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moss

moss

moss Sentence Examples

  • One was of medium height and slender, an older man with sharp green eyes the color of forest moss who seemed out of place in the middle of the room.

  • He followed the man with eyes as green as the moss in the corner of his room down the busy hallways, unaffected by the men who spit on him or shoved him as he went.

  • The man with eyes the color of the moss in his room materialized from the shadows.

  • The door to the underground tunnel network was hidden behind a boulder and draped with moss.

  • The water moved silently over moss and lichen covered slabs of rocks, forming small pools in the low spots.

  • On one side was a massive rock cliff covered with green moss.

  • These three men, and another opponent, Robert Moss, dean of Ely, were deprived of their royal chaplaincies.

  • She invented a deity of her own, a mysterious Corambe, half pagan and half Christian, and like Goethe erected to him a rustic altar of the greenest grass, the softest moss and the brightest pebbles.

  • They shelter in crevices of the bark of trees, in the dried stems of herbaceous plants, or among moss and fallen leaves on the ground.

  • The Galapagos Islands are of some commercial importance to Ecuador, on account of the guano and the orchilla moss found on them and exported to Europe.

  • At Rutland, Proctor and Dorset many darker shades are found, including "moss vein," olive green and various shades of blue, green, yellow and pink, which are used for ornamental purposes.

  • While the majority of the Nematodes are parasites, there are many that are never at any period of their life parasitic. These free-living forms are found everywhere - in salt and fresh water, in damp earth and moss, and among decaying substances; they are always minute in size, and like many other lower forms of life, are capable of retaining their vitality for a long period even when dried, which accounts for their wide distribution; this faculty is also possessed by certain of the parasitic Nematodes, especially by those which lead a free existence during a part of their life-cycle.

  • Thus various parts of criminals, such as the thigh bone of a hanged man, moss grown on a human skull, &c., were used, and even the celebrated Dr Culpeper in the 17th century recommended " the ashes of the head of a coal black cat as a specific for such as have a skin growing over their sight."

  • J, End of hydroid of the Moss Mnium, showing particularly thin oblique end-wall.

  • L, Optical section of cell of parenchyma in the same moss.

  • In Dawsonia superba, a large New Zealand moss, the hydroids of the central cylinder of the aerial stem are mixed with thick-walled stereids forming a hydrom-stereom strand somewhat like that of the rhizome in other Polytrichaceae.

  • The stereom of the moss is found mainly in the outer cortex of the stem and in the midrib of the leaf.

  • Moss, op. cit.

  • For example, rae Arenarion in one climatic or geographical region might be in~~ med an a-Arenarion and one in a different region a a-Arena- ~j1j ri, and so on (Moss, bc. cit.).

  • Schimper distinguishes moss tundra, Pot ytrichum tundra, and lichen tundra; and the lichen tundra is subdivided into Cladonia tundra, Platysma tundra, and Alectoria heath.

  • An unsuccessful diplomatist, his chief services in arms were the butchery in the north after the Pilgrimage of Grace and the raid into Scotland which ended with the rout of Solway Moss.

  • Owing to its northerly position a large part of Ungava is treeless, and belongs to the barren grounds where caribou roam and feed on the socalled caribou moss, a greyish lichen.

  • An interesting case of embankment and cutting in combination was involved in crossing Chat Moss on the Liverpool & Manchester railway.

  • The moss was 41 rn.

  • The subsoil was composed principally of clay and sand, and the railway had to be carried over the moss on the level, requiring cutting, and embanking for upwards of 4 m.

  • apart were cut, and when the moss between them was dry it was used to form the embankment.

  • Where the way was formed on the level, drains were cut on each side of the intended line, and were intersected here and there by cross drains, by which the upper part of the moss was rendered dry and firm.

  • Here, too, grows Spanish moss, used by upholsterers.

  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.

  • - Lancashire (Down Holland Moss), Holland, Sweden, Sardinia, Kaluga (Russia), Red Sea, Mediterranean.

  • They feed chiefly on grass, but also on moss, lichens and tender shoots of the willow and pine.

  • Much of the river swamp region is covered with cypress trees festooned with Spanish moss.

  • Moss's " Last Days of Wisconsin Territory and Early Days of Minnesota Territory " (1898);.

  • Moss, and later Mr F.

  • The nest is a neat structure of coarse grass and moss, mixed with earth, and plastered internally with mud, and here the female lays from four to six eggs of a blue colour speckled with brown.

  • Moss >>

  • It is only necessary here to mention one anomalous form, Enoicyla pusilla, in which the mature female is wingless and the larva is terrestrial, living in moss or decayed leaves.

  • The female makes her nest of moss, dried leaves and grass in the hollow of a tree, but sometimes in a hole among rocks or ruined buildings, and produces several young at a birth, usually from four to six.

  • Above this grows a species of pine, which becomes dwarfed and disappears at an altitude of about 6000 ft., beyond which is a zone of lichen and moss covered or almost bare rock.

  • Sir (Horace) Edward Moss >>

  • This consists of a heavy cast iron ring, known as a wedging crib, or curb, also fitted together in segments, which is lodged in a square-edged groove cut for its reception, tightly caulked with moss, and wedged into position.

  • The tubbing, which is considerably less in diameter than the borehole, is suspended by rods from the surface until a bed suitable for a foundation is reached, upon which a sliding length of tube, known as the moss box, bearing a shoulder, which is filled with dried moss, is placed.

  • The whole weight of the tubbing is made to bear on the moss, which squeezes outwards, forming a completely water-tight joint.

  • Belgium 1055 3461 Ashton Moss dip workings.

  • They are microscopical in size and live in damp moss or water.

  • On the summits of the Adirondacks are a few alpine species, such as reindeer moss and other lichens; on the shores of Long Island, Staten Island and Westchester county are a number of maritime species; and on Long Island are several species especially characteristic of the pine barrens of New Jersey.

  • On the Arka-tagh even the moss, the last surviving representative of the flora, disappears entirely.

  • Moss, Through Atolls and Islands (London, 1889); W.

  • Other industries of a desultory character include the collection of archil, or Spanish moss, on the western side of the Californian peninsula, hunting herons for their plumes and alligators for their skins, honey extraction (commonly wild honey), and the gathering of cochineal and ni-in insects.

  • The take of 1898 consisted chiefly of cod, haddock, lobsters, mackerel, alewives, pollock and hake, but was valued at only $48,987, which was a decrease of 67% from that of 1889; in 1905 the total take was valued at $51,944, of which $32,575 was the value of lobsters and $8166 was the value of fresh cod-the only other items valued at more than $loon were soft clams ($2770), Irish moss ($2400), alewives, fresh and salted ($1220), and haddock ($1048).

  • Its nest, which is a model of neatness and symmetry, it builds on trees and bushes, preferring such as are overgrown with moss and lichens.

  • It is chiefly composed of moss and wool, lined internally with grass, wool, feathers, and whatever soft material the locality affords.

  • The outside consists of moss and lichens, and according to Selby, "is always accordant with the particular colour of its situation."

  • North-west and north-east of Hudson Bay it becomes too severe for the growth of trees as seen on the " barren grounds," and there may be perpetual ice beneath the coating of moss which serves as a non-conducting covering for the " tundras."

  • 1546), was a member of the royal council under James V.; he was also an extraordinary lord of session, high admiral, and warden of the west marches, and was taken prisoner by the English at the rout of Solway Moss in 1542.

  • They are exceedingly active and surefooted, having perhaps no equal in traversing rocks and precipitous ground; and they feed on moss, grass, and leaves of the plants which grow on the mountains.

  • One of the most useful nutritious species is Cetraria islandica, " Iceland moss," which, after being deprived of its bitterness by boiling in water, is reduced to a powder and made into cakes, or is boiled and eaten with milk by the poor Icelander, whose sole food it often constitutes.

  • sylvatica, the familiar " reindeer moss," are frequently eaten by man in times of scarcity, after being powdered and mixed with flour.

  • This is the " Iceland moss " of the druggists' shops, which is undoubtedly an excellent demulcent in various dyspeptic and chest complaints.

  • and his wife Mary of Lorraine, was born in December 1542, a few days before the death of her father, heart-broken by the disgrace of his arms at Solway Moss, where the disaffected nobles had declined to encounter an enemy of inferior force in the cause of a king whose systematic policy had been directed against the privileges of their order, and whose representative on the occasion was an unpopular favourite appointed general in defiance of their ill-will.

  • For commercial purposes, crowns of lily of the valley, tulip and other bulbs, and such deciduous woody plants as lilac and deciduous species of rhododendron, while in a state of rest, are packed in wet moss and introduced into coldstorage chambers, where they may be kept in a state of quiescence, if desired, throughout the following summer.

  • The seeds should be kept in sacks or bags in a dry place, and if from plants which are rare, or liable to lose their vitality, they are advantageously packed for transmission to a distance in hermetically sealed bottles or jars filled with earth or moss, without the addition of moisture.

  • Very small seeds should only have a sprinkling of light earth or of sand, and sometimes only a thin layer of soft moss to exclude light and preserve an equable degree of moisture.

  • The earth must be kept moist, which is perhaps best done by a thick mulching of moss, the moss being also bound closely over the openings in the vessel, and all being kept damp by frequent syringings.

  • Gardeners often dispense with the pot, using sphagnum moss and leaf-mould only when propagating indiarubber plants, perpetual carnations, dracaenas, &c.

  • The same end, that of keeping the finer particles of the soil from mixing with the drainage crocks, may be attained by shaking in a little clean moss.

  • For most of these the lightest spongy but sweet turfy peat must be used, this being packed lightly about the roots, and built up above the pot-rim, or in some cases freely mixed before use with chopped sphagnum moss and small pieces of broken pots or nodules of charcoal.

  • Some of the species grow better when altogether taken out of the soil and fixed to blocks of wood, but in this case they require a little coaxing with moss about the roots until they get established.

  • For potting or basketing purposes, or for plants requiring blockculture, the materials used are light fibrous peat, special leaf-mould, osmunda or polypodium fibre and living sphagnum moss, which supply free drainage for the copious supply of water required.

  • " Moss culture " may be tried, the common sphagnum or moss of the swamps, mixed with one-twentieth of its bulk of bonedust, being laid as a mulch on the top of the earth of the flower-pots; its effect is to shield the pots from the sun, and at the same time stimulate the roots to come to the surface.

  • The " moss culture " will be found particularly valuable for these plants.

  • Thyme and the small white dune-rose (Rosa pimpinellifolia) also grow in the dunes, and wall-pepper (Sedum acre), field fever-wort, reindeer moss, common asparagus, sheep's fescue grass, the pretty Solomon-seal (Polygonatum officinale), and the broadleaved or marsh orchis (Orchis latifolia).

  • Of parks and open spaces there are in the south, Brodie Park (22 acres), presented in 1871 by Robert Brodie; towards the north Fountain Gardens (7a acres), the gift of Thomas Coats and named from the handsome iron fountain standing in the centre; in the north-west, St James Park (40 acres), with a racecourse (racing dates from 1620, when the earl of Abercorn and the Town Council gave silver bells for the prize); Dunn Square and the old quarry grounds converted and adorned; and Moss Plantation beyond the north-western boundary.

  • The leaf of Venus's fly-trap (Dionaea muscipula) when cut off and placed in damp moss, with a pan of water underneath and a bell-glass for a cover, has produced buds from which young plants were obtained.

  • In 1542 James madly sent a Scottish army to ruin at Solway Moss; his death a few weeks later left the Scottish throne to his infant daughter Mary Stuart, and Henry set to work to secure her hand for his son Edward and the recognition of his own suzerainty.

  • Presently ensued the Scottish raid of Solway Moss and the capture of many of the Scottish nobles.

  • England was prepared, and on the 23rd of November routed and drove into Solway Moss a demoralized multitude of farm-burning Scots.

  • Angus soon followed, with the lords captured at Solway Moss, all bound more or less to work Henry's will.

  • On the side of the extremists, Cameron was happy enough to die in fair fight at Airs Moss (22nd of July 1680), after publicly disowning the king for his breach of the Covenant.

  • and was covered with thick moss.

  • Springtails and bristle-tails live in damp concealed places - under stones or tree-bark, in moss, and in the decaying vegetable or animal matter which serves as food for most of them.

  • James was not slow to make reprisals, but his nobles were angry or indifferent, and on the 25th of November 1542 his forces were easily scattered at the rout of Solway Moss.

  • Bible, the Jewish Encyclopedia Among more popular, sketches are Moss's From Malachi to Matthew (1893); Streanes' The Age of the Maccabees (1898); Morrison's The Jews under Roman Rule (" Story of the Nations " series); W.

  • The principal natural product in this region is orchil, or Spanish moss, but by means of irrigation the soil produces a considerable variety of products, including sugar cane, cotton, cassava, cereals, tobacco and grapes.

  • Grasses grow luxuriantly in the river bottoms and wherever the tundra moss is destroyed to give them footing.

  • Most distinctive is the ubiquitous carpeting of mosses, varying in colours from the pure white and cream of the reindeer moss to the deep green and brown of the peat moss, all conspicuously spangled in the brief summer with bright flowers of the higher orders, heavy blossoms on stunted stalks.

  • The thick peat moss or tundra of the undrained lowlands covers probably at least a quarter of Alaska; the ' The trees here grow as large as 10 in.

  • reindeer moss grows both on the lowlands and the hills.

  • The timber resources of Alaska are untouched 2 280 species of mosses proper, of which 46 were new to science, and 16 varieties of peat moss (Sphagnum) were listed by the Harriman expedition; and 74 species or varieties of ferns.

  • 1) and the so-called Spanish moss (fig.

  • - Tillandsia usneoides, Spanish moss, slightly reduced.

  • There are innumerable kinds of moss and lichens and ferns with leaves 12 ft.

  • The portion of the trunk from which the bark has been, removed is sometimes protected by moss, and the new bark which forms is then distinguished by the name of "mossed bark."

  • to his anti-papal policy, revived the feudal claim to suzerainty, won the battle of Solway Moss (1542), and then after Jamess death bribed and threatened the Scots estates into concluding a treaty of marriage between their infant queen and Henrys son.

  • Berwick and Carlisle were repeatedly assailed, and battles took place at Halidon Hill (1333), Otterburn (1388), Nisbet (1402), Homildon (1402), Piperden (1435), Hedgeley Moor (1464),(1464), Flodden (1513), Solway Moss (1542), and Ancrum Moor (1544), in addition to many fights arising out of family feuds and raids fomented by the Armstrongs, Eliots, Grahams, Johnstones, Maxwells and other families, of which the most serious were the encounters at Arkenholme (Langholm) in 1455, the Raid of Reidswire (1575), and the bloody combat at Dryfe Sands (1593).

  • Iceland Moss >>

  • Scarcely less conspicuous for some distance from the ocean are the magnolias, the live oaks draped with long gray moss, and the reedcovered marshes.

  • was received after his defeat at Solway Moss in 1542, and here a few Jacobites used to meet in 1715.

  • HORTEN, a seaport of Norway, in Jarlsberg-Laurvik amt (county), beautifully situated on the west bank of the Christiania Fjord, opposite Moss, 38 m.

  • An investigation by Miss Sollas of a plant long known from Rhaetic rocks in the Severn valley as Naiadita acuminata has shown that this genus is in all probability a small lycopodiaceous plant, and neither a Moss nor a Monocotyledon, as some writers have supposed.

  • The part which lies within the Arctic Circle is very desolate and sterile, consisting chiefly of sand and reindeer moss.

  • On trees or in moss away from the water.-Rana opisthodon, Hylodes, Hylella platycephala.

  • One was of medium height and slender, an older man with sharp green eyes the color of forest moss who seemed out of place in the middle of the room.

  • His master's friend, the man with eyes as green as the moss in the corner of Two's room, stood in his doorway.

  • He looked up, surprised to see his master's friend in his doorway, the man with eyes the color of the moss in the corner of his room.

  • He followed the man with eyes as green as the moss in the corner of his room down the busy hallways, unaffected by the men who spit on him or shoved him as he went.

  • The man with eyes the color of the moss in his room materialized from the shadows.

  • He jerked, surprised to find his master's friend, the one with eyes the color of the moss in his room, standing before him.

  • The master's friend, the one with eyes the color of the moss in the corner of his room, stood before him.

  • The door to the underground tunnel network was hidden behind a boulder and draped with moss.

  • The water moved silently over moss and lichen covered slabs of rocks, forming small pools in the low spots.

  • On one side was a massive rock cliff covered with green moss.

  • Susan used an engraving from an 18th Century geological book, showing different varieties of moss agate, against a mottled background.

  • alder buckthorn occur mainly on the northern edge of the open moss.

  • Kate Moss has lost her modeling contract with High Street chain H&M despite making a groveling apology earlier this week.

  • I was reading the autobiography of Moss Hart, who wrote very successful comedies with George Kaufman.

  • beardless moss is recorded from both Lower South Woodburn and North Woodburn reservoir.

  • bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus, through grassy areas, to rich moss carpets.

  • bog moss can be found.

  • Across the road from the highest point of the mountain, a narrow footpath leads down into a small sphagnum moss bog.

  • border collie called Moss.

  • The attached pic shows Malcolm Moss getting breathless for a good cause.

  • James V died brokenhearted after his army had been slaughtered at Solway Moss (1542 ).

  • However, a fire could be made by means of the moss and dry brushwood, which covered certain parts of the plateau.

  • Small shrubs of alder buckthorn occur mainly on the northern edge of the open moss.

  • Look for plants such as sea pink, moss campion, scurvy grass, sea mayweed and lichens on the rocky foreshore.

  • carryr North West (formerly William Moss & Sons) also carried out the repairs to the war damage in the 1950s.

  • caulked with moss.

  • A mulch of grass clippings or peat moss will also protect the tree from loss of water in dry weather.

  • Moss has gone from seedy cokehead to prime time television in 12 weeks.

  • collecting nesting material â dead plant stalks, leaves, moss, feathers and sheepâs wool.

  • This high wild corrie sees even less traffic than the Great Moss side and is a place to really enjoy a bit of solitude.

  • Mr Julian Moss joined CreeS as lecturer in Russian Language and Literature in September 2001.

  • I have a lawn that contains nearly as many dandelions as blades of grass; there is also a fair bit of moss.

  • The North Banbridge Hills is an area of elongated ridges and small rounded drumlins containing small valleys and areas of moss.

  • Kate Moss has recorded a duet with Primal Scream singer Bobby Gillespie.

  • John Roger Stuart Moss died of amoebic dysentery on 20th June 1943.

  • other exoticS: Anyone tried Spanish Moss in the UK?

  • Mortlach Moss Aberdeenshire This small base-rich basin fen, lying upon igneous rock, is representative of Alkaline fens in northeast Scotland.

  • festooned with high altitude moss.

  • fir clubmoss, Huperzia selago and the wooly fringe moss, Racomitrium lanuginosum.

  • The moss Calliergon cuspidatum is characteristic of many calcareous flushes in the east midlands.

  • germinate well in areas covered in moss.

  • Moss goss - 04/03/03 Courtesy of Heat Magazine Fancy quizzing Kate Moss on all her top-notch celeb gossip?

  • Judge Moss told Hamilton, a trainee hairdresser, that she would not be facing prison.

  • Racomitrium moss heath has declined south of the Scottish Highlands during the last 50 years.

  • Local guides will map a hike through bog moss and ling heather or outfit you for a day of angling for Scottish salmon.

  • Landscape Key Characteristics Rolling drumlins with broad areas of wetland and bog in inter-drumlin hollows; small rounded loughs are fringed by moss.

  • Despite some burning in the past, the surface has an extremely high Sphagnum moss cover and a notable Sphagnum moss hummock development.

  • DR. - The type of cycle stands used in ' Ashton Moss ' retail area, deemed inadequate.

  • This can also be done to rake out dead moss a couple of weeks after applying a chemical moss killer.

  • It would then use its incredibly long, curved upper mandible to probe under any dislodged bark or moss.

  • mire vegetation now survives across the administrative boundary at Acorn Field Moss in North Merseyside.

  • In 1892 Church's friend, Tom Moss, a grocer from Memphis, was lynched by a white mob.

  • Cuttings are set in a rooting mixture of two parts sand to one part peat moss, which should be barely moist.

  • Some high hummocks are dominated by wooly hair moss.

  • moss The cheapest source of bushes is moss gathered from the garden.

  • How do I remove the moss with your products?

  • How to kill moss Where can I apply the Moss Killers?

  • The herb layer is not diverse and the epiphytic moss and lichen flora is also poor.

  • After cutting the stem pack it with damp moss.

  • A pile of Spanish moss lies like a coat of curly hair tossed onto the path.

  • Two months pass and John makes a basket for Marion made out of rare moss.

  • moss campion, scurvy grass, sea mayweed and lichens on the rocky foreshore.

  • moss peat.

  • moss stitch textured design.

  • Then treat the moss with a chemical moss killer.

  • moss carpets.

  • Next, add a thin cover of sphagnum moss, which will prevent the soil from sifting down to the drainage layer.

  • Fill the bottom of the hole with compost or peat moss.

  • In the wettest reaches of Bodmin moor, sphagnum or bog moss can be found.

  • In other words, all was quiet at the bottom of the torrent moss world, despite the storm of rushing water overhead.

  • Aqua Quorum also contains freesia, and is accented with oak moss, geranium an.. .

  • Alderman Fletcher Moss, who lived at the old parsonage, turned the house into an art gallery for his private collection.

  • peat moss.

  • Make a propagating compost from three parts sphagnum moss peat to one part perlite, sieved bark or acid sand.

  • They grow best in a 1:1 mixture of lime-free sharp sand and moss peat.

  • Location The reserve, which lies on a raised peat moss, is situated to the west of Wilmslow (O.S.

  • We'll attempt a landing at Coronation Island, known for its extensive moss beds, nesting penguins and beautiful snow petrels.

  • Men's Group All Saints Men's Group An evening with Dr. Roger Moss: former consultant psychiatrist was held in March.

  • The area of Carrington Moss was formerly a raised peat moss which has suffered from drainage and subsequent agricultural reclamation.

  • Johnny Depp has given ex-girlfriend Kate Moss a strange gift to celebrate her leaving rehab - a mirror.

  • A cathedral hull, moss vault ribbed with flying buttresses.

  • rip-off charges for patients Sunday Mirror, UK - 15 Jul 2006 By Vincent Moss And Stephen Hayward.

  • Treatment is the same as for Moss, so scarifying, aerating and feeding should remove the problem from a lawn.

  • scrabble about under the moss and pebbles as if in search of something.

  • The southern part is dry, with poor bog moss cover, short common heather, deer sedge, cross-leaved heath and Cladonia lichens.

  • The musty smell of moss and pregnant decay would not greet him.

  • sphagnum moss, which will prevent the soil from sifting down to the drainage layer.

  • sphagnum moss bog.

  • sphagnum moss peat (enough to fill the other half ).

  • The bog surface is permanently wet and supports a dense and diverse cover of sphagnum bog-mosses including the rare hummock forming moss Sphagnum imbricatum.

  • ANDREW MOSS FILM SOUND UK, 1984, sound mag stripe, color, 15 mins, 16mm.

  • In the 19th century, fishermen still caulked (filled the gaps in) their boats with a mixture of pine tar and moss.

  • tenacious of life - and easily transported alive in damp moss.

  • torrent moss world, despite the storm of rushing water overhead.

  • Conditions are locally acidic and this has encouraged the recent growth of a few tussocks of Bog Moss Sphagnum sp.

  • Fast plants grow best in a 1:1 mix of sieved moss peat and fine horticultural vermiculite.

  • Colorful Altamira Orioles and Green Jays inhabit the riverine woodlands, where Spanish Moss forms curtains on the branches of trees.

  • Irish Moss A seaweed that is added to boiling wort to filter proteins.

  • These three men, and another opponent, Robert Moss, dean of Ely, were deprived of their royal chaplaincies.

  • From this time onwards the Humber formed the boundary between the two kingdoms. In 684 we hear of the first English invasion of Ireland, but in the following year Ecgfrith was slain and his army totally destroyed by the Picts at a place called Nechtansmere (probably Dunnichen Moss in Forfarshire).

  • She invented a deity of her own, a mysterious Corambe, half pagan and half Christian, and like Goethe erected to him a rustic altar of the greenest grass, the softest moss and the brightest pebbles.

  • They shelter in crevices of the bark of trees, in the dried stems of herbaceous plants, or among moss and fallen leaves on the ground.

  • Like all widely spread and much-cultivated plants, the edible 1 The earlier 15th-century form of the word was musseroun, muscheron, &c., and was adapted from the French mousseron, which is generally connected with mousse, moss.

  • The shores of the larger islands are fringed in some parts with a dense barrier of mangroves, backed by an often impenetrable thicket of tropical undergrowth, which, as the ridges are ascended, give place to taller trees and deep green bushes which are covered with orchids and trailing moss (orchilla), and from which creepers hang down interlacing the vegetation.

  • The Galapagos Islands are of some commercial importance to Ecuador, on account of the guano and the orchilla moss found on them and exported to Europe.

  • At Rutland, Proctor and Dorset many darker shades are found, including "moss vein," olive green and various shades of blue, green, yellow and pink, which are used for ornamental purposes.

  • While the majority of the Nematodes are parasites, there are many that are never at any period of their life parasitic. These free-living forms are found everywhere - in salt and fresh water, in damp earth and moss, and among decaying substances; they are always minute in size, and like many other lower forms of life, are capable of retaining their vitality for a long period even when dried, which accounts for their wide distribution; this faculty is also possessed by certain of the parasitic Nematodes, especially by those which lead a free existence during a part of their life-cycle.

  • Thus various parts of criminals, such as the thigh bone of a hanged man, moss grown on a human skull, &c., were used, and even the celebrated Dr Culpeper in the 17th century recommended " the ashes of the head of a coal black cat as a specific for such as have a skin growing over their sight."

  • J, End of hydroid of the Moss Mnium, showing particularly thin oblique end-wall.

  • K, Optical section of two adjacent leptoids of the Moss Polytrichum juniperinum.

  • L, Optical section of cell of parenchyma in the same moss.

  • M, Part of elongated stereid of a Moss.

  • In Dawsonia superba, a large New Zealand moss, the hydroids of the central cylinder of the aerial stem are mixed with thick-walled stereids forming a hydrom-stereom strand somewhat like that of the rhizome in other Polytrichaceae.

  • The stereom of the moss is found mainly in the outer cortex of the stem and in the midrib of the leaf.

  • Moss, op. cit.

  • For example, rae Arenarion in one climatic or geographical region might be in~~ med an a-Arenarion and one in a different region a a-Arena- ~j1j ri, and so on (Moss, bc. cit.).

  • Schimper distinguishes moss tundra, Pot ytrichum tundra, and lichen tundra; and the lichen tundra is subdivided into Cladonia tundra, Platysma tundra, and Alectoria heath.

  • An unsuccessful diplomatist, his chief services in arms were the butchery in the north after the Pilgrimage of Grace and the raid into Scotland which ended with the rout of Solway Moss.

  • Owing to its northerly position a large part of Ungava is treeless, and belongs to the barren grounds where caribou roam and feed on the socalled caribou moss, a greyish lichen.

  • An interesting case of embankment and cutting in combination was involved in crossing Chat Moss on the Liverpool & Manchester railway.

  • The moss was 41 rn.

  • The subsoil was composed principally of clay and sand, and the railway had to be carried over the moss on the level, requiring cutting, and embanking for upwards of 4 m.

  • Large quantities of embanking were sunk in the moss, and, when the engineer, George Stephenson, after a month's vigorous operations, had made up his estimates, the apparent work done was sometimes less than at the beginning of the month.

  • apart were cut, and when the moss between them was dry it was used to form the embankment.

  • Where the way was formed on the level, drains were cut on each side of the intended line, and were intersected here and there by cross drains, by which the upper part of the moss was rendered dry and firm.

  • Here, too, grows Spanish moss, used by upholsterers.

  • In the swamps are the bald cypress, the white cedar and the live oak, usually draped in southern long moss; south of Cape Fear river are palmettos, magnolias, prickly ash, the American olive and mock orange; along streams in the Coastal Plain Region are the sour gum, the sweet bay and several species of oak; but the tree that is most predominant throughout the upland portion of this region is the long-leaf or southern pine.

  • - Lancashire (Down Holland Moss), Holland, Sweden, Sardinia, Kaluga (Russia), Red Sea, Mediterranean.

  • They feed chiefly on grass, but also on moss, lichens and tender shoots of the willow and pine.

  • Much of the river swamp region is covered with cypress trees festooned with Spanish moss.

  • Moss's " Last Days of Wisconsin Territory and Early Days of Minnesota Territory " (1898);.

  • Moss, and later Mr F.

  • This account does not by any means accord with one given by von Koppenfels, in which it is stated that while the old male gorilla sleeps in a sitting posture at the base of a tree-trunk (no mention being made of a bed), the female and young ones pass the night in a nest in the tree several yards above the ground, made by bending the boughs together and covering them with twigs and moss.

  • The nest is a neat structure of coarse grass and moss, mixed with earth, and plastered internally with mud, and here the female lays from four to six eggs of a blue colour speckled with brown.

  • It is only necessary here to mention one anomalous form, Enoicyla pusilla, in which the mature female is wingless and the larva is terrestrial, living in moss or decayed leaves.

  • The female makes her nest of moss, dried leaves and grass in the hollow of a tree, but sometimes in a hole among rocks or ruined buildings, and produces several young at a birth, usually from four to six.

  • Above this grows a species of pine, which becomes dwarfed and disappears at an altitude of about 6000 ft., beyond which is a zone of lichen and moss covered or almost bare rock.

  • Sir (Horace) Edward Moss >>

  • This consists of a heavy cast iron ring, known as a wedging crib, or curb, also fitted together in segments, which is lodged in a square-edged groove cut for its reception, tightly caulked with moss, and wedged into position.

  • The tubbing, which is considerably less in diameter than the borehole, is suspended by rods from the surface until a bed suitable for a foundation is reached, upon which a sliding length of tube, known as the moss box, bearing a shoulder, which is filled with dried moss, is placed.

  • The whole weight of the tubbing is made to bear on the moss, which squeezes outwards, forming a completely water-tight joint.

  • Belgium 1055 3461 Ashton Moss dip workings.

  • The brief war was finally concluded by the convention of Moss on the 14th of August 1814 (see Norway: History).

  • They are microscopical in size and live in damp moss or water.

  • On the summits of the Adirondacks are a few alpine species, such as reindeer moss and other lichens; on the shores of Long Island, Staten Island and Westchester county are a number of maritime species; and on Long Island are several species especially characteristic of the pine barrens of New Jersey.

  • On the Arka-tagh even the moss, the last surviving representative of the flora, disappears entirely.

  • Moss, Through Atolls and Islands (London, 1889); W.

  • Other industries of a desultory character include the collection of archil, or Spanish moss, on the western side of the Californian peninsula, hunting herons for their plumes and alligators for their skins, honey extraction (commonly wild honey), and the gathering of cochineal and ni-in insects.

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