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moray

moray

moray Sentence Examples

  • But Hepburn, prior of St Andrews, having obtained the vote of the chapter, expelled him, and was himself in turn expelled by Forman, bishop of Moray, who had been nominated by the pope.

  • Not far from the scene of this conflict stands Balquhain Castle, a seat of the Leslies, now a mere shell, which was occupied by Queen Mary in September 1562 before the fight at Corrichie between her forces, led by the earl of Moray, and those of the earl of Huntly.

  • Thomas Randolph, 1st earl of Moray >>

  • Skene's view is that it chronicles the struggle in 900 between Sigurd, earl of Orkney, and Maelbrigd, Maormor of Moray.

  • Farther south is the forest of Darnaway, famous for its oaks, in which stands the earl of Moray's mansion of Darnaway Castle.

  • Attached to it is the great hall, capable of accommodating l000 men, with an open roof of fine dark oak, the only remaining portion of the castle that was erected by Archibald Douglas, earl of Moray, in 1450.

  • Moved by this language and conscious of the weakness of Edward, the pope exhorted him to make peace with Scotland, and three years later Randolph, now earl of Moray, procured the recognition of Bruce as king from the papal see by promising aid for a crusade.

  • became king of England, and one of the first acts of the new reign, after a narrow escape of the young king from capture by Moray, was the treaty of York, ratified at Northampton in April 1328, by which it was agreed that "Scotland, according to its ancient bounds in the days of Alexander III., should remain to Robert, king of Scots, and his heirs free and divided from England, without any subjection, servitude, claim or demand whatsoever."

  • His last years were chiefly spent at the castle of Cardross on the Clyde, which he acquired in 1326, and the conduct of war, as well as the negotiations for peace, had been left to the young leaders, Moray and Sir James Douglas, whose training was one of Bruce's services to his country.

  • It belongs to the earl of Moray (Murray), who derives from it his title of Lord Doune, and was the home of James Stewart, the "bonnie earl" of Moray, murdered at Donibristle in Fife by the earl of Huntly (1592).

  • The regent Moray, the marquess of Montrose, and Napier of Merchiston were buried within its walls and are commemorated by monuments, and among the memorial tablets is one to R.

  • Almost opposite to it stands Moray House, from the balcony of which the 8th earl of Argyll watched Montrose led to execution (1650).

  • The library hall was restored and decorated, largely through the generosity of Sir William Priestley (1829-1900), formerly M.P. for the university; while munificent additions to the academic funds and resources were made by the 15th earl of Moray (1840-1901), Sir William Fraser (1816-1898), and others.

  • In the summer of 1388 the Scots invaded England by way of Carlisle, sending a small body under the earls of Douglas, Mar and Moray to invade Northumberland.

  • When she surrendered at Carberry Hill the stronghold fell into the hands of the regent Moray, by whom it was dismantled in 1568, but its ruins are still a picturesque object on the hill above the harbour.

  • Of these Maitland of Lethington was consenting to Darnley's murder; the earl of Morton had, at least, guilty foreknowledge; the regent Moray (Mary's natural brother) had "looked through his fingers" at the crime, and for months remained on intimate terms with the criminals.

  • This is attested as a "true copy," but Moray, who had been present when Bowton was examined (December 8, 1567), knew that the copy presented at Westminster (December 1568) had been mutilated because the excised passages were damning to Lethington and the earl of Morton, accomplices in the crime of Darnley's murder, and accomplices of Moray in his prosecution of his sister.

  • For example, when Moray, after Mary was in Elizabeth's power (May 16, 1568), wished Elizabeth to have the matter tried, he in May-June 1568 sent John Wood to England with Scots translations of the letters.

  • But if Moray could knowingly submit garbled evidence, Morton's oath is of no value if uncorroborated.

  • In the end of July 1567 the earl of Moray, Mary's brother, passing through London from France, told de Silva, as de Silva reported to his government, that there was proof of Mary's guilt in a letter of three double sheets of paper signed by her.

  • According to Moray's version of the letter, Mary was to try to poison Darnley in a house on the way between Glasgow and Edinburgh where he and she were to stop. Clearly Lord Livingstone's house, Callendar, where they did rest on their journey, is intended.

  • No such arrangement had been made, as the confessions of the murderers, at which Moray was present, clearly prove.

  • But the earl of Lennox, Darnley's father, understood Moray to mean that as early as January 21-22, 1567, the house of Kirk o' Field, where Darnley was slain, had already been mined.

  • Moray's version of the letter made Mary tell Bothwell to poison or put away his wife.

  • No such matters occur in Letter II.; Moray spoke, he said, on the authority of "a man who had read the letter."

  • Can we suppose that "the man who had read the letter" invented much of its contents, and told them to Moray, who told de Silva, and told Darnley's father, Lennox, then in or near London?

  • As has been said, he closely follows Moray's version reported by de Silva in July 1567.

  • Now, on the 11th of June 1568, Lennox was in the company of John Wood, a creature of Moray's, and Wood, as we saw, brought copies of the Scots renderings of the Letters into England in May - June 1568.

  • It was argued by Andrew Lang that Wood was likely to show these letters to Lennox; and that as Lennox follows Moray's version of Mary's long and murderous letter, and does not follow Letter II., the murderous letter (a forgery) was then part of the dossier of Mary's accusers.

  • in Scots, did Lennox follow Moray's erroneous version of July 1567 ?

  • It may be asked why, after being with Wood on the 11th of June, did Lennox still rely on Moray's version of Mary's letter?

  • In that case, when Lennox later quotes Moray's version, not Letter II.

  • Firth of Forth and Moray Firth.

  • Thus in 1315 the earl of Moray was appointed regent by Robert I.

  • By an act of 1567 the appointment by Mary of the earl of Moray as regent was confirmed.

  • 1450), Scottish writer, author of the Buke of the Howlat, was secretary or chaplain to the earl of Moray (1450) and rector of Halkirk, near Thurso.

  • is Donibristle House, the seat of the earl of Murray (Moray), and the scene of the murder (Feb.

  • GEORGE CHALMERS (1742-1825), Scottish antiquarian and political writer, was born at Fochabers, a village in the county of Moray, in 1742.

  • These seven mormaorships, or original "earldoms" of Scotland, as they were afterwards called, were: Angus, Athole with Gowry, Caithness with Sutherland, Fife, Mar with Buchan, Moray with Ross, and Stratherne with Menteith.

  • The fortress belonged to Sir Andrew Moray,.

  • of Lossiemouth its port, on the Moray Firth, and 714 m.

  • The centre of interest is the cathedral of Moray, which was founded in 1224, when the church of the Holy Trinity was converted to this use.

  • It is not later than 7 7 50 and, with its predecessor, was the cathedral of Moray during the rule of the first four bishops; the fourth bishop, Simon de Toeny, an Englishman, was buried in its precincts in 1184.

  • Many indications of ice action are found in these islands; striated surfaces are to be seen on the cliffs in Eday and Westray, in Kirkwall Bay and on Stennie Hill in Eday; boulder clay, with marine shells, and with many boulders of rocks foreign to the islands (chalk, oolitic limestone, flint, &c.), which must have been brought up from the region of Moray Firth, rests upon the old strata in many places.

  • It was kept in good repair till after the battle of Langside (1568), when it was burnt by order of the regent Moray.

  • The latter, who commanded the men of Bute at the battle of Falkirk in 1298, had seven sons: (1) Sir Alexander, whose grandson George became in 1389 earl of Angus, the title afterwards passing in the female line to the Douglases, and in 1761 to the duke of Hamilton; (2) Sir Alan of Dreghorn, ancestor of the earls and dukes of Lennox, from whcm Lord Darnley, husband of Queen Mary, and also Lady Arabella Stuart, were descended; (3) Sir Walter, who obtained the barony of Garlies, Wigtownshire, from his uncle John Randolph, earl of Moray, and was the ancestor of the earls of Galloway, younger branches of the family being the Stewarts of Tonderghie, Wigtownshire, and also those of Physgill and Glenturk in the same county; (4) Sir James, who fell at Dupplin in 1332, ancestor of the lords of Lorn, on whose descendants were conferred at different periods the earldoms of Athole, Buchan and Traquair, and who were also the progenitors of the Stewarts of Appin, Argyllshire, and of Grandtully, Perthshire; (5) Sir John, killed at Halidon Hill in 1333; (6) Sir Hugh, who fought under Edward Bruce in Ireland; and (7) Sir Robert of Daldowie, ancestor of the Stewarts of Allanton and of Coltness.

  • "A lytil tale Set herd I tel, Pat in to my tyme befel, of a gudman, in murrefe [Moray] borne in elgyne [Elgin], and his kine beforne, and callit was a faithful man vith al Jame fat hyme knew than; fis mare trastely I say, for I kend hyme weile mony day.

  • It is situated on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of the Nairn and on its left bank, 154 m.

  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.

  • Dissensions broke out among the Scottish leaders, and all Wallace's titled friends left him and made submission to Edward, except the ever faithful Sir Andrew Moray.

  • Sir Andrew Moray fell in this battle.

  • by Moray Firth, S.

  • by Inner Moray Firth (or Firth of Inverness) and Beauly Firth, and W.

  • Along both sides of the Moray Firth a strip of level land lies between the foot of the hills and the sea, while the county of Caithness, occupying a wide plain, does not, strictly speaking, belong to the Highlands.

  • In the basin of the gorges Moray Firth some fine examples may be seen on the Nairn and Findhorn, while on the west side of the Cromarty Firth some of the small streams descending from the high grounds of the east of the shire of Ross and Cromarty have cut out defiles in the Conglomerates, remarkable for their depth and narrowness.

  • The eastern is indented by a series of broad arms of the sea - the firths of Forth and Tay, Moray and Dornoch firths - but is otherwise relatively unbroken.

  • The Lower, with its abundant intercalated lavas and tuffs, extends continuously as a broad belt along the northern margin of the Central Plain, reappears in detached tracts along the southern border, is found again on the south side of the Uplands in Berwickshire and the Cheviot Hills, occupies a tract of Lorne (Oban and the vicinity) in Argyllshire, and on the north side of the Highlands underlies most of the low ground on both sides of the Moray Firth, stretches across Caithness and through nearly the whole of the Orkney Islands, and is prolonged into Shetland.

  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

  • Roman roads extended, with camps, as far as the Moray Firth.

  • After the death of Gilcomgain, Gruach wedded Macbeth, Mormaor (or earl in later style) of the province or subkingdom of Moray; Macbeth slew Duncan, and ruled as protector of the legitimate claims of Lulach.

  • To the Celts of Scotland, or at least to those of the great subkingship or province of Moray, Duncan, not Macbeth, was the usurper.

  • Malcolm subdued " the King of Moray," son of Lulach, who died in far Lochaber, though his family's claims to the crown of Scotland did not lapse.

  • The Celts (apart from the claimant of the blood of Lulach and the house of Moray) placed Donald Ban on the throne; England supported Duncan (by primogeniture Malcolm's heir, and a hostage in England); there was division of the kingdom till Duncan was slain, and Edgar, son of Malcolm and Margaret, was restored by Edgar ZEtheling.

  • We observe that the chief peers of Alexander, who signed the charter of his monastery at Scone, are Celts - Heth, earl of Moray (husband of the daughter of Lulach), Ma]ise of Strathearn, Dufagan of Fife, and Rory.

  • With Anglo-Norman aid he repelled a Celtic rising - the right of the claimants to represent the blood of Lulach is exquisitely complex and obscure in this case - but in the end David annexed to the crown the great old sub-kingdom or province of Moray, and made grants therein to English, Norman and Scottish followers.

  • Where Anglo-Normans obtained lands in Moray and Renfrewshire, there seems to have been no displacement of the population: though a FitzAlan was dominant in Renfrewshire, the " good men," or gentry, still bore Gaelic names, till territorial names - " of " this or that place - came into use.

  • The bishop of St Andrews was for Baliol, he of Glasgow was for Bruce; and the Baliol party, the seven earls complain, was ravaging Moray.

  • Sir William Douglas was kept a prisoner for life, but Andrew Murray was out in Moray, with a large following.

  • Bruce had but five hundred horse, under Keith the Marischal; Douglas led the levies of his own district and Ettrick Forest; Randolph commanded the men of Moray; Walter Steward, those of the south-western shires; and Angus Og brought to the Scottish standard the light-footed men of the Isles, and, probably, of Lochaber, Moidart, and the western coast in general.

  • These two men, with Campbell of Loch Awe, and Randolph's son, the earl of Moray, held up the national standard and were joined by the English claimant of the earldom of Atholl.

  • Moray, the last male representative of Randolph, with the Constable and Earl Marischal of Scotland, was slain; the Steward made his escape: and, henceforth, the childless David regarded his heir, the Steward, with jealousy and suspicion.

  • James desired to wed none but his mistress, Margaret Erskine, the mother of the Regent Moray.

  • Life went on much as usual, and the country, with a merely provisional government, was peaceful enough under the guidance of Moray, Maitland of Lethington, and the other lay Protestant leaders.

  • Till the spring of 1565, Mary, despite the insults to her religion and the provocations to herself, had remained attached to " the English course " and to the counsels of Moray and Lethington.

  • In 1501 he became bishop of Moray and in July 1513 Louis XII.

  • By his second wife, Euphemia, daughter of Hugh, earl of Ross, and widow of Moray, formerly his colleague as regent, he had two sons and several daughters; and he had also many illegitimate children.

  • BUCKIE, a fishing town and police burgh of Banffshire, Scotland, on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of Buckie burn, about 17 m.

  • Mary had put herself into the hands of her half-brother, Lord James Stuart afterwards earl of Moray, the only man who could perhaps have pulled her through.

  • Knox publicly protested; and Moray, who probably understood and liked both parties, brought the preacher to the presence of his queen.

  • Knox had gone too far in intolerance, and Moray and Maitland of Lethington gradually withdrew their support.

  • Knox had already by letter formally broken with the earl of Moray, "committing you to your own wit, and to the conducting of those who better please you"; and now, in one of his greatest sermons before the assembled lords, he drove at the heart of the situation - the risk of a Catholic marriage.

  • Mary had wearied of her guiding statesmen, Moray and the more pliant Maitland; the Italian secretary David Rizzio, through whom she had corresponded with the pope, now more and more usurped their place; and a weak fancy for her handsome cousin, Henry Darnley, brought about a sudden marriage in 1565 and swept the opposing Protestant lords into exile.

  • His main work was now really done; for the parliament of 1567 made Moray regent, and Knox was only too glad to have his old friend back in power, though they seem to have differed on the question whether the queen should be allowed to pass into retirement without trial for her husband's death, as they had differed all along on the question of tolerating her private religion.

  • From the Moray Firth it extends inland in a westerly and then south-westerly direction for a distance of 19 m.

  • 1436), governor of Berwick, burned it about 1417, and in 1562 the regent Moray had to suppress the lawless with a strong hand.

  • Pop. (1901), 4753 A branch of the Highland railway also gives access to Elgin, and there is a line to Buckie and Portessie on the Moray Firth.

  • Broad Street contains the ruins of Mar's Work, the palace built by John Erskine, 1st (or 6th) earl of Mar, about 1570, according to tradition, out of the stones of Cambuskenneth Abbey; the old town house, erected in 1701 instead of that in which John Hamilton, the last Roman Catholic archbishop of St Andrews, was hanged for alleged complicity in the murders of Darnley and the regent Moray; the town cross, restored in 1891, and the house which was, as a mural tablet says, the "nursery of James VI.

  • The cathedral, built by Bishop Gilbert de Moravia (Moray) (d.

  • When he returned to England in 1664 he established intimate relations with Sir Robert Moray and with John Maitland, earl and afterwards first duke of Lauderdale, both of whom at that time advocated a tolerant policy towards the Scottish covenanters.

  • Burnet became a member of the Royal Society, of which Moray was the first president.

  • 887), appears to have aimed at the supreme command of all the Scandinavian settlements of the west, and in the course of a few years conquered the kingdom of the Isles, Sutherland, Ross, Moray and Argyll.

  • Kinneddar Castle in the parish of Drainie - in which Lossiemouth is situated - was a seat of the bishops of Moray, and Old Duffus Castle, 22 m.

  • Nearly midway between Lossiemouth and Elgin stand the massive ruins of the palace of Spynie, formerly a fortified residence of the bishops of Moray.

  • Green moray eels and French angelfish are often spotted at this site.

  • These days the A9 takes a dual carriageway bypass route which crosses the Moray Firth at Kessock bridge.

  • Doune castle A magnificent 14th century courtyard castle, once the ancestral home of the Earls of Moray.

  • century courtyard castle, once the ancestral home of the Earls of Moray.

  • She had seen a giant green moray eel under an overhang.

  • Also saw a ribbon eel which is also called a Ghost Moray.

  • Not being able to see clearly added to the danger from razor sharp growths or the teeth of moray eels.

  • The Moray Firth is a large triangular embayment in NE Scotland.

  • Its root has been noted on seismic surveys in connection with the oil exploration of the Moray Firth.

  • free-swimming moray eel.

  • The first stage was the popular uprising under Wallace and Andrew Moray, whose backbone was an armed peasantry led by minor gentry.

  • Marine life is less abundant than in tropical seas but includes grouper, rays, moray eels, turtles and octopi.

  • Moray Leisure Center is within easy reach and has squash courts, a swimming pool an ice rink and a state-of-the-art gymnasium.

  • Our Local housing Strategy has highlighted the shortage of affordable rented housing in Moray.

  • hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Moray Firth has increased in recent years.

  • Right across the country on the east coast the Moray Firth is a huge sea inlet where dolphins may be seen.

  • magnificent 14th century courtyard castle, once the ancestral home of the Earls of Moray.

  • The dive finishes on the shallow reef, where the guests can see a large resident moray.

  • We will use moray only to create the patch itself, not the other elements of the scene.

  • There is also a large green moray that hides in the area.

  • moray eels.

  • On a night dive we saw a coral cat shark and honeycomb moray.

  • Blue spotted rays seemed to abound on the sand here and our first sight of a free swimming moray eel.

  • Issue 34 includes features on Jim Moray English folk music's wonderkid on why he's happy to remain an outsider.

  • pa jobs in Montrose, Motherwell or Moray.

  • scoter species were recorded in the Firths of Moray, Tay and Forth.

  • Moray Firth 2.40 Exploration activity in the Moray Firth increased to seven wells (including two sidetracks) compared with five drilled in 1999.

  • I'll attacked by moray eels, bitten by barracudas, stung by stingrays Not if you don't attack them first.

  • Moray's Biblical Garden is, without doubt, a veritable treasure trove of variety.

  • Other recreational activities on the Moray Coast include yachting, cycling, windsurfing or just visiting the beach.

  • But Hepburn, prior of St Andrews, having obtained the vote of the chapter, expelled him, and was himself in turn expelled by Forman, bishop of Moray, who had been nominated by the pope.

  • His authority was recognized in Galloway which, hitherto, had been practically independent; he put an end to a formidable insurrection in Moray and Inverness; and a series of campaigns taught the far north, Caithness and Sutherland, to respect the power of the crown.

  • Not far from the scene of this conflict stands Balquhain Castle, a seat of the Leslies, now a mere shell, which was occupied by Queen Mary in September 1562 before the fight at Corrichie between her forces, led by the earl of Moray, and those of the earl of Huntly.

  • Thomas Randolph, 1st earl of Moray >>

  • A third conjecture is that it commemorates the expulsion of the Danes from Moray in 1014.

  • Skene's view is that it chronicles the struggle in 900 between Sigurd, earl of Orkney, and Maelbrigd, Maormor of Moray.

  • Farther south is the forest of Darnaway, famous for its oaks, in which stands the earl of Moray's mansion of Darnaway Castle.

  • Attached to it is the great hall, capable of accommodating l000 men, with an open roof of fine dark oak, the only remaining portion of the castle that was erected by Archibald Douglas, earl of Moray, in 1450.

  • Moved by this language and conscious of the weakness of Edward, the pope exhorted him to make peace with Scotland, and three years later Randolph, now earl of Moray, procured the recognition of Bruce as king from the papal see by promising aid for a crusade.

  • became king of England, and one of the first acts of the new reign, after a narrow escape of the young king from capture by Moray, was the treaty of York, ratified at Northampton in April 1328, by which it was agreed that "Scotland, according to its ancient bounds in the days of Alexander III., should remain to Robert, king of Scots, and his heirs free and divided from England, without any subjection, servitude, claim or demand whatsoever."

  • His last years were chiefly spent at the castle of Cardross on the Clyde, which he acquired in 1326, and the conduct of war, as well as the negotiations for peace, had been left to the young leaders, Moray and Sir James Douglas, whose training was one of Bruce's services to his country.

  • Still more recently the hardship of treating the greater part of Moray Firth as open sea to the exclusion of British and to the advantage of foreign fishermen has been raised (see North Sea Fisheries Convention; Territorial Waters).

  • It belongs to the earl of Moray (Murray), who derives from it his title of Lord Doune, and was the home of James Stewart, the "bonnie earl" of Moray, murdered at Donibristle in Fife by the earl of Huntly (1592).

  • The regent Moray, the marquess of Montrose, and Napier of Merchiston were buried within its walls and are commemorated by monuments, and among the memorial tablets is one to R.

  • Almost opposite to it stands Moray House, from the balcony of which the 8th earl of Argyll watched Montrose led to execution (1650).

  • The library hall was restored and decorated, largely through the generosity of Sir William Priestley (1829-1900), formerly M.P. for the university; while munificent additions to the academic funds and resources were made by the 15th earl of Moray (1840-1901), Sir William Fraser (1816-1898), and others.

  • In the summer of 1388 the Scots invaded England by way of Carlisle, sending a small body under the earls of Douglas, Mar and Moray to invade Northumberland.

  • When she surrendered at Carberry Hill the stronghold fell into the hands of the regent Moray, by whom it was dismantled in 1568, but its ruins are still a picturesque object on the hill above the harbour.

  • Of these Maitland of Lethington was consenting to Darnley's murder; the earl of Morton had, at least, guilty foreknowledge; the regent Moray (Mary's natural brother) had "looked through his fingers" at the crime, and for months remained on intimate terms with the criminals.

  • This is attested as a "true copy," but Moray, who had been present when Bowton was examined (December 8, 1567), knew that the copy presented at Westminster (December 1568) had been mutilated because the excised passages were damning to Lethington and the earl of Morton, accomplices in the crime of Darnley's murder, and accomplices of Moray in his prosecution of his sister.

  • pp. 183-188.) If Moray the righteous could act thus, much more might the murderer Morton perjure himself in his averment that there had been no tampering with the Casket Letters in his custody.

  • For example, when Moray, after Mary was in Elizabeth's power (May 16, 1568), wished Elizabeth to have the matter tried, he in May-June 1568 sent John Wood to England with Scots translations of the letters.

  • But if Moray could knowingly submit garbled evidence, Morton's oath is of no value if uncorroborated.

  • In the end of July 1567 the earl of Moray, Mary's brother, passing through London from France, told de Silva, as de Silva reported to his government, that there was proof of Mary's guilt in a letter of three double sheets of paper signed by her.

  • According to Moray's version of the letter, Mary was to try to poison Darnley in a house on the way between Glasgow and Edinburgh where he and she were to stop. Clearly Lord Livingstone's house, Callendar, where they did rest on their journey, is intended.

  • No such arrangement had been made, as the confessions of the murderers, at which Moray was present, clearly prove.

  • But the earl of Lennox, Darnley's father, understood Moray to mean that as early as January 21-22, 1567, the house of Kirk o' Field, where Darnley was slain, had already been mined.

  • Moray's version of the letter made Mary tell Bothwell to poison or put away his wife.

  • No such matters occur in Letter II.; Moray spoke, he said, on the authority of "a man who had read the letter."

  • Can we suppose that "the man who had read the letter" invented much of its contents, and told them to Moray, who told de Silva, and told Darnley's father, Lennox, then in or near London?

  • As has been said, he closely follows Moray's version reported by de Silva in July 1567.

  • Now, on the 11th of June 1568, Lennox was in the company of John Wood, a creature of Moray's, and Wood, as we saw, brought copies of the Scots renderings of the Letters into England in May - June 1568.

  • It was argued by Andrew Lang that Wood was likely to show these letters to Lennox; and that as Lennox follows Moray's version of Mary's long and murderous letter, and does not follow Letter II., the murderous letter (a forgery) was then part of the dossier of Mary's accusers.

  • in his indictment against Mary, and had to rest on Moray's version of July 1567, because Lennox's indictment was completed, and even laid before Elizabeth, as early as the 28th of May 1568.

  • in Scots, did Lennox follow Moray's erroneous version of July 1567 ?

  • It may be asked why, after being with Wood on the 11th of June, did Lennox still rely on Moray's version of Mary's letter?

  • In that case, when Lennox later quotes Moray's version, not Letter II.

  • Firth of Forth and Moray Firth.

  • Thus in 1315 the earl of Moray was appointed regent by Robert I.

  • By an act of 1567 the appointment by Mary of the earl of Moray as regent was confirmed.

  • 1450), Scottish writer, author of the Buke of the Howlat, was secretary or chaplain to the earl of Moray (1450) and rector of Halkirk, near Thurso.

  • is Donibristle House, the seat of the earl of Murray (Moray), and the scene of the murder (Feb.

  • GEORGE CHALMERS (1742-1825), Scottish antiquarian and political writer, was born at Fochabers, a village in the county of Moray, in 1742.

  • These seven mormaorships, or original "earldoms" of Scotland, as they were afterwards called, were: Angus, Athole with Gowry, Caithness with Sutherland, Fife, Mar with Buchan, Moray with Ross, and Stratherne with Menteith.

  • The fortress belonged to Sir Andrew Moray,.

  • of Lossiemouth its port, on the Moray Firth, and 714 m.

  • The centre of interest is the cathedral of Moray, which was founded in 1224, when the church of the Holy Trinity was converted to this use.

  • It is not later than 7 7 50 and, with its predecessor, was the cathedral of Moray during the rule of the first four bishops; the fourth bishop, Simon de Toeny, an Englishman, was buried in its precincts in 1184.

  • Many indications of ice action are found in these islands; striated surfaces are to be seen on the cliffs in Eday and Westray, in Kirkwall Bay and on Stennie Hill in Eday; boulder clay, with marine shells, and with many boulders of rocks foreign to the islands (chalk, oolitic limestone, flint, &c.), which must have been brought up from the region of Moray Firth, rests upon the old strata in many places.

  • Among well-known Orcadians may be mentioned James Atkine (1613-1687), bishop first of Moray and afterwards of Galloway; Murdoch McKenzie (d.

  • It was kept in good repair till after the battle of Langside (1568), when it was burnt by order of the regent Moray.

  • The latter, who commanded the men of Bute at the battle of Falkirk in 1298, had seven sons: (1) Sir Alexander, whose grandson George became in 1389 earl of Angus, the title afterwards passing in the female line to the Douglases, and in 1761 to the duke of Hamilton; (2) Sir Alan of Dreghorn, ancestor of the earls and dukes of Lennox, from whcm Lord Darnley, husband of Queen Mary, and also Lady Arabella Stuart, were descended; (3) Sir Walter, who obtained the barony of Garlies, Wigtownshire, from his uncle John Randolph, earl of Moray, and was the ancestor of the earls of Galloway, younger branches of the family being the Stewarts of Tonderghie, Wigtownshire, and also those of Physgill and Glenturk in the same county; (4) Sir James, who fell at Dupplin in 1332, ancestor of the lords of Lorn, on whose descendants were conferred at different periods the earldoms of Athole, Buchan and Traquair, and who were also the progenitors of the Stewarts of Appin, Argyllshire, and of Grandtully, Perthshire; (5) Sir John, killed at Halidon Hill in 1333; (6) Sir Hugh, who fought under Edward Bruce in Ireland; and (7) Sir Robert of Daldowie, ancestor of the Stewarts of Allanton and of Coltness.

  • "A lytil tale Set herd I tel, Pat in to my tyme befel, of a gudman, in murrefe [Moray] borne in elgyne [Elgin], and his kine beforne, and callit was a faithful man vith al Jame fat hyme knew than; fis mare trastely I say, for I kend hyme weile mony day.

  • It is situated on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of the Nairn and on its left bank, 154 m.

  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.

  • Dissensions broke out among the Scottish leaders, and all Wallace's titled friends left him and made submission to Edward, except the ever faithful Sir Andrew Moray.

  • Sir Andrew Moray fell in this battle.

  • by Moray Firth, S.

  • by Inner Moray Firth (or Firth of Inverness) and Beauly Firth, and W.

  • Along both sides of the Moray Firth a strip of level land lies between the foot of the hills and the sea, while the county of Caithness, occupying a wide plain, does not, strictly speaking, belong to the Highlands.

  • In the basin of the gorges Moray Firth some fine examples may be seen on the Nairn and Findhorn, while on the west side of the Cromarty Firth some of the small streams descending from the high grounds of the east of the shire of Ross and Cromarty have cut out defiles in the Conglomerates, remarkable for their depth and narrowness.

  • The eastern is indented by a series of broad arms of the sea - the firths of Forth and Tay, Moray and Dornoch firths - but is otherwise relatively unbroken.

  • The Lower, with its abundant intercalated lavas and tuffs, extends continuously as a broad belt along the northern margin of the Central Plain, reappears in detached tracts along the southern border, is found again on the south side of the Uplands in Berwickshire and the Cheviot Hills, occupies a tract of Lorne (Oban and the vicinity) in Argyllshire, and on the north side of the Highlands underlies most of the low ground on both sides of the Moray Firth, stretches across Caithness and through nearly the whole of the Orkney Islands, and is prolonged into Shetland.

  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

  • Roman roads extended, with camps, as far as the Moray Firth.

  • After the death of Gilcomgain, Gruach wedded Macbeth, Mormaor (or earl in later style) of the province or subkingdom of Moray; Macbeth slew Duncan, and ruled as protector of the legitimate claims of Lulach.

  • To the Celts of Scotland, or at least to those of the great subkingship or province of Moray, Duncan, not Macbeth, was the usurper.

  • Malcolm subdued " the King of Moray," son of Lulach, who died in far Lochaber, though his family's claims to the crown of Scotland did not lapse.

  • The Celts (apart from the claimant of the blood of Lulach and the house of Moray) placed Donald Ban on the throne; England supported Duncan (by primogeniture Malcolm's heir, and a hostage in England); there was division of the kingdom till Duncan was slain, and Edgar, son of Malcolm and Margaret, was restored by Edgar ZEtheling.

  • We observe that the chief peers of Alexander, who signed the charter of his monastery at Scone, are Celts - Heth, earl of Moray (husband of the daughter of Lulach), Ma]ise of Strathearn, Dufagan of Fife, and Rory.

  • With Anglo-Norman aid he repelled a Celtic rising - the right of the claimants to represent the blood of Lulach is exquisitely complex and obscure in this case - but in the end David annexed to the crown the great old sub-kingdom or province of Moray, and made grants therein to English, Norman and Scottish followers.

  • Where Anglo-Normans obtained lands in Moray and Renfrewshire, there seems to have been no displacement of the population: though a FitzAlan was dominant in Renfrewshire, the " good men," or gentry, still bore Gaelic names, till territorial names - " of " this or that place - came into use.

  • The bishop of St Andrews was for Baliol, he of Glasgow was for Bruce; and the Baliol party, the seven earls complain, was ravaging Moray.

  • Sir William Douglas was kept a prisoner for life, but Andrew Murray was out in Moray, with a large following.

  • Bruce had but five hundred horse, under Keith the Marischal; Douglas led the levies of his own district and Ettrick Forest; Randolph commanded the men of Moray; Walter Steward, those of the south-western shires; and Angus Og brought to the Scottish standard the light-footed men of the Isles, and, probably, of Lochaber, Moidart, and the western coast in general.

  • These two men, with Campbell of Loch Awe, and Randolph's son, the earl of Moray, held up the national standard and were joined by the English claimant of the earldom of Atholl.

  • Moray, the last male representative of Randolph, with the Constable and Earl Marischal of Scotland, was slain; the Steward made his escape: and, henceforth, the childless David regarded his heir, the Steward, with jealousy and suspicion.

  • James desired to wed none but his mistress, Margaret Erskine, the mother of the Regent Moray.

  • Life went on much as usual, and the country, with a merely provisional government, was peaceful enough under the guidance of Moray, Maitland of Lethington, and the other lay Protestant leaders.

  • Till the spring of 1565, Mary, despite the insults to her religion and the provocations to herself, had remained attached to " the English course " and to the counsels of Moray and Lethington.

  • In 1501 he became bishop of Moray and in July 1513 Louis XII.

  • He was one of the leaders of the Scottish army at the battle of Halidon Hill in July 1 333; and after gaining some successes over the adherents of Edward Baliol in the west of Scotland, he and John Randolph, 3rd earl of Moray (d.

  • By his second wife, Euphemia, daughter of Hugh, earl of Ross, and widow of Moray, formerly his colleague as regent, he had two sons and several daughters; and he had also many illegitimate children.

  • He left one legitimate child, his successor James V., but as his gallantries were numerous he had many illegitimate children, among them (by Marion Boyd) Alexander Stewart, archbishop of St Andrews and chancellor of Scotland, who was killed at Flodden, and (by Janet Kennedy) James Stewart, earl of Moray (d.

  • BUCKIE, a fishing town and police burgh of Banffshire, Scotland, on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of Buckie burn, about 17 m.

  • Mary had put herself into the hands of her half-brother, Lord James Stuart afterwards earl of Moray, the only man who could perhaps have pulled her through.

  • Knox publicly protested; and Moray, who probably understood and liked both parties, brought the preacher to the presence of his queen.

  • Knox had gone too far in intolerance, and Moray and Maitland of Lethington gradually withdrew their support.

  • Knox had already by letter formally broken with the earl of Moray, "committing you to your own wit, and to the conducting of those who better please you"; and now, in one of his greatest sermons before the assembled lords, he drove at the heart of the situation - the risk of a Catholic marriage.

  • Mary had wearied of her guiding statesmen, Moray and the more pliant Maitland; the Italian secretary David Rizzio, through whom she had corresponded with the pope, now more and more usurped their place; and a weak fancy for her handsome cousin, Henry Darnley, brought about a sudden marriage in 1565 and swept the opposing Protestant lords into exile.

  • His main work was now really done; for the parliament of 1567 made Moray regent, and Knox was only too glad to have his old friend back in power, though they seem to have differed on the question whether the queen should be allowed to pass into retirement without trial for her husband's death, as they had differed all along on the question of tolerating her private religion.

  • From the Moray Firth it extends inland in a westerly and then south-westerly direction for a distance of 19 m.

  • 1436), governor of Berwick, burned it about 1417, and in 1562 the regent Moray had to suppress the lawless with a strong hand.

  • Pop. (1901), 4753 A branch of the Highland railway also gives access to Elgin, and there is a line to Buckie and Portessie on the Moray Firth.

  • Broad Street contains the ruins of Mar's Work, the palace built by John Erskine, 1st (or 6th) earl of Mar, about 1570, according to tradition, out of the stones of Cambuskenneth Abbey; the old town house, erected in 1701 instead of that in which John Hamilton, the last Roman Catholic archbishop of St Andrews, was hanged for alleged complicity in the murders of Darnley and the regent Moray; the town cross, restored in 1891, and the house which was, as a mural tablet says, the "nursery of James VI.

  • Duns castle, adjoining the town on the W., includes the Tower erected by Thomas Randolph, earl of Moray (d.

  • EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, a Scottish church (see above) in communion with, but historically distinct from, the Church of England, and composed of seven dioceses: Aberdeen and Orkney; Argyll and the Isles; Brechin; Edinburgh; Glasgow and Galloway; Moray, Ross and Caithness; and St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane.

  • The cathedral, built by Bishop Gilbert de Moravia (Moray) (d.

  • When he returned to England in 1664 he established intimate relations with Sir Robert Moray and with John Maitland, earl and afterwards first duke of Lauderdale, both of whom at that time advocated a tolerant policy towards the Scottish covenanters.

  • Burnet became a member of the Royal Society, of which Moray was the first president.

  • 887), appears to have aimed at the supreme command of all the Scandinavian settlements of the west, and in the course of a few years conquered the kingdom of the Isles, Sutherland, Ross, Moray and Argyll.

  • Kinneddar Castle in the parish of Drainie - in which Lossiemouth is situated - was a seat of the bishops of Moray, and Old Duffus Castle, 22 m.

  • Nearly midway between Lossiemouth and Elgin stand the massive ruins of the palace of Spynie, formerly a fortified residence of the bishops of Moray.

  • In addition, significant numbers of unidentified scoter species were recorded in the Firths of Moray, Tay and Forth.

  • Moray Firth 2.40 Exploration activity in the Moray Firth increased to seven wells (including two sidetracks) compared with five drilled in 1999.

  • The Moray Firth is a wide bay, with the port of Inverness at its southwesterly corner.

  • I'll attacked by moray eels, bitten by barracudas, stung by stingrays Not if you do n't attack them first.

  • Moray 's Biblical Garden is, without doubt, a veritable treasure trove of variety.

  • The Earl o Moray took ower the kingdom an gart peer Mary sign a paper tae say she wis nae langer in pooer.

  • Other recreational activities on the Moray Coast include yachting, cycling, windsurfing or just visiting the beach.

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