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moths

moths Sentence Examples

  • Includes the moths and butterflies.

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  • Includes the moths and butterflies.

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  • Insect life is represented by plant-bugs, locusts, crickets, grasshoppers, cockroaches, dragon-flies, butterflies, numerous varieties of moths, bees and mosquitoes.

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  • Insect life is represented by plant-bugs, locusts, crickets, grasshoppers, cockroaches, dragon-flies, butterflies, numerous varieties of moths, bees and mosquitoes.

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    1
  • For special treatment towards the regeneration of an infected race, the most robust worms were to be selected, and the moths issuing from the cocoons were to be coupled in numbered cells, where the female was to be confined till she deposited her eggs.

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  • Of moths alone Mr Whymper took away with him specimens representing no less than 23 genera, with a probable addition of 13 genera more among his undescribed specimens, the largest of which (an Erebus odora) was 74 in.

    2
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  • Butterflies and moths are remarkable for their number, size, variety and beauty.

    2
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  • - Among the disadvantages under which the silks of the wild moths long laboured one of the most serious was the natural colour of the silks, and the extreme difficulty with which they took on dyes, specially the light and brilliant colours.

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  • The resemblance that certain moths - e.g.

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  • Leaf-feeding beetles and larvae of moths are best got rid of by shaking the branches and collecting the insects.

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  • The resemblance that certain moths - e.g.

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  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.

    1
    1
  • Fishing lines are manufacttired from the cocoons of the genjiki-mushi (Caligula japonica), which is one of the commonest moths in the islands.

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    1
  • CADDIS-FLY and Caddis-Worm, the name given to insects with a superficial resemblance to moths, sometimes referred to the Neuroptera, sometimes to a special order, the Trichoptera, in allusion to the hairy clothing of the body and wings.

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  • The leaves of the hazel are frequently found mined on the upper and under side respectively by the larvae of the moths Lithocolletis coryli and L.

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  • The leaves of the hazel are frequently found mined on the upper and under side respectively by the larvae of the moths Lithocolletis coryli and L.

    1
    1
  • 2, II), while in moths and caddis-flies they are reduced to mere vestiges or altogether suppressed.

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  • The moths yielding wild silks which have obtained most attention belong to the extensive and handsome family Saturnidee.

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  • Moths, also, of strange forms and of great size are common.

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  • The moths yielding wild silks which have obtained most attention belong to the extensive and handsome family Saturnidee.

    1
    2
  • The scandals of the bowling alleys grew rampant in Elizabethan London, and Stephen Gosson in his School of Abuse (1579) says, "Common bowling alleys are privy moths that eat up the credit of many idle citizens; whose gains at home are not able to weigh down their losses abroad; whose shops are so far from maintaining their play, that their wives and children cry out for bread, and go to bed supperless often in the year."

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  • those due to .Synchytrium, Protomyces, Cysto pus, many Ustilagineae, &c. These cases are not easily distinguished superficially froni the pustular outgrowth of actual mycelia and spores (stromata) of such Fungi as Nectria, Puccinia, &c. The cylindrical stem-swellings due to Calyptospora, Epichloe, &c., may also be mentioned here, and the tyro may easily confound with these the layers and cushions of eggs laid on similar organs by moths.

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  • Sugar-canes suffer from the sugar cane borer (Diatioca sacchari) in the West Indies; tobacco from the larvae of hawk moths (Sphingidae) in America; corn and grass from various Lepidopterous pests all over the world.

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  • In butterflies and moths the lacinia is absent while the galea becomes a flexible process, grooved on its inner face, so as to make with its fellow a hollow sucking-trunk, and the palp is usually very small.

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  • In insects so widely separated as bristle-tails and moths this occurs occasionally.

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  • In moths and certain saw-flies there is no rupture of the membranes; the Russian zoologists Tichomirov and Kovalevsky have described the growth of both amnion and embryonic ectoderm around the yolk, the embryo being thus completely enclosed until hatching time by both amnion and serosa.

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  • His classification was founded mainly on the nature of the wings, and five of his orders - the Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, &c.), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (two-winged flies), Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and Hemiptera (bugs, cicads, &c.) - are recognized to-day with nearly the same limits as he laid down.

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  • The caterpillars (" cut worms ") of various species of Agrotis and other moths occur in all parts of the world and attack young cotton.

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  • Beneath are the official Liverpool quotations of " futures," as they appeared on the morning of the 19th of April 1906: A merican Deliveries, any port, basis of middling, good ordinary clause (the fractions are given in moths of a penny).

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  • Pliny says that their wood was everlasting, and therefore images of the gods were made of it; he makes mention also of the oil of cedar, or cedrium, distilled from the wood, and used by the ancients for preserving their books from moths and damp; papyri anointed or rubbed with cedrium were on this account called ced ati libri.

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  • Drawers of cedar or chips of the wood are now employed to protect furs and woollen stuffs from injury by moths.

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  • That is especially true of the moths (yacho), 100 species of which have been identified with English types.

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  • with the appendages not fixed to the body, as is the case in the pupa of most moths.

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  • Most Hymenoptera are of moderate or small size, the giants of the order - certain saw-flies and tropical digging-waspsnever reach the bulk attained by the largest beetles, while the wing-spread is narrow compared with that of many dragonflies and moths.

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  • Butterflies, moths and bees are very abundant, the former being remarkable for their size and splendid coloration; but these groups have not been investigated exhaustively enough to afford a correct idea of their number or their true affinities.

    0
    0
  • Scorpions and tarantulas are numerous, and lizards, frogs, beetles, ants, butterflies, moths and flies are abundant.

    0
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  • Birds and mammals take the first place; the leading collections devote a good deal of attention to reptiles and batrachians; fishes and aquatic invertebrata are most often to be found only when there are special aquaria, whilst non-aquatic invertebrates are seldom to be seen and at most consist of a few moths and butterflies, spiders, scorpions and centipedes, molluscs and crustaceans.

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  • But the fibres used for manufacturing purposes are exclusively produced by the mulberry silk-moth of China, Bombyx mori, and a few other moths closely allied to that insect.

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  • The mulberry-feeding moth, Bombyx mori, which is the principal source of silk, belongs to the Bombycidae, a family of Lepidoptera in which are embraced some of the largest and most handsome moths.

    0
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  • Such cocoons as are selected for the production of graine, on the other hand, are collected, freed from the external floss, and preserved at a temperature of from 66° to 72° F., and after a lapse of from eleven to fifteen days the moths begin to make their appearance.

    0
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  • He had only to examine the bodies of the moths yielding his graine: if they were free from disease then a crop was sure; if they were infected the education would assuredly fail.

    0
    0
  • The insects appeared quickly to revert to natural conditions; the moths brought out in open air were strongly marked, lively and active, and eggs left on the trees stood the severity of the winter well, and hatched out successfully in the following season.

    0
    0
  • It is important to note that the scales are present when the moths first emerge from the pupa-case, but are loosely attached and fall off with the first flight.

    0
    0
  • This type of colouring is also found in genera of quite distinct sub-families of butterflies, namely in Danainae and Pierinae, as well as in some diurnal moths, all of which occur in the same district as the Ithomiinae.

    0
    0
  • The branches are some times attacked by weevils (Rhyn- cites) and the larvae of various moths, and saw-flies (chiefly Erio- campa) feed on the leaves, and young branches and leaves are sometimes invaded by Aphides.

    0
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  • larly abundant; crickets, beetles, locusts, walking-stick insects, mayflies and bugs are found, but there were neither flies, moths, butterflies nor bees, which is no more than we should expect from the conditions of plant life.

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  • In England moth life is practically continuous all the year round, that is, as regards those moths that attack furs, though the destructive element exists to a far greater extent during spring and summer.

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  • Mosquitoes are innumerable, and moths and ants of the most destructive kind, as well as others equally noxious and disagreeable.

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  • Many Aptera are covered with flattened scales like those of moths.

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  • The general practice for many years past among naturalists has been to restrict the terms "Insecta" and "insect" to the class of Arthropods with three pairs of legs in the adult condition: bees, flies, moths, bugs, grasshoppers, springtails are "insects," but not spiders, centipedes nor crabs, far less earthworms, and still less slugs, starfishes or coral polyps.

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  • The insect life comprises many brilliantly-coloured beetles, butterflies (about eight hundred species of which are known), moths, locusts, spiders and flies, and also noxious spiders, with scorpions and centipedes.

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  • bagworm moths (Jewell and Biffin, 2001 ).

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  • There will be a chance to look for bats and moths and also to see a barn owl.

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  • Other interesting subjects to study are wasps, bees, flies, beetles, butterflies, moths, and dragonflies.

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  • brimstone moth and large yellow underwing moths, among others.

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  • The four red moths were burnets and I think they were 6-spot Burnets, but I am not sure.

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  • burnet moths were found at the site between 1986 and 1989.

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  • butterfly moths and silver-studded blue butterflies can also be seen.

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  • caterpillars of some moths.

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  • Keep a look out for the giant caterpillars of the Hawk Moths.

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  • clothes moth is the smallest of the three moths, being pale beige or straw colored, almost golden.

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  • coddleyou can probably get close if your orchard hygiene is impeccable and if you use traps for coddling moths and apple maggots.

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  • convolvulus hawk moths.

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  • The mode of inheritance of resistance to Cry1Ac in diamondback moths was traced to inheritance as an incompletely dominant trait.

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  • The adult moths have a grayish forewing with an angled darker marking just inside the cleft.

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  • This family of moths have long narrow forewings capable of powerful flight and can hover over flowers to feed.

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  • Common and conspicuous insects include grasshoppers, earwigs, and many species of beetles, butterflies and moths.

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  • Moths such as the bright pink and lime green elephant hawk moth.

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  • A perfect combination for elephant hawk moths, night-scented flowers with nectar for the adults, willowherb foodplant for the caterpillars.

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  • The area includes woodland and glades, perfect for spotting butterflies and moths which are attracted to the wild honeysuckle.

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  • immigrant moths in the Obs garden traps this morning included nothing of note.

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  • Once inside the trap, the male moths become contaminated with sufficient fungal inoculum to guarantee that they become infected.

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  • Malcolm quoted a sample menu - snail soup, fried sole with wood louse sauce, mutton with wireworm sauce, moths on toast.

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  • This non-drying adhesive catches and retains warehouse moths, which are attracted into the trap by the pheromone lure provided with the locator.

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  • But you can probably get close if your orchard hygiene is impeccable and if you use traps for coddling moths and apple maggots.

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  • melanism in moths: a review and reassessment.

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  • These in turn produce the number and variety of butterflies and day-flying moths which are such a feature of the reserve in summer.

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  • Normally these day-flying moths are encountered hovering at flowers - they don't alight to feed.

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  • Brimstone and White Admiral butterflies are frequent in this reserve, which also hosts a number of scarce moths.

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  • Uncommon moths including the scarce burnished brass and the obscure wainscot, both nationally notable species.

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  • pheromone lure which attracts male moths.

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  • HOW IT WORKS: A sticky base in the delta trap is baited with a specific sex pheromone lure which attracts male moths.

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  • plume moths can be identified by their characteristic scales.

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  • pollinated by moths, and these often have pale colors or perfumes which are stronger at night.

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  • moths found in Quaker Oats packs Boxes of Quaker Oats are pulled from the shelves because of the presence of moth pupae and larvae.

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  • pyralid moths by B. Goater - pages 89-90.

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  • The manufacture of a silk sari will involve the death of approximately 50,000 silk moths.

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  • In this way the slowness of the sloth serves these most " slothful " of sloth moths!

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  • speckled yellow moths are also very numerous at the moment within Warren Glen and Firehills.

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  • There is a colony of chimney sweeper moths in the woodland.

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  • The only other moths recorded this month were Winter Moths and a single Mottled umber at illuminated windows or security lights.

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  • Moths such as the red underwing have brightly colored hindwings, which the moth when disturbed will quickly flash.

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  • underwing moths, among others.

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  • unseasonable weather, some unexpected moths also appeared, well outside what I would call their normal flight times.

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  • The scandals of the bowling alleys grew rampant in Elizabethan London, and Stephen Gosson in his School of Abuse (1579) says, "Common bowling alleys are privy moths that eat up the credit of many idle citizens; whose gains at home are not able to weigh down their losses abroad; whose shops are so far from maintaining their play, that their wives and children cry out for bread, and go to bed supperless often in the year."

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  • Many larvae of beetles, moths, &c., bore into bark, and injure the cambium, or even the wood and pith; in addition to direct injury, the interference with the transpiration current and the access of other parasites through the wounds are also to be feared in proportion to the numbers of insects at work.

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  • those due to .Synchytrium, Protomyces, Cysto pus, many Ustilagineae, &c. These cases are not easily distinguished superficially froni the pustular outgrowth of actual mycelia and spores (stromata) of such Fungi as Nectria, Puccinia, &c. The cylindrical stem-swellings due to Calyptospora, Epichloe, &c., may also be mentioned here, and the tyro may easily confound with these the layers and cushions of eggs laid on similar organs by moths.

    0
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  • Others, with soft, white, cylindrical bodies, which recall the caterpillars of moths, burrow in the leaves or stems of plants.

    0
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  • Sugar-canes suffer from the sugar cane borer (Diatioca sacchari) in the West Indies; tobacco from the larvae of hawk moths (Sphingidae) in America; corn and grass from various Lepidopterous pests all over the world.

    0
    0
  • 2, II), while in moths and caddis-flies they are reduced to mere vestiges or altogether suppressed.

    0
    0
  • In butterflies and moths the lacinia is absent while the galea becomes a flexible process, grooved on its inner face, so as to make with its fellow a hollow sucking-trunk, and the palp is usually very small.

    0
    0
  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.

    0
    0
  • In insects so widely separated as bristle-tails and moths this occurs occasionally.

    0
    0
  • In moths and certain saw-flies there is no rupture of the membranes; the Russian zoologists Tichomirov and Kovalevsky have described the growth of both amnion and embryonic ectoderm around the yolk, the embryo being thus completely enclosed until hatching time by both amnion and serosa.

    0
    0
  • His classification was founded mainly on the nature of the wings, and five of his orders - the Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, &c.), Coleoptera (beetles), Diptera (two-winged flies), Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), and Hemiptera (bugs, cicads, &c.) - are recognized to-day with nearly the same limits as he laid down.

    0
    0
  • The caterpillars (" cut worms ") of various species of Agrotis and other moths occur in all parts of the world and attack young cotton.

    0
    0
  • Beneath are the official Liverpool quotations of " futures," as they appeared on the morning of the 19th of April 1906: A merican Deliveries, any port, basis of middling, good ordinary clause (the fractions are given in moths of a penny).

    0
    0
  • Pliny says that their wood was everlasting, and therefore images of the gods were made of it; he makes mention also of the oil of cedar, or cedrium, distilled from the wood, and used by the ancients for preserving their books from moths and damp; papyri anointed or rubbed with cedrium were on this account called ced ati libri.

    0
    0
  • Drawers of cedar or chips of the wood are now employed to protect furs and woollen stuffs from injury by moths.

    0
    0
  • That is especially true of the moths (yacho), 100 species of which have been identified with English types.

    0
    0
  • Fishing lines are manufacttired from the cocoons of the genjiki-mushi (Caligula japonica), which is one of the commonest moths in the islands.

    0
    0
  • CADDIS-FLY and Caddis-Worm, the name given to insects with a superficial resemblance to moths, sometimes referred to the Neuroptera, sometimes to a special order, the Trichoptera, in allusion to the hairy clothing of the body and wings.

    0
    0
  • with the appendages not fixed to the body, as is the case in the pupa of most moths.

    0
    0
  • Most Hymenoptera are of moderate or small size, the giants of the order - certain saw-flies and tropical digging-waspsnever reach the bulk attained by the largest beetles, while the wing-spread is narrow compared with that of many dragonflies and moths.

    0
    0
  • Butterflies, moths and bees are very abundant, the former being remarkable for their size and splendid coloration; but these groups have not been investigated exhaustively enough to afford a correct idea of their number or their true affinities.

    0
    0
  • Scorpions and tarantulas are numerous, and lizards, frogs, beetles, ants, butterflies, moths and flies are abundant.

    0
    0
  • Birds and mammals take the first place; the leading collections devote a good deal of attention to reptiles and batrachians; fishes and aquatic invertebrata are most often to be found only when there are special aquaria, whilst non-aquatic invertebrates are seldom to be seen and at most consist of a few moths and butterflies, spiders, scorpions and centipedes, molluscs and crustaceans.

    0
    0
  • But the fibres used for manufacturing purposes are exclusively produced by the mulberry silk-moth of China, Bombyx mori, and a few other moths closely allied to that insect.

    0
    0
  • The mulberry-feeding moth, Bombyx mori, which is the principal source of silk, belongs to the Bombycidae, a family of Lepidoptera in which are embraced some of the largest and most handsome moths.

    0
    0
  • The art of sericulture concerns itself with the rearing of silkworms under artificial or domesticated conditions, their feeding, the formation of cocoons, the securing of these before they are injured and pierced by the moths, and the maturing of a sufficient number of moths to supply eggs for the cultivation of the following year.

    0
    0
  • Such cocoons as are selected for the production of graine, on the other hand, are collected, freed from the external floss, and preserved at a temperature of from 66° to 72° F., and after a lapse of from eleven to fifteen days the moths begin to make their appearance.

    0
    0
  • Pebrine manifests itself by dark spots in the skin of the larvae; the eggs do not hatch out, or hatch imperfectly; the worms are weak, stunted and unequal in growth, languid in movement, fastidious in feeding; many perish before coming to maturity; if they spin a cocoon it is soft and loose, and moths when developed are feeble and inactive.

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  • Pasteur established (I) that the corpuscles are the special characteristic of the disease, and that these invariably manifest themselves, if not in earlier stages, then in the mature moths; (2) that the corpuscles are parasites, and not only the sign but the cause of the disease; and (3) that the disease manifests itself by heredity, by contagion with diseased worms, and by the eating of leaves on which corpuscles are spread.

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  • He had only to examine the bodies of the moths yielding his graine: if they were free from disease then a crop was sure; if they were infected the education would assuredly fail.

    0
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  • have appeared till towards the period of transformation and escape of the moths, the eggs subsequently hatched out might be depended on to yield a fair crop of silk; should the moths prove perfectly free from corpuscles after depositing their eggs the next generation would certainly live well through the larval stage.

    0
    0
  • For special treatment towards the regeneration of an infected race, the most robust worms were to be selected, and the moths issuing from the cocoons were to be coupled in numbered cells, where the female was to be confined till she deposited her eggs.

    0
    0
  • The insects appeared quickly to revert to natural conditions; the moths brought out in open air were strongly marked, lively and active, and eggs left on the trees stood the severity of the winter well, and hatched out successfully in the following season.

    0
    0
  • The moths hatch out at a period when oak leaves are not ready for their feeding, and the silk is by no means of a quality to compare with that of the common mulberry worm.

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  • These are only a few of the moths from which silks of various usefulness can be produced; but none of these presents qualities, saving perhaps cheapness alone, which can put them in competition with common silk.

    0
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  • - Among the disadvantages under which the silks of the wild moths long laboured one of the most serious was the natural colour of the silks, and the extreme difficulty with which they took on dyes, specially the light and brilliant colours.

    0
    0
  • It is important to note that the scales are present when the moths first emerge from the pupa-case, but are loosely attached and fall off with the first flight.

    0
    0
  • This type of colouring is also found in genera of quite distinct sub-families of butterflies, namely in Danainae and Pierinae, as well as in some diurnal moths, all of which occur in the same district as the Ithomiinae.

    0
    0
  • The branches are some times attacked by weevils (Rhyn- cites) and the larvae of various moths, and saw-flies (chiefly Erio- campa) feed on the leaves, and young branches and leaves are sometimes invaded by Aphides.

    0
    0
  • Leaf-feeding beetles and larvae of moths are best got rid of by shaking the branches and collecting the insects.

    0
    0
  • larly abundant; crickets, beetles, locusts, walking-stick insects, mayflies and bugs are found, but there were neither flies, moths, butterflies nor bees, which is no more than we should expect from the conditions of plant life.

    0
    0
  • In England moth life is practically continuous all the year round, that is, as regards those moths that attack furs, though the destructive element exists to a far greater extent during spring and summer.

    0
    0
  • Of moths alone Mr Whymper took away with him specimens representing no less than 23 genera, with a probable addition of 13 genera more among his undescribed specimens, the largest of which (an Erebus odora) was 74 in.

    0
    0
  • Mosquitoes are innumerable, and moths and ants of the most destructive kind, as well as others equally noxious and disagreeable.

    0
    0
  • Butterflies and moths are remarkable for their number, size, variety and beauty.

    0
    0
  • Many Aptera are covered with flattened scales like those of moths.

    0
    0
  • Moths, also, of strange forms and of great size are common.

    0
    0
  • The general practice for many years past among naturalists has been to restrict the terms "Insecta" and "insect" to the class of Arthropods with three pairs of legs in the adult condition: bees, flies, moths, bugs, grasshoppers, springtails are "insects," but not spiders, centipedes nor crabs, far less earthworms, and still less slugs, starfishes or coral polyps.

    0
    0
  • The insect life comprises many brilliantly-coloured beetles, butterflies (about eight hundred species of which are known), moths, locusts, spiders and flies, and also noxious spiders, with scorpions and centipedes.

    0
    0
  • Moths found in Quaker Oats packs Boxes of Quaker Oats are pulled from the shelves because of the presence of moth pupae and larvae.

    0
    0
  • An account of the differences may be found in British Pyralid Moths by B. Goater - pages 89-90.

    0
    0
  • Many moths have a kidney shaped mark (reniform stigma) roughly two thirds of the way back on the forewing.

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    0
  • The manufacture of a silk sari will involve the death of approximately 50,000 silk moths.

    0
    0
  • In this way the slowness of the sloth serves these most " slothful " of sloth moths !

    0
    0
  • Speckled yellow moths are also very numerous at the moment within Warren Glen and Firehills.

    0
    0
  • There is a colony of chimney sweeper moths in the woodland.

    0
    0
  • The only other moths recorded this month were Winter Moths and a single Mottled Umber at illuminated windows or security lights.

    0
    0
  • Moths such as the red underwing have brightly colored hindwings, which the moth when disturbed will quickly flash.

    0
    0
  • Along with the unseasonable weather, some unexpected moths also appeared, well outside what I would call their normal flight times.

    0
    0
  • Strikeback Insect Killing Spray kills most insects, such as ants, bed bugs, flying ants, fleas, cockroaches, flies, moths, wasps and mosquitoes.

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  • The root is primarily eaten by moths and butterflies but is also cultivated for human consumption.

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  • Many are not considered pests and might be the larvae of important species of butterflies or moths.

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  • Cabbage moths fly to the nasturtiums and munch on their leaves instead of cabbage leaves.

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  • Hang it on padded hangars and store in a cool, dry place where it cannot be eaten by moths.

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  • Get some natural cedar for your sweater drawer to keep the garments fresh and moths at bay.

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  • Place cedar chips or lavender with the pajamas to repel moths.

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  • You will often see vintage hand-knit sweaters in shops - if kept from moths, they really do hold up beautifully.

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  • Wrap your bargain basement treasure carefully in tissue paper, and tuck a tiny bit of cedar in the tissue to repel moths.

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  • Then, press X to have a bunch of moths surround you.

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  • Others are drawn to this personality like moths to a flame, partly because of the humanness of Aquarius and partly because of the constant air of self-confidence exuding in everything she undertakes.

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  • Moths, butterflies, worms and rolly pollies are all great bugs to search for, and are usually plentiful during the springtime.

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  • They provide full-color images of real butterflies and moths that you might spot outside your window.

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  • These creatures are as small as butterflies or even moths, and often have magical abilities to enact either good or evil upon the humans they encounter.

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  • The art of sericulture concerns itself with the rearing of silkworms under artificial or domesticated conditions, their feeding, the formation of cocoons, the securing of these before they are injured and pierced by the moths, and the maturing of a sufficient number of moths to supply eggs for the cultivation of the following year.

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  • These are only a few of the moths from which silks of various usefulness can be produced; but none of these presents qualities, saving perhaps cheapness alone, which can put them in competition with common silk.

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