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morocco

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morocco

morocco Sentence Examples

  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.

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  • The eastern division of the Atlas, which forms the backbone of Algeria and Tunisia, is adequately known with the exception of the small portion in Morocco forming the province of Er-Rif.

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  • Among his books may be mentioned Mogreb-elAcksa: a Journey in Morocco (1898); The Ipane (1899); A Vanished Arcadia (1901); Faith (1909); Hope (1910); Charity (1912); A Life of Bernal Diaz del Castillo (1915); A Brazilian Mystic (1920); Cartagena and the Books of the Sinu (1920).

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  • The Argan tree (A rgania Sideroxylon), which forms forests in Morocco, is a remarkable survivor of a tropical family (Sapotaceae).

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  • m.) It is at the southern extremity of Liberia, Cape Palmas, that the West African coast from Morocco to the southernmost extremity of Guinea turns somewhat abruptly eastwards and northwards and faces the Gulf of Guinea.

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  • The centre of the traffic in Morocco was Sidi Hamed ibn Musa, seven days' journey south of Mogador, where a great yearly fair was held.

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  • by Morocco, S.

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  • Ballota, a closely allied species abundant in Morocco, bears large edible acorns, which form an article of trade with Spain; an oil, resembling that of the olive, is obtained from them by expression.

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  • The conflict with France, the operations in Eritrea, the vigorous interpretation of the triple alliance, the questions of Morocco and Bulgaria, were all used by him as means to stimulate national sentiment.

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  • Rabat trades with Fez and the interior of Morocco, with the neighbouring coast towns and Gibraltar, and with Marseilles, Manchester and London, and is the greatest industrial centre in Morocco.

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  • Gold and silk embroidery, filigree work, morocco and richly-braided jackets are produced for home use and for sale in Bosnia, Macedonia and Montenegro.

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  • Rouvier reproached the Foreign Minister with imprudence in the matter of Morocco, and after a heated discussion M.

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  • Westermarck has shown from his observations in Morocco that the blood of the victim was considered to visit a curse upon the object to whom the sacrifice is offered and thereby the latter is made amenable to the sacrificer.

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  • In Morocco the Jews, who until late in the 19th century were often persecuted, are still confined to a mellah (separate quarter), but at the coast-towns there are prosperous Jewish communities mostly engaged in commerce.

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  • His policy had aroused German jealousy, which became evident in the asperity with which the question of Morocco was handled in Berlin.

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  • The tile mosaics are believed to have come from Morocco.

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  • - This section of the Atlas, known to the inhabitants of Morocco by its Berber name, Idraren Draren or the " Mountains of Mountains," consists of five distinct ranges, varying in length and height, but disposed more or less parallel to one another in a general direction from south-west to north-east, with a slight curvature towards the Sahara.

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  • They successfully invaded India and central Asia in the east, Spain and Morocco in the west.

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  • Under the Arabs the growth and manufacture of the cane spread far and wide, from India to Sus in Morocco (Edrisi, ed.

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  • His ardent zeal was sorely tried by Philip's cautious temperament; and Sir Thomas Stukeley's projected Irish expedition, which Sanders was to have accompanied with the blessings and assistance of the pope, was diverted to Morocco where Stukeley was killed at the battle of Al Kasr al Kebir in 1578.

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  • Tunisia does not appear to possess the Barbary ape, which is found in Algeria and Morocco.

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  • Natives of Morocco and of the Sahara oases occasionally bring with them young baboons which they assert are obtained in various Sahara countries to the south and south-west of Tunisia.

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  • TLEMCEN, a town of Algeria, the capital of an arrondissement in the department of Oran, near the frontier:of Morocco, 68 m.

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  • west of Tlemcen, owes its foundation to the attempts of the Beni-Marin rulers of Morocco to extend their sovereignty.

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  • In 1337 the power of the Abd-el-Wahid was temporarily extinguished by the Marinide sultans of Morocco.

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  • When the French entered Algeria the sultans of Morocco were disputing the possession of Tlemcen with the Kuluglis, who fought first for themselves and afterwards for France.

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  • From that time until his death in 1881 the Aga Khan, while leading the life of a peaceful and peacemaking citizen, under the protection of British rule, continued to discharge his sacerdotal functions, not only among his followers in India, but towards the more numerous communities which acknowledged his religious sway in distant countries, such as Afghanistan, Khorasan, Persia, Arabia, Central Asia, and even distant Syria and Morocco.

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  • When the poet was three years old his father returned to France, and subsequently from 1768 to 1775 served as consul-general of France in Morocco.

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  • In 1844, when war between Spain and Morocco was threatened by reason of the frequent raids by the inhabitants of the Rif on the Spanish settlement of Ceuta, Spain declined arbitration on the ground that her rights were too clear for argument.

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  • But both she and Morocco subsequently accepted joint mediation at the hands of Great Britain and France.

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  • His first expedition to Morocco, in 1574, was little more than a reconnaissance; in a second expedition Sebastian was killed and his army annihilated at Al Kasr al Kebir (4th of August 1578).

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  • TETUAN (TETTAWAN), the only open port of Morocco on the Mediterranean, a few miles S.

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  • found in 1908 at El Ksar on the coast of Morocco see Dieudonne in Revue Numism.

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  • Bakhchi-sarai manufactures morocco, sheepskin cloaks, agricultural implements, sabres and cutlery.

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  • There are large morocco factories.

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  • RABAT (Ribat), a city on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 34° 3' N., 6° 46' W., 130 m.

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  • in width, is known, as in Morocco and Tunisia.

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  • Most 1 The name " Great " Atlas is more correctly applied to the main range in Morocco.

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  • It formerly belonged to Morocco, by whom it was ceded to the Turks towards the close of the 17th century.

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  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

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  • A trunk line runs from the frontier of Morocco at Lalla Maghnia, 44 m.

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  • C.) History From a geographical point of view Algeria, together with Morocco and Tunisia, from which it is separated only by artificial and purely political frontiers, forms a distinct country, Africa which it is convenient to designate by the name of Africa Minor.

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  • Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - dates back to the time of the Turkish dominion.

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  • He took refuge in Morocco, and induced that power to declare war on the French on the pretext that they would not give up the frontier post of Lalla-Maghnia.

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  • Morocco was soon vanquished.

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  • Morocco signed a treaty of peace at Tangier on the 10th of September 1844.

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  • Badly received by the great aristocratic family of the Walid-sidiSheikh, he re-entered Morocco, but the emperor of that country, dreading his influence and fearing difficulties with the French, drove him out.

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  • But soon the French columns re-established peace, and Bu-Amama had to take refuge in Morocco.

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  • Pseudopus, the glass-snake, from Morocco and the Balkan peninsula to Burma and Fokien; also in the U.S.A., with the limbs reduced to a pair of tiny spikes near the vent, and a lateral fold along the snake-like body.

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  • MARRAKESH (erroneously MoRocco or Marocco City), one of the quasi-capitals of the sultanate of Morocco, Fez and Mequinez being the other two.

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  • _ Almost the only manufacture extensively prosecuted is that of Morocco leather, mainly red and yellow, about 1,50o men being employed as tanners and shoemakers.

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  • The fact that he was a Lorrainer prejudiced public opinion in his favour, and his popularity was increased by his' foreign policy - especially the successful establishment of the French protectorate over Morocco and the conclusion of the naval agreement with Russia.

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  • The mystery which Kiderlen-Wachter, with the complicity of his chief, Bethmann Hollweg, chose to maintain with regard to Germany's ultimate intentions in Morocco, was largely responsible for the crisis which arose between the Western Powers and Germany and which necessitated very plain speaking in the House of Commons by Sir Edward Grey (Nov.

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  • An agreement on the basis of a cession of territory in the French Congo in exchange for a German declaration of complete desinteressement in Morocco was nevertheless ultimately effected.

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  • By it all the powers represented agree to respect the territorial integrity of Morocco, subject to a possible intervention limited to the purpose of preserving order within it.

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  • The discussion on the question of the " opendoor " in connexion with the Morocco difficulty was useful in calling general public attention once more to the undesirability of allowing any single power to exclude other nations from trading on territory over which it may be called to exercise a protectorate, especially if equality of treatment of foreign trade had been practised by the authority ruling over the territory in question before its practical annexation under the name of protectorate.

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  • Between Spain and Morocco a treaty of the 5th of March 1894 established between the Camp of Melilla and Moroccan territory a zone within which no new roads were to be made, no herds to be allowed to graze, no land to be cultivated, no troops of either party, or even private persons carrying arms, to set foot, no inhabitants to dwell, and all habitations to be razed.

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  • The Russo-Japanese War came to an end; the new offensive and defensive alliance with Japan was signed on the 12th of August; the successful AngloFrench agreement, concluded in April 1904, had brought out a vigorous expression of cordiality between England and France, shown in an enthusiastic exchange of naval visits; and the danger, which threatened in the early summer, of complications with France and Gemany over Morocco, was in a fair way of being dispelled by the support given to France by Great Britain.

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  • CASABLANCA (Dar el Baida, " the white house"), a seaport on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 33° 27' N., 7° 46' W.

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  • It is a wool and grain port for central Morocco, chiefly for the provinces of Tadla and Shawia.

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  • A railway to Ber Reshid, the first section of a line intended to tap the rich agricultural region of which Casablanca is the port, was opened in September 1908, being the first railway built in Morocco.

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  • MAZAGAN (El Jadida), a port on the Atlantic coast of Morocco in 33° 16' N.

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  • Alcacer Quibir), a town of Morocco, on the river Lekkus, 80 m.

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  • A vice-governor is appointed for the town by the basha of Laraiche, one for the country round by the sultan of Morocco, a condition which causes much confusion on market-days.

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  • LARAISH (El Araish), a port in northern Morocco on the Atlantic coast in 35° 13' N., 6° 9' W., 43 m.

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  • Missions: Egypt, Tripoli, Morocco, China (N.

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  • North Africa, along the Mediterranean from Morocco to Egypt, is distinctly Mahommedan.

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  • TANGIER (locally Tanjah), a seaport of Morocco, on the Straits of Gibraltar, about 14 m.

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  • Tangier is almost destitute of manufactures, and while the trade, about £750,000 a year, is considerable for Morocco, it is confined chiefly to imports, about two-fifths of which come from Great Britain and Gibraltar, and one quarter from France.

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  • The harbour formed by the Bay of Tangier is an extensive one, the best Morocco possesses, and good in all weathers except during a strong east wind, but vessels of any size have to anchor a mile or so out as the shore to the west is shallow and sandy, and to the east, rocky and shingly.

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  • It was bombarded in 1844 by the French, then at war with Morocco.

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  • Two years later Tiaret was captured by Massala ibn Habbus of the Miknasa dynasty of Morocco, and after his death in 924 two other princes of the same house maintained their independence, but in 933 the Fatimites again gained the mastery.

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  • It also crosses the Mediterranean to Algeria and Morocco; but there, as in southern Spain, it is probably but a winter immigrant.

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  • Formerly famous for its carpets and its oil of roses, Kairawan is now known in northern Africa rather for copper vessels, articles in morocco leather, potash and saltpetre.

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  • The name had different significations at different times; but before the Roman occupation, Mauretania comprised a considerable part of the modern Morocco i.e.

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  • The magnificent plateau in which the city of Morocco is situated seems to have been unknown to ancient geographers, and was certainly never included in the Roman Empire.

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  • (For physical geography, see MoRocco.) Mauretania, or Maurusia as it was called by Greek writers, signified the land of the Mauri, a term still retained in the modern name of Moors.

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  • Morocco 10% ad val.

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  • In Morocco and generally throughout North Africa there is a considerable demand for green tea, which is drunk hot out of glasses, the liquor being almost saturated with sugar and strongly flavoured with mint.

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  • to Kid was reciprocated by that of the German squadron to Plymouth; in July a treaty of arbitration was signed between the two countries, while in the Reichstag the chancellor declared that, Germanys interests in Morocco being purely commercial, the understanding between France and England as to that country, embodied in the convention of the 8th of April 1904, did not immediately concern her.

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  • On the 31st of March 1905 the emperor William landed at Tangier, and is reported on this occasion to have used language which in effect amounted to a promise to support the sultan of Morocco in resisting French control.

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  • Deep-sea fisheries give employment to some twenty thousand Sicilians, who exercise their calling not only off the coasts of their island, but along the north African shore, from Morocco to Tripoli.

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  • ALMORAVIDES (properly Murabtis, the name being corrupted through the Spanish), a Berber horde from the Sahara which, in the 11th century, founded the fourth dynasty in Morocco.

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  • They then came in contact with the Berghwata, a Berber people of central Morocco, who followed a heresy founded by Salah ibn Tarif 300 years previously.

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  • Ibn Tashfin, who was largely guided by Zainab, had in the meantime brought what is now known as Morocco to complete subjection, and in 1062 had founded the city of Marrakesh ("Morocco City").

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  • of Morocco, Madrid, Lisbon and Oporto were added, and Spain was again invaded in 1119 and 1121, but the tide had turned, the French having assisted the Aragonese to recover Saragossa.

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  • was a pious nonentity, who fasted and prayed while his empire fell to pieces under the combined action of his Christian foes in Spain and the agitation of the Muwahhadis or "Almohades" in Morocco.

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  • Ladies use slippers of yellow morocco, and abroad, inner boots of the same material, above which they wear, in either case, thick shoes, having only toes.

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  • On the 8th of April 1904 a declaration was signed by the representatives of France and Great Britain which virtually recognized the dominant position of France in Morocco and of Britain in Egypt.

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  • MELILLA, a Spanish fortified station and penal settlement on the north coast of Morocco, south of Cape Tres Forcas and 135 m.

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  • The Spaniards have had much trouble with the neighbouring tribes - turbulent Ruffians, hardly subject to the sultan of Morocco.

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  • The limits of the Spanish territory round the fortress were fixed by treaties with Morocco in 1859, 1860, 1861 and 1894.

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  • Jews who have adopted the Tatar language and dress, and who live chiefly by making morocco leather goods, knives, embroidery and so forth.

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  • It has three Evangelical and two Roman Catholic churches, a classical school and a teachers' seminary; the manufactures include woollen and cotton goods, hats, morocco leather and gloves, and there is a considerable trade in corn, cattle and wool.

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  • At the conference assembled at Algeciras to settle the Morocco Question, Austria supported the German position, and after the close of the conferences the emperor William II.

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  • Maupoi, dark men), the name which, as at present used, is loosely applied to any native of Morocco, but in its stricter sense only to the townsmen of mixed descent.

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  • While the mountainous parts of Morocco continued to be occupied by pure Berber people, the Shluh or Shilluh, the Andalusian Moors flocked to 5 Proc. Zool.

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  • the coast towns and the plains of Morocco, occupied largely by Arabs.

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  • The name Moor is however still applied to the populations speaking Arabic who inhabit the country extending from Morocco to the Senegal, and to the Niger as far east as Timbuktu, i.e.

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  • The typical Moors of Morocco are a handsome race, with skin the colour of coffee-and-milk, with black eyes and black silky hair, and the features of Europeans.

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  • See Dr Arthur Leared, Morocco and the Moors (1891); Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (1899); and The Moors (1902); Frances Macnab, A Ride in Morocco (1902); and see under Morocco; Mauretania; Berbers, &C.

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  • Timber comes chiefly from North America and Scandinavia, alcohol from Cuba and the United States, wheat and flour from various British possessions, maize from Morocco and Argentina.

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  • We find him at different periods in Seville, Cordova and Morocco, probably as physician to Yusef al-Mansur, who took pleasure in engaging him in discussions on the theories of philosophy and their bearings on the faith of Islam.

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  • Averroes was recalled to Morocco when the transient passion of the people had been satisfied, and for a brief period survived his restoration to honour.

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  • 3 During this time he assisted in negotiating a treaty of amity and commerce with Prussia (1785) and one with Morocco (1789), and negotiated with France a "convention defining and establishing the functions and privileges" of consuls and vice-consuls "(1788).

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  • To speak of more modern times there can be enumerated the Zouaoua and Jebalia (Tripoli and Tunisia); the Chauwia, Kabyles and Beni-Mzab (Algeria); the Shluh (Chlouah), Amazigh and Berbers (Morocco); the Tuareg, Amoshagh, Sorgu, &c. (Sahara).

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  • Latham, who writes: " All that is not Arabic in the kingdom of Morocco, all that is not Arabic in the French provinces of Algeria, and all that is not Arabic in Tunis, Tripoli and Fezzan, is Berber."

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  • At present he forms at least three-fifths of the population in Algeria, and in Morocco the proportion is greater.

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  • Tobacco, maize and potatoes have been introduced; and the aloe and prickly pear, called in Morocco the Christian fig, are also found.

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  • Teadrinking probably became a habit in Morocco about the beginning of the 19th century; coffee came by way of Algiers.

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  • South of Morocco proper, Gerhard Rohlfs, who travelled extensively in the region (c. 1861-1867), states that a Berber religious corporation, the Savia Karlas, was ruled over by a woman, the chief's wife.

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  • Whatever these dialects be called, the Kabyle, the Shilha, the Zenati, the Tuareg or Tamashek, the Berber language is still essentially one, and the similarity between the forms current in Morocco, Algeria, the Sahara and the far-distant oasis of Siwa is much more marked than between the Norse and English in the sub-Aryan Teutonic group. The Berbers have, moreover, a writing of their own, peculiar and little used or known, the antiquity of which is proved by monuments and inscriptions ranging over the whole of North Africa.

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  • As might be expected the Berber tongue is most common in Morocco and the western Sahara - the regions where Arab dominion was least exercised.

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  • When Arabic is mentioned as the language of Morocco it is seldom realized how small a proportion of its inhabitants use it as their mother tongue.

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  • Berber is the real language of Morocco, Arabic that of its creed and government.

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  • Finally he concluded with England the important Agreements of 1904 covering colonial and other questions which had long been a matter of dispute, especially concerning Egypt, Newfoundland and Morocco.

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  • Suspicion of the growing entente between France and England soon arose on the part of Germany, and in 1905 German assertiveness was shown in a crisis which was forced on in the matter of the French activity in Morocco (q.v.), in which the handling of French policy by M.

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  • It claims to be the oldest town in the Sahara, and was for a long time self-governing, but eventually placed itself under the protection of the sultan of Morocco.

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  • Morocco, he felt, was, after all, the best of countries.

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  • (See Morocco).

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  • SAFFI, or AsFI, a seaport on the west coast of Morocco, in 32° 20' N.

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  • (Pop. about 15,000.) Although the principal wool and grain port of central Morocco, the anchorage is an open roadstead and communication with the shore is at times difficult.

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  • Out of the breeding-season it shows itself in most parts of the North Atlantic, but never seems to stray farther south than Gibraltar or Morocco, and it is therefore a matter of much interest to find the Southern Ocean inhabited by a bird - the "Port Egmont Hen" of Cook's Voyages - which so closely resembles the Skua as to have been for a long while regarded as specifically identical with it, but is now usually recognized as distinct under the name of S.

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  • Among the earliest recruits were some Englishmen, and the first to go on the special mission of the order were two Englishmen, who in 1200 went to Morocco and returned thence to France with 186 liberated Christian captives.

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  • 257; Weir, The Shaikhs of Morocco (1904).

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  • by the Mediterranean, comprising the states of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Tripoli.

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  • A period of expansion oversea began in the same reign, with the capture of Ceuta in Morocco.

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  • Under Alphonso V., surnamed the African (1443-1481), the Gulf of Guinea was explored as far as Cape St Catherine, and three expeditions (1458, 1461, 1471) were sent to Morocco; in 1471 Arzila (Asila) and Tangier were captured from the Moors.

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  • Equally barren was the intermittent fighting in Morocco, which was regarded as a crusade against the Moors.

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  • had been his withdrawal of all the Portuguese garrisons in Morocco except those at Ceuta, Arzila and Tangier.

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  • A dethroned sultan of Morocco, named Mulai Ahmad (Mahommed XI.), offered to acknowledge Portuguese suzerainty if he were restored to the throne by Portuguese arms, and Sebastian eagerly accepted these terms. The flower of his army was in Asia and his treasury was empty; but he contrived to extort funds from the " New Christians," and collected a force of some 18,000 men, chiefly untrained lads, wornout veterans, and foreign free-lances.

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  • In Borneo,China, Korea, Morocco, Persia, Siam, Tripoli and Turkey an extensive jurisdiction, civil and criminal, is exercised by treaty stipulation in cases where United States subjects are interested.

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  • MOGADOR (Es-Sueira), the most southern seaport on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 31° 50' N., 9° 20' W., the capital of the province of Haha.

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  • On the land side stretch miles of sand-dunes studded with broom, and beyond, the argan forests, distinctive of southern Morocco.

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  • The only redeeming traits of Queen Isabella's reign were a war against Morocco, which ended in an advantageous treaty and some cession of territory; some progress in public works, especially railways; a slight improvement in commerce and finance.

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  • barbarus of Tunisia and Morocco, and the still smaller C. e.

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  • Thus Drosophyllum occurs only in Portugal and Morocco, Byblis in tropical Australia, and, although Aldrovanda is found in Queensland, in Bengal and in Europe, a wide distribution explained by its aquatic habit, Dionaea is restricted to a few localities in North and South Carolina.

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  • MEQUINEZ (the Spanish form of the Arabic Miknasa), a city of Morocco, situated 1600 ft.

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  • From 1888 to 1893 he was consul-general at Budapest, in 1894 secretary of embassy at Constantinople, from 1894 to 1895 agent in Bulgaria, and from 1895 to 1904 minister in Morocco.

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  • (1880-), sultan of Morocco, son of Sultan Mulai el Hasan III.

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  • The sultan gave his adherence to the Act of the Algeciras Conference, but the state of anarchy into which Morocco fell during the latter half of 5906 and the beginning of 1907 showed that the young ruler lacked strength sufficient to make his will respected by his turbulent subjects.

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  • (See MOROCCO, History.)

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  • In 1860, it should be mentioned, he was present with the Spanish troops in Morocco, and took part in the battle of Tetuan.

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  • The most important fisheries extend along the coasts of Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco; but red coral is also obtained in the vicinity of Naples, near Leghorn and Genoa, and on the coasts of Sardinia, Corsica, Catalonia and Provence.

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  • CEUTA (Arabic Sebta), a Spanish military and convict station and seaport on the north coast of Morocco, in 35° 54' N., 5° 18' W.

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  • As the result of the war between Spain and Morocco in 1860 the area of Spanish territory around the town was increased.

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  • The military governor of the town also commands the troops in the other Spanish stations on the coast of Morocco.

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  • >> 0'1, r: -?-:w ry See de Prado, Recuerdos de Africa; historia de la plaza de Ceuta (Madrid, 1859-1860); Budgett Meakin, The Land of the Moors (London, 1901), chap. xix., where many works dealing with Spanish Morocco are cited.

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  • He was the third (or, counting children who died in infancy, the fifth) son of John (Joao) I., the founder of the Aviz dynasty, under whom Portugal, victorious against Castile and against the Moors of Morocco, began to take a prominent place among European nations; his mother was Philippa, daughter of John of Gaunt.

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  • Meantime, in 1418, Henry had gone in person to relieve Ceuta from an attack of Morocco and Granada Mussulmans; had accomplished his task, and had planned, though he did not carry out, a seizure of Gibraltar.

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  • Plans of further conquest in Morocco, resulting in 1437 in the disastrous attack upon Tangier, and followed in 1438 by the death of King Edward (Duarte) and the domestic troubles of the earlier minority of Affonso V., now interrupted Atlantic and African exploration down to 1441, except only in the Azores.

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  • In the Morocco campaigns of his last years, especially at the capture of Alcazar the Little (1458), he restored the military fame which he had founded at Ceuta and compromised at Tangier, and which brought him invitations from the pope, the emperor and the kings of Castile and England, to take command of their armies.

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  • ZENATA, or Zanata, a Berber tribe of Morocco in the district of the central Atlas.

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  • The Beni Marin and Wattasi dynasties which reigned in Morocco from 1213 to 1548 were of Zenata origin.

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  • In that year he accompanied King Sebastian (1557-1578) in his invasion of Morocco, and was taken prisoner by the Moors at the battle of Alcazar-Kebir, in which the king was slain.

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  • The social condition of the time recalls that of present-day Morocco, in the high price of necessaries and the extortions of the financial authorities; every man was either soldier, beggar or smuggler.

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  • The same phenomena were repeated in Spain under the Mahommedan rulers of Andalusia and Morocco, with this difference, that the time of philosophical development was shorter, and the heights to which Spanish thinkers soared were greater.

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  • SUS, a province of southern Morocco, once an independent kingdom, and still too unruly to be opened to Europeans, who have nevertheless for centuries past made efforts to secure a foothold.

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  • Susis are well known in the north of Morocco as able tradesmen and clever metal workers.

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  • Besides these isolated posts Spain holds Rio de Oro, a stretch of the Saharan coast, and its hinterland lying between Morocco and French West Africa; the Muni River Settlements or Spanish Guinea, situated between French Congo and the German colony of Cameroon; Fernando P0, Annobon, Corisco and other islands in the Gulf of Guinea.

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  • Part went to people the town of Fez, newly founded in the Morocco, by the Idrisites.

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  • One of them, al-Mamun, even sought Fernandos help to regain his throne in Morocco, and ceded a suburb of the city to his Christian allies.

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  • A successful war in Morocco in 1859 flattered the pride of the Spaniards, and the country began to make real progress towards prosperity.

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  • in regard to foreign policy, the king and Canovas both inclined to assist national aspirations in Morocco, and jealously watched the relations of that empire with other European powers.

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  • This desire to exercise a preponderant influence in the affairs of Morocco culminated in the Madrid conference of 1880.

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  • Preponderant influence was not attained, but the conference led to a treaty which regulated the consular protection extended to the subjects of Morocco.

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  • He had to sett) some knotty questions, foremost a conflict with Morocco, which was the consequence of the aggression of the unruly Riff tribes upon the Spanish outposts around Melilla.

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  • The sultan of Morocco lost no tim~ in censuring the behaviour cf the Riff tribes, and in promisint that he would chastise them.

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  • Marshal Cainpos was sent n Fez to make a treaty, in which he obtained ample redress and the promise of an indemnity of 800,ooo, which Morocco punctually paid.

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  • Its downfall was ultimately due to the development of the crisis in Morocco.

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  • Morocco History); here it is only proposed to outline the effects Crisis, of its reaction upon the internal affairs of Spain.

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  • The government had been already weakened by the news of Marshal Marinas reverse in Morocco (Sept.

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  • It sent General Weyler to keep Barcelona in order, caused the release of most of the prisoners in Monjuich, reduced the forces in Morocco, reopened negotiations with Rome for a modification of the concordat, and on the 31st of December, the end of the financial year, was responsible for the issue of a royal decree stating that the budget would remain in force until the Cortes could pass a new one.

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  • It has been alleged that these horses were Barbs from Morocco, but a still more likely theory is that they existed only in name, and never reached either England or Scotland.

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  • Spanker himself was by D'Arcy's Yellow Turk from a daughter of the Morocco Barb and Old Bald Pegg by an Arab horse from a Barb mare.

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  • Charters were given to companies trading to Guinea, Morocco, Guiana and the Canaries, but none of these enjoyed a very long or prosperous existence, principally owing to the difficulties caused by foreign competition.

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  • Isolated cases of piracy have occurred on the Rif coast of Morocco even in our time, but the pirate communities which lived by plunder and could live by no other resource, vanished with the French conquest of Algiers in 1830.

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  • The story of the establishment of Turkish rule in northern Africa and of the revolutions of Morocco must be sought under the heads of Turkey, Tripoli, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.

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  • This port was so much the most formidable that the name of Algerine came to be used as synonymous with Barbary pirate, but the same trade was carried on, though with less energy, from Tripoli and Tunis - as also from towns in the empire of Morocco, of which the most notorious was Salli.

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  • He took part in the Morocco campaign of 1859-1860, and distinguished himself in sixteen actions, obtaining the cross of San Fernando, and the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

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  • In 1893 he was selected to command the Spanish army at Melilla, and went to the court of Morocco to make an advantageous treaty of peace, which averted a war.

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  • It is found in the Andean regions of Chile and Peru and is also indigenous to parts of Morocco.

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  • He is an experienced alpinist who has led trekking expeditions for us in Morocco.

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  • bindis superb example of local ephemera is bound in contemporary maroon morocco, and lettered in gilt on the upper cover: 'Mr.

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  • soft citrus: the relevant authorities in Morocco had been informed of this result.

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  • Back to map page 21/03/01 Morocco Red and Indigo food bar 02/02/01 Temptation's roof edging being fitted.

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  • escorted camping treks in Morocco more information Consider extra nights in Marrakech.

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  • The British Isles represent the northern extremity of the range in the northeast Atlantic, which extends south to Morocco.

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  • And I am almost fluent in French in Morocco, tho much less so in France.

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  • The group conducts basin analysis research with a petroleum geoscience theme in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Libya and Tunisia.

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  • The last one to be seen alive anywhere in the world was shot by a hunter in Morocco in 1920.

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  • imbibe the spirit of Morocco, wander the streets of the great cities.

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  • He is currently incarcerated in Spain awaiting extradition to Morocco.

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  • UMT and CDT are Morocco's two largest trade unions and the government's main interlocutors on labor issues.

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  • kilim rugs and cushions from many regions, from the high Atlas mountains in Morocco to Anatolia, Iran and Afghanistan.

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  • No holiday to Morocco would be complete without visiting a medina in one of the cities like Fez or Marrakech.

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  • medina cities in Morocco.

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  • Full leather red morocco, richly decorated front cover, rear cover and spine in gilt.

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  • The manuscript is on vellum and bound in full green morocco with elaborate gold tooling.

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  • Lower holiday insurance long morocco stay the bar lower back stand.

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  • morocco leather, probably in the mid 19th century.

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  • morocco multi trip to a today usagencies is.

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  • morocco spine, no label or title.

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  • morocco cover, no title or label.

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  • Due holiday insurance morocco multi trip to a today usagencies is.

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  • Moroccan surf Adventures, surfing morocco, surf morocco, morocco surf camp, surf trips morocco, Anchor point, .. .

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  • BBC - Wales surfing - surfing morocco BBC Surfing Wales.. .

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  • Housed in a quarter morocco and marbled paper covered board clamshell case.

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  • The shattering earthquake that struck northern Morocco early Tuesday has claimed 564 lives (reported February 25 ).

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  • African reactor The United States and Morocco have signed an agreement which could see the construction of the African country's first nuclear reactor.

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  • Walter Harris's account of the years leading up to the French protectorate, in Morocco That Was, is hard to put down.

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  • A victim of " extraordinary rendition ", he was rendered to Morocco where he was tortured for 18 months.

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  • Camping treks in Morocco We also offer 3 escorted camping treks in Morocco more information Consider extra nights in Marrakech.

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  • upshot of this week-long meeting in Morocco?

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  • RIFFIANS, the name given to the Berbers of the Rif district of Morocco, the mountain region bordering the north coast from Ceuta eastward nearly to the borders of Algeria and forming part of the Atlas range.

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  • The Ruffians are only nominally subject to the sultan of Morocco, against whose authority they are in constant revolt.

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  • See further Berbers, Morocco, Moors, Kabyles, Mzabites.

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  • Mahommedan Spain followed the fate of Africa, and in 1170 the Muwahhadis transferred their capital to Seville, a step followed by the founding of the great mosque, now superseded by the cathedral, the tower of which they erected in 1184 to mark the accession of Ya`kub el Mansur, From the time of Yusef II., however, they governed their co-religionists in Spain and Central North Africa through lieutenants, their dominions outside Morocco being treated as provinces.

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  • He, after critical negotiations, secured on July 8th an agreement with Germany accepting the international conference proposed by the sultan of Morocco on the assurance that Germany would recognize the special nature of the interest of France in maintaining order on the frontier of her Algerian empire.

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  • The largest Jewish populations were those of Russia (5,215,000), Austria-Hungary (2,084,000), United States of America (1,777,000), Germany (607,000, of whom 409,000 were in Prussia), Turkey (463,000, of whom some 78,000 resided in Palestine), Rumania (250,000), Morocco (109,000) and Holland (106,000).

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  • (See also Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Sahara.) Authorities.

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  • A controversy not amenable to ordinarydiplomatic methodsarose between Great Britain, France and Germany on the one hand and Japan on the other hand as to the legality of a house tax imposed by Japan on certain subjects of those so long as France chose to renew it, but that after that date such authorization was improper unless the guarantees could establish that they had been treated by France as her proteges within the meaning of that term as explained in a treaty of 1863 between France and Morocco.

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  • BARBARY APE, a tailless monkey inhabiting Algeria, Morocco, and the rock of Gibraltar (where it may have been introduced), and referable to the otherwise Asiatic group of macaques, in which it alone represents the subgenus Inuus.

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  • It is celebrated for its large and luscious dates, to the successful cultivation of which, soon after the arrival of an ancestor of the reigning dynasty of Morocco (hence called the Filali Sharifs, i.e.

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  • RABAT (Ribat), a city on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 34° 3' N., 6° 46' W., 130 m.

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  • The murder of a Frenchman, Dr Mauchamp, in March 1907, by the rabble of Marrakesh was the immediate cause of the occupation of Udja by France (see Morocco: History).

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  • CASABLANCA (Dar el Baida, " the white house"), a seaport on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 33° 27' N., 7° 46' W.

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  • In August 1907, in consequence of the murder of a number of French and Spanish workmen engaged on the harbour works, the town was bombarded and occupied by the French (see MOROCCO: History).

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  • MAZAGAN (El Jadida), a port on the Atlantic coast of Morocco in 33° 16' N.

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  • LARAISH (El Araish), a port in northern Morocco on the Atlantic coast in 35° 13' N., 6° 9' W., 43 m.

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  • Most of the trade, both wholesale and retail, is in the hands of the Jews (see further Morocco).

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  • As one result of the Algeciras conference of 1906 a regular police force was organized, and the control of the customs passed into European hands (see Morocco: § History).

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  • The only protracted camel or mule caravan journeys remaining in connexion with the tea trade are those in Persia and Morocco, where the conservatism of race delays the introduction of even wheel roads, not to mention railways.

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  • Germany had perhaps missed an opportunity for putting an end for ever to the rivalry of France; but she had inflicted a humiliation on her rival, and proved her capacity to make her voice heard in the councils of Europe.i The proceedings of the conference of Algeciras (see MoRocco) emphasized the restored confidence of Germany in her international position.

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  • The intimate relations between the two powers had been revealed during the dispute between France and Germany about Morocco; in the critical division of the 3rd of March 1906 at the Algeciras Conference Austria-Hungary, alone of all the powers, had sided with Germany, and it was a proposal of the Austro-Hungarian plenipotentiary that formed the basis of the ultimate settlement between Germany and France (see MoRoeco: History).

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  • On the 10th of June 1904 he addressed a meeting of the Liberal League at the Queen's Hall, London, and sketched, a programme of "sane and practical Imperialism"; but he irritated the Home Rulers by again repudiating a parliament in Dublin, and he perplexed the public generally by his adverse criticism on the popular Anglo-French Agreement, which he was the only English statesman to oppose, on the ground of its handing over Morocco to France.

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  • During 1907 and 1908 his premiership was notable for the way in which the new entente with England was cemented, and for the successful part which France played in European politics, in spite of difficulties with Germany and attacks by the Socialist party in connexion with Morocco (see France: History).

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  • Of games the young Moors play a great number; the principal one is a kind of football, more like that of Siam and Burma than that of England; wrestling and fencing are popular, but the chief amusement of the adult Moors is the "powder-play" (la ` ab el bariid), which consists of a type of military tournament, the horsemen going through lance and musket exercises or charging in review fashion, firing volleys as they gallop. Other recreations much in favour throughout Morocco are music, singing, jugglery, snake-charming and acrobatic performances.

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  • 138 (14th August 755) Abdarrahman landed in the Iberian peninsula, where he was universally welcomed, and 1 The rule of the caliphs in Morocco, which had never been firmly established, had already, in 740, given place to that of independent princes (see Morocco, History).

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  • Abdallah, a brother of Mahommed and Ibrahim, the rivals of Mansur, succeeded in escaping, and fled to Egypt, whence by the help of the postmaster, himself a secret partisan of the Shiites, he passed into West Africa, where at a later period his son founded the Idrisite dynasty in Fez (see Morocco).

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  • SAFFI, or AsFI, a seaport on the west coast of Morocco, in 32° 20' N.

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  • MOGADOR (Es-Sueira), the most southern seaport on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in 31° 50' N., 9° 20' W., the capital of the province of Haha.

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  • Carmoly edited and translated a fuller recension which he had found in a MS. from the library of Eliezer Ben Hasan, forwarded to him by David Zabach of Morocco (see Relation d'Eldad le Danite, Paris, 1838).

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  • CEUTA (Arabic Sebta), a Spanish military and convict station and seaport on the north coast of Morocco, in 35° 54' N., 5° 18' W.

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  • North of the Sahara in Algeria and Morocco are the Libyans (Berbers, q.v.), a distinctively white people, who have in certain respects (e.g.

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  • The making of morocco leather and other leather-work, such as saddlery, harness and boots and shoes, affords employment to a large number of persons.

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  • The sun had reached the other side of the house, and its slanting rays shone into the open window, lighting up the room and part of the morocco cushion at which Princess Mary was looking.

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  • What was the upshot of this week-long meeting in Morocco?

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  • The roots of Mediterranean decor and interior design reach back to the countries lining the Mediterranean Sea including Italy, Spain, France, Greece, and Morocco.

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  • Just Morocco - Lanterns, ceramics, wall hangings, mosaics, wrought iron, and more.

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  • If there is a national dish in Morocco, it would be couscous.

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  • He adopted a dog named Sidi in Morocco during the filming of Kingdom of Heaven.

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  • Cameron worked around the world, including stints in Morocco, Australia, France, Mexico, and Japan.

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  • Western Mediterranean cruises journey to Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Morocco, and Tunisia.

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  • The shrubby A. mogadorensis forms snowy masses on a little islet on the Morocco coast, and has not been found elsewhere.

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  • B. rotundifolium coerulescens (Blue Daisy) is a native of Morocco, and a pretty rock plant.

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  • Organic argan oil is produced from the kernels of the argan tree, which grows in Morocco.

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  • If you are an advocate of women's rights, and you want to try out this amazing oil, then you'll want to make sure you are purchasing oil that comes from one of the cooperatives within Morocco.

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  • Several shows, such as the KaTonga musical review of African animal mythology or the roving Mystic Sheiks of Morocco brass band are directly related to the park's overall theme.

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  • Guess is an American clothing company started by four brothers from Morocco.

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  • It's located in Marrakech, Morocco and is one of the most luxurious resorts in the world.

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  • Other stops include Morocco's historic city of Marrakech and Egypt's ancient Luxor and the Valley of the Kings where you will be treated to stays in five-star resorts.

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  • One assistant was even left to fend for herself in Morocco with no funds or a passport to get back when Naomi deserted her after a photo shoot.

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  • In Morocco, the cast explores the competing pressures of fashion and religion.

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  • Some of the signature prints include Morocco, Bundle Up, Cool Breeze and Lazy Days.

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  • expedition, but agreed to suspend Italian consular jurisdiction in Tunis, and deprecated suspicion of French designs upon Morocco.

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  • Son and nobles alike supported the Moors, when he tried to unite the nation in a crusade; and when he allied himself with the rulers of Morocco they denounced him as an enemy of the faith.

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  • Having been refused permission to pass through Morocco, he chose the Guinea Coast route.

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  • They extend from Cape Nun on the west to the Gulf of Gabes on the east, a distance of some i 50o m., traversing Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.

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  • This general disposition is seen most distinctly in eastern Morocco and Algeria.

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  • Both slopes are wooded, and its forests are the only parts of Morocco where the lion still survives.

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  • On its western extremity it is linked by secondary ranges to the mountain system of Morocco.

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  • de Foucauld, Reconnaissance au Maroc 1883-1884 (Paris, 1888, almost the sole authority for the geography of the Atlas; his book gives the result of careful surveys, and is illustrated with a good collection of maps and sketches); Hooker, Ball and Maw, Marocco and the Great Atlas (London, 1879, a most valuable contribution, always scientific and trustworthy, especially as to botany and geology); Joseph Thomson, Travels in the Atlas and Southern Morocco (London, 1889, valuable geographical and geological data); Louis Gentil, Mission de Segonzac, &c. (Paris, 1906; the author was geologist to the 1905 expedition); Gerhard Rohlfs, Adventures in Morocco (London, 1874); Walter B.

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  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.

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  • After serving as minister plenipotentiary in Morocco (1888-1891), M.

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  • Pierre Loti in Au Maroc has described his diplomacy in Morocco.

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  • The manufacture of morocco leather goods and the quarrying of the lithographic stone of the vicinity are carried on, and there is trade in cattle, grain, wine, truffles and dressed pork.

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  • He died at Morocco.

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  • The whole of the north of Africa from Egypt to Morocco has been mahommedanized, and Mahommedan influence is general and fairly strong from Timbuktu to Lake Chad and Wadai.

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  • Leather goods of all kinds are also manufactured, and from Kano come most of the "morocco leather" goods on the European markets.

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  • The control now exercised by the French over the greater part of the western Sudan has deprived Morocco of its chief sources of supply.

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  • Torgud was now summoned to Constantinople to answer for piracies committed on the friendly galleys of Venice; but he sailed instead to Morocco, and there for two years defied the sultan's authority.

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  • Between 1130 and his death in 1163, `Abd-el-Mumin not only rooted out the Murabtis, but extended his power over all northern Africa as far as Egypt, becoming amir of Morocco in 1149.

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  • In the Mediterranean, Crete and Malta yet survived as outposts of Christendom; but the northern coasts of Africa from Egypt to Morocco acknowledged the supremacy of the sultan, whose sea power in the Mediterranean had become a factor to be reckoned with in European politics, threatening not only the islands, but the very heart of Christendom, Italy itself, and capable - as the alliance with France against Charles V.

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  • After his return to Morocco at the age of twentyeight, he began preaching and agitating, heading riotous attacks on wine-shops and on other manifestations of laxity.

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  • Thus special parts are reserved for natives of the various provinces of Egypt, of Morocco,Syria, Arabia, India, Turkey, &c. Each student can, FIG.

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  • Of Morocco there are many maps, among which several compiled by the French service geographique de 1'armee, including a Carte du Maroc (1;200,000), in progress since 1909.

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  • The library, situated above the principal portico, was at one time one of the richest in Europe, comprising the king's own collection, the extensive bequest of Diego de Mendoza, Philip's ambassador to Rome, the spoils of the emperor of Morocco, Muley Zidan (1603-1628) and various contributions from convents, churches and cities.

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