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mormons

mormons Sentence Examples

  • They have become^mainly Protestants, Catholics or Mormons, but retain many superstitions connected with their native religion.

  • In 1906, of the 14,944 members of religious denominations 9,97 0 were Roman Catholics, 1,210 Protestant Episcopalians, 1,105 Latter-Day Saints (Mormons), 618 Methodists and 520 Presbyterians.

  • 2 A law passed in 1887, requiring all voters to take an oath against polygamy, with the object of disfranchising Mormons, was declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court.

  • (See MORMONS.)

  • 4,618 Mormons 3,212 Baptists.

  • 2,722 The Mormons of Alberta are in the most southerly part of the province, and are a colony from the Mormon settlements in Utah, U.S. On coming to Canada they were given lands by the Dominion of Canada.

  • The organization adopted in Utah among the Mormons is found also in Alberta, but the Canadian Mormons profess to have received a later revelation condemning polygamy.

  • the Mormons or "Latter Day Saints").

  • In the 16th century we find faith cures recorded of Luther and other reformers, in the next century of the Baptists, Quakers and other Puritan sects, and in the 18th century the faith healing of the Methodists in this country was paralleled by Pietism in Germany, which drew into its ranks so distinguished a man of science as Stahl (1660-1734) In the 19th century Prince Hohenlohe-WaldenburgSchillingsfiirst, canon of Grosswardein, was a famous healer on the continent; the Mormons and Irvingites were prominent among English-speaking peoples; in the last quarter of the 19th century faith healing became popular in London, and Bethshan homes were opened in 1881, and since then it has found many adherents in England.

  • "Commerce City" was laid out here in 1834 by Connecticut speculators; but the first settlement of importance was made by the Mormons in 1839-1840; they named it Nauvoo,' in obedience to a "revelation" made to Joseph Smith, and secured a city charter in 1840.

  • Three years after the expulsion of the Mormons Nauvoo was occupied by the remnant (some 250) of a colony of French communists, the Icarians, who had come out under the leadership of Etienne Cabet.

  • In May 1858 the surviving members of his faction together with a few fresh arrivals from France established a new 1 The Mormons said the name was 6f Hebrew origin and meant "beautiful place"; Hebrew "naveh" means "pleasant."

  • Mormons >>

  • The Mormons claim more than 4000 adherents, whose principal settlement is at Laie, on the north-east shore of Oahu; the first Mormon missionaries came to the islands in 1850.

  • Nor do the proselytizing enterprises of Seventh Day Adventists, Christian Scientists, Mormons and other American bodies rightly find a place here.

  • They remained until 1846-1847, when the Mormons came, built many cabins, and named the place Kanesville.

  • The Mormons remained only about five years, but on their departure for Utah their places were speedily taken by new immigrants.

  • A notable incident in the history of the state was the immigration of the Mormons from Missouri, about 1840.

  • Political intrigue, claims of independence from the state, as well as charges of polygamy and lawless conduct, aroused such intense opposition to the sect that in 1844 a civil war broke out in Hancock county which resulted in the murder of Joseph Smith and the removal of the Mormons from Illinois in 1846.

  • In later times the Mormons in America provide the most notable instance of the revival of polygamy.

  • Among the numbers of religious denominations in 1906 the Roman Catholics, with 10,264 communicants, had the largest membership, followed by the Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, with 5211 communicants (21.8% of the total church membership for the state), the Protestant Episcopalians with 1741, the Methodists with 1612 and the Presbyterians with 984.

  • Mormon migration passed along the trail in 1847-1849, and in 1853 fifty-five Mormons settled on Green river at the trading post of James Bridger, which they purchased and named Fort Supply.

  • In 1828 (to 1832) a fortified trading post was established near La Junta in the Arkansas valley on the Santa Fe trail; in 1834-1836 several private forts were erected on the Platte; in 1841 the first overland emigrants to the Pacific coast crossed the state, and in 1846-1847 the Mormons settled temporarily at the old Mexican town of Pueblo.

  • the Moravians, the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Mormons, the office and title of bishop have survived, or been created.

  • In 1906 it was estimated that the total membership of all religious denominations was 74,578, and that there were 32,425 Latter-Day Saints or Mormons (266 of the Reorganized Church), 18,057 Roman Catholics, 5884 Methodist Episcopalians (53 1 3 of the Northern Church), 3770 Presbyterians (3698 of the Northern Church), 3206 Disciples of Christ, and 2374 Baptists (2331 of the Northern Convention).

  • An act of 1889, when the Mormons constituted over 20% of the population, forbade in the case of any who had since the 1st of January 1888 practised, taught, aided or encouraged polygamy or bigamy, their registration or voting until two years after they had taken a test oath renouncing such practices, and until they had satisfied the District Court that in the two years preceding they had been guilty of no such practices.

  • The Latter Day Saints (Mormons) had (1908) 82 churches in Great Britain.

  • The large English immigration is to be ascribed to the successful proselytizing efforts of the Mormons in England.

  • The Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) are far more numerous than any other sect, this church having a membership in 1906 of 151,525 (of these 493 were of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) out of a total of 172,814 in all denominations; there were 479 members of this denomination to every 1000 of the population in the state, and the next largest sect, the Roman Catholics, had only 26 per 1000 of population and no Protestant body more than 6 per 1000.

  • There is a state commission which promotes the establishment of free libraries and gymnasiums. The Mormons control Brigham Young University (1876) at Provo, Brigham Young College (1878) at Logan, the Latterday Saints University (1887) at Salt Lake City, and academies at Ogden, Ephraim, Castle Dale, Beaver and Vernal.

  • Before the end of 1848 about 5000 Mormons had settled in the Salt Lake Valley.

  • Statehood, therefore, was not granted until the 4th of January 1896, owing to the apparent hostility of the Mormon authorities to non-Mormon settlers and to repeated clashes between the Mormon Church and the United States government regarding extent of control, polygamous practices, &c. And even after the admission of the state these questions arose in the matter of seating prominent Mormons who were elected to Congress.

  • For a detailed account of these difficulties and of the growth of the " Gentile " or nonMormon element see the article Mormons.

  • After 1849 the gold-fever horde bound for California furnished a source of revenue to the Mormons, as their settlement afforded an admirable post for supplies.

  • The division of land among the Mormons was singularly equitable.

  • In 1847 Brigham Young had succeeded Joseph Smith as president of the Mormons, and he held that position of veritable dictator until his death (1877); John Taylor succeeded him, and Wilford Woodruff in 1890 was chosen head of the organization; then Lorenzo Snow was president in 1898-1901, and Joseph Fielding Smith was elected in 1901.

  • From time to time the Indians have risen against the Mormons.

  • The important titles for the history of the state are those given in the article Mormons, especially H.

  • In the four decades before the Civil War, two matters stand out as most distinctive in the history of the state: the trouble with the Mormons, and the growth of river and prairie trade.

  • The Mormons have this rite.

  • The city is the headquarters of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (see Mormons).

  • The history of the city is largely that of the Mormons and in its earlier years that of Utah (q.v.).

  • The Mormons first came here in 1847; an advance party led by Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow entered the Salt Lake Valley on the 22nd of July.

  • The gold excitement of 1849 and the following years was the source of the city's first prosperity: the Mormons did not attempt to do any mining - Brigham Young counselled them not to abandon agriculture for prospecting - but they made themselves rich by outfitting those of the gold-seekers who went to California overland and who stopped at the City of the Great Salt Lake, the westernmost settlement of any importance.

  • See the bibliography under Mormons and under Utah; and particularly E.

  • But this movement of hunters, trappers, traders, Mormons, miners and homeseekers left nothing to show of settlement in Kansas, for which, therefore, the succession of Territorial governments organized for the northern portion of the Louisiana Purchase had no real significance.

  • polygamy among the Mormons, or violation of the trust-deeds under which the property of a church is held).

  • Meanwhile there had begun the passage of the Mormons across the state (1845-1857), marked by important temporary settlements near Omaha (q.v.) and elsewhere, the travel to Oregon, and to California, for which depots of supplies were established at Bellevue, Plattsmouth, Nebraska City and old Ft.

  • She made up her mind to call in person at the address given for the Mormons, which was conveniently central.

  • Special Considerations Some Mormons who have been through a special temple ceremony wear a sacred undergarment.

  • They have become^mainly Protestants, Catholics or Mormons, but retain many superstitions connected with their native religion.

  • In 1906, of the 14,944 members of religious denominations 9,97 0 were Roman Catholics, 1,210 Protestant Episcopalians, 1,105 Latter-Day Saints (Mormons), 618 Methodists and 520 Presbyterians.

  • 2 A law passed in 1887, requiring all voters to take an oath against polygamy, with the object of disfranchising Mormons, was declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court.

  • In the meantime the discovery of gold in California had swelled the stream of westward migration across the Washoe Country, and had resulted in the settlement of traders, mostly Mormons, along the routes to the gold fields.

  • (See MORMONS.)

  • 4,618 Mormons 3,212 Baptists.

  • 2,722 The Mormons of Alberta are in the most southerly part of the province, and are a colony from the Mormon settlements in Utah, U.S. On coming to Canada they were given lands by the Dominion of Canada.

  • The organization adopted in Utah among the Mormons is found also in Alberta, but the Canadian Mormons profess to have received a later revelation condemning polygamy.

  • the Mormons or "Latter Day Saints").

  • In the 16th century we find faith cures recorded of Luther and other reformers, in the next century of the Baptists, Quakers and other Puritan sects, and in the 18th century the faith healing of the Methodists in this country was paralleled by Pietism in Germany, which drew into its ranks so distinguished a man of science as Stahl (1660-1734) In the 19th century Prince Hohenlohe-WaldenburgSchillingsfiirst, canon of Grosswardein, was a famous healer on the continent; the Mormons and Irvingites were prominent among English-speaking peoples; in the last quarter of the 19th century faith healing became popular in London, and Bethshan homes were opened in 1881, and since then it has found many adherents in England.

  • "Commerce City" was laid out here in 1834 by Connecticut speculators; but the first settlement of importance was made by the Mormons in 1839-1840; they named it Nauvoo,' in obedience to a "revelation" made to Joseph Smith, and secured a city charter in 1840.

  • Three years after the expulsion of the Mormons Nauvoo was occupied by the remnant (some 250) of a colony of French communists, the Icarians, who had come out under the leadership of Etienne Cabet.

  • In May 1858 the surviving members of his faction together with a few fresh arrivals from France established a new 1 The Mormons said the name was 6f Hebrew origin and meant "beautiful place"; Hebrew "naveh" means "pleasant."

  • The Mormons settled Utah to insure social isolation, for the security of their theological system.

  • The Mormons claim more than 4000 adherents, whose principal settlement is at Laie, on the north-east shore of Oahu; the first Mormon missionaries came to the islands in 1850.

  • Nor do the proselytizing enterprises of Seventh Day Adventists, Christian Scientists, Mormons and other American bodies rightly find a place here.

  • They remained until 1846-1847, when the Mormons came, built many cabins, and named the place Kanesville.

  • The Mormons remained only about five years, but on their departure for Utah their places were speedily taken by new immigrants.

  • A notable incident in the history of the state was the immigration of the Mormons from Missouri, about 1840.

  • Political intrigue, claims of independence from the state, as well as charges of polygamy and lawless conduct, aroused such intense opposition to the sect that in 1844 a civil war broke out in Hancock county which resulted in the murder of Joseph Smith and the removal of the Mormons from Illinois in 1846.

  • In later times the Mormons in America provide the most notable instance of the revival of polygamy.

  • Among the numbers of religious denominations in 1906 the Roman Catholics, with 10,264 communicants, had the largest membership, followed by the Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, with 5211 communicants (21.8% of the total church membership for the state), the Protestant Episcopalians with 1741, the Methodists with 1612 and the Presbyterians with 984.

  • Mormon migration passed along the trail in 1847-1849, and in 1853 fifty-five Mormons settled on Green river at the trading post of James Bridger, which they purchased and named Fort Supply.

  • In 1828 (to 1832) a fortified trading post was established near La Junta in the Arkansas valley on the Santa Fe trail; in 1834-1836 several private forts were erected on the Platte; in 1841 the first overland emigrants to the Pacific coast crossed the state, and in 1846-1847 the Mormons settled temporarily at the old Mexican town of Pueblo.

  • the Moravians, the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Mormons, the office and title of bishop have survived, or been created.

  • In 1906 it was estimated that the total membership of all religious denominations was 74,578, and that there were 32,425 Latter-Day Saints or Mormons (266 of the Reorganized Church), 18,057 Roman Catholics, 5884 Methodist Episcopalians (53 1 3 of the Northern Church), 3770 Presbyterians (3698 of the Northern Church), 3206 Disciples of Christ, and 2374 Baptists (2331 of the Northern Convention).

  • An act of 1889, when the Mormons constituted over 20% of the population, forbade in the case of any who had since the 1st of January 1888 practised, taught, aided or encouraged polygamy or bigamy, their registration or voting until two years after they had taken a test oath renouncing such practices, and until they had satisfied the District Court that in the two years preceding they had been guilty of no such practices.

  • The Latter Day Saints (Mormons) had (1908) 82 churches in Great Britain.

  • The presence of this and other trails to California was of great importance during the gold excitement of 1849, when many miners outfitted at Salt Lake City and the Mormons grew rich in this business.

  • The large English immigration is to be ascribed to the successful proselytizing efforts of the Mormons in England.

  • The Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) are far more numerous than any other sect, this church having a membership in 1906 of 151,525 (of these 493 were of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) out of a total of 172,814 in all denominations; there were 479 members of this denomination to every 1000 of the population in the state, and the next largest sect, the Roman Catholics, had only 26 per 1000 of population and no Protestant body more than 6 per 1000.

  • There is a state commission which promotes the establishment of free libraries and gymnasiums. The Mormons control Brigham Young University (1876) at Provo, Brigham Young College (1878) at Logan, the Latterday Saints University (1887) at Salt Lake City, and academies at Ogden, Ephraim, Castle Dale, Beaver and Vernal.

  • With Brigham Young and his little band of Mormon followers (between 140 and 150 members)., who entered the Great Salt Lake Valley in July 1847, begins the story of settlement and civilization (see Mormons).

  • Before the end of 1848 about 5000 Mormons had settled in the Salt Lake Valley.

  • Statehood, therefore, was not granted until the 4th of January 1896, owing to the apparent hostility of the Mormon authorities to non-Mormon settlers and to repeated clashes between the Mormon Church and the United States government regarding extent of control, polygamous practices, &c. And even after the admission of the state these questions arose in the matter of seating prominent Mormons who were elected to Congress.

  • For a detailed account of these difficulties and of the growth of the " Gentile " or nonMormon element see the article Mormons.

  • After 1849 the gold-fever horde bound for California furnished a source of revenue to the Mormons, as their settlement afforded an admirable post for supplies.

  • The division of land among the Mormons was singularly equitable.

  • In 1847 Brigham Young had succeeded Joseph Smith as president of the Mormons, and he held that position of veritable dictator until his death (1877); John Taylor succeeded him, and Wilford Woodruff in 1890 was chosen head of the organization; then Lorenzo Snow was president in 1898-1901, and Joseph Fielding Smith was elected in 1901.

  • From time to time the Indians have risen against the Mormons.

  • The important titles for the history of the state are those given in the article Mormons, especially H.

  • In the four decades before the Civil War, two matters stand out as most distinctive in the history of the state: the trouble with the Mormons, and the growth of river and prairie trade.

  • The Mormons have this rite.

  • The city is the headquarters of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (see Mormons).

  • The history of the city is largely that of the Mormons and in its earlier years that of Utah (q.v.).

  • The Mormons first came here in 1847; an advance party led by Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow entered the Salt Lake Valley on the 22nd of July.

  • The gold excitement of 1849 and the following years was the source of the city's first prosperity: the Mormons did not attempt to do any mining - Brigham Young counselled them not to abandon agriculture for prospecting - but they made themselves rich by outfitting those of the gold-seekers who went to California overland and who stopped at the City of the Great Salt Lake, the westernmost settlement of any importance.

  • See the bibliography under Mormons and under Utah; and particularly E.

  • But this movement of hunters, trappers, traders, Mormons, miners and homeseekers left nothing to show of settlement in Kansas, for which, therefore, the succession of Territorial governments organized for the northern portion of the Louisiana Purchase had no real significance.

  • polygamy among the Mormons, or violation of the trust-deeds under which the property of a church is held).

  • Meanwhile there had begun the passage of the Mormons across the state (1845-1857), marked by important temporary settlements near Omaha (q.v.) and elsewhere, the travel to Oregon, and to California, for which depots of supplies were established at Bellevue, Plattsmouth, Nebraska City and old Ft.

  • Special Considerations Some Mormons who have been through a special temple ceremony wear a sacred undergarment.

  • Family Search is a project of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, or the Mormons.

  • Family Search is a genealogy project of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, the Mormons.

  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS), also known as the Mormons, has extensive family history information in a variety of databases.

  • You don't have to be in genealogy for long to learn that the Mormons take genealogy very seriously and they have provided priceless contributions to the field - most of which are free for the taking by genealogists around the world.

  • However, access to the resources at FamilySearch is not limited to Mormons.

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