or by a mechanically driven plunger, to take the shape and impression of a mould; and can be almost indefinitely extended as solid rod or as hollow tube.

    1
    2
  • The blower places the glass in the mould, closes the mould by pressing a lever with his foot, and either blows down the blowing iron or attaches it to a tube connected with a supply of compressed air.

    1
    2
  • The cakes when completed are, in order to remove them from the mould, slit open with a sharp knife, which is kept wet, and are hung up to dry.

    1
    3
  • mould and bacterial growths, and causing the appearance, on the surface of their " mushroom garden," of numerous small white bodies formed by swollen ends of the fungus hyphae.

    1
    4
  • The milk is then carefully dried by turning the mould round and round in the smoke produced by burning wood mixed with certain oily palm nuts; those of A ttalea excelsa are considered best, the smoke being confined within certain limits by the narrowness of the neck of the pot in which the nuts are heated.

    1
    4
  • mould and bacterial growths, and causing the appearance, on the surface of their " mushroom garden," of numerous small white bodies formed by swollen ends of the fungus hyphae.

    1
    4
  • Into the mould left by the saint's body liquid plaster of Paris was run, and a perfect model obtained, showing the features of the youth, the cords which bound him, and even the texture of his clothing.

    1
    5
  • This thing, remaining essentially the same, receives in the same way other forms which constitute Plato and the other individuals of the species man; and, with the exception of those forms which mould that matter into the individual Socrates, there is nothing in Socrates that is not the same at the same time under the forms of Plato.

    1
    5
  • A sufficient weight of molten glass to form a bottle is gathered and placed in a funnel-shaped vessel which serves as a measure, and gives access to the mould which shapes the outside of the neck.

    1
    5
  • A sufficient weight of molten glass to form a bottle is gathered and placed in a funnel-shaped vessel which serves as a measure, and gives access to the mould which shapes the outside of the neck.

    1
    5
  • I got out several cords of stumps in plowing, which supplied me with fuel for a long time, and left small circles of virgin mould, easily distinguishable through the summer by the greater luxuriance of the beans there.

    1
    5
  • s'asseoir en forme, to sit in a row); a mould or shape on or in which an object is manufactured; the lair or nest of a hare.

    1
    11
  • The mould is in two, pieces hinged together; it is heated and the inner surface is rubbed over with finely powdered plumbago.

    1
    15
  • The outer surface of these sheets is slightly roughened by contact with the iron mould.

    0
    0
  • The operator knows by touch when the plunger has pressed the glass far enough to exactly fill the mould.

    0
    0
  • Although the moulds are heated, the surface of the glass is always slightly ruffled by contact with the mould.

    0
    0
  • Thus, for the Nara Dai-butsu, the mould was constructed in a series of steps ascending 12 in.

    0
    0
  • He conceived the idea 0 shaping his pieces by putting the mould inside and pressing the cia) with the hand into the matrix.

    0
    0
  • Its eggs, which are of the size and shape of a dove's egg, are from fifteen to thirty in number, are deposited in mould or under damp leaves, and are glued together into one mass.

    0
    0
  • Shrewd, wily, adroit, unfailingly tactful, an adept in all the arts of the politician, he is considered to have done more than any other one man, in the years immediately preceding the War of Independence, to mould and direct public opinion in his community.

    0
    0
  • For statuary, and "undercut" work generally, an elastic mould - of glue and treacle (80: 20 parts) - may be used; the mould, when set, is waterproofed by immersion in a solution of potassium bichromate followed by exposure to sunlight, or in some other way.

    0
    0
  • The best results, however, are obtained by taking a wax cast from the elastic mould, and then from this a plaster mould, which may be waterproofed with wax, black-leaded, and used as cathode.

    0
    0
  • It was as chairman of the Independent Labour party - the section led by Mr. Keir Hardie - that he entered the House of Commons; and he explained at the congress of the party in April 1907 that its object was to mould society into the socialist State.

    0
    0
  • Beyond a doubt he was not without a certain moral timidity contrasting strangely with his eager temperament and alertness of intellect; but, though he was not cast in a heroic mould, he must have been one of the most amiable of men.

    0
    0
  • The parts of the range of moulds are brought tightly together and held in position by the bars 0 and the screw P, and when one mould is filled the carrier is moved forward on its rails by wheels worked by a handle also shown in the figure.

    0
    0
  • The mountain slopes are often bare or covered only with a thin layer of mould.

    0
    0
  • It is often locally enriched by vegetable mould, and is well adapted for wheat-growing.

    0
    0
  • West of the Missouri river the drift gives place to a fine soil of sand aid clay, with deposits of alluvium in the vicinity of streams. Though lacking in vegetable mould, these soils are generally capable of producing good crops where the water-supply is sufficient.

    0
    0
  • A statesman of firmer mould than Lord Melbourne would hardly have succeeded so well as he did in making rough places smooth for Prince Albert.

    0
    0
  • In the Isle of Thanet a light mould predominates, which has been much enriched by fish manure.

    0
    0
  • The most destructive is Botrytis cinerea which forms orangebrown or buff specks on the stems, pedicels, leaves and flower-buds, which increase in size and become covered with a delicate grey mould, completely destroying or disfiguring the parts attacked.

    0
    0
  • The spores formed on the delicate grey mould are carried during the summer from one plant to another, thus spreading the disease, and also germinate in the soil where the fungus may remain passive during the winter producing a new crop of spores next spring, or sometimes attacking the scales of the bulbs forming small black hard bodies embedded in the flesh.

    0
    0
  • The Jagiellos were all of the same mould and pattern, but the mould was a strong one and the pattern was good.

    0
    0
  • The soil should be a light and fairly rich compost, comprising about 2 parts loam, I part decayed manure or horse droppings that have been thoroughly sweetened, I part leaf mould and half a part of sand.

    0
    0
  • Hitherto it had been felt as a great difficulty in casting specula that the solidification did not begin at one surface and proceed gradually to the other, the common sand mould allowing the edges to cool first, so that the central parts were subject to great straining when their time of cooling came, and in large castings this generally caused cracking.

    0
    0
  • By forming the bottom of the mould of hoop iron placed on edge and closely packed, and the sides of sand, while the top was left open, Lord Rosse overcame this difficulty, and the hoop iron had the further advantage of allowing the gas developed during the cooling to escape, thus preventing the speculum from being full of pores and cavities.

    0
    0
  • The residual oily liquid is then poured out into a polished iron tray, or into an iron mould to produce the customary form of "sticks," and allowed to cool.

    0
    0
  • It comprises the chronological details, references to authorities, and judgments on the character of the various kings, especially as regards their attitude to the worship at the high places, all cast in the same literary mould, and marked by the same characteristic phraseology.

    0
    0
  • The parents leave the eggs to hatch where they are deposited, in sand or in mould.

    0
    0
  • The book, it is true, is not framed on a rigid mould, nor is there any parade of systematic divisions and subdivisions.

    0
    0
  • These works, which did much to mould the character of the German people, were set among the doctrinal standards of the Lutheran Church and powerfully influenced other compilations.

    0
    0
  • The great power exercised by the Roman Catholic church during the colonial period enabled it not only to mould the spiritual belief of the whole people, but also to control their education, tax their industries, and shape the political policies governing their daily life.

    0
    0
  • They chiefly differ from our fairies in their greater tendency to wear animal forms; though, like the fairies, when they choose to appear in human shape they are not to be distinguished from men and women of mortal mould.

    0
    0
  • The solidified chloride is then broken up, the shots and fused masses of magnesium are picked out, run together in a plumbago crucible without flux, and poured into a suitable mould.

    0
    0
  • The Plant Stove differs in no respect from the greenhouse except in having a greater extent of hot-water pipes for the purpose, of securing a greater degree of heat, although, as the plants in stove houses often attain a larger size, and many of them require a bed of coco-nut fibre, tan or leaf mould to supply with bottom heat, b: !, b a somewhat greater elevation may perhaps be occasionally required in some of the houses.

    0
    0
  • The soil should consist of about 3 parts turfy loam, i part leaf mould, I part coarse silver sand, with enough chemical or other manure added to render the whole moderately rich.

    0
    0
  • These beds are covered with a few inches of the fine old mould obtained from the decayed manure of previous years.

    0
    0
  • The blue-green mould P. crustaceum and the green mould A.

    0
    0
  • hastening its cooling by casting it in a cool mould, favours the formation of cementite rather than of graphite in the freezing of the eutectic at aBc, and also, in case of hyper-eutectic iron, in the passage through region 3.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, since the mould acts as a covering to retard the loss of heat, it should not be removed from the ingot until just before the latter is to be placed in its soaking furnace.

    0
    0
  • In this system there is for each ingot and each mould only one handling in which it is moved as a separate unit, the mould from one train to the other, the ingot from its train into the furnace.

    0
    0
  • The difficulty in the way of this system was that, in pouring the steel from ladle to mould, more or less of it:occasionally spatters, and these spatterings, if they strike the rails or the running gear of the cars, obstruct and foul them, preventing the movement of the train, because the solidified steel is extremely tenacious.

    0
    0
  • Here each mould and each ingot was handled as a separate unit twice, instead of only once as in the car casting system; the ingots radiated away great quantities of heat in passing naked from the converting mill to the soaking furnaces, and the heat which they and the moulds radiated while in the converting mill was not only wasted, but made this mill, open-doored as it was, so intolerably hot, that the cost of labour there was materially increased.

    0
    0
  • For making castings, especially those which are so thin and intricate that, in order that the molten steel may remain molten long enough to run into the thin parts of the mould, it must be heated initially very far above its melting-point, the Bessemer process has a very great advantage in that it can develop a much higher temperature than is attainable in either of its competitors, the crucible and the openhearth processes.

    0
    0
  • The iron for a statuette must first of all be very fluid, so that it will run into every crevice in its mould, and it must expand in solidifying, so that it shall reproduce accurately every detail of that mould.

    0
    0
  • 5) causes a sudden and permanent expansion, which forces the metal into even the finest crevices in its mould, a fact which is taken advantage of in making ornamental castings and others which need great sharpness of detail, by making them rich in graphite.

    0
    0
  • Thus thick machinery castings usually contain between 1.50 and 2.25% of silicon, whereas thin castings and ornamental ones which must reproduce the finest details of the mould accurately may have as much as 3 or even 3.4 0% of it.

    0
    0
  • - In an early period of the solidification of a molten steel ingot cast in a cold iron mould we may distinguish three parts: (1) the outer layers, i.e.

    0
    0
  • At this instant the outer layers, because of their contact with the cold mould, are cooling much faster than the inner ones, and hence tend to contract faster.

    0
    0
  • Because this pipe is due to the difference in the rates of contraction of interior and exterior, it may be lessened by retarding the cooling of the mass as a whole, and it may be prevented from stretching down deep by retarding the solidification of the upper part of the ingot, as, for instance, by preheating the top of the mould, or by covering the ingot with a mass of burning fuel or of molten slag.

    0
    0
  • casting the steel as a " steel casting " in a mould which has the exact shape of the object to be made, e.g.

    0
    0
  • These and kindred difficulties make each new shape or size a new problem, and in particular they require that for each and every individual casting a new sand or clay mould shall be made with care by a skilled workman.

    0
    0
  • The south-western part of the country, a vast and almost level plain, is known as Dar Homr. A granitic sand with abundance of mica and feldspar forms the upper stratum throughout the greater part of Kordofan; but an admixture of clay, which is observable in the north, becomes strongly marked in the south, where there are also stretches of black vegetable mould.

    0
    0
  • Of late years it has been found possible in many cases to take casts of the bodies found - a complete mould having been formed around them by the fine white ashes, partially consolidated by water.

    0
    0
  • The Austrian government, after the subjection of Hungary, withdrew every concession it had made under pressure, and established a thorough despotism, trampling upon the rights of the individual nationalities, and forcing all its subjects into a common political mould.

    0
    0
  • Livius Andronicus, laid the foundation of a new Latin literature by his translation of the Odyssey, and that the Greek dramas were recast in a Latin mould.

    0
    0
  • Ennius prided himself especially on being the first to form the strong speech of Latium into the mould of the Homeric hexameter in place of the old Saturnian metre.

    0
    0
  • The brick-mould was an open frame, with one side prolonged into a handle (9l~l, exactly as the modern mould.

    0
    0
  • The mould was single, so that one side of the tool was the open face of metal.

    0
    0
  • thick, and the core truly centred in the mould.

    0
    0
  • Reason abandons her efforts to mould the world, and is content to let the aims of individuals work out their results independently, only stepping in to lay down precepts for the cases where individual actions conflict, and to test these precepts by the rules of formal logic.

    0
    0
  • In architecture, the term "corona" is used of that part of a cornice which projects over the bed mould and constitutes the chief protection to the wall from rain; it is always throated, and its soffit rises towards the wall.

    0
    0
  • The great fluidity of bronze when melted, the slightness of its contraction on solidifying, together with its density and hardness, make it especially suitable for casting, and allow of its taking the impress of the mould with extreme sharpness and delicacy.

    0
    0
  • This has passed through three stages, the first being represented by solid castings, such as are most celts and other implements of the prehistoric time; the mould was formed of clay, sand or stone, and the fluid metal was poured in till the hollow was full.

    0
    0
  • Soft clay was then carefully laid on to strengthen the mould, in considerable thickness, till the whole statue appeared like a shapeless mass of clay, round which iron hoops were bound to hold it all together.

    0
    0
  • The whole was then thoroughly dried, and placed in a hot oven, which baked the clay, both of the core and the outside mould, and melted the wax, which was allowed to run out from small holes made for the purpose.

    0
    0
  • Thus a hollow was left, corresponding to the skin of wax between the core and the mould, the relative positions of which were preserved by various small rods of bronze, which had previously been driven through from the outer mould to the rough core.

    0
    0
  • The mould was now ready, and melted bronze was poured in till the whole space between the core and the outer mould was full.

    0
    0
  • After slowly cooling, the outer mould was broken away from outside the statue and the inner core as much as possible broken up and raked out through a hole in the foot or some other part of the statue.

    0
    0
  • In the latter the artist provides a model in plaster from which the founder takes a mould within an encircling box.

    0
    0
  • This mould must obviously be made in scores of little separate sections (false cores or drawbacks) to permit of their removal from the model without causing fracture of the sand.

    0
    0
  • The advantage of this process is that the artist's model is not destroyed as in the cire-perdue, and if a "waster" results, a second mould can be taken.

    0
    0
  • While thus the Greek philosophy furnished the dialectic and the mould for the characteristic Christian teaching, the doctrine of the Trinity preserved religious values.

    0
    0
  • They did not dream of verbal fidelity; even when they had more exact reports before them, they preferred to mould a speaker's thoughts to their own methods of presentation.

    0
    0
  • Western Europe was taken out of the imperial mould and broken up. This is a revolution of sufficient magnitude to be regarded as politically the opening of a new era.

    0
    0
  • It is caused by a species of mould which lives on the green part of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The soils of the lowlands are prevailing sandy loams, with a covering of rich mould.

    0
    0
  • His vast learning was the result of a powerful memory and unwearied industry, and he lacked the creative imagination necessary to mould this material into new forms. He was a powerful debater, but his victories were those of a dialectician rather than a convincing reasoner, and in him depth of insight and conviction were ill replaced by the controversial violence characteristic of the age.

    0
    0
  • of mould, and then hooped and protected with mats and straw, under which conditions they will sprout in about a month.

    0
    0
  • deep, radishes being sown thinly over them and covered lightly with mould.

    0
    0
  • of space in the middle, between the mould arid the hoop, and are covered with mats and straw, but as soon as the radishes come up they are uncovered daily, and covered again every night as a protection against possible frosts.

    0
    0
  • 16) and by the rhetorical mould in which his thoughts and illustrations are cast.

    0
    0
  • From Seneca we turn, not without satisfaction, to men of sterner mould, such as Musonius Rufus, who certainly deserves.

    0
    0
  • The Lusiads may be called at once the most successful epic cast in the classical mould, and the most national of poems, and the great historical monuments and books of travel of the 16th and 17th centuries are worthy of a nation of explorers who carried the banner of the Quinas to the ends of the earth.

    0
    0
  • His Lusiads, cast in the Virgilian mould, celebrates the combination of faith and patriotism which led to the discoveries and conquests of the Portuguese, and though the Epic voyage of Vasco da Gama occasioned its composition and formed the skeleton round which it grew, its true subject is the peito illustre lusitano.

    0
    0
  • 47-59, a further description of different kinds of mould or fungus-growth affecting stuffs and leather; (c) xiv.

    0
    0
  • 33-53, regulations dealing with the appearance of patches of mould or mildew on the walls of a house.

    0
    0
  • Except for the broad valleys of the Panhandle, where the soils are black in colour and rich in vegetable mould, the surface of the state is arid; the Snake river valley is a vast lava bed, covered with deposits of salt and sand, or soils of volcanic origin.

    0
    0
  • The scorifier is taken from the muffle in a pair of tongs and the contents poured into a mould, the lead forming a button in the bottom while the slag floats on top. When cold, the contents of the mould are taken out and the lead button hammered into the form of a cube, the slag, which is glassy and brittle, separating readily from the metal, which is then ready for cupellation.

    0
    0
  • When the mixture has been in a tranquil state of fusion for a few minutes it is poured into a mould.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, for the history of Italy and western Europe he falls back on Roman annalists, especially, it seems, on Claudius Quadrigarius and Valerius Antias - a most unfortunate choice - and from them too he takes the annalistic mould into which his matter is cast.

    0
    0
  • Their primitive beauty is not marred by any attempt to force them into an historical mould, or disguised beneath an accumulation of the insipid inventions of later times.

    0
    0
  • The great Yashts - some nine or ten - are impressed with a higher stamp: they are cast almost throughout in a poetical mould, and represent the religious poetry of the ancient Iranians.

    0
    0
  • MOULD.

    0
    0
  • In the sense of a furry growth, consisting of minute fungi found on animal or vegetable substances exposed to damp, the word may be either an extension of "mould," earth, or an adaptation of an early "moul," with an additional d due to "mould."

    0
    0
  • He was created originally good: freewill was bestowed upon him with instruction in the two ways of light and darkness, and then he was left to mould his own destiny (xxx.

    0
    0
  • His body, though cast in a sturdy mould, and though still in the highest vigour of youth, trembled whole days together with the fear of death and judgment.

    0
    0
  • It may be prepared by keeping moist and exposed to the air for from four to six weeks, at a temperature of 20° to 25° C., a paste of powdered gall-nuts and water, and removing from time to time the mould which forms on its surface; the paste is then boiled with water, the hot solution filtered, allowed to cool, the separated gallic acid drained, and purified by dissolving in boiling water, recrystallization at about 27° C., and washing of the crystals with ice-cold water.

    0
    0
  • All the Whittiers were men of stature and bodily strength, John Greenleaf being almost the first exception, a lad of delicate mould, scarcely adapted for the labour required of a Yankee farmer and his household.

    0
    0
  • He returned again and again to their production, seldom labouring on sonnets and lyrics of the Victorian mould.

    0
    0
  • In 1874 he published his last great romance, the tragic and historic poem in prose called Quatrevingt-treize; a work as rich in thought, in tenderness, in wisdom and in humour and in pathos, as ever was cast into the mould of poetry or of fiction.

    0
    0
  • Tertullian's legal training as a lawyer was a curious coincidence, if nothing more, and those legal concepts which show themselves strongly in him have done much to mould the Western type of Christian theology.

    0
    0
  • He strongly believed in the absolute truth of a few moral ideas, with which it was the aim of his teaching to mould and suffuse political economy.

    0
    0
  • In the disordered state of society official stability was a valuable warrant of peace, and the administrative hierarchy, lay or spiritual, thus formed a mould for the hierarchy of feudalism.

    0
    0
  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

    0
    0
  • This work is partly carried out beneath the surface and partly on the surface, upon which the worms wander at night and eject the swallowed and triturated earth; frequently castings of some height are formed of coiled ropes of agglutinated particles of mould.

    0
    0
  • The surrounding matrix will of course show the mould of the cast, with its elevations and depressions reversed.

    0
    0
  • Professor Seward, however, has found a Zygosporites in situ, terminating an apparently fungal hypha: he suggests a possible comparison with the mould Mucor.

    0
    0
  • mould frames should be made from molded timber sections and trimmed with molded architraves.

    0
    0
  • mould correct seal for the 3/8 " pushrod has 6 radially molded ribs to identify it.

    0
    0
  • mould viscosity adhesives may be dispensed directly into shaped molds for the production of test specimens.

    0
    0
  • mould requirement is for batches of just 200 and so conventional injection mold tooling would have made the unit cost exorbitant.

    0
    0
  • The preference exhibited by yeast cells for sugar molecules is shared by mould fungi and soluble enzymes in their fermentative actions.

    0
    0
  • It is beyond the scope of the present article to attempt to describe the different forms of budding fungi (Saccharomyces), mould fungi and bacteria which are capable of fermenting sugar solutions.

    0
    0
  • But the lessons thus learnt were sufficiently striking to mould his .whole character and policy.

    0
    0
  • Bound hand and foot he was thrown alive into a mould in which a block of concrete was about to be made.

    0
    0
  • Into the mould left by the saint's body liquid plaster of Paris was run, and a perfect model obtained, showing the features of the youth, the cords which bound him, and even the texture of his clothing.

    0
    0
  • In spirit a child, in character a man of classic mould, Garibaldi had remained the nations idol, an almost legendary hero whose place none could aspire to fill.

    0
    0
  • Pythium, Peronospore, Completoria, Vol utelta, Botrytis, &c. That such overturgescence should lead to the bursting of fleshy fruits, such as gooseberries, tomatoes and grapes, is not surprising, nor can we wonder that fermentation and mould Fungi rapidly spread in such fruits; and the same is true for bulbs and herbaceous organs generally.

    0
    0
  • Snow accumulating on the higher portions of the land, when compacted into ice and caused to flow downwards by gravity, gives rise, on account of its more coherent character, to continuous glaciers, which mould themselves to the slopes down which they are guided, different ice-streams converging to send forward a greater volume.

    0
    0
  • But it has a value of its own inasmuch as it illustrates the permanent tendencies which mould the history of the Jews.

    0
    0
  • high, with hills rising to 600 ft.; their sides are generally steep. The surface is covered with a rich mould unusual in coral islands, mixed towards the sea with sand, and having a substratum of red or blue clay.

    0
    0
  • Many of the narratives furnish a vivid picture of the life of David with a minuteness of personal detail which has suggested to some that their author was intimately acquainted with the events, and, if not a contemporary, belonged to the succeeding generation, while to others it has seemed more probable that these reflect rather " the plastic mould of popular tradition."

    0
    0
  • p. 99) "For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine."

    0
    0
  • Next he sought to prepare the inactive form of the acid by artificial means; and after great and long-continued labour he succeeded, and was led to the commencement of his classical researches on fermentation, by the observation that when the inactive acid was placed in contact with a special form of mould (Penicillium glaucum) the right-handed acid alone was destroyed, the left-handed variety remained unchanged.

    0
    0
  • He was not cast in a heroic mould, and he had no desire to figure at the stake; like Cecil, and Elizabeth herself, he had a great respect for authority, and when his time came he could consistently impose authority on others.

    0
    0
  • In the latter part of his stay at Auxonne (June 1788 - September 1789) occurred the first events of the Revolution which was destined to mould anew his ideas and his career.

    0
    0
  • The soil is composed of red ferruginous kankar, with a stratum of clay in the more elevated parts, covered by a thin layer of vegetable mould, or by recent alluvial deposits.

    0
    0
  • In both there are species which form no nest or burrow, others which construct a simple silk-lined tunnel in the soil, and others which close the aperture of the burrow with a hinged door; while both share the habit of lining the burrow with silk to prevent the infall of loose sand or mould; and the species which make an open burrow close the aperture with a sheet of silk in the winter during hibernation and open it again in the spring.

    0
    0
  • In " Root rot," as the name implies, the roots are attacked, the fungus being a species of Ozonium, which envelops the roots in a white covering of mould or mycelium.

    0
    0
  • They may be divided into three classes: the pine lands, which often have a surface of dark vegetable mould, under which is a sandy loam resting on a substratum of clay, marl or limestone - areas of such soil are found throughout the state; the " hammocks," which have soil of similar ingredients and are interspersed with the pine lands - large areas of this soil occur in Levy, Alachua, Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Gadsden, Leon, Madison, Jefferson and Jackson counties; and the alluvial swamp lands, chiefly in E.

    0
    0
  • In the plains the soil is generally of sand or alluvial clay, covered in the valleys with a rich vegetable mould.

    0
    0
  • The surface soil of Berar is to a great extent a rich black vegetable mould; and where this surface soil does not exist, there are muram and trap with a shallow upper crust of inferior light soil.

    0
    0
  • The milk is then carefully dried by turning the mould round and round in the smoke produced by burning wood mixed with certain oily palm nuts; those of A ttalea excelsa are considered best, the smoke being confined within certain limits by the narrowness of the neck of the pot in which the nuts are heated.

    0
    0
  • Before it is put in, the article is roughly put together, and the expansion of the included air forces the rubber into contact with the internal surface of the mould, or a little carbonate of ammonia is enclosed.

    0
    0
  • Rubber mixed in the usual way with about WA of sulphur is now softened by heat, forced into the mould, and retained there by pressure during the operation of curing, which is usually effected in an iron box heated over a gas burner to 140° C.

    0
    0
  • s'asseoir en forme, to sit in a row); a mould or shape on or in which an object is manufactured; the lair or nest of a hare.

    0
    0
  • This thing, remaining essentially the same, receives in the same way other forms which constitute Plato and the other individuals of the species man; and, with the exception of those forms which mould that matter into the individual Socrates, there is nothing in Socrates that is not the same at the same time under the forms of Plato.

    0
    0
  • He did more than any one to mould the minds * of the rising generation, and he carried them with him even in his violent attacks on all opinions and all parties which appeared in any way to be injurious to the rising power of Germany.

    0
    0
  • p. 21 seq.) endeavours to claim a higher value for the narratives about Gurya, Shamona and Habbibh, on the ground that these have left more trace in the later literature; but it is to be feared that all five martyrdoms are turned out in the same legendary mould.

    0
    0
  • A mass of glass in a viscous state can be rolled with an iron roller like dough; can be rendered hollow by the pressure of the human breath or by compressed air; can be forced by air pressure, or by a mechanically driven plunger, to take the shape and impression of a mould; and can be almost indefinitely extended as solid rod or as hollow tube.

    0
    0
  • A non-spherical form can only be produced by blowing the hollow bulb into a mould of the required shape.

    0
    0
  • In France, Germany and the United States it is rare to find a piece of tableware which has not received its shape in a mould.

    0
    0
  • Under the new system the bowl is fashioned by blowing the slightly hollowed mass of glass into a mould.

    0
    0
  • If the section of the finished tube is to be a triangle, with the enamel and bore at the base, the molten mass is pressed into a V-shaped mould before it is pulled out.

    0
    0
  • When this is the case the gathering is carried to a block or half-open mould in which it is rolled and blown until it acquires, roughly, the shape of a hemisphere, the flat side being towards the pipe and the convexity away from it; the diameter of this hemisphere is so regulated as to be approximately that of the cylinder which is next to be formed of the viscous mass.

    0
    0
  • Glass is blown into an oblong box-shaped iron mould, about 12 in.

    0
    0
  • The outer surface of these sheets is slightly roughened by contact with the iron mould.

    0
    0
  • The blower places the glass in the mould, closes the mould by pressing a lever with his foot, and either blows down the blowing iron or attaches it to a tube connected with a supply of compressed air.

    0
    0
  • When the air has forced the glass to take the form of the mould, the mould is opened and the blower gives the blowing iron with the bottle attached to it to the " wetter off."

    0
    0
  • A bottle mould rises and envelops the mass of molten glass.

    0
    0
  • As soon as a blowing iron is in connexion with an air jet, the sections of the mould close upon the molten glass, and the compressed air forces the glass to take the form of the mould.

    0
    0
  • The mass of glass, yielding, to its own weight and the pressure of air or steam, sinks downwards and adapts itself to any mould or receptacle beneath it.

    0
    0
  • The mould is in two, pieces hinged together; it is heated and the inner surface is rubbed over with finely powdered plumbago.

    0
    0
  • When the glass is being blown in the mould the blowing iron is twisted round and round so that the finished bulb may not be marked by the joint of the mould.

    0
    0
  • - The technical difference between pressed and moulded glass is that moulded glass-ware has taken its form from a mould under the pressure of a workman's breath, or of compressed air, whereas pressed glass-ware has taken its form from a mould under the pressure of a plunger.

    0
    0
  • Moulded glass receives the form of the mould on its interior as well as on its exterior surface.

    0
    0
  • In pressed glass the exterior surface is modelled by the mould, whilst the interior surface is modelled by the plunger (fig.

    0
    0
  • The operator knows by touch when the plunger has pressed the glass far enough to exactly fill the mould.

    0
    0
  • Although the moulds are heated, the surface of the glass is always slightly ruffled by contact with the mould.

    0
    0
  • For this reason every piece of pressed glass-ware, as soon as it is liberated from the mould, is exposed to a sharp heat in a small subsidiary furnace in order that the ruffled surface may be removed by melting.

    0
    0
  • Again, by raising the temperature, a metal in the solid state can be melted and liquefied, and poured into a mould to assume any form desired, which is retained when the metal cools and solidifies again; the gaseous state of a metal is revealed by the spectroscope.

    0
    0
  • In casting a thin hollow object like a bell, it will be seen that the resultant upward thrust on the mould may be many times greater than the weight of metal; many a curious experiment has been devised to illustrate this property and classed as a hydrostatic paradox (Boyle, Hydrostatical Paradoxes, 1666).

    0
    0
  • As the molten metal is run in, the upward thrust on the outside mould, when the level has reached PP', is the weight of metal in the volume generated by the revolution of APQ; and this, by a theorem of Archimedes, has the same volume as the cone ORR', or rya, where y is the depth of metal, the horizontal sections being equal so long as y is less than the radius of the outside FIG.

    0
    0
  • The upward thrust is the same, however thin the metal may be in the interspace between the outer mould and the core inside; and this was formerly considered paradoxical.

    0
    0
  • Stem rot, due to a mould (Botrytis sp.), occurs in wet weather.

    0
    0
  • He therefore adapts himself to his circumstances, and, using the mould rather than the chisel, produces specimens which show tawdry handsomeness and are attractively cheap. It must be admitted, however, that even though foreign appreciative faculty were sufficiently educated, the Japanese artist in metals would still labor under the great difficulty of devising shapes to take the place of those which Europe and America have learned to consider classical.

    0
    0
  • Gowland has shown that, whatever may have been the practice of Japanese bronze makers in ancient and medieval eras, their successors in later days deliberately introduced arsenic and antimony into the compound in order to harden the bronze without impairing its fusibility, so that it might take a sharper impression of the mould.

    0
    0
  • Thus, for the Nara Dai-butsu, the mould was constructed in a series of steps ascending 12 in.

    0
    0
  • He conceived the idea 0 shaping his pieces by putting the mould inside and pressing the cia) with the hand into the matrix.

    0
    0
  • Its eggs, which are of the size and shape of a dove's egg, are from fifteen to thirty in number, are deposited in mould or under damp leaves, and are glued together into one mass.

    0
    0
  • In Scotland its influence has continued to the present day, contributing not a little to mould the high qualities of religious insight and courage and perseverance which have honourably distinguished Scottish Presbyterians all the world over.

    0
    0
  • Shrewd, wily, adroit, unfailingly tactful, an adept in all the arts of the politician, he is considered to have done more than any other one man, in the years immediately preceding the War of Independence, to mould and direct public opinion in his community.

    0
    0
  • For statuary, and "undercut" work generally, an elastic mould - of glue and treacle (80: 20 parts) - may be used; the mould, when set, is waterproofed by immersion in a solution of potassium bichromate followed by exposure to sunlight, or in some other way.

    0
    0
  • The best results, however, are obtained by taking a wax cast from the elastic mould, and then from this a plaster mould, which may be waterproofed with wax, black-leaded, and used as cathode.

    0
    0
  • It was as chairman of the Independent Labour party - the section led by Mr. Keir Hardie - that he entered the House of Commons; and he explained at the congress of the party in April 1907 that its object was to mould society into the socialist State.

    0
    0
  • Beyond a doubt he was not without a certain moral timidity contrasting strangely with his eager temperament and alertness of intellect; but, though he was not cast in a heroic mould, he must have been one of the most amiable of men.

    0
    0
  • The parts of the range of moulds are brought tightly together and held in position by the bars 0 and the screw P, and when one mould is filled the carrier is moved forward on its rails by wheels worked by a handle also shown in the figure.

    0
    0
  • The mountain slopes are often bare or covered only with a thin layer of mould.

    0
    0
  • It is often locally enriched by vegetable mould, and is well adapted for wheat-growing.

    0
    0
  • West of the Missouri river the drift gives place to a fine soil of sand aid clay, with deposits of alluvium in the vicinity of streams. Though lacking in vegetable mould, these soils are generally capable of producing good crops where the water-supply is sufficient.

    0
    0
  • A statesman of firmer mould than Lord Melbourne would hardly have succeeded so well as he did in making rough places smooth for Prince Albert.

    0
    0
  • In the Isle of Thanet a light mould predominates, which has been much enriched by fish manure.

    0
    0
  • The most destructive is Botrytis cinerea which forms orangebrown or buff specks on the stems, pedicels, leaves and flower-buds, which increase in size and become covered with a delicate grey mould, completely destroying or disfiguring the parts attacked.

    0
    0
  • The spores formed on the delicate grey mould are carried during the summer from one plant to another, thus spreading the disease, and also germinate in the soil where the fungus may remain passive during the winter producing a new crop of spores next spring, or sometimes attacking the scales of the bulbs forming small black hard bodies embedded in the flesh.

    0
    0
  • The Jagiellos were all of the same mould and pattern, but the mould was a strong one and the pattern was good.

    0
    0
  • The soil should be a light and fairly rich compost, comprising about 2 parts loam, I part decayed manure or horse droppings that have been thoroughly sweetened, I part leaf mould and half a part of sand.

    0
    0
  • Hitherto it had been felt as a great difficulty in casting specula that the solidification did not begin at one surface and proceed gradually to the other, the common sand mould allowing the edges to cool first, so that the central parts were subject to great straining when their time of cooling came, and in large castings this generally caused cracking.

    0
    0
  • By forming the bottom of the mould of hoop iron placed on edge and closely packed, and the sides of sand, while the top was left open, Lord Rosse overcame this difficulty, and the hoop iron had the further advantage of allowing the gas developed during the cooling to escape, thus preventing the speculum from being full of pores and cavities.

    0
    0
  • The residual oily liquid is then poured out into a polished iron tray, or into an iron mould to produce the customary form of "sticks," and allowed to cool.

    0
    0
  • It comprises the chronological details, references to authorities, and judgments on the character of the various kings, especially as regards their attitude to the worship at the high places, all cast in the same literary mould, and marked by the same characteristic phraseology.

    0
    0
  • The parents leave the eggs to hatch where they are deposited, in sand or in mould.

    0
    0
  • The book, it is true, is not framed on a rigid mould, nor is there any parade of systematic divisions and subdivisions.

    0
    0
  • These works, which did much to mould the character of the German people, were set among the doctrinal standards of the Lutheran Church and powerfully influenced other compilations.

    0
    0
  • The great power exercised by the Roman Catholic church during the colonial period enabled it not only to mould the spiritual belief of the whole people, but also to control their education, tax their industries, and shape the political policies governing their daily life.

    0
    0
  • They chiefly differ from our fairies in their greater tendency to wear animal forms; though, like the fairies, when they choose to appear in human shape they are not to be distinguished from men and women of mortal mould.

    0
    0
  • The solidified chloride is then broken up, the shots and fused masses of magnesium are picked out, run together in a plumbago crucible without flux, and poured into a suitable mould.

    0
    0
  • The Plant Stove differs in no respect from the greenhouse except in having a greater extent of hot-water pipes for the purpose, of securing a greater degree of heat, although, as the plants in stove houses often attain a larger size, and many of them require a bed of coco-nut fibre, tan or leaf mould to supply with bottom heat, b: !, b a somewhat greater elevation may perhaps be occasionally required in some of the houses.

    0
    0
  • The soil should consist of about 3 parts turfy loam, i part leaf mould, I part coarse silver sand, with enough chemical or other manure added to render the whole moderately rich.

    0
    0
  • These beds are covered with a few inches of the fine old mould obtained from the decayed manure of previous years.

    0
    0
  • The blue-green mould P. crustaceum and the green mould A.

    0
    0
  • hastening its cooling by casting it in a cool mould, favours the formation of cementite rather than of graphite in the freezing of the eutectic at aBc, and also, in case of hyper-eutectic iron, in the passage through region 3.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, since the mould acts as a covering to retard the loss of heat, it should not be removed from the ingot until just before the latter is to be placed in its soaking furnace.

    0
    0
  • In this system there is for each ingot and each mould only one handling in which it is moved as a separate unit, the mould from one train to the other, the ingot from its train into the furnace.

    0
    0
  • The difficulty in the way of this system was that, in pouring the steel from ladle to mould, more or less of it:occasionally spatters, and these spatterings, if they strike the rails or the running gear of the cars, obstruct and foul them, preventing the movement of the train, because the solidified steel is extremely tenacious.

    0
    0
  • Here each mould and each ingot was handled as a separate unit twice, instead of only once as in the car casting system; the ingots radiated away great quantities of heat in passing naked from the converting mill to the soaking furnaces, and the heat which they and the moulds radiated while in the converting mill was not only wasted, but made this mill, open-doored as it was, so intolerably hot, that the cost of labour there was materially increased.

    0
    0
  • For making castings, especially those which are so thin and intricate that, in order that the molten steel may remain molten long enough to run into the thin parts of the mould, it must be heated initially very far above its melting-point, the Bessemer process has a very great advantage in that it can develop a much higher temperature than is attainable in either of its competitors, the crucible and the openhearth processes.

    0
    0
  • The iron for a statuette must first of all be very fluid, so that it will run into every crevice in its mould, and it must expand in solidifying, so that it shall reproduce accurately every detail of that mould.

    0
    0
  • 5) causes a sudden and permanent expansion, which forces the metal into even the finest crevices in its mould, a fact which is taken advantage of in making ornamental castings and others which need great sharpness of detail, by making them rich in graphite.

    0
    0
  • Thus thick machinery castings usually contain between 1.50 and 2.25% of silicon, whereas thin castings and ornamental ones which must reproduce the finest details of the mould accurately may have as much as 3 or even 3.4 0% of it.

    0
    0
  • The " tread " or circumferential part of the mould itself is made of iron, because this, by conducting the heat away from the casting rapidly, makes it cool quickly, and thus causes most of the carbon here to form cementite, and thus in turn makes the tread of the wheel intensely hard; while those parts of the mould which come in contact with the central parts of the wheel are made of sand, which conducts the heat away from the molten metal so slowly that it solidifies slowly, with the result that most of its carbon forms graphite, and here the metal is soft and shock-resisting.

    0
    0
  • - In an early period of the solidification of a molten steel ingot cast in a cold iron mould we may distinguish three parts: (1) the outer layers, i.e.

    0
    0
  • At this instant the outer layers, because of their contact with the cold mould, are cooling much faster than the inner ones, and hence tend to contract faster.

    0
    0
  • Because this pipe is due to the difference in the rates of contraction of interior and exterior, it may be lessened by retarding the cooling of the mass as a whole, and it may be prevented from stretching down deep by retarding the solidification of the upper part of the ingot, as, for instance, by preheating the top of the mould, or by covering the ingot with a mass of burning fuel or of molten slag.

    0
    0
  • casting the steel as a " steel casting " in a mould which has the exact shape of the object to be made, e.g.

    0
    0
  • These and kindred difficulties make each new shape or size a new problem, and in particular they require that for each and every individual casting a new sand or clay mould shall be made with care by a skilled workman.

    0
    0
  • The south-western part of the country, a vast and almost level plain, is known as Dar Homr. A granitic sand with abundance of mica and feldspar forms the upper stratum throughout the greater part of Kordofan; but an admixture of clay, which is observable in the north, becomes strongly marked in the south, where there are also stretches of black vegetable mould.

    0
    0
  • Of late years it has been found possible in many cases to take casts of the bodies found - a complete mould having been formed around them by the fine white ashes, partially consolidated by water.

    0
    0
  • The Austrian government, after the subjection of Hungary, withdrew every concession it had made under pressure, and established a thorough despotism, trampling upon the rights of the individual nationalities, and forcing all its subjects into a common political mould.

    0
    0
  • Livius Andronicus, laid the foundation of a new Latin literature by his translation of the Odyssey, and that the Greek dramas were recast in a Latin mould.

    0
    0
  • Ennius prided himself especially on being the first to form the strong speech of Latium into the mould of the Homeric hexameter in place of the old Saturnian metre.

    0
    0
  • The brick-mould was an open frame, with one side prolonged into a handle (9l~l, exactly as the modern mould.

    0
    0
  • The mould was single, so that one side of the tool was the open face of metal.

    0
    0
  • thick, and the core truly centred in the mould.

    0
    0
  • 588 et seq.); (xi.) examinations have in England mechanically cast the education of women into the same mould as that of men, without reference to the different social functions of the two sexes (the remedy is obvious); (xii.) it is unjustifiable to give a man a university position on the results of his performance in the examination room, a practice common in England though almost unknown on the continent; a just estimate of a man's powers in research or for teaching can only be properly based on his performance.

    0
    0
  • Reason abandons her efforts to mould the world, and is content to let the aims of individuals work out their results independently, only stepping in to lay down precepts for the cases where individual actions conflict, and to test these precepts by the rules of formal logic.

    0
    0
  • In architecture, the term "corona" is used of that part of a cornice which projects over the bed mould and constitutes the chief protection to the wall from rain; it is always throated, and its soffit rises towards the wall.

    0
    0
  • The great fluidity of bronze when melted, the slightness of its contraction on solidifying, together with its density and hardness, make it especially suitable for casting, and allow of its taking the impress of the mould with extreme sharpness and delicacy.

    0
    0
  • Gold, silver and bronze may be treated in various ways, the chief of which are (1) casting in a mould,' e and (2) treatment by hammering and punching (Fr.

    0
    0
  • This has passed through three stages, the first being represented by solid castings, such as are most celts and other implements of the prehistoric time; the mould was formed of clay, sand or stone, and the fluid metal was poured in till the hollow was full.

    0
    0
  • Soft clay was then carefully laid on to strengthen the mould, in considerable thickness, till the whole statue appeared like a shapeless mass of clay, round which iron hoops were bound to hold it all together.

    0
    0
  • The whole was then thoroughly dried, and placed in a hot oven, which baked the clay, both of the core and the outside mould, and melted the wax, which was allowed to run out from small holes made for the purpose.

    0
    0
  • Thus a hollow was left, corresponding to the skin of wax between the core and the mould, the relative positions of which were preserved by various small rods of bronze, which had previously been driven through from the outer mould to the rough core.

    0
    0
  • The mould was now ready, and melted bronze was poured in till the whole space between the core and the outer mould was full.

    0
    0
  • After slowly cooling, the outer mould was broken away from outside the statue and the inner core as much as possible broken up and raked out through a hole in the foot or some other part of the statue.

    0
    0
  • The keen desire to be unconventional in applied art has spread from Great Britain and the United States to Germany, Austria and other countries, but without well-defined first principles, or limitations It seems agreed in a general way that the completed work in metal is to be wholly the conception and, as far as possible, the actual handiwork of the designer: casting by the tire-perdue process, left practically untouched from the mould, and embossing, being the two most favoured processes.

    0
    0
  • In the latter the artist provides a model in plaster from which the founder takes a mould within an encircling box.

    0
    0
  • This mould must obviously be made in scores of little separate sections (false cores or drawbacks) to permit of their removal from the model without causing fracture of the sand.

    0
    0
  • The advantage of this process is that the artist's model is not destroyed as in the cire-perdue, and if a "waster" results, a second mould can be taken.

    0
    0
  • While thus the Greek philosophy furnished the dialectic and the mould for the characteristic Christian teaching, the doctrine of the Trinity preserved religious values.

    0
    0
  • They did not dream of verbal fidelity; even when they had more exact reports before them, they preferred to mould a speaker's thoughts to their own methods of presentation.

    0
    0
  • Western Europe was taken out of the imperial mould and broken up. This is a revolution of sufficient magnitude to be regarded as politically the opening of a new era.

    0
    0
  • It is caused by a species of mould which lives on the green part of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The soils of the lowlands are prevailing sandy loams, with a covering of rich mould.

    0
    0
  • His vast learning was the result of a powerful memory and unwearied industry, and he lacked the creative imagination necessary to mould this material into new forms. He was a powerful debater, but his victories were those of a dialectician rather than a convincing reasoner, and in him depth of insight and conviction were ill replaced by the controversial violence characteristic of the age.

    0
    0
  • of mould, and then hooped and protected with mats and straw, under which conditions they will sprout in about a month.

    0
    0
  • deep, radishes being sown thinly over them and covered lightly with mould.

    0
    0
  • of space in the middle, between the mould arid the hoop, and are covered with mats and straw, but as soon as the radishes come up they are uncovered daily, and covered again every night as a protection against possible frosts.

    0
    0
  • 16) and by the rhetorical mould in which his thoughts and illustrations are cast.

    0
    0
  • From Seneca we turn, not without satisfaction, to men of sterner mould, such as Musonius Rufus, who certainly deserves.

    0
    0
  • The Lusiads may be called at once the most successful epic cast in the classical mould, and the most national of poems, and the great historical monuments and books of travel of the 16th and 17th centuries are worthy of a nation of explorers who carried the banner of the Quinas to the ends of the earth.

    0
    0
  • His Lusiads, cast in the Virgilian mould, celebrates the combination of faith and patriotism which led to the discoveries and conquests of the Portuguese, and though the Epic voyage of Vasco da Gama occasioned its composition and formed the skeleton round which it grew, its true subject is the peito illustre lusitano.

    0
    0
  • 47-59, a further description of different kinds of mould or fungus-growth affecting stuffs and leather; (c) xiv.

    0
    0
  • 33-53, regulations dealing with the appearance of patches of mould or mildew on the walls of a house.

    0
    0
  • Except for the broad valleys of the Panhandle, where the soils are black in colour and rich in vegetable mould, the surface of the state is arid; the Snake river valley is a vast lava bed, covered with deposits of salt and sand, or soils of volcanic origin.

    0
    0
  • The scorifier is taken from the muffle in a pair of tongs and the contents poured into a mould, the lead forming a button in the bottom while the slag floats on top. When cold, the contents of the mould are taken out and the lead button hammered into the form of a cube, the slag, which is glassy and brittle, separating readily from the metal, which is then ready for cupellation.

    0
    0
  • At the expiration of this time, when the charge should be perfectly liquid and in a tranquil state of fusion, the crucible is removed from the furnace and the contents are poured into a mould.

    0
    0
  • When the mixture has been in a tranquil state of fusion for a few minutes it is poured into a mould.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, for the history of Italy and western Europe he falls back on Roman annalists, especially, it seems, on Claudius Quadrigarius and Valerius Antias - a most unfortunate choice - and from them too he takes the annalistic mould into which his matter is cast.

    0
    0
  • Their primitive beauty is not marred by any attempt to force them into an historical mould, or disguised beneath an accumulation of the insipid inventions of later times.

    0
    0
  • MOLD (formerly Mould, Welsh Y Wyddgrug, a conspicuous barrow, Lat.

    0
    0
  • The great Yashts - some nine or ten - are impressed with a higher stamp: they are cast almost throughout in a poetical mould, and represent the religious poetry of the ancient Iranians.

    0
    0
  • In the sense of a furry growth, consisting of minute fungi found on animal or vegetable substances exposed to damp, the word may be either an extension of "mould," earth, or an adaptation of an early "moul," with an additional d due to "mould."

    0
    0
  • He was created originally good: freewill was bestowed upon him with instruction in the two ways of light and darkness, and then he was left to mould his own destiny (xxx.

    0
    0
  • His body, though cast in a sturdy mould, and though still in the highest vigour of youth, trembled whole days together with the fear of death and judgment.

    0
    0
  • It may be prepared by keeping moist and exposed to the air for from four to six weeks, at a temperature of 20° to 25° C., a paste of powdered gall-nuts and water, and removing from time to time the mould which forms on its surface; the paste is then boiled with water, the hot solution filtered, allowed to cool, the separated gallic acid drained, and purified by dissolving in boiling water, recrystallization at about 27° C., and washing of the crystals with ice-cold water.

    0
    0
  • All the Whittiers were men of stature and bodily strength, John Greenleaf being almost the first exception, a lad of delicate mould, scarcely adapted for the labour required of a Yankee farmer and his household.

    0
    0
  • He returned again and again to their production, seldom labouring on sonnets and lyrics of the Victorian mould.

    0
    0
  • In 1874 he published his last great romance, the tragic and historic poem in prose called Quatrevingt-treize; a work as rich in thought, in tenderness, in wisdom and in humour and in pathos, as ever was cast into the mould of poetry or of fiction.

    0
    0
  • Tertullian's legal training as a lawyer was a curious coincidence, if nothing more, and those legal concepts which show themselves strongly in him have done much to mould the Western type of Christian theology.

    0
    0
  • He strongly believed in the absolute truth of a few moral ideas, with which it was the aim of his teaching to mould and suffuse political economy.

    0
    0
  • It was from Helvetius that he learnt that, men being universally and solely governed by self-love, the so-called moral judgments are really the common judgments of any society as to its common interests; that it is therefore futile on the one hand to propose any standard of virtue, except that of conduciveness to general happiness, and on the other hand useless merely to lecture men on duty and scold them for vice; that the moralist's proper function is rather to exhibit the coincidence of virtue with private happiness; that, accordingly, though nature has bound men's interests together in many ways, and education by developing sympathy and the habit of mutual help may much extend the connexion, still the most effective moralist is the legislator, who by acting on self-love through legal sanctions may mould human conduct as he chooses.

    0
    0
  • The only attempt since the publication of this great work to develop the various theories involved on a uniform plan and mould them into a consistent whole is that of de Pontecoulant in Theorie analytique du systeme du monde (1829-46, Paris).

    0
    0
  • In the disordered state of society official stability was a valuable warrant of peace, and the administrative hierarchy, lay or spiritual, thus formed a mould for the hierarchy of feudalism.

    0
    0
  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

    0
    0
  • This work is partly carried out beneath the surface and partly on the surface, upon which the worms wander at night and eject the swallowed and triturated earth; frequently castings of some height are formed of coiled ropes of agglutinated particles of mould.

    0
    0
  • except rarely where the loess or drift is bare, is a rich, black vegetable mould, I to 5 ft.

    0
    0
  • The surrounding matrix will of course show the mould of the cast, with its elevations and depressions reversed.

    0
    0
  • Professor Seward, however, has found a Zygosporites in situ, terminating an apparently fungal hypha: he suggests a possible comparison with the mould Mucor.

    0
    0
  • They grow well in loam or leaf mould, but are not hardy enough for permanent cultivation in the open air.

    0
    0
  • Quite happy in cool loam and leaf mould.

    0
    0
  • A wet soil is good in summer, but injurious in winter, and to prevent surface wet from injuring old plants left in the open ground, remove the mould round their necks, filling up with about 6 inches of white sand.

    0
    0
  • Where the soil is naturally poor, light, and sandy, it should be taken out to a depth of 18 inches, and replaced with the compost above mentioned, or some fine well-enriched mould.

    0
    0
  • A soil which is naturally peaty is no doubt the best, but not essential; they may be grown out of doors in loam either light or moderately stiff so long as lime is absent, and with plenty of leaf mould.

    0
    0
  • In its own land it grows in sheltered situations, the roots going deep down into rich vegetable mould.

    0
    0
  • In the plains the soil is generally of sand or alluvial clay, covered in the valleys with a rich vegetable mould.

    0
    1
  • He did more than any one to mould the minds * of the rising generation, and he carried them with him even in his violent attacks on all opinions and all parties which appeared in any way to be injurious to the rising power of Germany.

    0
    1
  • p. 21 seq.) endeavours to claim a higher value for the narratives about Gurya, Shamona and Habbibh, on the ground that these have left more trace in the later literature; but it is to be feared that all five martyrdoms are turned out in the same legendary mould.

    0
    1
  • In France, Germany and the United States it is rare to find a piece of tableware which has not received its shape in a mould.

    0
    1
  • Under the new system the bowl is fashioned by blowing the slightly hollowed mass of glass into a mould.

    0
    1
  • p. 99) "For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine."

    0
    2
  • Next he sought to prepare the inactive form of the acid by artificial means; and after great and long-continued labour he succeeded, and was led to the commencement of his classical researches on fermentation, by the observation that when the inactive acid was placed in contact with a special form of mould (Penicillium glaucum) the right-handed acid alone was destroyed, the left-handed variety remained unchanged.

    0
    2
  • He was not cast in a heroic mould, and he had no desire to figure at the stake; like Cecil, and Elizabeth herself, he had a great respect for authority, and when his time came he could consistently impose authority on others.

    0
    2
  • It now remains my pleasant task to direct and mould the beautiful intelligence that is beginning to stir in the child-soul.

    0
    2
  • The surface soil of Berar is to a great extent a rich black vegetable mould; and where this surface soil does not exist, there are muram and trap with a shallow upper crust of inferior light soil.

    0
    4
  • When this is the case the gathering is carried to a block or half-open mould in which it is rolled and blown until it acquires, roughly, the shape of a hemisphere, the flat side being towards the pipe and the convexity away from it; the diameter of this hemisphere is so regulated as to be approximately that of the cylinder which is next to be formed of the viscous mass.

    0
    6
Browse other sentences examples →