How to use Mosque in a sentence

mosque
  • Her mosque was built in 1418.

    220
    96
  • He must not sit in a mosque, except under necessity, but in some open, accessible place.

    226
    117
  • Of the principal mosques the large Buyuk Djamia, with nine metal cupolas, has become the National Museum; the Tcherna Djamia or Black Mosque, latterly used as a prison, has been transformed into a handsome church; the Banyabashi Djamia, with its picturesque minaret, is still used by Moslem worshippers.

    54
    33
  • In such moments of baffled inquiry he would leave his books, perform the requisite ablutions, then hie to the mosque, and continue in prayer till light broke on his difficulties.

    60
    44
  • The church, which was converted into a mosque by the Turks, was partly destroyed by earthquakes in 1818 and 1858.

    33
    17
    Advertisement
  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

    73
    58
  • Here begins the mosque of Gauhar Shad.'

    39
    25
  • The earliest mosque erected was that at Mecca, which consisted of a great court, in the centre of which was the Ka`ba or Holy Stone.

    34
    21
  • It was based, therefore, on the great mosque at Kairawan, and although more or less rebuilt, it still preserves its original plan.

    30
    18
  • On leaving Egypt he travelled by land to the Persian Gulf, disguised as a Mameluke, visiting Damascus, and entering the great mosque undetected.

    24
    13
    Advertisement
  • It has a special interest in being the chief university of the Moslem world, containing some thousands of students (mujawirin), for whom certain parts of the mosque (riwaq) are screened off, according to the country from which they come.

    20
    11
  • On the whole it is most likely that the Temple was erected by Solomon on the same spot as is now occupied by the Dome of the Rock, commonly known as the Mosque of Omar, and, regard being had to the levels of the ground, it is possible that the Holy of Holies, the most sacred chamber of the Temple, stood over the rock which is still regarded with veneration by the Mahommedans.

    33
    25
  • Among the most conspicuous of these are the mosque of Aurangzeb, built as an intentional insult in the middle of the Hindu quarter; the Bisheshwar or Golden Temple, important less through architectural beauty than through its rank as the holiest spot in the holy city; and the Durga temple, which, like most of the other principal temples, is a Mahratta building of the 17th century.

    17
    10
  • The acquisition of Aleppo could only make that supreme object more readily attainable; and so Saladin had spent his time in acquiring Aleppo, but only in order that he might ultimately "attain the goal of his desires, and set the mosque of Asha free, to which Allah once led in the night his servant Mahomet."

    18
    12
  • All this part of the mosque (shrine) was built by Shah Abbas.

    18
    13
    Advertisement
  • The oldest building in Sofia is the little round chapel of St George in the Jewish quarter - originally, it is said, a Roman temple; then a church, then a mosque, and now a church once more.

    17
    12
  • One tradition describes how Neagoe Bassarab, while a hostage in Constantinople, designed a splendid mosque for the sultan, returning to build the cathedral out of the surplus materials.

    19
    14
  • The mosque of the Omayyads in Damascus was built by the Caliph Walid in A.D.

    8
    5
  • The most beautiful portion of the mosque, however, still exists in the prayer chamber of Hakim, where are to be found the earliest examples of the cusped arch and the origin of many of the geometrical patterns in stucco at the Alhambra.

    9
    6
  • The mosque of el Azhar, "the splendid," was begun about A.D.

    13
    10
    Advertisement
  • The principal buildings which remain are the church of St John, which is become the principal mosque; the hospital, which has been transformed into public granaries; the palace of the grand master, now the residence of the pasha; and the senate-house, which still contains some marbles and ancient columns.

    13
    11
  • In elevation the façade seems to have connexion with the five-bayed façade of the Kahriyeh Jame, or mosaic mosque, at Constantinople.

    9
    7
  • The court was surrounded with arcades, all of which constituted the prayer chamber, so that its plan is necessarily different to the normal type; the existing buildings date only from the first half of the 17th century, as the whole mosque was destroyed by a torrent in 1626.

    10
    8
  • The architect is said to have been a Coptic Christian who deprecated the destruction of ancient buildings to obtain columns and blocks of stone, and who undertook to design a mosque which should be built entirely in brick, which when coated with stucco and appropriate decorative designs would rival its predecessors.

    8
    6
  • You will also visit the Terai Camp, the Etigar Mosque, Mogao Grottoes, Labrang Monastery and much more.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the farther side of the eastern ravine stands a smaller but very well proportioned structure, the church of St Eugenius, the patron saint of Trebizond, now the Yeni Djuma djami, or New Friday mosque.

    1
    0
  • These formed a single building, which was still intact goo years ago, and was used as the mosque of the then existing city of Istakhr.

    9
    8
  • Several of these columns belonged to the former mosque.

    1
    0
  • In the centre of the eastern side of the quadrangle two gigantic doors were thrown open to admit the people into the adytum or inner mosque (shrine) where is the marble tomb of Imam Reza, surrounded by a silver railing with knobs of gold.

    13
    12
  • The site is now covered with valonia oaks, and has been much plundered, e.g by Mahommed IV., who took columns to adorn his new Valideh mosque in Stambul; but the circuit of the old walls can be traced, and in several places they are fairly well preserved.

    7
    6
    Advertisement
  • The Parthenon was transformed into a mosque; the existing minaret at its south-western corner was built after 1466.

    14
    13
  • In the earliest mosque at old Delhi, they adopted the piers and bracketed capitals of the Jaina builders, whom they probably employed to build their mosque.

    1
    0
  • They, however, had no confidence in the arch, which, as the Hindu says, "never sleeps but is always tending to its own destruction," so that the pointed arch, which had almost become the emblem of the Mahommedan religion, had to be dispensed with for the covered aisles which surrounded the great court, and in the triple entrance gateway the form of an arch only was retained, as it was constructed with horizontal courses of masonry for the haunches, and with long slabs of stone resting one against the other at the top. A similar construction was employed in the great mosque at Ajmere, built A.D.1200-1211at the same time as the Delhi mosque.

    1
    0
  • As a contrast to the Ahmedabad mosques, the Kadam Rasul mosque at Gaur in Bengal possesses some characteristics which resemble those of the mosque of Tulun in Cairo, possibly due to the fact that it is entirely built in brick, with massive piers carrying pointed arches.

    1
    0
  • The mosque at Fatehpur-Sikri possesses in its great southern gateway, built by Akbar in the second half of the 16th century, the masterpiece of IndoSaracenci architecture.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • This point is very near the present mosque of Nebi Daniel; and the line of the great east-west "Canopic" street only slightly diverged from that of the modern Boulevard de Rosette.

    1
    0
  • However, by sending heavy bribes to Bayezid and his vizier, and by offering to build a mosque and.

    1
    0
  • The mosque was destroyed later on and the Mussulman settlers driven out.

    1
    0
  • The Marjanieh mosque, not far from the minaret of Mostansir, although its body is modern, has some remains of old and very rich arabesque work on its surface, dating from the 1 4 th century.

    1
    0
  • The Mosque of the Vizier, on the eastern side of the Tigris, near the pontoon bridge, has a fine dome and a lofty minaret, and the Great Mosque in the square of el Meidan, in the neighbourhood of the serai, is also a noble building.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In its present form this mosque dates from the 19th century.

    1
    0
  • The possessor or controller of this wealthy mosque is the nakib, locally pronounced najeeb, or marshal of the nobles, whose office is to determine who are Se`ids, i.e.

    1
    0
  • There are said to be about thirty khans or caravanserais in Bagdad for the reception of pilgrims and merchants and their goods, none of which is of any importance as a building, with the single exception of the khan el-Aurtmeh adjoining the Marjanieh mosque, to which it formerly belonged.

    1
    0
  • It was a mile in diameter, built in concentric circles, with the mosque and palace of the caliph in the centre, and had four gates toward the four points of the compass.

    1
    0
  • Bima or Bodjo, the chief town of the latter state, lies on the east side of the Bay of Bima; it has a stone-walled palace and a mosque, as well as a Dutch fort.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Shah Jahan erected many splendid monuments, the most famous of which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, built as a tomb for his wife Mumtaz Mahal; while the Pearl Mosque at Agra and the palace and great mosque at Delhi also commemorate him.

    1
    0
  • There were, in 1900, four Servian Orthodox churches, including the cathedral, one Roman Catholic chapel, one Evangelical chapel (German), two synagogues and one mosque.

    1
    0
  • Its most conspicuous feature is the burial mosque of Sultan Sanjar, reputedly dating from the 12th century.

    1
    0
  • The enamelled Saracenic glasses take the form of flasks, vases, goblets, beakers and mosque lamps.

    1
    0
  • The great mosque (Jamaa-el-Kebir) has a brick minaret 112 ft.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • This mosque was built A.D.

    2
    1
  • The mosque of Sidi Ahmed bel Hassan, usually called Abul Hassan, built A.D.

    2
    1
  • The adjacent mosque is a beautiful specimen of Moorish art.

    2
    1
  • The mosque is divided by columns into five aisles.

    2
    1
  • The medressa is a building resembling the mosque.

    2
    1
  • Of the rest of the mosque only the outer walls remain.

    2
    1
  • Such was the mosque of the Mosalla before its destruction.

    2
    1
  • The Great Mosque, Ulu Jami, formerly a Christian church, occupies the site of a Sassanian palace and was built with materials from an older palace, probably that of Tigranes II.

    1
    0
  • The court of the mosque is entered by a gateway on which lions and other animals are sculptured.

    1
    0
  • The mosque is at the same time the university hall, where between two pilgrim seasons lectures are delivered on Mahommedan law, doctrine and connected branches of science.

    1
    0
  • The mosque of Khaseki, supposed to have been an old Christian church, is chiefly distinguished for its prayer niche, which, instead of being a simple recess, is crowned by a Roman arch, with square pedestals, spirally fluted shafts and a rich capital of flowers, with a fine fan or shell-top in the Roman style.

    1
    0
  • The most notable of the mosques is the Mir-Arab, built in the 16th century, with its beautiful lecture halls; the chief mosque of the emir is the Mejid-kalyan, or Kok-humbez, close by which stands a brick minaret, 203 ft.

    0
    0
  • There are three colleges, and the Biki mosque is a fine building inlaid with blue and white tiles.

    0
    0
  • That to the left leads to the chief mosque of the city, the Jamaa-al-Zeituna (mosque of the Olive Tree), founded in A.D.

    0
    0
  • Attached to the mosque is a college attended by several hundreds of Moslem youths.

    0
    0
  • The kasbah, which forms the western side of the Suk-el-Islam, includes within the circuit of its walls a mosque built about A.D.

    0
    0
  • North-east of the Palais de Justice, which like the Sadiki College is built in the Moorish style, rises the great dome, surrounded by smaller cupolas, of the largest mosque in the city, that named after Sidi Mahrez, a renowned saint of the 5th century of the Mahommedan era, whose tomb makes it a sancutary for debtors.

    0
    0
  • East of the mosque, which dates from the 17th century, and just without the inner city walls, here demolished, is the Protestant cemetery of St George, used during the 17th, 18th and the greater part of the 19th centuries.

    0
    0
  • The principal educational establishments, besides that of the mosque of the Olive Tree, are the Sadiki College, founded in 1875, for free instruction in Arabic and European subjects, the Lycee Carnot in the Avenue de Paris, formerly the College of St Charles (founded by Cardinal Lavigerie), open to Christians and Moslems alike, and the normal school, founded in 1884 by the reigning bey, for the training of teachers in the French language and European ideas.

    0
    0
  • Damghan was an important city in the middle ages, but only a ruined mosque with a number of massive columns and some fine wood carvings and two minarets of the 11th century remain of that period.

    0
    0
  • But it revived, and most of its fine Moslem mosque and fortress architecture, still extant, belongs to the reign of Sultan Kalaun (1282) and the succeeding century, during which Abulfeda describes it as a very strong place.

    0
    0
  • Its chief buildings are the cathedral, originally a mosque, and the ruined castle, which is the chief among many interesting relics of Moorish rule.

    0
    0
  • In the East the metropolitan baptistery at Constantinople still stands at the side of the mosque which was once the patriarchal church of St Sophia; and many others, in Syria, have been made known to us by recent researches, as also have some belonging to the churches of North Africa.

    0
    0
  • The interior of Mosul has an insignificant appearance, only a few of the older buildings being left, among which may be mentioned the Great Mosque, with its leaning minaret, formerly a church dedicated to St Paul.

    0
    0
  • A mosque still stands on the spot where `Ali is reputed to have worshipped.

    0
    0
  • The houses, which are built of clay, are low and flat-roofed; and the only buildings of importance are the chief mosque, which is surmounted by a tower 95 ft.

    0
    0
  • About it Yakub Beg erected a commodious college, mosque and monastery, the whole being surrounded by rich orchards, fruit gardens and vineyards.

    0
    0
  • One wide street traverses the town from east to west, but the others are narrow, unpaved and dirty, except near the new government buildings and the large modern mosque of Hajji Izzet Pasha to the north, which are the only buildings of note.

    0
    0
  • On the eastern side of the city stand the ruins of the Masjed i Jehan Shah, commonly known as the Masjed i Kebud, or "Blue Mosque," from the blue glazed tiles which cover its walls.

    0
    0
  • The ancient collegiate church of San Maximo occupies the traditional site of a cathedral founded by the Visigothic king Reccared about 600, and afterwards converted into a mosque.

    0
    0
  • Of earlier buildings, the most distinguished are the Eski Serai, an ancient and half-ruined palace of the sultans; the bazaar of Ali Pasha; and the 16th-century mosque of the sultan Selim II., a magnificent specimen of Turkish architecture.

    0
    0
  • The town, which is of considerable antiquity, contains some fine buildings, the chief mosque having a conspicuous tower.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of the tower of the Kutubia Mosque and a certain archway which was brought in pieces from Spain, there is not, it is asserted, a single stone building in the city; and even bricks (although the local manufacture is of excellent quality) are sparingly employed.

    0
    0
  • The mosque to which the tower belongs is a large brick building erected by `Abd el Mumin; the interior is adorned with marble pillars, and the whole of the crypt is occupied by a vast cistern excavated by Yakub el Mansur.

    0
    0
  • There is also a Turkish mosque, which is now used as a guard-house.

    0
    0
  • According to Clavijo, ninety captured elephants were employed merely to carry stones from certain quarries to enable the conqueror to erect a mosque at Samarkand.

    0
    0
  • But perhaps the most unique sight in Ahmedabad is the two windows in Sidi Said's mosque of filigree marble work.

    0
    0
  • An ancient Jain temple, now converted into a Mahommedan mosque, is situated on the lower slope of the Taragarh hill.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of that part used as a mosque, nearly the whole of the ancient temple has fallen into ruins, but the relics are not excelled in beauty of architecture and sculpture by any remains of Hindu art.

    0
    0
  • Its mud and pantile dwellings are here and there relieved by a mosque tower, but the aspect of the town is far from inviting.

    0
    0
  • In 1754 Mahmud died of heart-disease when returning from the Friday service at the mosque.

    0
    0
  • The town of Palembang is a large place on the river Musi, with 50,000 inhabitants (2500 Chinese), extensive barracks, hospitals, &c., a mosque (1740), considered the finest in the Dutch Indies, and a traditional tomb of Alexander the Great.

    0
    0
  • Outside the fort the places of most importance are the sarai and gardens of Khasru, the son of the Emperor Jehangir, and the Jama Masjid or Great Mosque.

    0
    0
  • When the town first came into the hands of the English this mosque was used as a residence by the military officer commanding the station, and afterwards as an assembly room.

    0
    0
  • In the northern quarter stands the great mosque founded by Sidi Okba ibn Nafi, and containing his shrine and the tombs of many rulers of Tunisia.

    0
    0
  • In all the mosque contains 439 columns, including two of alabaster given by one of the Byzantine emperors.

    0
    0
  • Of greater external beauty than that of Sidi Okba is the mosque of the Three Gates.

    0
    0
  • Internally the mosque is a single chamber supported by sixteen Roman columns.

    0
    0
  • This mosque is specially sacred as possessing what are said to be three hairs of the Prophet's beard, buried with the saint, who was one of the companions of Mahomet.

    0
    0
  • The 19th-century mosque of Sidi Amar Abada, also outside the wall, is in the form of a cross and is crowned with seven cupolas.

    0
    0
  • Arabi also attended lectures at the mosque El Azhar and acquired a reputation as an orator.

    0
    0
  • The buildings of interest in the town are a palace, built by Akbar, called the Lal Kila or the Red Fort, and the Jama Masjid or Great Mosque, built by Ali Khan, one of the Farukhi dynasty, in 1588.

    0
    0
  • On his way home he attended the teachers of the mosque at Kairawan, in Tunisia, who soon learnt from him that his people knew little of the religion they were supposed to profess, and that though his will was good, his own ignorance was great.

    0
    0
  • The citadel or El-Kala was built by Saladin about 1166, but it has since undergone frequent alteration, and now contains a palace erected by Mehemet Ali, and a mosque of Oriental alabaster (based on the model of the mosques at Constantinople) founded by the same pasha on the site of " Joseph's Hall," so named after the prenomen of Saladin.

    0
    0
  • The dome and the two slender minarets of this mosque form one of the most picturesque features of Cairo, and are visible from a great distance.

    0
    0
  • The restoration of parts of the mosque which had fallen into decay was begun in 1904.

    0
    0
  • Besides the mosque proper there is a second mosque containing the fine mausoleum of Kalaun.

    0
    0
  • Adjacent to the muristan on the north is the tomb mosque of al Nasir,.

    0
    0
  • East of the Khan-el-Khalil is the mosque of El Hasanen, which is invested with peculiar sanctity as containing relics of Hosain and Hasan, grandsons of the Prophet.

    0
    0
  • This mosque was rebuilt in the 19th century and is of no architectural importance.

    0
    0
  • This mosque was carefully restored in 1898.

    0
    0
  • Near the imam's mosque is a family burial-place built by Mehemet Ali.

    0
    0
  • Farther to the east is the mosque of Amr, a much-altered building dating from A.D.

    0
    0
  • Roda Island contains a mosque built by Kait Bey, and at its southern extremity is the Nilometer, by which the Cairenes have for over a thousand years measured the rise of the river.

    0
    0
  • Of the first, the mosque of Ahmed Ibn-Tulun in the southern part of Cairo, and the three great gates of the city, the Bab-en-Nasr, Bab-el-Futuh and Bab-Zuwela, are splendid examples.

    0
    0
  • The mosque of Tulun was built entirely in brick, and is the earliest instance of the employment of the pointed arch in Egypt.

    0
    0
  • The mosque of sultan Hasan, below the citadel, those of Muayyad and Kalaun, with the Barkukiya and the mosque of Barkuk in the cemetery of Kait Bey, are instances of the second and more matured style of the period.

    0
    0
  • The principal characteristics of this second period are the magnificent portals, rising sometimes, as in the mosque of sultan Hasan, to 80 or 90 ft., with elaborate stalactite vaulting at the top, and the deep stalactite cornices which crown the summit of the building.

    0
    0
  • Of the last style of this period the Ghuriya and the mosque of Kait Bey in his cemetery are beautiful specimens.

    0
    0
  • Of the age of decline the finest monument is the mosque of Mahommad Bey Abu-Dahab.

    0
    0
  • The usual plan of a congregational mosque is a large, square, open court, surrounded by arcades of which the chief, often several bays deep, and known as the Manksura, or prayer-chamber, faces Mecca (eastward), and has inside its outer wall a decorated niche to mark the direction of prayer.

    0
    0
  • The museum of Egyptian antiquities was founded at Bulak in 1863, being then housed in a mosque, by the French savant Auguste Mariette.

    0
    0
  • It continued the royal residence of his successors; but was sacked not long after the fall of the dynasty and rapidly decayed., A part of the present Cairo occupies its site and contains its great mosque, that of Ahmed Ibn Tulun.

    0
    0
  • This council consists of the sheikh or religious chief of each of the four orthodox sects, the sheikh of the mosque of Azhar, who is of the sect of the Shafiis, the chief (nakib) of the Sherifs, or descendants of Mahomet, and others.

    0
    0
  • On the way to the cemetery the corpse is generally carried to some revered mosque.

    0
    0
  • The tenth day, being the anniversary of the martyrdom of Hosain, the son of Ali and grandson of the Prophet, the mosque of the Hasanen at Cairo is thronged to excess, mostly by women.

    0
    0
  • In the evening a procession goes to the mosque, the principal figure being a white horse with white trappings, upon which is seated a small boy, the horse and the lad, who represents Hosain, being smeared with blood.

    0
    0
  • From the mosque the procession goes to a private house, where a mullah recites the story of the martyrdom.

    0
    0
  • A few days after, the Kiswa, or new covering for the Kaba at Mecca, is taken in procession from the citadel, where it is always manufactured, to the mosque of the Hasanhn to be completed; and, later, the caravan of pilgrims departs, when the grand procession of the Mahmal takes place.

    0
    0
  • The mosque of the Hasanhn (Or that of the two Hasans) is the most reverenced shrine in the country, and is believed to contain the head of Hosain.

    0
    0
  • By 875 he found himself strong enough to refuse to send tribute to Bagdad, preferring to spend the revenues of Egypt on the maintenance of his army and the erection of great buildings, such as his famous mosque; and though Mowaffaq advanced against him with an army, the project of reducing Abmad to submission had to be abandoned for want of means.

    0
    0
  • This vizier had the astuteness to see the necessity of codifying the doctrines of the Ftimites, and himself undertook this task; in the newly-established mosque of el-Azhar he got his master to make provision for a perpetual series of teachers and students of his manual.

    0
    0
  • Klber, quickly suppressed this rising; but the stabling of the French cavalry in the mosque of Azhar gave great and permanent offence.

    0
    0
  • A certain Ahmed Pasha, who was about to proceed to a province in Arabia, of which he had been appointed governor, was raised to the important post of pasha of Egypt, through the influence of the Turks and the favor of the sheiks; but Mehemet Ali, who with his Albanians held the citadel, refused to assent to their choice; the Mamelukes moved over from El-Giza, whither they had been invited by Thir Pasha, and Ahmed Paslia betook himself to the mosque of al-Zflhir, which the French had converted into a fortress.

    0
    0
  • At the mosque called the Ashrafia they separated, one party proceeding to the Azhar and the houses of certain sheiks, and the other continuing along the main street, and through the gate called BI-b Zuwla, where they turned up towards the citadel.

    0
    0
  • Thus shut up in a narrow Street, some sought refuge in the collegiate mosque Barkukia, while the remainder fought their way through their enemies and escaped over the city-wall with the loss of their horses.

    0
    0
  • Of these works only two remain perfect, St Sophia in Constantinople, now a mosque, and one of the architectural wonders of the world, and the church of SS Sergius and Bacchus, now commonly called Little St Sophia, which stands about half a mile from the great church, and is in its way a very delicate and beautiful piece of work.

    0
    0
  • In the years1872-1878the Afghan Jamal ud-Din, a professor in the Azhar mosque at Cairo, attempted to read Avicenna with his scholars, and to exercise them in things that went beyond theology, bringing, for example, a globe into the mosque to explain the form of the earth.

    0
    0
  • But the other professors rose in arms, forbade him to enter the mosque, and in 1879 procured his exile on the pretext that he entertained democratic and revolutionary ideas.

    0
    0
  • Of the great universities but one survives - the Azhar mosque at Cairo - where thousands of students still gather to follow a course of study which gives an accurate picture of the Mahommedan ideal of theological education.

    0
    0
  • The less fortunate make shift to live outside as best they can, but are all day in the mosque, and are seldom deserted by Moslem charity.

    0
    0
  • The student who has passed his examinations at Constantinople or Cairo may take up the purely religious office of imam (president in worship) or khatib (preacher) at a mosque.

    0
    0
  • It was used as a mosque during the Turkish occupation, and here took place the coronation of Franz Joseph as king of Hungary in 1867.

    0
    0
  • In Buda, near the Kaiserbad, and not far from the Margaret bridge, is a small octagonal Turkish mosque, with a dome 25 ft.

    0
    0
  • It contains a small crusaders' church, now a mosque.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand it may be mentioned that on the 30th of June 18J5 the cross was for the first time since the crusades borne aloft through the streets of Jerusalem on the occasion of the visit of a European prince; and that in 1858 the sacred area of the Haramesh-Sherif - the mosque on the site of the Temple of Jerusalem - was for the first time thrown open to Christian visitors.

    0
    0
  • Other shrines, such as the alleged tomb of Moses, and the mosque of Hebron over the cave of Machpelah, are the centres of Moslem pilgrimage.

    0
    0
  • In some tribes a tablet, on which is inscribed the name of every man fit to bear arms, is placed in the mosque.

    0
    0
  • The Tawahhid (The Unity of God), said to have been written in Moroccan Berber and believed to be the oldest African work in existence, except Egyptian and Ethiopic, was the work of the Muwahhadi leader, Ibn Tumart the Mandi, at a time when the officials of the Kairawan mosque were dismissed because they could not speak Berber.

    0
    0
  • An ancient stone vessel preserved in a mosque at Kandahar is almost certainly the same that was treasured at Peshawar in the 5th century as the begging pot of SakyaMuni.

    0
    0
  • That city was occupied in April 1839, and Shah Shuja was crowned in his grandfather's mosque.

    0
    0
  • The fine mosque of Sidi-el-Kattani (or Salah Bey) dates from the close of the 18th century; that of Suk-er-Rezel, now transformed into a cathedral, and called Notre-Dame des Sept Douleurs, was built about a century earlier.

    0
    0
  • The Great Mosque, or Jamaa-el-Kebir, occupies the site of what was probably an ancient pantheon.

    0
    0
  • The mosque Sidi-el-Akhdar has a beautiful minaret nearly 80 ft.

    0
    0
  • It contains an old summer palace, overshadowed by plane trees, with numerous springs, and a fine mosque and shrine.

    0
    0
  • In the mosque at Medina he was stabbed by a Kufan workman and died in November 644.

    0
    0
  • He exhibited Othman's blood-stained garment in the mosque at Damascus, and incited his Syrians to vengeance.

    0
    0
  • Nafi ` and the foundation of Kairawan, where the great mosque still bears his name.

    0
    0
  • At a Friday service in the great mosque `Amr was insulted and pelted with pebbles.

    0
    0
  • A characteristically Arabic ceremony took place in the mosque of Medina.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of his reign Abdalmalik had replaced the humble mosque built by Omar on the site of the temple at Jerusalem by a magnificent dome, which was completed in the year 691.

    0
    0
  • In the time of the conquest of Damascus, one half of the great church had been made a mosque, while the remaining half had been left to the Christians.

    0
    0
  • Walid also caused the mosque of Medina to be enlarged.

    0
    0
  • Strictly it was a huge citadel, in the centre of which was the palace of the caliph and the great mosque.

    0
    0
  • From Mecca Mandi went to Medina, where he caused the mosque to be enlarged, and where a similar distribution of gifts took place.

    0
    0
  • On his return to Bagdad the traveller found there a young man, son of this prince, who gained a single dirhem daily for serving as imam in a mosque, and did not get the least relief from his rich father.

    0
    0
  • The church of San Lorenzo (1270-1300) is noteworthy for the beautiful tracery of its Gothic windows; its nave is said to have been a Roman temple, converted by the Moors into a mosque and by Ramon Berenguer IV., last count of Barcelona, into a church.

    0
    0
  • Of these the most conspicuous is the mausoleum of Seyed Kavvam ud-din, king of Mazandaran, who died in 1379, and one old mosque dates from A.D.

    0
    0
  • A splendid mosque called Meshed Ali was afterwards erected near the city, but the place of his burial is unknown.

    0
    0
  • There are a large railway station, a very fine mosque (restored), and a palace of the khedive.

    0
    0
  • The Frank conquest is represented by the " Crusaders' Tower " at Kolossi, and the church of St Nicholas at Nicosia; and, later, by masterpieces of a French Gothic style, such as the church (mosque) of St Sophia, and other churches at Nicosia; the cathedral (mosque) and others at Famagusta (q.v.), and the monastery at Bella Pais; as well as by domestic architecture at Nicosia; and by forts at Kyrenia, Limasol and elsewhere.

    0
    0
  • Maundrell in 1697 found it a complete ruin, save for a khan occupied by some French merchants, a mosque and a few poor cottages.

    0
    0
  • The Grand Mosque (in rue Philippe) was erected at the end of the 18th century to commemorate the expulsion of the Spaniards, and with money paid as ransom for Christian slaves.

    0
    0
  • The streets are very narrow, and the buildings of any interest few; most prominent are some large caravanserais belonging to the period of Sidon's modern prosperity, and the large mosque, formerly a church of the knights of St John.

    0
    0
  • Running south from Khedive Avenue at the spot where the Gordon statue stands, is Victoria Avenue, leading to Abbas Square, in the centre of which is the great mosque with two minarets.

    0
    0
  • Although capital of the province, it is not the residence of the governor, who prefers the more healthy Bostam, a small city with fine gardens and a mosque of the 14th century, lying 3 m.

    0
    0
  • The chief priest of the principal mosque of a city, the masfid i jami, is called imam juma, and he, or a representative appointed by him, reads the kljutba, Friday oration, and also preaches.

    0
    0
  • The leader of the prayers in a mosque is the pishnamaz, and the crier to prayers is the muazzin.

    0
    0
  • Treachery may have had to do with the result, for when the shahs troops entered the holy city the ealar sought refuge in the mosque of Imam Riza, and was forcibly expelled.

    0
    0
  • Though for the most part poorly built, it has one or two buildings of some pretension - an ancient castle, a mosque, a Franciscan monastery, government buildings and barracks.

    0
    0
  • It was subsequently rebuilt, and in 1558 was again taken by the Portuguese, who made a permanent settlement and converted the mosque into a Christian church.

    0
    0
  • Of the old period a ruined mosque and two colleges remain; other mosques and colleges are of recent construction.

    0
    0
  • In 795 Harun al-Rashid made the pilgrimage, came with two of his sons to Medina, and sat at the feet of Malik as he lectured in the mosque.

    0
    0
  • Another building of much the same date is the red stone palace generally attributed to Akbar, but probably of an earlier time, which is the finest example of pure Hindu architecture; while the Moti Masjid, or Pearl Mosque, is an equally perfect example of the Mahommedan style.

    0
    0
  • It is lavishly bestowed on the tombs themselves and the screens which surround them, but more sparingly introduced on the mosque that forms one wing of the Taj, and on the fountains and surrounding buildings.

    0
    0
  • There are some houses in the Moorish style and a mosque among the ruins bears date 636 A.H.

    0
    0
  • Including an Anglican and a Roman Catholic cathedral, there are about fifty churches in the city and its suburbs, as well as a Mahommedan mosque.

    0
    0
  • A short distance south of the Chandni Chauk the Jama Masjid, or Great Mosque, rises boldly from a small rocky eminence.

    0
    0
  • The mosque itself, a splendid structure forming an oblong 261 ft.

    0
    0
  • The interior of the mosque is paved throughout, and the walls and roof are lined, with white marble.

    0
    0
  • Two other mosques in Delhi itself deserve passing notice, the Kala Masjid or Black Mosque, which was built about 1380 in the reign of Feroz Shah, and the Moti Masjid or Pearl Mosque, a tiny building added to the palace by Aurangzeb, as the emperor's private place of prayer.

    0
    0
  • It stands in the south-east corner of the outer court of the mosque erected by Kutb-ud-din immediately after his capture of Delhi in 1193.

    0
    0
  • The design of this mosque is Mahommedan, but the wonderfully delicate ornamentation of its western façade and other remaining parts is Hindu.

    0
    0
  • In the inner courtyard of the mosque stands the Iron Pillar, which is probably the most ancient monument in the neighbourhood of Delhi, dating from about A.D.

    0
    0
  • Whatever its dim predecessors may have been, however, the actual history of Delhi dates no further back than the 11th century A.D., when Anangapala (Anang Pal), a chief of the Tomara clan, built the Red Fort, in which the Kutb DSinar now stands; in 1052 the same chief removed the famous Iron Pillar from its original position, probably at Muttra, and set it up among a group of temples of which the materials were afterwards used by the Mussulmans for the construction of the great Kutb Mosque.

    0
    0
  • His dynasty is known as that of the slave kings, and it is to them that old Delhi owes its grandest remains, among them Kutb Mosque and the Kutb Minar.

    0
    0
  • The imperial palace, the Jama Masjid or Great Mosque, and the restoration of what is now the western Jumna canal, are the work of Shah Jahan.

    0
    0
  • Of late years this mosque has been thoroughly restored, and one portion is now used as a museum in which all objects of interest discovered in the surrounding country are exhibited.

    0
    0
  • Next to this comes the Ibrahim Roza, or tomb and mosque of Ibrahim Adil Shah II., which was completed about 1620 and is supposed to be one of the most exquisite buildings in the world after the Taj at Agra.

    0
    0
  • The next king worth mentioning is Ali Adil Shah I., who reigned from 1557 to 1579 and, besides the fort, built the Jama Masjid or great mosque, the aqueducts and other notable works in the city.

    0
    0
  • The ruins include the remains of the former pepper warehouses, the old factory, called Fort Speelwijk, belonging to the company, the fortified palace of the former sultans and a well-preserved mosque thought to have been built by the third Mahommedan ruler of Bantam about 1562-1576, and containing the tombs of various princes of Bantam.

    0
    0
  • It is an episcopal see of great antiquity, but its cathedral, built in the 18th century on the site of a mosque, possesses little architectural merit.

    0
    0
  • Kmba, Kaaba, or Kaabeh, the sacred shrine of Mahommedanism, containing the "black stone," in the middle of the great mosque at Mecca.

    0
    0
  • Finally it may be mentioned that a small number of Englishmen, chiefly resident in Liverpool and London, have embraced Islam; they have a mosque at Liverpool.

    0
    0
  • The mosque is square, with a flat roof supported on clay columns, and crowned by a minaret.

    0
    0
  • In the north-west corner of the mosque is the tomb of Sidi Okba, the leader of the Arabs who in the 1st century of the Hegira conquered Africa for Islam from Egypt to Tangier.

    0
    0
  • He also mentions a castle and a mosque.

    0
    0
  • Mequinez at a distance appears a city of palaces, but it possesses few buildings of any note except the palace and the mosque of Mulai Ismail, which serves as the royal burying-place.

    0
    0
  • The Muezzin, who is a paid servant of the mosque, must stand with his face towards Mecca and with the points of his forefingers in his ears while reciting Azan.

    0
    0
  • The third or western gate, Bab elOmra (formerly also Bab el-Zahir, from a village of that name), lay almost opposite the great mosque, and opened on a road leading westwards round the southern spurs of the Red Mountain.

    0
    0
  • Considerable suburbs now lie outside the quarter named after this gate; in the middle ages a pleasant country road led for some miles through partly cultivated land with good wells, as far as the boundary of the sacred territory and gathering place of the pilgrims at Tanim, near the mosque of Ayesha.

    0
    0
  • The mosque is enclosed by houses with windows opening on the arcades and commanding a view of the Ka`ba.

    0
    0
  • The other chief bazaars are also near the mosque in smaller streets.

    0
    0
  • Istakhri gives the length of the city proper from north to south as m., and the greatest breadth from the Jiyad quarter east of the great mosque across the valley and up the western slopes as twothirds of the length.

    0
    0
  • The madrassehs or buildings around the mosque, originally intended as lodgings for students and professors, have long been let out to rich pilgrims. The minor places of visitation for pilgrims, such as the birthplaces of the prophet and his chief followers, are not notable.'

    0
    0
  • Both these and the court of the great mosque lie beneath the general level of the city, the site having been gradually raised by accumulated rubbish.

    0
    0
  • Omar, Othman and Ibn Jubair had all a share in this work, but the great founder of the mosque in its present form, with its spacious area and deep ' The old kiswa is removed on the 25th day of the month before the pilgrimage, and fragments of it are bought by the pilgrims as charms. Till the 10th day of the pilgrimage month the Ka`ba is bare.

    0
    0
  • After the Ka`ba the principal points of interest in the mosque are the well Zamzam and the Maqam Ibrahim.

    0
    0
  • But it is also proper during one's residence in the holy city to perform at least one omra from Tanim in connexion with a visit to the mosque of Ayesha there.

    0
    0
  • To the ordinary pilgrim the omra has become so much an episode of the hajj that it is described by some European pilgrims as a mere visit to the mosque of Ayesha; a better conception of its original significance is got from the Meccan feast of the seventh month (Rajab), graphically described by Ibn Jubair from his observations in A.D.

    0
    0
  • It leads through the straggling village of Mina, occupying a long narrow valley (Wadi Mina), two to three hours from Mecca, and thence by the mosque of Mozdalifa over a narrow pass opening out into the plain of Arafa,which is an expansion of the great Wadi Naman,through which the Taif road descends from Mount Kara.

    0
    0
  • Before sunrise next morning (the loth) a second "stand" like that on Arafa is made for a short time by torchlight round the mosque of Mozdalifa, but before the sun is fairly up all must be in motion in the second ifada towards Mina.

    0
    0
  • There are also ruins of a large mosque.

    0
    0
  • The blood and refuse were discharged through a drain into the brook Kedron; this drain probably still remains, in the Bir el-Arwah, under the "Dome of the Rock" in the mosque which covers the site of the temple.

    0
    0
  • Both these and the royal chapel have several small cupolas, and there is a still greater display in that way in the church of San Giovanni degli Eremiti, which it is hard to believe never was a mosque.

    0
    0
  • The 1st hill is distinguished by the Seraglio, St Sophia and the Hippodrome; the 2nd by the column of Constantine and the mosque Nuri-Osmanieh; the 3rd by the war office, the Seraskereate Tower and the mosque of Sultan Suleiman; the 4th by the mosque of Sultan Mahommed II., the Conqueror; the 5th by the mosque of Sultan Selim; the 6th by Tekfour Serai and the quarter of Egri Kapu; the 7th by Avret Tash and the quarter of Psamatia.

    0
    0
  • One is found in the name Isa Kapusi (the Gate of Jesus) attached to a mosque, formerly a Christian church, situated above the quarter of Psamatia.

    0
    0
  • A column in honour of the emperor Marcian still stands in the valley of the Lycus, below the mosque of Sultan Mahommed the Conqueror.

    0
    0
  • The citizens of Constantinople found their principal recreation in the chariot-races held in the Hippodrome, now the At Meidan, to the west of the mosque of Sultan Ahmed.

    0
    0
  • The great monument of early Arabic architecture in Spain, the mosque of Cordova, was built by his predecessors, not by him.

    0
    0
  • In 1415 the town was captured by the Portuguese under John I., among those taking part in the attack being Prince Henry "the Navigator" and two of his brothers, who were knighted on the day following in the mosque (hastily dedicated as a Christian church).

    0
    0
  • The most remarkable remains are the palace of the Safawid shahs and the mosque with its large blue dome.

    0
    0
  • Just within the northern gate is the market place, which contains the chief mosque.

    0
    0
  • A mosque was built by order of Khair-ed-din Barbarossa, and under the Turks the town was of some importance.

    0
    0
  • This monarch built the great mosque at Sennar, almost the only building in the town to survive the ravages of the dervishes in the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • Sultan Berkat built a mosque and enforced Mahommedan law, and with the assistance of the Chinese built the stone wall, which is still in existence between the islands of Kaya Orang and Chermin, by sinking forty junks filled with rock across the mouth of the Brunei river.

    0
    0
  • In the Christian quarter is the church of St George; the mosque also is a building of Christian origin.

    0
    0
  • It contains a fine 16thcentury mosque, built by the celebrated architect Sinan.

    0
    0
  • St Sophia (Aya Sofia), formerly the cathedral, and probably erected in the 6th century by Justinian's architect Anthemius, was converted into a mosque in 1589.

    0
    0
  • The Eski Juma, or Old Mosque, is another interesting basilica, evidently later than Constantine, with side aisles and an apse without side chapels.

    0
    0
  • Diagonally opposite the mosque is a house with a square tower, which is locally believed to occupy the place of the famous ancient school.

    0
    0
  • In the bazaar, which lies between the chief mosque and the sacred pool, and contains several streets, are displayed not only the native woollen stuffs, pottery and silver work, but also a considerable variety of European goods, especially cloth stuffs.

    0
    0
  • Mosque have not received a single piece of radio airplay - not even on Shaun's own show.

    0
    0
  • Controversial cleric vows to defy mosque ban 18 January 2003 Charity bosses remove Abu Hamza.

    0
    0
  • Our final take is a close-up of the digital billboard above the mosque, next to the United Colors of Benetton shop.

    0
    0
  • One of political party cadre collected donation in pray event in Al Azhar mosque yard in Jakarta.

    0
    0
  • Two days later a police tear gas canister was fired into a mosque during Friday prayers.

    0
    0
  • We reached the next checkpoint by a mosque, which we were enticed into for a visit.

    0
    0
  • The empty coffin now resides at the back of the Yogomaia Mosque, a permanent reminder of the lamentable event.

    0
    0
  • Eventually my father became the emir (leader) of a local mosque.

    0
    0
  • There was a minaret from a mosque popping up only a few yards away, also damaged by gunfire.

    0
    0
  • He knew quite well that Mohammad Mansour, a security police informer, was recording my sermons from the bathroom in the mosque.

    0
    0
  • A number of my friends in the Harrisburg mosque questioned why we needed an intercessor, and specifically one who was human?

    0
    0
  • We went to the mosque yesterday lunchtime, where we received an excellent reception.

    0
    0
  • The impressive State Mosque, clad in Italian marble, has a minaret rising from the center of a reflecting pool within its walls.

    0
    0
  • And it's so flat that from almost anywhere in town you can see the landmark minaret of the Koutoubia Mosque.

    0
    0
  • Here stands the Hassan II Mosque, the world's largest mosque with one of the world's tallest minarets.

    0
    0
  • With its distinctive dome and needle-like minaret, the mosque was built by the Ottoman Turks in 1816.

    0
    0
  • The latter sponsored the construction of the Great Mosque of Samarra with its unique spiral minaret, built in 847.

    0
    0
  • Appeals blared from the mosque minarets implored people to stop destroying the city, the Arab language TV al-Jazeera reported.

    0
    0
  • As many as 1,000 people attend the mosque to pray there during the Ramadan season.

    0
    0
  • If you claim that it is Mecca, can you produce a single verse stating that the sacred mosque is located there?

    0
    0
  • He watched the kites circling the tall spires of the Turkish mosque in Saladin's citadel, then looked across to the railroad station.

    0
    0
  • In fact, there was a nearby mosque that was under the patronage of my mother's family.

    0
    0
  • Inside the mosque, all the vehicles parked up in the mosque compound.

    0
    0
  • Passing a mosque we could hear the muezzin calling the people to prayer.

    0
    0
  • A nearby mosque ensures that you do not oversleep in the morning.

    0
    0
  • The main tourist attraction is the nearby mosque of Hala Sultan Tekke, which draws pilgrims from across the Moslem world.

    0
    0
  • Where railings overlooked the ravine with that mosque near the bottom of it another group stared intently down.

    0
    0
  • A mosque in the former rebel stronghold had been rebuilt, and refugees had begun to return.

    0
    0
  • One day I was sitting in the mosque when a man entered and recited the same surah in a different style.

    0
    0
  • When we got back to our car, parked opposite a mosque, our driver, Yusuf, normally taciturn, was looking shaken.

    0
    0
  • Ibn Tumart was the son of a lamplighter in a mosque and had been noted for his piety from his youth; he was small, ugly, and misshapen and lived the life of a devotee-beggar.

    0
    0
  • Mahommedan Spain followed the fate of Africa, and in 1170 the Muwahhadis transferred their capital to Seville, a step followed by the founding of the great mosque, now superseded by the cathedral, the tower of which they erected in 1184 to mark the accession of Ya`kub el Mansur, From the time of Yusef II., however, they governed their co-religionists in Spain and Central North Africa through lieutenants, their dominions outside Morocco being treated as provinces.

    0
    0
  • A theory frequently put forward is that it stood within the Haram area near the Mosque of el Aksa, but it is more probable that it was on Zion, near the traditional place of the Coenaculum or last supper, where the Mahommedan building known as the tomb of David now stands.

    0
    0
  • A road has been cut through the centre of the building, the mosque turned into barracks, and the hall of audience allowed to fall into ruin.

    0
    0
  • It has an old mosque, with a minaret 123 ft.

    0
    0
  • In elevation the façade seems to have connexion with the five-bayed façade of the Kahriyeh Jame, or mosaic mosque, at Constantinople.

    0
    0
  • The principal feature in the mosque is the niche (mihrab), which is sunk in a wall built at right angles to a line drawn from Mecca, and indicates the direction towards which the Moslem should turn when engaged in prayer.

    0
    0
  • The normal type referred to is best represented in the mosque of `Amr (see `AMR-IBN-EL -Ass) at Fostat, Cairo; built in A.D.

    0
    0
  • The objection to the arch is more clearly shown 1 It is very generally held that this "Blue Mosque" dates only from the 15th century (see Tabriz).

    0
    0
  • One of the most ancient, as it is one of the loveliest fragments, strange to say, is found at Tuzer, in the Jerid, the mahrab of a ruined mosque.

    0
    0
  • The mosque of El-Halawi (the Sweetmeat Maker), dating from 1353, is outside the walls of the town.

    0
    0
  • The mosque of Sidi Okba is the prototype of many other notable mosques (see Mosque).

    0
    0
  • When a mosque is also the founder's tomb, it has a richly ornamented sepulchral chamber always covered by a dome (see further Mosque, which contains plans of the mosques of Amr and sultan Hasan, and of the tomb mosque of Kait Bey).

    0
    0
  • If he is lucky he gets a sleeping-place within the mosque, a chest to hold his things, and a daily ration of bread.

    0
    0
  • There a young relation of Abdarrahman was so roused by the taunt that the death of his kinsman was unavenged, that he killed Ibn Othal near the mosque of Damascus.

    0
    0
  • The design of this mosque is Mahommedan, but the wonderfully delicate ornamentation of its western façade and other remaining parts is Hindu.

    0
    0
  • Below, the city 's seventeenth century Ottoman mosque, a symbol of the region 's multi-ethnic past, lay in smoldering ruins.

    0
    0
  • The bomb exploded early Friday morning about 200 meters from a mosque in the New Baghdad district, southeast of the capital.

    0
    0
  • Let 's just start at the beginning, with an early public call for the closing of a powerful mosque.

    0
    0
  • There, a few doors away from the mosque, was a small stationer 's shop which sold European papers.

    0
    0
  • One day I was sitting in the mosque when a man entered and recited the same Surah in a different style.

    0
    0
  • Or largest mosque in Ohio plans more terror attacks.

    0
    0
  • When the pastor of a nearby church saw the students vandalizing the mosque, he called the police.

    0
    0
  • If you already have a strong social network of good friends, a relationship, maybe a church, mosque or synagogue where you feel welcome, you're well on your way to healthy mental and spiritual aging.

    0
    0
  • Whether you are Protestant, Muslim, Evangelical, Jewish, or Buddhist, there is likely a church, mosque or temple in your region of the country that provides the faithful with Christmas charities.

    0
    0
  • A wooden mosque was erected near the site of the Temple, which was replaced by the Mosque of Aksa, built by the amir Abdalmalik (Abd el Malek), who also constructed the Dome of the Rock, known as the Mosque of Omar, in 688.

    6
    6
  • The interior of the mosque is square and is divided into aisles by columns joined by Moorish arches.

    15
    15
  • The New Mosque (Jamaa-el-Jedid), dating from the 17th century, is in the form of a Greek cross, surmounted by a large white cupola, with four small cupolas at the corners.

    11
    11
  • The cathedral of St Philippe, built on the site of a mosque, is in the place Malakoff, next to the governor-general's palace.

    9
    9
  • The Begova Djamia (Djamia), or mosque of Husref Bey, is only surpassed, among European mosques, by those of Adrianople and Constantinople.

    9
    9
  • Where the mosque was erected, there was no room for church or synagogue.

    10
    10
  • The attempts of Ali Pasha of Iannina to make himself master of the place were thwarted partly by the presence of a French garrison in the citadel and partly by the heroic attitude of the Pargiotes themselves, who were anxious to have their city incorporated with the Ionian Republic. To secure their purpose they in 1814 expelled the French garrison and accepted British protection; but the British Government in 1815 determined to go back to the convention of 1800 by which Parga was to be surrendered to Turkey, though no mosque was to be built or Mussulman to settle within its territory.

    0
    1
  • Mazar-i-Sharif also contains a celebrated mosque, from which the town takes its name.

    0
    1
  • Mussulman books; they eat from their hands; the rao, when he appears in public, alternately worships God in a Hindu pagoda and a Mahommedan mosque; and he fits out annually at Mandvi a ship for the conveyance of pilgrims to Mecca, who are maintained during the voyage chiefly by the liberality of the prince.

    1
    1
  • A short distance from the town is Khatmia, containing a tomb mosque with a high tower, the headquarters of the Morgani family.

    1
    1
  • The town itself consists of a mass of one-storeyed stone houses, each surmounted by a little dome, clustering round the market-place with its mosque and minaret.

    0
    1
  • The buildings include the residence of the administrator, barracks, a government school for natives, a mosque and Hindu temple, and the establishment of the Mission du Sacre Caur, which possesses a large plantation of coco-nut palms. Bagamoyo is in telegraphic communication with Zanzibar and with the other coast towns of German East Africa, and has regular steamship communication with Zanzibar.

    0
    1
  • In the 8th century, when peace was made between the caliph Walid and the emperor Justinian II., the former stipulated for a quantity of mosaic for the decoration of the new mosque at Damascus, and in the 10th century the materials for the decoration of the niche of the kibla at Cordova were furnished by Romanus II.

    0
    1
  • An analysis of the glass of a Cairene mosque lamp shows that it is a soda-lime glass and contains as much as 4% of magnesia.

    0
    1
  • The enamelling process was probably introduced in the early part of the 13th century; most of the enamelled mosque lamps belong to the 14th century.

    0
    1
  • The Khalifa's house (a two-storeyed building), the mosque, the Beit el Amana (arsenal) and other houses famed in the history of the town also face the central square.

    0
    1
  • It still exists, built into a mosque on the western wall of the city.

    0
    1
  • On the 14th of October 1802 the amir Abdul Aziz, at the age of eighty-two years, was murdered by a Shia fanatic when at prayers in the mosque of Deraiya, and Salad, who had for many years led the Wahhabi armies, became the reigning amir.

    0
    1
  • The majority are modern, but the mosque of Aurangzeb, on a lofty site, dates from 1669.

    0
    1
  • The principal mosque at Beja was originally a Christian basilica, and is still dedicated to Sidna Aissa (our Lord Jesus).

    0
    1
  • The principal mosque of the town is a church of the crusaders converted to Mahommedan worship. Towards the end of the 18th century it was the headquarters of the turbulent sheikh Kasim el-Ahmad.

    0
    1
  • The palace of the sultans and the mosque of Ala ed-din Kaikobad formerly covered great part of the Acropolis hill in the northern part of the city.

    0
    1
  • The most important mosques are the great Tekke, which contains the tomb of the poet Mevlana Jelal ed-din Rumi, a mystic (sufi) poet, founder of the order of Mevlevi (whirling) dervishes, and those of his successors, the "Golden" mosque and those of Ala ed-Din and Sultan Selim.

    0
    1
  • The various quarters are grouped around the principal mosque - the Jewish to the south-west, the Moorish to the south-east, that of the merchants to the north-east, while the new town with the civic buildings lies to the north-west.

    1
    1
  • Only the minaret of the mosque, dating from the 14th century, and the battlemented wall, flanked by two towers, remain of its former magnificence.

    1
    1
  • In the immediate neighbourhood of the modern Tlemcen are numerous remains of the fortifications of Agadir (vide infra), and the minaret of the mosque, a beautiful tower dating Sidi from the 13th century, the lower part of which is built Medin.

    1
    1
  • Besides the walls and towers, and the minaret of the mosque, little remains of Mansura, of which Ibn Khaldun has left a contemporary and graphic sketch.

    1
    1
  • The minaret, notwithstanding that one side and parts of two other sides have perished, is one of the finest mosque towers in existence.

    1
    1
  • Modern structures include a public hall, and an Oriental institute (in the building erected for the Royal Dramatic College, including a museum of Eastern antiquities, a mosque, and residences for Orientals).

    1
    1
  • The most interesting of them are the Assa range, with its sandal trees and Buddhist remains; Udayagiri (Sunrise-hill), with its colossal image of Buddha, sacred reservoir, and ruins; and Assagiri, with its mosque of 1719.

    1
    1
  • The Lat Masjid, or Pillar Mosque, was built by Dilawar Khan in 1405 out of the remains of Jain temples.

    1
    1
  • Centuries later the tomb became a place of pilgrimage and the traditional site is marked by a fine mosque.'

    1
    1
  • The mosque which he erected and called by his own name is described in Asiatic Journal (1890), p. 759.

    1
    1
  • The only other public building of any consequence in Herat is the great mosque or Mesjid-i-Juma, which comprises an area of Boo yds.

    1
    2
  • The Grand Mosque, built out of ruins of the ancient Hippo, occupies one side of the chief square, the Place d'Armes.

    1
    2
  • In the mosque libraries at Constantinople there are at least five MSS.; and at Cairo there is a modern copy of one of these, containing the whole of al-Anbari's commentary.

    1
    2
  • An older Jain temple has been used as a mosque.

    1
    2
  • Kamenets is the see of a Roman Catholic and a Greek Orthodox bishop. The Roman Catholic cathedral of St Peter and St Paul, built in 1361, is distinguished by a minaret, recalling the time when it was used as a mosque by the Turks (1672-1699).

    1
    1
  • Of existing buildings the most remarkable is the great Mosque of the Hundred Columns, now used as a military hospital.

    1
    1