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morals

morals Sentence Examples

  • You were brought up with old-fashioned morals, so you simply didn't discuss things like that.

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  • No, your morals have nothing to do with my reluctance to introduce him.

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  • His ambitions were boundless and his morals lax.

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  • Waiting until after marriage is following my morals, not his.

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  • In morals it is evident that he was, according to his lights, a strictly honest and honourable man.

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  • The real difference is much more one of morals than of manners.

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  • And she had rubbed her morals in his face again – only this time she had used other people's opinion as a hammer to drive her morals home.

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  • His morals were of the laxest description, and he had as many illegitimate children as Henry VIII.

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  • Give up the antiquated morals or the relationship.

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  • Sometimes, but if it's against your morals, then no.

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  • The scribe could train the individual in morals and in manners; but the high priest was the ruler of the nation.

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  • The scribe could train the individual in morals and in manners; but the high priest was the ruler of the nation.

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  • Ficino differed from the majority of his contemporaries in this that, while he felt the influence of antiquity no less strongly than they did, he never lost his faith in Christianity, or contaminated his morals by contact with paganism.

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  • In 1842-1855 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church of Boston, and in 1855-1860 was preacher to the university and Plummer professor of Christian Morals at Harvard; he then left the Unitarian Church, with which his father had been connected as a clergyman at Hadley, resigned his professorship and became pastor of the newly established Emmanuel Church of Boston.

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  • And you wouldn't think of pushing your morals down someone else's throat.

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  • How could people go to church on Sunday with one set of morals and spend the rest of the week with another?

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  • That's what you do every time your morals are challenged.

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  • With the principles of private morals he really deals only so far as is necessary to enable the reader to appreciate the impulses which have to be controlled by law.

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  • Like Augustus, he attempted a reformation of morals and religion.

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  • Translated into the plainest English, the position is as follows: " Society can only be regenerated by the greater subordination of politics to morals, by the moralization of capital, by the renovation of the family, by a higher conception of marriage and so on.

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  • We're not the custodians of the morals of our guests, nor the taste of her lovers.

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  • I think it was a backward step when women started stooping to the morals of men.

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  • And here we are, acting like two heavies from the Church of Yesterday's Morals giving him a hard time.

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  • In fact a medley from both Basil and the Physiologus exists under the title of the Hexaeineron of Eustathius; some copies of the first bear as a title IIepi diuvnoXoyc'as, and in a Milan MS. the "morals" of the Physiologus are ascribed to Basil.

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  • The picture given of Jerusalemite morals is an appalling one.

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  • Its connexion with the two former parts is little more than nominal, Crusoe being simply made the mouth-piece of Defoe's sentiments on various points of morals and religion.

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  • Unrestrained conversation on the topics which most interested him - philosophy, politics, morals, religion - was at this time to be had in Holland with less danger and in greater abundance than in any other country in the world.

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  • He was by no means indifferent to private virtue, which indeed he judged the basis of all healthy national existence; but in the realm of politics he postponed morals to political expediency.

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  • Unrestrained conversation on the topics which most interested him - philosophy, politics, morals, religion - was at this time to be had in Holland with less danger and in greater abundance than in any other country in the world.

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  • If it meant abandoning the morals, maybe that was what she should do.

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  • The Provencal (c. 1250), published in Bartsch's Chrestomathie provenrale, omits the "morals," but is remarkable for its peculiarities of form.

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  • He was, however, blameless in morals and reverent in religion.

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  • Well, you know how you are about the morals.

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  • I've never given him any reason to think anything like that, and I don't think I have any reason to apologize for having morals.

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  • She couldn't swallow his ability to be a fierce beast shredding human-like creatures with no regard or morals.

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  • Long ago she had learned that many people didn't subscribe to her morals.

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  • So am I, but I'm not trashing your morals.

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  • I'm not trashing your morals.

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  • She was today with yesterdays morals.

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  • It was hard to believe the vampire had any sense of morals.

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  • The substance of the claim to infallibility made by the Roman Catholic Church is that the Church and the pope cannot err when solemnly enunciating, as binding on all the faithful, a decision on a question of faith or morals.

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  • as introducing a discipline of stern repression which made the innocent gaieties of life impossible, and produced a dull uniformity of straitlaced manners and hypocritical morals.

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  • Two regions become prominent in the working out of intuitionalism, if still more prominent in the widely differing philosophy of Kant - the regions of mathematics and of morals.

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  • The registry of the citizens, the suppression of litigation, the elevation of public morals, the care of minors, the retrenchment of public expenses, the limitation of gladiatorial games and shows, the care of roads, the restoration of senatorial privileges, the appointment of none but worthy magistrates, even the regulation of street traffic, these and numberless other duties so completely absorbed his attention that, in spite of indifferent health, they often kept him at severe labour from early morning till long after midnight.

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  • But most of Bentham's conclusions may be accepted without any formal profession of the utilitarian theory of morals.

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  • He was a disciplinarian, a scholar, a modest and moderate man of genuine piety and irreproachable morals.

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  • When he arrived near Loyola he would not go to the castle, but lived at the public hospice at Azpeitia, and began his usual life of teaching Christian doctrine and reforming morals.

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  • Her theologians had, to begin with, little turn for mystical speculation; their tendency was rather to reduce the gospel to a system of morals.

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  • In its action on the slave it marred in a great measure the happy effects of habitual industry by preventing the development of the sense of human dignity which lies at the foundation of morals.

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  • 05v050s), a term denoting an assembly of ecclesiastical officials legally convoked to discuss and decide points of faith, discipline and morals.

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  • 4 In 1700 he married Frances, daughter of Sir Henry Winchcombe, Bart., of Bucklebury, Berkshire, but matrimony while improving his fortune did not redeem his morals.

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  • Many concubines are spoken of, he had several illegitimate children, and the morals of his daughters were very loose.

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  • He admonished the pope, appointed the bishops, watched over the morals and work of the clergy, and took an active part in the deliberations of church synods; he founded bishoprics and monasteries, was lavish in his gifts to ecclesiastical foundations, and chose bishops and abbots for administrative work.

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  • and censorious criticism of persons, morals, manners, politics, literature, &c. which the word satire has ever since denoted.

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  • He did not believe in the divinity of Christ, but thought " his system of morals and his religion, as he left them to us, the best the world ever saw, or is like to see."

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  • Calvin's book furnished the Protestants not only with a compact and admirably written handbook of theology, vigorous and clear, but with a system of Church government and a code of morals.

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  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

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  • C. Carey, who attracts him both by his theory of value, which suggests an ultimate harmony of the interests of capitalist and labourer, and also by his doctrine of "national" political economy, which advocates protection on the ground that the morals and culture of a people are promoted by having its whole system of industry complete within its own borders.

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  • In Egypt, Amasis had the occupation of each individual annually registered, nominally to aid the official supervision of morals by discouraging disreputable means of subsistence; and this ordinance, according to Herodotus, was introduced by Solon into the Athenian scheme of administration, where it developed later into an electoral record.

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  • His travels, however, if they enriched his mind, relaxed his character, and he brought home easy morals as well as exquisite manners.

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  • But he early taught his son to read, and seems to have laid the foundation of the flighty sentimentalism in morals and politics which Rousseau afterwards illustrated with his genius.

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  • The academy of Dijon offered a prize for an essay on the effect of the progress of civilization on morals.

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  • They were the champions of State authority, order and public morals.

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  • Between these two were Questions in Political Economy, Politics, Morals, &c. (1823), and a Critical Dissertation on the Nature, Measure, and Causes of Value (1825), directed against the opinions of Ricardo and his school.

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  • (4) In the theory of morals, Bailey is an advocate of utilitarianism (though he objects to the term "utility" as being narrow and, to the unthinking, of sordid content), and works out with great skill the steps in the formation of the "complex" mental facts involved in the recognition of duty, obligation, right.

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  • In the patronage of learning and in the exercise of authority over the morals and education of youth Laud was in his proper sphere, many valuable reforms at Oxford being due to his activity, including the codification of the statutes, the statute by which public examinations were rendered obligatory for university degrees, and the ordinance for the election of proctors, the revival of the college system, of moral and religious discipline and order, and of academic dress.

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  • Through fear of drought the islanders removed to Tahiti in 1830, but disapproved of both the climate and the morals of this island, and returned to Pitcairn in 1831.

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  • Visited in 1873 and 1878 the colony was found in excellent order, but by the end of the century it was stated that intermarriage was bringing a deterioration of intellect, morals and energy, and that the islanders would probably drift into imbecility.

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  • In 1781 he was imprisoned for a short time in the Bicetre on an accusation of corrupting the morals of his pupils, his real offence being the writing of satirical verse.

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  • Walker, superintendent of the censuses of 1870 and 1880, the remarkable fact that such reduction coincided with a cause that was regarded as certain to quicken the increase of population, viz, the introduction of a vast body of fresh peasant blood from Europe, afforded proof that in this matter of population morals are far more potent than physical causes.

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  • Down then to their common definition of pleasure as activity the three treatises present a harmonious system of morals, consistently with one another, and with the general philosophy of Aristotle.

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  • I, 1 355 a 33-35); rhetoric, since its artificial evidences involve characters, passions and reasoning, is called a kind of offshoot of dialectic and morals, and a copy of dialectic, because neither is a science of anything definite, but both faculties (SvvItyas) of providing arguments (i.

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  • 2, 1356 a 33); and, since rhetorical arguments are examples and enthymemes analysed in the Analytics, rhetoric is finally regarded as a compound of analytic science and of morals, while it is like dialectical and sophistic arguments (i.

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  • were devoted to expounding his views, or rather his doctrines, on social and industrial problems, on education, morals and religion, wherein art becomes an incidental and instrumental means to a higher and more spiritual life.

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  • At the end of the year 1864 Ruskin delivered at Manchester a new series of lectures - not on art, but on reading, education, woman's work and social morals - the expansion of his earlier treatises on economic sophisms. This afterwards was included with a Dublin lecture of 1868 under the fantastic title of Sesame and Lilies (perhaps the most popular of his social essays), of which 44,000 copies were issued down to 1900.

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  • In the year 1866 he published a little book about girls, and written for girls, a mixture of morals, theology, economics and geology, under the title of Ethics of the Dust; and this was followed by a more important and popular work, The Crown of Wild Olive.

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  • His pantheism had an antinomian drift; for himself and his officials he claimed impeccability; but, whatever truth there may be in the charge that among his followers were those who interpreted "love" as licence, no such charge can be sustained against the morals of Niclaes and the other leaders of the sect.

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  • It would be difficult to conceive a disposition more remote from the morals of ordinary life, not to speak of Christian ideals, than that with 1 " Perpetual peace," he said, " is a dream, and it is not even a beautiful dream.

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  • His published works include (besides several volumes of verse) Homer and the Iliad (1866), maintaining the unity of the poems; Four Phases of Morals: Socrates, Aristotle, Christianity, Utilitarianism (1871); Essay on Self-Culture (1874); Horae Hellenicae (1874); The Language and Literature of the Scottish Highlands (1876); The Natural History of Atheism (1877); The Wise Men of Greece (1877); Lay Sermons (1881); Altavona (1882); The Wisdom of Goethe (1883); The Scottish Highlanders and the Land Laws (1885); Life of Burns (1888); Scottish Song (1889); Essays on Subjects of Moral and Social Interest (1890); Christianity and the Ideal of Humanity (1893).

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  • Lastly, when a theory of the world supposes a noumenal power, a resistent and persistent force, which results in an evolution, defined as an integration of matter and a dissipation of motion, which having resulted in inorganic nature and organic nature, further results without break in consciousness, reason, society and morals, then such a theory will be construed as materialistically as that of Haeckel by the reader, whatever the intention of the author.

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  • One of Price's most intimate friends was Dr Priestley, in spite of the fact that they took the most opposite views on morals and metaphysics.

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  • The Review of the Principal Questions in Morals (1757 3rd ed.

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  • 1 Here of course the author speaks of the papal supremacy and not of papal infallibility in matters of faith and morals - a doctrine which was formally declared a dogma of the Church only at the Vatican council in 1870.

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  • Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia, a man of the most abandoned morals, who did not change his mode of life when he ascended the throne as Pope Alexander VI.

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  • The Curia, once so corrupt, was completely metamorphosed, and once more became a rallying point for men of stainless character, so that it produced a profound impression even on non-Catholics; while the original methods of St Philip Neri had a profound influence on the reform of popular morals.

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  • The Romantic movement helped, with its idealization of a past but vaguely realized and imperfectly understood, and Chateaubriand heralded in the Catholic reaction with his Genie du Christianisme (1801) a brilliant if superficial attack on the encyclopaedists and their neo-Paganism, and a glorification of the Christian Church as supreme not only in the regions of faith and morals, but also in those of intellect and art.

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  • These two great rationalist movements, the critical and the philosophical, ultimately led to, or were accompanied by, the gradual reduction of religion to a system of morals based at the most on two or three fundamental religious principles.

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  • But it is the general opinion of historians that he had a high sense of his responsibilities and a strong love of justice; despite the looseness of his personal morals, he commanded the affection and respect of Gilbert Foliot and Hugh of Lincoln, the most upright of the English bishops.

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  • No doubt these romances, taken alone, might give as unfair an idea as modern French novels give of Parisian morals, but we have abundant other evidence for placing the moral standard of the age of chivalry definitely below that of educated society in the present day.

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  • Chivalry in short is in morals very much what feudalism is in law: each substitutes purely personal obligations devised in the interests of an exclusive class, for the more homely duties of an honest man and a good citizen " (Norman Conquest, v.

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  • The members were to be gentilshor y nznes de nom et d'armes et sans reproche, not knights of any other order, and vowed to join their sovereign in the defence of the Catholic faith, the protection of Holy Church, and the upholding of virtue and good morals.

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  • The third volume, containing book iii., Of Morals, was published in the following year.

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  • In the same year appeared the recast of the third book of the Treatise, called Inquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, of which he says that " of all his writings, philosophical, literary or historical, it is incomparably the best."

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  • Besides the qualifications required of a presentee by canon law, such as being of the canonical age, and in priest's orders before admission, sufficient learning and proper orthodoxy or morals, the Benefices Act requires that a year shall have elapsed since a transfer of the right of patronage, unless it can be shown that such transfer was not made in view of a probable vacancy; that the presentee has been a deacon for three years; and that he is not unfit for the discharge of his duties by reason of physical or mental infirmity or incapacity, grave pecuniary embarrassment, grave misconduct or neglect of duty in an ecclesiastical office, evil life, or conduct causing grave scandal concerning his moral character since his ordination, or being party to an illegal agreement with regard to the presentation; that notice of the presentation has been given to the parish of the benefice.

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  • He was a favourer of the troubadours, and in his ways of life he indulged in the laxity of Provençal morals to the fullest extent.

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  • He was also very devout, and his morals were irreproachable.

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  • Truth, morals and justice are subject to no evolution; but the collective man evolves better forms of knowledge and behaviour.

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  • It is purely ethical, independent alike of theology and ritual, and is the code of morals as laid down in the Buddhist sacred books for laymen.

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  • About a year after the representation of Irene, he began to publish a series of short essays on morals, manners and literature.

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  • But they did justice to the acuteness of his observations on morals and manners, to the constant precision and frequent brilliancy of his language, to the weighty and magnificent eloquence of many serious passages, and to the solemn yet pleasing humour of some of the lighter papers.

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  • But the peculiar way in which it enforces its morals in terms of the Platonic contrast between the spiritual and sensuous worlds, as archetype and temporal manifestation, suggests a special local type of theology which must be taken into account in fixing its provenance.

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  • In Rome, under the broadening influence of classical and ecclesiastical art, he learned to look at Christianity in its human and universalistic aspects, and began to develop his great idea, the inseparable relation of religion and morals.

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  • 1855), who endowed the Plummer Professorship of Christian Morals at Harvard.

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  • By the words "political justice" the author meant "the adoption of any principle of morality and truth into the practice of a community," and the work was therefore an inquiry into the principles of society, of government and of morals.

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  • The beauty and the lax morals of Daphne were celebrated all over the western world; and indeed Antioch as a whole shared in both these titles to fame.

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  • 18) as the fundamental law of religious morals, became in a certain sense a commonplace of Pharisaic scholasticism.

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  • A hideous tale is told by Buchanan against his private morals, but it is certainly inaccurate in detail, and is uncorroborated, while it appears to turn on a confusion between an alleged royal mistress, " the Daisy," and Margaret (Daisy), the king's own sister.

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  • It abounds in error as to matters of fact, contradicts human experience, reason and morals, and is one tissue of folly, deceit, enthusiasm, selfishness and crime.

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  • He insisted on a poetical interpretation of the Church's liturgy; and while strenuously maintaining her Divine commission to teach faith and morals, he regarded the Church as in other respects a learner; and he advocated a policy of conciliation with the world, and an alliance with the best tendencies of contemporary thought.

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  • No writer who was acquainted with Hebrew history could suppose that there was any relation between the national morality and the abundance of prophetic visions; the period in which such visions were most numerous is precisely that in which the corruption of morals is painted by the prophets in the darkest colours and, on the other hand, the people are said (in Pss.

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  • The temptations of Alexandria and the loose morals of the time (latter part of the 3rd century) are illustrated by the story told by Josephus (Ant.

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  • This collection, alphabetically arranged, comprised annotations on classical authors, passages from newspapers, treatises on morals and mathematics from the standard works of the period.

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  • In his lectures on religion he dealt with Christianity, as in his philosophy of morals he had regarded the state.

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  • Luther believed that the sales were injurious to the morals of the townsmen; he had heard reports of Tetzel's sermons; he had become wrathful on reading the letter of recommendation of the archbishop; and friends had urged him to interfere.

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  • His principal works are: The Coming Revolution (1880); The Co-operative Commonwealth in its Outlines, An Exposition of Modern Socialism (1884); Ca Ira, or Danton in the French Revolution (1888), a rehabilitation of Danton; Our Destiny, The Influence of Socialism on Morals and Religion (1890); and The New Economy (1898) .

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  • The criticism is even to-day current with the uninformed that Jefferson took his manners, 4 morals, "irreligion" and political philosophy from his French residence; and it cannot be wholly ignored.

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  • 4 Patrick Henry humorously declaimed before a popular audience that Jefferson, who favoured French wine and cookery, had" abjured his native victuals."supports, that Jefferson's morals were pure.

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  • Amongst the many merits of that admirable scholar, it is one of the greatest that he has laid " the fiend called die Sophistik," that is to say, the theory that sophistry was an organized conspiracy against law and morals.

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  • The inspectors or sixth class of Megasthenes have been identified with Asoka's Mahamatra and his Buddhist inspectors of morals.

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  • The annexation of the province of Oudh was justifiable on the ground of morals, though not on that of policy.

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  • His morals were as loose as those of his great rival Mirabeau, but he was famed in Paris for his wit and gaiety.

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  • If in his youth he had been prone to gambling, and before his marriage with Theodora had been somewhat lax in his morals, when he became a man he put away childish things; his married life was a shining example to his people and he was abstemious both in food and drink, holding that "excess in either was an incentive to the worst of crimes."

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  • Thus during the session 1778-177 9, in addition to his mathematical work, he delivered an original course of lectures on morals.

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  • - In the middle ages Cicero was chiefly known as a writer on rhetoric and morals.

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  • To say, however, that Clarke simply confused mathematics and morals by justifying the moral criterion on a mathematical basis is a mistake.

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  • It was laid down in these that over and above safe custody it was essential to preserve health, improve morals, and enforce hard labour on all prisoners sentenced to it.

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  • The truly devout Moslems on the other hand were scandalized by the growing luxury which relaxed the austere morals of the first Moslems, and this also was imputed to Othman.

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  • In Greece he became more and more reflective and conscious of himself, of his body and soul, his manners and morals, his mental operations and especially his reason.

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  • The reality of mathematics, equally with that of the ideals of morals drawn from within, does not extend to the " ectypes " of the outer world.

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  • Finally he accepted the decrees against him and retracted "all that he said contrary to the faith, morals and discipline of the Church."

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  • (I) In the matter of jurisdiction: "If any one say that the Roman Pontiff has an office merely of inspection and direction, and not the full and supreme power of jurisdiction over the whole Church, not only in matters of faith and morals, but also as regards discipline and the government of the Church scattered throughout the whole world; or that he has only the principal portion and not the plenitude of that supreme power; or that his power is not ordinary and immediate, as much over each and every church as over each and every pastor and believer: anathema sit."

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  • (2) In the matter of infallibility: "We decree that when the Roman Pontiff speaks ex cathedra, that is to say, when, in his capacity as Pastor and Doctor of all Christians he defines, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, a certain doctrine concerning faith or morals to be held by the whole Church, he enjoys, by the divine assistance promised to him in the Blessed Peter, that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer has thought good to endow His Church in order to define its doctrine in matters of faith and morals; consequently, these definitions of the Roman Pontiff are irreformable in themselves and not in consequence of the consent of the Church."

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  • For Protestants the Bible only now becomes the infallible, inspired authority in faith and morals.

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  • During his reign, acting, as he did in most things, under the influence of his mother, he did much to improve the morals and condition of the people.

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  • The new denominations vigorously attacked the methods and immunities of the established church, whose clergy had grown lukewarm in zeal and lax in morals.

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  • One can already discern a movement in various quarters towards a recognition of impersonal theism, and towards fixing the teaching of the philosophical schools upon some definitely authorized system of faith and morals, which may satisfy a rising ethical standard, and may thus permanently embody that tendency to substitute spiritual devotion for external forms and caste rules which is the characteristic of the sects that have from time to time dissented from orthodox Brahminism."

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  • Of this authority the pope is regarded as the centre and source, so far as the interpretation of the Divine Will to the world is concerned in matters of faith and morals.

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  • To pretend to an independent judgment in questions of faith or morals is for a Roman Catholic to commit treason against his Church; and even in the wide sphere of questions lying beyond the dogmas defined as de fide a too curious discussion is discouraged, if not condemned.

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  • On the other hand, these " Escobarine morals " by no means passed unchallenged; ever since the foundation of the society the aims and methods of the Jesuits had called forth lively opposition in many parts of Catholic Europe, and not least in Loyola's native land of Spain.

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  • In art and learning, morals and government, the old walls came crashing down; in the general bankruptcy of authority men were forced to depend on themselves.

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  • To what extent the accusations of profligate morals brought against these reforming sectarians were justified remains doubtful; and the same uncertainty rests upon the alleged iniquities of the Templars.

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  • In later ages Elisha (alaer " the other," as he was named) was regarded as the type of a heretic whose pride of intellect betrayed him into infidelity to law and morals.

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  • In the domain of morals, dualism postulates the separate existence of Good and Evil, as principles of existence.

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  • Before we proceed to the next period of utilitarian theory we ought to go back to notice Hume's Inquiry concerning the Principles of Morals (pub.

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  • These opinions are developed in his Principles of Morals and Legislation (pub.

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  • in 1863) sums up in brief and perfect form the essential principles of his doctrine, and is a little masterpiece worthy to be set beside Kant's Metaphysic of Morals as an authoritative statement of one of the two main forms of modern ethical speculation.

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  • Hobhouse's Morals in Evolution and Professor Westermarck's Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas (both published in 1906) deal with the matter from the side of anthropology.

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  • His success as a dramatist had by this time gone some way to disabuse hostile critics of the suspicions as regards his personal character which had been excited by the apparent looseness of morals which since his Oxford days it had always pleased him to affect; but to the consternation of his friends, who had ceased to credit the existence of any real moral obliquity, in 1895 came fatal revelations as the result of his bringing a libel action against the marquis of Queensberry; and at the Old Bailey, in May, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour for offences under the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

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  • In the sphere of morals, the ultimate and only authority which the mind can recognize is the law which emerges from the pure moral consciousness.

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  • The great judgment of Osiris formulates with the utmost precision the alliance between morals and religion.

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  • (London, 1906); Hobhouse, Morals in Evolution (2 vols., London, 1906).

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  • The slightest tincture of red or black blood bars entry into any of the old families who are descendants of Spaniards from the Provincias Vascongadas or those bordering the Bay of Biscay, where the morals are perhaps the purest (as regards the intercourse of the sexes) of any in Europe, and where for a girl, even of the poorest class, to have a child before marriage is the rarest thing possible.

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  • The following observation is therefore of interest: At Guayaquil for a lady of good family - married or unmarried - to be of loose morals is so uncommon, that when it does happen it is felt as a calamity by the whole community.

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  • The new bishop showed much eagerness to reform the manners and morals of his clergy, and also to introduce greater order and reverence into the services of the church.

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  • There is, first of all, the service of the Surete-- in other words, of public safety - the detective department, employed entirely in the pursuit and capture of criminals; next comes the police, now amalgamated with the Surete, that watches over the morals of the capital and possesses arbitrary powers under the existing laws of France; then there is the brigade de garnis, the police charged with the supervision of all lodging-houses, from the commonest "sleep-sellers'" shop, as it is called, to the grandest hotels.

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  • It is clear, therefore, that from this point of view the sum of practical morals might be given in Butler's own words - "that mankind is a community, that we all stand in a relation to each other, that there is a public end and interest of society, which each particular is obliged to promote."

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  • Two lines in the poem suggest that the satirist, who inveighed with just severity against the worst corruptions of Roman morals, was not too rigid a censor of the morals of his friend.

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  • His services to morals do not consist in any positive contributions to the notions of active duty, but in the strength with which he has realized and expressed the restraining influence of the old Roman and Italian ideal of character, and also of that religious conscience which was becoming a new power in the world.

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  • In taking this immense stride and identifying the Cynic " reason," which is a law for man, with the " reason " which is the law of the universe, Zeno has been compared with Plato, who similarly extended the Socratic " general notion " from the region of morals - of justice, temperance, virtue - to embrace all objects of all thought, the verity of all things that are.

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  • Although there was in the end a reaction from this extreme, yet it is impossible to mistake the bearing of all this upon a practical system of morals.

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  • The Oriental magnificence of these embassies, notably that of 1514, and the fact that a king of Portugal dared openly to criticize the morals of the Vatican, temporarily enhanced the prestige of the monarchy.

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  • Beginning with a chapter on the means of locomotion in the 10th century, it went on to discuss war, the conflict of languages, faith, morals, the elimination of the unfit, and other general topics, with remarkable acuteness and constructive ability.

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  • Fleury, Rabelais is a sober reformer, an apostle of earnest work, of sound education, of rational if not dogmatic religion, who wraps up his morals in a farcical envelope partly to make them go down with the vulgar and partly to shield himself from the consequences of his reforming zeal.

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  • She is much praised by historians for her modesty and prudence, and is said to have brought about by her example a considerable improvement in the morals of her nation.

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  • In ethics, again, the revolt against absolute standards limits us to the relative, and morals are investigated on the basis of history, as largely conditioned by economic environment and the growth of intellectual freedom.

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  • There is a general looseness of morals: marriage is a very slight tie, which can be dissolved at any time by either husband or wife.

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  • His thought in this direction, wherein he anticipated something of modern speculation, is the more remarkable because his scholastic successors accomplished least in the field of morals, hardly venturing to bring the principles and rules of conduct under pure philosophical discussion, even after the great ethical inquiries of Aristotle became fully known to them.

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  • In the 4th century their place was taken by ten sophronistae (one for each tribe), who, as the name implies, took special interest in the morals of those under them, their military training being in the hands of experts, of whom the chief were the hoplomachus, the acontistes, the toxotes and the aphetes (instructors respectively in the use of arms, javelin-throwing, archery and the use of artillery engines).

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  • History was to him, as it had been to Cicero, a school for morals; but he had perhaps a juster conception than Ranke of the breadth and scope of the historian's field.

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  • The religious profession of the Colombian people is Roman Catholic, and is recognized as such by the constitution, but the exercise is permitted of any other form of worship which is not contrary to Christian morals or to the law.

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  • On the one hand, it is opposed as the citadel of sacerdotal authority and as a peril to morals.

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  • This great prelate was an ecclesiastical reformera leader in a movement for the general purification of morals, and especially for the repressing of simony and evil-living among the clergy a great builder of churches, and a stringent enforcer of the rules of the monastic life.

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  • If the Commons wished to be rid of him because he upheld the prerogative, the kIng was equally desirous to be rid of him because he looked coldly on the looseness of the royal morals.

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  • a widely-spread relaxation of morals, and also, as far as the educated class was concerned, an eagerness for the discussion of all social and religious problems. The fierce excitement of political life had quickened thought, and the most anciently received doctrines were held of little, vorth until they were brought to the test of reason.

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  • He founded in 1871 a society for the reclamation of discharged prisoners, and presided over various bodies formed to secure improvement of the public morals.

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  • The influence of literature on Burke lay partly in the direction of emancipation from the mechanical formulae of practical politics; partly in the association which it engendered, in a powerful understanding like his, between politics and the moral forces of the world, and between political maxims and the old and great sentences of morals; partly in drawing him, even when resting his case on prudence and expediency, to appeal to the widest and highest sympathies; partly, and more than all, in opening his thoughts to the many conditions, possibilities and "varieties of untried being," in human character and situation, and so giving an incomparable flexibility to his methods of political approach.

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  • Between 1835 and 1861 Whewell was the author of various works on the philosophy of morals and politics, the chief of which, Elements of Morality, including Polity, was published in 1845.

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  • When is the theory op- pope ruling faith and morals from his throne?

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  • He preserved the habits of a simple peasant, and his administration was characterized in part by the peasant's shrewd common sense, but yet more by a pious solicitude for the minutest details of faith and morals.

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  • But from these unscientific utterances to a philosophy of morals was a long process.

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  • But Bacon's great task of reforming scientific method was one which, as he conceived it, left morals on one side; he never made any serious effort to reduce his ethical views to a coherent system, methodically reasoned on an independent basis.

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  • He argues that Hobbes's atomic materialism involves the conception of an objective physical world, the object not of passive sense that varies from man to man, but of the active intellect that is the same in all; there is therefore, he urges, an inconsistency in refusing to admit a similar exercise of intellect in morals, and an objective world of right and wrong, which the mind by its normal activity clearly apprehends as such.

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  • It is difficult to make these views quite consistent; but at any rate Hume emphatically maintains that " reason is no motive to action," except so far as it " directs the impulse received from appetite or inclination "; 2 Hume's ethical view was finally stated in his Inquiry into the Principles of Morals (1751), which is at once more popular and more purely utilitarian than his earlier work.

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  • Price's Review of the Chief Questions and Difficulties of Morals was published in 1757, two years before Adam Smith's treatise.

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  • What has not been adequately realized is that the metaphysical basis of his system of ethics - the argument, for example, contained in the introduction to the Prolegomena - is unfairly treated if divorced from his treatment of morals as a whole, and that it can be justly estimated only if interpreted as much as the conclusion as the starting-point of moral theory.

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  • But although Green's loyalty to the primary facts of the moral consciousness prevented him from constructing a rationalistic system of morals based solely upon the conclusions of metaphysics, it was perhaps inevitable that the revival of interest in metaphysics so prominent in his own speculations should lead to a more daring criticism of ethical first principles in other writers.

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  • Appearance and Reality was not primarily concerned with morals, yet it inevitably led to certain conclusions affecting conduct, and it was no very long time before these conclusions were elaborated in detail.

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  • Alexander (Moral Order and Progress, 1899), together with the metaphysical theories of morals of which T.

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  • Hobhouse's Morals in Evolution or Professor E.

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  • Lecky, History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne (1869, many editions); works of Ed.

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  • Stephen, Science of Ethics (1882); P. Janet, The Theory of Morals (Eng.

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  • Courtney, Constructive Ethics (1886); Wilson and Fowler, Principles of Morals (1886); H.

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  • Bixby, The Crisis in Morals: An Examination of Rational Ethics (1891); J.

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  • France there had not been as yet any overt revolt against the Church of Rome, but multitudes were in sympathy with any attempt to improve the church by education, by purer morals, by better preaching and by a return to the primitive and uncorrupted faith.

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  • Strictly speaking, the antitheses of good and bad and of free and necessary have no place in an ethical system, but simply in history, which is obliged to compare the actual with the ideal, but as far as the terms "good" and "bad" are used in morals they express the rule or the contrary of reason, or the harmony or the contrary of the particular and the general.

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  • The transition period which follows the loosening of a people's faith in its old religion and before the authority of the new is universally accepted is always a time of confusion and relaxation of morals.

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  • The morals of the clergy were no better than in other countries, and we have evidence of many scandalous irregularities.

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  • As regards ethics, Baader rejects the Kantian or any autonomic system of morals.

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  • Among his very numerous works two poems entitle him to a distinguished place in the Latin literature of the middle ages; one of these, the De planctu naturae, is an ingenious satire on the vices of humanity; the other, the Anticlaudianus, a treatise on morals, the form of which recalls the pamphlet of Claudian against Rufinus, is agreeably versified and relatively pure in its latinity.

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  • Only on the assumption that the book of Genesis is a composite work is it possible to explain the duplication of events, the varying use of the divine names Yahweh and Elohim, the linguistic and stylistic differences, the internal intricacies of the subject matter, and the differing standpoints as regards tradition, chronology, morals and religion.'

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  • A lover of peace through sheer cowardicer and as depraved in his morals as Chilperic, Guntram had played a vacillating and purely self-interested part in the family tragedy.

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  • This youth of nineteen, the ill-omened son of a madman and of a Bavarian of loose morals, was a symbol of France, 7~22 timorous and mistrustful.

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  • Married to a woman of loose morals, and afterwards to a devout Italian, he was gross and vulgar in his appetites and pleasures.

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  • it had to compensate for many affronts to public and private morals, the financial necessity of augmenting the free donations of the clergy, and the political necessity of relying upon that body in his conflicts with the pope, led the king between 1661 and 1685 to embark upon a double campaign of arbitrary proceedings with the object of nullifying the edict, conversions being procured either by force or by bribery.

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  • Pure and austere, it enjoined the strictest morals in the midst of corruption, and the most dignified self-respect in face of idolatrous servility.

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  • In reality, he was a prince of wide knowledge and culture, knowing several languages and austere in morals; and although he cannot be acquitted of occasional harshness, he had the secret of winning the hearts of his subjects, who never refused him their support in times of difficulty.

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  • He undertook without delay the reformation of morals and clerical discipline throughout his vast diocese.

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  • APOSTOLICI,' 'APOSTOLIC BRETHREN, or APOSTLES, the names given to various Christian heretics, whose common doctrinal feature was an ascetic rigidity of morals, which made them reject property and marriage.

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  • In the long reign that followed he showed no great ability or energy, and a looseness of morals which embroiled him with the Church.

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  • In religious matters Calvinists and Lutherans were placed upon an equality, but the elector was unable to impress his own spirit of tolerance upon the clergy, who were occupied with ecclesiastical squabbles while the state of education and of public morals left much to be desired.

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  • The prize essay On the Principles of Natural Theology and Morals brings forward the same fundamental opposition - though in a special form.

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  • Sometimes, but if it's against your morals, then no.

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  • Well, you know how you are about the morals.

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  • I've never given him any reason to think anything like that, and I don't think I have any reason to apologize for having morals.

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  • No, your morals have nothing to do with my reluctance to introduce him.

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  • She couldn't swallow his ability to be a fierce beast shredding human-like creatures with no regard or morals.

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  • We're not the custodians of the morals of our guests, nor the taste of her lovers.

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  • I think it was a backward step when women started stooping to the morals of men.

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  • And here we are, acting like two heavies from the Church of Yesterday's Morals giving him a hard time.

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  • Waiting until after marriage is following my morals, not his.

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  • And you wouldn't think of pushing your morals down someone else's throat.

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  • If I have offended you or anyone with my morals, I'm sorry.

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  • How could people go to church on Sunday with one set of morals and spend the rest of the week with another?

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  • Long ago she had learned that many people didn't subscribe to her morals.

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  • That's what you do every time your morals are challenged.

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  • So am I, but I'm not trashing your morals.

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  • I'm not trashing your morals.

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  • Give up the antiquated morals or the relationship.

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  • If it meant abandoning the morals, maybe that was what she should do.

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  • And she had rubbed her morals in his face again – only this time she had used other people's opinion as a hammer to drive her morals home.

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  • You were brought up with old-fashioned morals, so you simply didn't discuss things like that.

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  • What he wanted was a woman with yesterday's morals and today's savvy – someone both passionate and honorable.

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  • She was today with yesterdays morals.

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  • It was hard to believe the vampire had any sense of morals.

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  • I settled for dry cornflakes, dry toast and despite dietary morals, cake.

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  • Be a small glimmer of morals in a world gone mad.

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  • It explains how a priest with low morals became a demon huntsman.

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  • lax morals and liberal politics.

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  • laxity of morals at these balls incredible.

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  • metaphysic of morals, in Paton H The moral law.

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  • morals of the tale have as much relevance now as they did in the 1600's when Cervantes was writing the novel.

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  • First Corinthians 15:33 says, " Evil company corrupts good morals.

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  • In 397 he became Bishop of Constantinople and really got stuck into trying to reform the morals of both clergy and people.

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  • Can you be true to yourself, while adhering to the strict Islamic morals the country prides itself on?

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  • When it was originally published, six of the poems were banned as being offensive to public morals and Baudelaire received a fine.

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  • You read 2 Peter 2 and you'll see how bad theology and bad morals go together.

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  • Firstly, everything, from the protocol for catching a bus, to food, to personal morals or social requirements are completely different.

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  • much in the vein of the morals that " decent people " might support.

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  • Yet at the very moment when they should be decoupled, sanctimonious nitwits are calling for a return to morals based on superstition.

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  • sanctimonious nitwits are calling for a return to morals based on superstition.

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  • self-appointed guardian of village morals.

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  • Rose's text repeats almost wholesale the original text, omitting only the morals which Perrault had appended.

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  • The substance of the claim to infallibility made by the Roman Catholic Church is that the Church and the pope cannot err when solemnly enunciating, as binding on all the faithful, a decision on a question of faith or morals.

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  • supreme apostolic authority, he lays down that a certain doctrine concerning faith or morals is binding, upon the universal Church, - possesses, by the Divine assistance which was promised to him in the person of the blessed Saint Peter, that same infallibility with which the Divine Redeemer thought fit to endow His Church, to define its doctrine with regard to faith and morals; and, consequently, that these definitions of the Roman Pontiff are irreformable in themselves, and not in consequence.

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  • Among other subjects, he wrote on the School of Hierotheus, on Romish falsifications of the Greek Fathers, on Leo XIII., on Liberal Ultramontanism, on the Papal Teaching in regard to Morals, on Vincentius of Lerins and he carried on a controversy with Professor Willibald Beyschlag, of the German Evangelical Church, on the respective merits of Protestantism and Old Catholicism regarded as a basis for teaching the Christian faith.

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  • His ambitions were boundless and his morals lax.

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  • The picture given of Jerusalemite morals is an appalling one.

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  • The book on Morals might, however, have been written but for the heavy burden of the vice-chancellorship, which he was induced to accept in 1882, by the hope, only partially fulfilled, of securing many improvements for the university.

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  • as introducing a discipline of stern repression which made the innocent gaieties of life impossible, and produced a dull uniformity of straitlaced manners and hypocritical morals.

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  • The state of morals is mirrored in the canons denouncing prevalent vices.

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  • Hitherto he had been scrupulously impartial in raising the best men to the judicial bench, including the illustrious Matthew Hale, but he now appointed compliant judges, and, alluding to Magna Carta in terms impossible to transcribe for modern readers, declared that" it should not control his actions which he knew were for the safety of the Commonwealth."The country was now divided into twelve districts each governed by a major-general, to whom was entrusted the duty of maintaining order, stamping out disaffection and plots, and executing the laws relating to public morals.

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  • The levy of ship money and customs by Charles sinks into insignificance beside Cromwell's wholesale taxation by ordinances; the inquisitional methods of the major-generals and the unjust and exceptional taxation of royalists outdid the scandals of the extra-legal courts of the Stuarts; the shipment of British subjects by Cromwell as slaves to Barbados has no parallel in the Stuart administration; while the prying into morals, the encouragement of informers, the attempt to make the people religious by force, were the counterpart of the Laudian system, and Cromwell's drastic treatment of the Irish exceeded anything dreamed of by Strafford.

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  • of European Morals, pp. 5 8, 59.

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  • Two regions become prominent in the working out of intuitionalism, if still more prominent in the widely differing philosophy of Kant - the regions of mathematics and of morals.

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  • But analytic thinking is victorious in morals, where the test of formal self-consistency distinguishes virtue from vice.

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  • The registry of the citizens, the suppression of litigation, the elevation of public morals, the care of minors, the retrenchment of public expenses, the limitation of gladiatorial games and shows, the care of roads, the restoration of senatorial privileges, the appointment of none but worthy magistrates, even the regulation of street traffic, these and numberless other duties so completely absorbed his attention that, in spite of indifferent health, they often kept him at severe labour from early morning till long after midnight.

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  • They laid great stress on purity of morals; and convinced that the Utraquist Church was morally corrupt, they founded a number of independent societies, first at Kremsir and Meseritsch in Moravia, and then at Wilenow, Diwischau and Chelcic in Bohemia.

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  • In fact a medley from both Basil and the Physiologus exists under the title of the Hexaeineron of Eustathius; some copies of the first bear as a title IIepi diuvnoXoyc'as, and in a Milan MS. the "morals" of the Physiologus are ascribed to Basil.

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  • Land's Anecdota syriaca; thirty-two chapters with the "morals" left out in a very late Vatican copy, published by Tychsen; and about the same number in a late MS. of the British Museum (Add.

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  • The Provencal (c. 1250), published in Bartsch's Chrestomathie provenrale, omits the "morals," but is remarkable for its peculiarities of form.

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  • His morals were of the laxest description, and he had as many illegitimate children as Henry VIII.

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  • in the hands of the crown; and the personal example of lavish ostentation and loose morals which the cardinal-archbishop exhibited cannot have been without influence on the king, who grew to maturity under Wolsey's guidance.

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  • The great work, upon which he had been engaged for many years, the Principles of Morals and Legislation, was published in 1789.

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  • But most of Bentham's conclusions may be accepted without any formal profession of the utilitarian theory of morals.

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  • With the principles of private morals he really deals only so far as is necessary to enable the reader to appreciate the impulses which have to be controlled by law.

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  • Like Augustus, he attempted a reformation of morals and religion.

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  • He was a disciplinarian, a scholar, a modest and moderate man of genuine piety and irreproachable morals.

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  • He was, however, blameless in morals and reverent in religion.

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  • As a committee of public safety it dealt with all cases of conspiracy; for example, it tried the Doge Marino Falier and the General Carmagnola; on the same ground all cases affecting public morals came within its extensive criminal jurisdiction.

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  • When he arrived near Loyola he would not go to the castle, but lived at the public hospice at Azpeitia, and began his usual life of teaching Christian doctrine and reforming morals.

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  • His manners were agreeable and his appearance fascinating, but, like many other prelates of the day, his morals were far from blameless, his two dominant passions being greed of gold and love of women, and he was devotedly fond of the children whom his mistresses bore him.

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  • Her theologians had, to begin with, little turn for mystical speculation; their tendency was rather to reduce the gospel to a system of morals.

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  • In its action on the slave it marred in a great measure the happy effects of habitual industry by preventing the development of the sense of human dignity which lies at the foundation of morals.

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  • Ficino differed from the majority of his contemporaries in this that, while he felt the influence of antiquity no less strongly than they did, he never lost his faith in Christianity, or contaminated his morals by contact with paganism.

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  • They retain the old high standard of morals, and in some instances go beyond it, as in the injunctions to be kind to enemies (Prov.

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  • The native Thracians were inferior in morals, allowing their girls complete licence till marriage.

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  • His revolt against Christian faith and morals turns him into a proudly atheistic "free-thinker," and preacher of a new "master" morality, which transposes the current valuations, deposes the "Christian virtues," and incites the "over-man" ruthlessly to trample under foot the servile herd of the weak, degenerate and poor in spirit.

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  • This may be so extended as to include a discourse in favour of pure morality, though, even in that case, the morals are founded on Christian doctrine, and even the sermon which the fox preaches in La Fontaine's Fables is a parody of a Christian discourse.

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  • Maury describes all the divisions of which a good sermon should consist - an exordium, a proposition, a section, a confirmation in two or more points, a peroration; and he holds that a sermon on morals should have but two points, while one on the Passion must have three.

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  • He also wrote a campaign biography of William Henry Harrison (1839); Theory of Morals (1844); and Theory of Politics (1853), as well as Lives of Atrocious Judges (1856), compiled from Lord Campbell's two works.

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  • After that time but little is heard of it, though Petronius mentions the corrupt morals of its inhabitants; but it continues to be mentioned down to the Gothic wars.

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  • Though still comparatively young, Gerhard had already come to be regarded as the greatest living theologian of Protestant Germany; in the numerous "disputations" of the period he was always protagonist, while on all public and domestic questions touching on religion or morals his advice was widely sought.

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  • 3, 7) divides these functions under three heads: - (1) Care of the city: the repair and preservation of temples, sewers and aqueducts; street cleansing and paving; regulations regarding traffic, dangerous animals and dilapidated buildings; precautions against fire; superintendence of baths and taverns; enforcement of sumptuary laws; punishment of gamblers and usurers; the care of public morals generally, including the prevention of foreign superstitions.

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  • By this principle Ferguson endeavours to reconcile all moral systems. With Hobbes and Hume he admits the power of self-interest or utility, and makes it enter into morals as the law of self-preservation.

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  • 05v050s), a term denoting an assembly of ecclesiastical officials legally convoked to discuss and decide points of faith, discipline and morals.

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  • His language has the purity of the desert, his morals are those of the city, his universalism is that of the man of the world.

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  • Translated into the plainest English, the position is as follows: " Society can only be regenerated by the greater subordination of politics to morals, by the moralization of capital, by the renovation of the family, by a higher conception of marriage and so on.

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  • Elected pope on the 29th of May 1724, he attempted to reform clerical morals; but neither the decrees of the Latin council (1725) nor his personal precepts had much effect.

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  • Polygamy is not practised; early marriages are rare, and their morals are generally better than those of their Christian masters.

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  • While professor of morals at Leipzig, Otto Mencke planned the Acta eruditorum, with a view to make known, by means of analyses, extracts and reviews, the new works produced throughout Europe.

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  • He did not confine himself to news, but wrote something very like finished essays on questions of policy, trade and domestic concerns; he also introduced a "Scandal Club," in which minor questions of manners and morals were treated in a way which undoubtedly suggested the Tatlers and Spectators which followed.

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  • Its connexion with the two former parts is little more than nominal, Crusoe being simply made the mouth-piece of Defoe's sentiments on various points of morals and religion.

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  • The real difference is much more one of morals than of manners.

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  • In morals it is evident that he was, according to his lights, a strictly honest and honourable man.

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  • 4 In 1700 he married Frances, daughter of Sir Henry Winchcombe, Bart., of Bucklebury, Berkshire, but matrimony while improving his fortune did not redeem his morals.

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  • For about thirty years the most important event in Roman literature was the production of the satires of Lucilius, in which the politics, morals, society and letters of the time were criticized with the utmost freedom and pungency, and his own personality was brought immediately and familiarly before his contemporaries.

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  • And thus, within the large congregations where there was so much that was open to censure in doctrine and constitution and morals, conventicles were formed in order that Christians might prepare themselves by strict discipline for the day of the Lord.

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  • He was by no means indifferent to private virtue, which indeed he judged the basis of all healthy national existence; but in the realm of politics he postponed morals to political expediency.

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  • In 1842-1855 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church of Boston, and in 1855-1860 was preacher to the university and Plummer professor of Christian Morals at Harvard; he then left the Unitarian Church, with which his father had been connected as a clergyman at Hadley, resigned his professorship and became pastor of the newly established Emmanuel Church of Boston.

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  • Many concubines are spoken of, he had several illegitimate children, and the morals of his daughters were very loose.

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  • He admonished the pope, appointed the bishops, watched over the morals and work of the clergy, and took an active part in the deliberations of church synods; he founded bishoprics and monasteries, was lavish in his gifts to ecclesiastical foundations, and chose bishops and abbots for administrative work.

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  • and censorious criticism of persons, morals, manners, politics, literature, &c. which the word satire has ever since denoted.

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  • He did not believe in the divinity of Christ, but thought " his system of morals and his religion, as he left them to us, the best the world ever saw, or is like to see."

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  • He was by no means prone to overmuch introspection, his great interest in the conduct of others being shown in the wise maxims of Poor Richard, which were possibly too utilitarian but were wonderfully successful in instructing American morals.

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  • Calvin's book furnished the Protestants not only with a compact and admirably written handbook of theology, vigorous and clear, but with a system of Church government and a code of morals.

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  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

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  • Among these functions were probably jurisdiction in cases of impiety, the supervision of magistrates and the censorship of the morals of citizens, the inhibition of illegal and unconstitutional resolutions in the Five Hundred and the Ecclesia, the examination into the fitness of candidates for office, and the collection of rents from the sacred property (cf.

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  • C. Carey, who attracts him both by his theory of value, which suggests an ultimate harmony of the interests of capitalist and labourer, and also by his doctrine of "national" political economy, which advocates protection on the ground that the morals and culture of a people are promoted by having its whole system of industry complete within its own borders.

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  • In Egypt, Amasis had the occupation of each individual annually registered, nominally to aid the official supervision of morals by discouraging disreputable means of subsistence; and this ordinance, according to Herodotus, was introduced by Solon into the Athenian scheme of administration, where it developed later into an electoral record.

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  • His travels, however, if they enriched his mind, relaxed his character, and he brought home easy morals as well as exquisite manners.

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  • In 1865 Dellinger wrote: " The Ultramontane view can be summarized in a single, concise, and luminous proposition; but out of this proposition are evolved a doctrine and a view that embrace not merely religion and the Church, but science and the state, politics, morals and the social order - in a word, the whole intellectual life of men and nations.

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  • But he early taught his son to read, and seems to have laid the foundation of the flighty sentimentalism in morals and politics which Rousseau afterwards illustrated with his genius.

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  • The academy of Dijon offered a prize for an essay on the effect of the progress of civilization on morals.

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  • They were the champions of State authority, order and public morals.

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  • Between these two were Questions in Political Economy, Politics, Morals, &c. (1823), and a Critical Dissertation on the Nature, Measure, and Causes of Value (1825), directed against the opinions of Ricardo and his school.

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  • (4) In the theory of morals, Bailey is an advocate of utilitarianism (though he objects to the term "utility" as being narrow and, to the unthinking, of sordid content), and works out with great skill the steps in the formation of the "complex" mental facts involved in the recognition of duty, obligation, right.

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  • In the patronage of learning and in the exercise of authority over the morals and education of youth Laud was in his proper sphere, many valuable reforms at Oxford being due to his activity, including the codification of the statutes, the statute by which public examinations were rendered obligatory for university degrees, and the ordinance for the election of proctors, the revival of the college system, of moral and religious discipline and order, and of academic dress.

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  • Through fear of drought the islanders removed to Tahiti in 1830, but disapproved of both the climate and the morals of this island, and returned to Pitcairn in 1831.

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  • Visited in 1873 and 1878 the colony was found in excellent order, but by the end of the century it was stated that intermarriage was bringing a deterioration of intellect, morals and energy, and that the islanders would probably drift into imbecility.

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  • Works: - Neue Apologie des Socrates, &c. (2 vols., 1772-1778); Allgemeine Theorie des Denkens and Empfindens, &c. (Berlin, 1776), an essay which gained the prize assigned by the Royal Society of Berlin for that year; Von dem Begriff der Philosophie and ihren Theilen (Berlin, 1778) - a short essay, in which he announced the plan of his lectures on being appointed to the professorship at Halle; Lobschrift auf Herrn Johann Thunmann Prof. der Weltweisheit and Beredsamkeit auf der Universitcit zu Halle (Halle, 1779); Amyntor, eine Geschichte in Briefen (Berlin, 1782) - written with the view of counteracting the influence of those sceptical and Epicurean principles in religion and morals then so prevalent in France, and rapidly spreading amongst the higher ranks in Germany; Ober die Zeichen der Aufklarung einer Nation, &c. (Halle, 1783); Theorie der schonen Kiinste and Wissenschaften, &c. (Halle, 1783, 3rd ed.

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  • In 1781 he was imprisoned for a short time in the Bicetre on an accusation of corrupting the morals of his pupils, his real offence being the writing of satirical verse.

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  • Walker, superintendent of the censuses of 1870 and 1880, the remarkable fact that such reduction coincided with a cause that was regarded as certain to quicken the increase of population, viz, the introduction of a vast body of fresh peasant blood from Europe, afforded proof that in this matter of population morals are far more potent than physical causes.

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  • At Athens in his second period for some twenty years he acquired the further advantage of balancing natural science by metaphysics and morals in the course of reading Plato's writings and of hearing Plato's unwritten dogmas (cf.

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  • Down then to their common definition of pleasure as activity the three treatises present a harmonious system of morals, consistently with one another, and with the general philosophy of Aristotle.

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  • I, 1 355 a 33-35); rhetoric, since its artificial evidences involve characters, passions and reasoning, is called a kind of offshoot of dialectic and morals, and a copy of dialectic, because neither is a science of anything definite, but both faculties (SvvItyas) of providing arguments (i.

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  • 2, 1356 a 33); and, since rhetorical arguments are examples and enthymemes analysed in the Analytics, rhetoric is finally regarded as a compound of analytic science and of morals, while it is like dialectical and sophistic arguments (i.

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  • were devoted to expounding his views, or rather his doctrines, on social and industrial problems, on education, morals and religion, wherein art becomes an incidental and instrumental means to a higher and more spiritual life.

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  • At the end of the year 1864 Ruskin delivered at Manchester a new series of lectures - not on art, but on reading, education, woman's work and social morals - the expansion of his earlier treatises on economic sophisms. This afterwards was included with a Dublin lecture of 1868 under the fantastic title of Sesame and Lilies (perhaps the most popular of his social essays), of which 44,000 copies were issued down to 1900.

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  • In the year 1866 he published a little book about girls, and written for girls, a mixture of morals, theology, economics and geology, under the title of Ethics of the Dust; and this was followed by a more important and popular work, The Crown of Wild Olive.

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  • His pantheism had an antinomian drift; for himself and his officials he claimed impeccability; but, whatever truth there may be in the charge that among his followers were those who interpreted "love" as licence, no such charge can be sustained against the morals of Niclaes and the other leaders of the sect.

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  • It would be difficult to conceive a disposition more remote from the morals of ordinary life, not to speak of Christian ideals, than that with 1 " Perpetual peace," he said, " is a dream, and it is not even a beautiful dream.

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  • His published works include (besides several volumes of verse) Homer and the Iliad (1866), maintaining the unity of the poems; Four Phases of Morals: Socrates, Aristotle, Christianity, Utilitarianism (1871); Essay on Self-Culture (1874); Horae Hellenicae (1874); The Language and Literature of the Scottish Highlands (1876); The Natural History of Atheism (1877); The Wise Men of Greece (1877); Lay Sermons (1881); Altavona (1882); The Wisdom of Goethe (1883); The Scottish Highlanders and the Land Laws (1885); Life of Burns (1888); Scottish Song (1889); Essays on Subjects of Moral and Social Interest (1890); Christianity and the Ideal of Humanity (1893).

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  • Lastly, when a theory of the world supposes a noumenal power, a resistent and persistent force, which results in an evolution, defined as an integration of matter and a dissipation of motion, which having resulted in inorganic nature and organic nature, further results without break in consciousness, reason, society and morals, then such a theory will be construed as materialistically as that of Haeckel by the reader, whatever the intention of the author.

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  • One of Price's most intimate friends was Dr Priestley, in spite of the fact that they took the most opposite views on morals and metaphysics.

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  • The Review of the Principal Questions in Morals (1757 3rd ed.

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  • Gregory XI., though equally distinguished for his erudition and pure morals, his piety, modesty and wisdom, was fated to Gregory Xl., pay dearly for the weakness of his predecessor in 1370-1378.

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  • 1 Here of course the author speaks of the papal supremacy and not of papal infallibility in matters of faith and morals - a doctrine which was formally declared a dogma of the Church only at the Vatican council in 1870.

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  • Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia, a man of the most abandoned morals, who did not change his mode of life when he ascended the throne as Pope Alexander VI.

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  • The Curia, once so corrupt, was completely metamorphosed, and once more became a rallying point for men of stainless character, so that it produced a profound impression even on non-Catholics; while the original methods of St Philip Neri had a profound influence on the reform of popular morals.

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  • The Romantic movement helped, with its idealization of a past but vaguely realized and imperfectly understood, and Chateaubriand heralded in the Catholic reaction with his Genie du Christianisme (1801) a brilliant if superficial attack on the encyclopaedists and their neo-Paganism, and a glorification of the Christian Church as supreme not only in the regions of faith and morals, but also in those of intellect and art.

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  • These two great rationalist movements, the critical and the philosophical, ultimately led to, or were accompanied by, the gradual reduction of religion to a system of morals based at the most on two or three fundamental religious principles.

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  • But it is the general opinion of historians that he had a high sense of his responsibilities and a strong love of justice; despite the looseness of his personal morals, he commanded the affection and respect of Gilbert Foliot and Hugh of Lincoln, the most upright of the English bishops.

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  • No doubt these romances, taken alone, might give as unfair an idea as modern French novels give of Parisian morals, but we have abundant other evidence for placing the moral standard of the age of chivalry definitely below that of educated society in the present day.

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  • Chivalry in short is in morals very much what feudalism is in law: each substitutes purely personal obligations devised in the interests of an exclusive class, for the more homely duties of an honest man and a good citizen " (Norman Conquest, v.

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  • The members were to be gentilshor y nznes de nom et d'armes et sans reproche, not knights of any other order, and vowed to join their sovereign in the defence of the Catholic faith, the protection of Holy Church, and the upholding of virtue and good morals.

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  • The third volume, containing book iii., Of Morals, was published in the following year.

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  • In the same year appeared the recast of the third book of the Treatise, called Inquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, of which he says that " of all his writings, philosophical, literary or historical, it is incomparably the best."

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  • Besides the qualifications required of a presentee by canon law, such as being of the canonical age, and in priest's orders before admission, sufficient learning and proper orthodoxy or morals, the Benefices Act requires that a year shall have elapsed since a transfer of the right of patronage, unless it can be shown that such transfer was not made in view of a probable vacancy; that the presentee has been a deacon for three years; and that he is not unfit for the discharge of his duties by reason of physical or mental infirmity or incapacity, grave pecuniary embarrassment, grave misconduct or neglect of duty in an ecclesiastical office, evil life, or conduct causing grave scandal concerning his moral character since his ordination, or being party to an illegal agreement with regard to the presentation; that notice of the presentation has been given to the parish of the benefice.

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  • He was a favourer of the troubadours, and in his ways of life he indulged in the laxity of Provençal morals to the fullest extent.

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  • He was also very devout, and his morals were irreproachable.

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  • Since there must be the same conservation of energy in morals as elsewhere, the eternal reason is the divine Logos.

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  • Truth, morals and justice are subject to no evolution; but the collective man evolves better forms of knowledge and behaviour.

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  • It is purely ethical, independent alike of theology and ritual, and is the code of morals as laid down in the Buddhist sacred books for laymen.

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  • About a year after the representation of Irene, he began to publish a series of short essays on morals, manners and literature.

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  • But they did justice to the acuteness of his observations on morals and manners, to the constant precision and frequent brilliancy of his language, to the weighty and magnificent eloquence of many serious passages, and to the solemn yet pleasing humour of some of the lighter papers.

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  • But the peculiar way in which it enforces its morals in terms of the Platonic contrast between the spiritual and sensuous worlds, as archetype and temporal manifestation, suggests a special local type of theology which must be taken into account in fixing its provenance.

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  • In Rome, under the broadening influence of classical and ecclesiastical art, he learned to look at Christianity in its human and universalistic aspects, and began to develop his great idea, the inseparable relation of religion and morals.

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  • Their application to publications which had no concern with morals or religion was no longer conceivable; and, finally, the penalties called for modification.

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  • 1855), who endowed the Plummer Professorship of Christian Morals at Harvard.

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  • By the words "political justice" the author meant "the adoption of any principle of morality and truth into the practice of a community," and the work was therefore an inquiry into the principles of society, of government and of morals.

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  • Ewald's son Carl (1856-1908) achieved a great name as a novelist, but did his most characteristic work in a series of books for children, in which he used the fairy tale, in the manner of Hans Andersen, as a vehicle for satire and a theory of morals.

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  • The beauty and the lax morals of Daphne were celebrated all over the western world; and indeed Antioch as a whole shared in both these titles to fame.

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  • 18) as the fundamental law of religious morals, became in a certain sense a commonplace of Pharisaic scholasticism.

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  • A hideous tale is told by Buchanan against his private morals, but it is certainly inaccurate in detail, and is uncorroborated, while it appears to turn on a confusion between an alleged royal mistress, " the Daisy," and Margaret (Daisy), the king's own sister.

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  • It abounds in error as to matters of fact, contradicts human experience, reason and morals, and is one tissue of folly, deceit, enthusiasm, selfishness and crime.

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  • He insisted on a poetical interpretation of the Church's liturgy; and while strenuously maintaining her Divine commission to teach faith and morals, he regarded the Church as in other respects a learner; and he advocated a policy of conciliation with the world, and an alliance with the best tendencies of contemporary thought.

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  • No writer who was acquainted with Hebrew history could suppose that there was any relation between the national morality and the abundance of prophetic visions; the period in which such visions were most numerous is precisely that in which the corruption of morals is painted by the prophets in the darkest colours and, on the other hand, the people are said (in Pss.

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  • The temptations of Alexandria and the loose morals of the time (latter part of the 3rd century) are illustrated by the story told by Josephus (Ant.

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  • This collection, alphabetically arranged, comprised annotations on classical authors, passages from newspapers, treatises on morals and mathematics from the standard works of the period.

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  • In his lectures on religion he dealt with Christianity, as in his philosophy of morals he had regarded the state.

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  • Luther believed that the sales were injurious to the morals of the townsmen; he had heard reports of Tetzel's sermons; he had become wrathful on reading the letter of recommendation of the archbishop; and friends had urged him to interfere.

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  • His principal works are: The Coming Revolution (1880); The Co-operative Commonwealth in its Outlines, An Exposition of Modern Socialism (1884); Ca Ira, or Danton in the French Revolution (1888), a rehabilitation of Danton; Our Destiny, The Influence of Socialism on Morals and Religion (1890); and The New Economy (1898) .

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  • The criticism is even to-day current with the uninformed that Jefferson took his manners, 4 morals, "irreligion" and political philosophy from his French residence; and it cannot be wholly ignored.

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  • 4 Patrick Henry humorously declaimed before a popular audience that Jefferson, who favoured French wine and cookery, had" abjured his native victuals."supports, that Jefferson's morals were pure.

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  • He was singularly sweet-tempered, and shrank from the impassioned political bitterness that raged about him; bore with relative equanimity a flood of coarse and malignant abuse of his motives, morals, religion, 4 personal honesty and decency; cherished very few personal animosities; and better than any of his great antagonists cleared political opposition of illblooded personality.

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  • Amongst the many merits of that admirable scholar, it is one of the greatest that he has laid " the fiend called die Sophistik," that is to say, the theory that sophistry was an organized conspiracy against law and morals.

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  • The inspectors or sixth class of Megasthenes have been identified with Asoka's Mahamatra and his Buddhist inspectors of morals.

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  • The annexation of the province of Oudh was justifiable on the ground of morals, though not on that of policy.

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  • His morals were as loose as those of his great rival Mirabeau, but he was famed in Paris for his wit and gaiety.

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  • If in his youth he had been prone to gambling, and before his marriage with Theodora had been somewhat lax in his morals, when he became a man he put away childish things; his married life was a shining example to his people and he was abstemious both in food and drink, holding that "excess in either was an incentive to the worst of crimes."

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  • Thus during the session 1778-177 9, in addition to his mathematical work, he delivered an original course of lectures on morals.

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  • - In the middle ages Cicero was chiefly known as a writer on rhetoric and morals.

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  • To say, however, that Clarke simply confused mathematics and morals by justifying the moral criterion on a mathematical basis is a mistake.

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  • It was laid down in these that over and above safe custody it was essential to preserve health, improve morals, and enforce hard labour on all prisoners sentenced to it.

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  • The truly devout Moslems on the other hand were scandalized by the growing luxury which relaxed the austere morals of the first Moslems, and this also was imputed to Othman.

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  • In Greece he became more and more reflective and conscious of himself, of his body and soul, his manners and morals, his mental operations and especially his reason.

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  • The reality of mathematics, equally with that of the ideals of morals drawn from within, does not extend to the " ectypes " of the outer world.

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  • Finally he accepted the decrees against him and retracted "all that he said contrary to the faith, morals and discipline of the Church."

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  • (I) In the matter of jurisdiction: "If any one say that the Roman Pontiff has an office merely of inspection and direction, and not the full and supreme power of jurisdiction over the whole Church, not only in matters of faith and morals, but also as regards discipline and the government of the Church scattered throughout the whole world; or that he has only the principal portion and not the plenitude of that supreme power; or that his power is not ordinary and immediate, as much over each and every church as over each and every pastor and believer: anathema sit."

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  • (2) In the matter of infallibility: "We decree that when the Roman Pontiff speaks ex cathedra, that is to say, when, in his capacity as Pastor and Doctor of all Christians he defines, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, a certain doctrine concerning faith or morals to be held by the whole Church, he enjoys, by the divine assistance promised to him in the Blessed Peter, that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer has thought good to endow His Church in order to define its doctrine in matters of faith and morals; consequently, these definitions of the Roman Pontiff are irreformable in themselves and not in consequence of the consent of the Church."

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  • For Protestants the Bible only now becomes the infallible, inspired authority in faith and morals.

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  • During his reign, acting, as he did in most things, under the influence of his mother, he did much to improve the morals and condition of the people.

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  • The employment of children under fourteen years of age in any factory, workshop, mercantile establishment, store, business office, telegraph or telephone office, restaurant, hotel, apartment house, club, theatre, bootblack stand, or in the distribution or transmission of merchandise or messages is forbidden, except that a child between twelve and fourteen years of age may with the permission of the judge of the juvenile court be employed at an occupation not dangerous or injurious to his health or morals if necessary for his support or for the assistance of a disabled, ill or invalid parent, a younger brother or sister, or a widowed mother.

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  • The new denominations vigorously attacked the methods and immunities of the established church, whose clergy had grown lukewarm in zeal and lax in morals.

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  • One can already discern a movement in various quarters towards a recognition of impersonal theism, and towards fixing the teaching of the philosophical schools upon some definitely authorized system of faith and morals, which may satisfy a rising ethical standard, and may thus permanently embody that tendency to substitute spiritual devotion for external forms and caste rules which is the characteristic of the sects that have from time to time dissented from orthodox Brahminism."

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  • Of this authority the pope is regarded as the centre and source, so far as the interpretation of the Divine Will to the world is concerned in matters of faith and morals.

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  • His pronouncements are held to be infallible when he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals ex cathedra to be held by the universal church (see Infallibility and Vatican Council).

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  • To pretend to an independent judgment in questions of faith or morals is for a Roman Catholic to commit treason against his Church; and even in the wide sphere of questions lying beyond the dogmas defined as de fide a too curious discussion is discouraged, if not condemned.

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  • On the other hand, these " Escobarine morals " by no means passed unchallenged; ever since the foundation of the society the aims and methods of the Jesuits had called forth lively opposition in many parts of Catholic Europe, and not least in Loyola's native land of Spain.

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  • In art and learning, morals and government, the old walls came crashing down; in the general bankruptcy of authority men were forced to depend on themselves.

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  • On the 18th of July the pope's decrees were declared " irreformable of themselves, irrespectively of the consent of the Church," always provided that they dealt with doctrines of faith and morals, and were delivered ex cathedra - that is, with the intention of binding the consciences of all Catholics.

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  • To what extent the accusations of profligate morals brought against these reforming sectarians were justified remains doubtful; and the same uncertainty rests upon the alleged iniquities of the Templars.

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  • In later ages Elisha (alaer " the other," as he was named) was regarded as the type of a heretic whose pride of intellect betrayed him into infidelity to law and morals.

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  • In the domain of morals, dualism postulates the separate existence of Good and Evil, as principles of existence.

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  • Before we proceed to the next period of utilitarian theory we ought to go back to notice Hume's Inquiry concerning the Principles of Morals (pub.

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  • These opinions are developed in his Principles of Morals and Legislation (pub.

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  • in 1863) sums up in brief and perfect form the essential principles of his doctrine, and is a little masterpiece worthy to be set beside Kant's Metaphysic of Morals as an authoritative statement of one of the two main forms of modern ethical speculation.

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  • Hobhouse's Morals in Evolution and Professor Westermarck's Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas (both published in 1906) deal with the matter from the side of anthropology.

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  • His success as a dramatist had by this time gone some way to disabuse hostile critics of the suspicions as regards his personal character which had been excited by the apparent looseness of morals which since his Oxford days it had always pleased him to affect; but to the consternation of his friends, who had ceased to credit the existence of any real moral obliquity, in 1895 came fatal revelations as the result of his bringing a libel action against the marquis of Queensberry; and at the Old Bailey, in May, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour for offences under the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

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  • In the sphere of morals, the ultimate and only authority which the mind can recognize is the law which emerges from the pure moral consciousness.

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  • The great judgment of Osiris formulates with the utmost precision the alliance between morals and religion.

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  • (London, 1906); Hobhouse, Morals in Evolution (2 vols., London, 1906).

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  • The slightest tincture of red or black blood bars entry into any of the old families who are descendants of Spaniards from the Provincias Vascongadas or those bordering the Bay of Biscay, where the morals are perhaps the purest (as regards the intercourse of the sexes) of any in Europe, and where for a girl, even of the poorest class, to have a child before marriage is the rarest thing possible.

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  • The following observation is therefore of interest: At Guayaquil for a lady of good family - married or unmarried - to be of loose morals is so uncommon, that when it does happen it is felt as a calamity by the whole community.

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  • The new bishop showed much eagerness to reform the manners and morals of his clergy, and also to introduce greater order and reverence into the services of the church.

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  • There is, first of all, the service of the Surete-- in other words, of public safety - the detective department, employed entirely in the pursuit and capture of criminals; next comes the police, now amalgamated with the Surete, that watches over the morals of the capital and possesses arbitrary powers under the existing laws of France; then there is the brigade de garnis, the police charged with the supervision of all lodging-houses, from the commonest "sleep-sellers'" shop, as it is called, to the grandest hotels.

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  • How far the extraordinary corruption of private morals which has gained for the restoration period so unenviable a notoriety was owing to the king's own example of flagrant debauchery, how far to the natural reaction from an artificial Puritanism, is uncertain, but it is incontestable that Charles's cynical selfishness was the chief cause of the degradation of public life which marks his reign, and of the disgraceful and unscrupulous betrayal of the national interests which raised France to a threatening predominance and imperilled the very existence of Britain for generations.

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  • It is clear, therefore, that from this point of view the sum of practical morals might be given in Butler's own words - "that mankind is a community, that we all stand in a relation to each other, that there is a public end and interest of society, which each particular is obliged to promote."

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  • Two lines in the poem suggest that the satirist, who inveighed with just severity against the worst corruptions of Roman morals, was not too rigid a censor of the morals of his friend.

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  • His services to morals do not consist in any positive contributions to the notions of active duty, but in the strength with which he has realized and expressed the restraining influence of the old Roman and Italian ideal of character, and also of that religious conscience which was becoming a new power in the world.

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  • In taking this immense stride and identifying the Cynic " reason," which is a law for man, with the " reason " which is the law of the universe, Zeno has been compared with Plato, who similarly extended the Socratic " general notion " from the region of morals - of justice, temperance, virtue - to embrace all objects of all thought, the verity of all things that are.

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  • Although there was in the end a reaction from this extreme, yet it is impossible to mistake the bearing of all this upon a practical system of morals.

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  • The Oriental magnificence of these embassies, notably that of 1514, and the fact that a king of Portugal dared openly to criticize the morals of the Vatican, temporarily enhanced the prestige of the monarchy.

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  • Beginning with a chapter on the means of locomotion in the 10th century, it went on to discuss war, the conflict of languages, faith, morals, the elimination of the unfit, and other general topics, with remarkable acuteness and constructive ability.

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  • Fleury, Rabelais is a sober reformer, an apostle of earnest work, of sound education, of rational if not dogmatic religion, who wraps up his morals in a farcical envelope partly to make them go down with the vulgar and partly to shield himself from the consequences of his reforming zeal.

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  • She is much praised by historians for her modesty and prudence, and is said to have brought about by her example a considerable improvement in the morals of her nation.

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  • In ethics, again, the revolt against absolute standards limits us to the relative, and morals are investigated on the basis of history, as largely conditioned by economic environment and the growth of intellectual freedom.

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  • There is a general looseness of morals: marriage is a very slight tie, which can be dissolved at any time by either husband or wife.

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  • His thought in this direction, wherein he anticipated something of modern speculation, is the more remarkable because his scholastic successors accomplished least in the field of morals, hardly venturing to bring the principles and rules of conduct under pure philosophical discussion, even after the great ethical inquiries of Aristotle became fully known to them.

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  • In the 4th century their place was taken by ten sophronistae (one for each tribe), who, as the name implies, took special interest in the morals of those under them, their military training being in the hands of experts, of whom the chief were the hoplomachus, the acontistes, the toxotes and the aphetes (instructors respectively in the use of arms, javelin-throwing, archery and the use of artillery engines).

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  • History was to him, as it had been to Cicero, a school for morals; but he had perhaps a juster conception than Ranke of the breadth and scope of the historian's field.

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  • The religious profession of the Colombian people is Roman Catholic, and is recognized as such by the constitution, but the exercise is permitted of any other form of worship which is not contrary to Christian morals or to the law.

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  • On the one hand, it is opposed as the citadel of sacerdotal authority and as a peril to morals.

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  • This great prelate was an ecclesiastical reformera leader in a movement for the general purification of morals, and especially for the repressing of simony and evil-living among the clergy a great builder of churches, and a stringent enforcer of the rules of the monastic life.

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  • If the Commons wished to be rid of him because he upheld the prerogative, the kIng was equally desirous to be rid of him because he looked coldly on the looseness of the royal morals.

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  • a widely-spread relaxation of morals, and also, as far as the educated class was concerned, an eagerness for the discussion of all social and religious problems. The fierce excitement of political life had quickened thought, and the most anciently received doctrines were held of little, vorth until they were brought to the test of reason.

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  • He founded in 1871 a society for the reclamation of discharged prisoners, and presided over various bodies formed to secure improvement of the public morals.

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  • The influence of literature on Burke lay partly in the direction of emancipation from the mechanical formulae of practical politics; partly in the association which it engendered, in a powerful understanding like his, between politics and the moral forces of the world, and between political maxims and the old and great sentences of morals; partly in drawing him, even when resting his case on prudence and expediency, to appeal to the widest and highest sympathies; partly, and more than all, in opening his thoughts to the many conditions, possibilities and "varieties of untried being," in human character and situation, and so giving an incomparable flexibility to his methods of political approach.

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  • Between 1835 and 1861 Whewell was the author of various works on the philosophy of morals and politics, the chief of which, Elements of Morality, including Polity, was published in 1845.

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  • The second and decisive victory followed at the Vatican Council (1870), which, at the cost of a small secession of distinguished men, declared the pope personally infallible (see Infallibility) and irreformable as often as he rules ex cathedra points of faith or morals.

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  • When is the theory op- pope ruling faith and morals from his throne?

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  • He preserved the habits of a simple peasant, and his administration was characterized in part by the peasant's shrewd common sense, but yet more by a pious solicitude for the minutest details of faith and morals.

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  • But from these unscientific utterances to a philosophy of morals was a long process.

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  • But Bacon's great task of reforming scientific method was one which, as he conceived it, left morals on one side; he never made any serious effort to reduce his ethical views to a coherent system, methodically reasoned on an independent basis.

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  • He argues that Hobbes's atomic materialism involves the conception of an objective physical world, the object not of passive sense that varies from man to man, but of the active intellect that is the same in all; there is therefore, he urges, an inconsistency in refusing to admit a similar exercise of intellect in morals, and an objective world of right and wrong, which the mind by its normal activity clearly apprehends as such.

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  • It is difficult to make these views quite consistent; but at any rate Hume emphatically maintains that " reason is no motive to action," except so far as it " directs the impulse received from appetite or inclination "; 2 Hume's ethical view was finally stated in his Inquiry into the Principles of Morals (1751), which is at once more popular and more purely utilitarian than his earlier work.

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  • Price's Review of the Chief Questions and Difficulties of Morals was published in 1757, two years before Adam Smith's treatise.

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  • What has not been adequately realized is that the metaphysical basis of his system of ethics - the argument, for example, contained in the introduction to the Prolegomena - is unfairly treated if divorced from his treatment of morals as a whole, and that it can be justly estimated only if interpreted as much as the conclusion as the starting-point of moral theory.

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  • But although Green's loyalty to the primary facts of the moral consciousness prevented him from constructing a rationalistic system of morals based solely upon the conclusions of metaphysics, it was perhaps inevitable that the revival of interest in metaphysics so prominent in his own speculations should lead to a more daring criticism of ethical first principles in other writers.

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  • Appearance and Reality was not primarily concerned with morals, yet it inevitably led to certain conclusions affecting conduct, and it was no very long time before these conclusions were elaborated in detail.

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  • Alexander (Moral Order and Progress, 1899), together with the metaphysical theories of morals of which T.

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  • Hobhouse's Morals in Evolution or Professor E.

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  • Lecky, History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne (1869, many editions); works of Ed.

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  • Stephen, Science of Ethics (1882); P. Janet, The Theory of Morals (Eng.

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  • Courtney, Constructive Ethics (1886); Wilson and Fowler, Principles of Morals (1886); H.

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  • Bixby, The Crisis in Morals: An Examination of Rational Ethics (1891); J.

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  • France there had not been as yet any overt revolt against the Church of Rome, but multitudes were in sympathy with any attempt to improve the church by education, by purer morals, by better preaching and by a return to the primitive and uncorrupted faith.

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  • Strictly speaking, the antitheses of good and bad and of free and necessary have no place in an ethical system, but simply in history, which is obliged to compare the actual with the ideal, but as far as the terms "good" and "bad" are used in morals they express the rule or the contrary of reason, or the harmony or the contrary of the particular and the general.

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  • The transition period which follows the loosening of a people's faith in its old religion and before the authority of the new is universally accepted is always a time of confusion and relaxation of morals.

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  • The morals of the clergy were no better than in other countries, and we have evidence of many scandalous irregularities.

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  • As regards ethics, Baader rejects the Kantian or any autonomic system of morals.

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  • Among his very numerous works two poems entitle him to a distinguished place in the Latin literature of the middle ages; one of these, the De planctu naturae, is an ingenious satire on the vices of humanity; the other, the Anticlaudianus, a treatise on morals, the form of which recalls the pamphlet of Claudian against Rufinus, is agreeably versified and relatively pure in its latinity.

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  • Only on the assumption that the book of Genesis is a composite work is it possible to explain the duplication of events, the varying use of the divine names Yahweh and Elohim, the linguistic and stylistic differences, the internal intricacies of the subject matter, and the differing standpoints as regards tradition, chronology, morals and religion.'

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  • A lover of peace through sheer cowardicer and as depraved in his morals as Chilperic, Guntram had played a vacillating and purely self-interested part in the family tragedy.

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  • This youth of nineteen, the ill-omened son of a madman and of a Bavarian of loose morals, was a symbol of France, 7~22 timorous and mistrustful.

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  • Married to a woman of loose morals, and afterwards to a devout Italian, he was gross and vulgar in his appetites and pleasures.

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  • Moreover, a Catholic lnovement for religious reform in the Church of France began during the i7th century, marked by the creation of seminaries, the foundation of new orthodox religious orders, and the organization of public relief by Saint Vincent de Paul, Jansenism was the most vigorous contemporary effort to renovate not only morals but Church doctrine (see JANSENISM).

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  • it had to compensate for many affronts to public and private morals, the financial necessity of augmenting the free donations of the clergy, and the political necessity of relying upon that body in his conflicts with the pope, led the king between 1661 and 1685 to embark upon a double campaign of arbitrary proceedings with the object of nullifying the edict, conversions being procured either by force or by bribery.

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  • Pure and austere, it enjoined the strictest morals in the midst of corruption, and the most dignified self-respect in face of idolatrous servility.

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  • In reality, he was a prince of wide knowledge and culture, knowing several languages and austere in morals; and although he cannot be acquitted of occasional harshness, he had the secret of winning the hearts of his subjects, who never refused him their support in times of difficulty.

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  • He undertook without delay the reformation of morals and clerical discipline throughout his vast diocese.

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  • APOSTOLICI,' 'APOSTOLIC BRETHREN, or APOSTLES, the names given to various Christian heretics, whose common doctrinal feature was an ascetic rigidity of morals, which made them reject property and marriage.

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  • In the long reign that followed he showed no great ability or energy, and a looseness of morals which embroiled him with the Church.

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  • In religious matters Calvinists and Lutherans were placed upon an equality, but the elector was unable to impress his own spirit of tolerance upon the clergy, who were occupied with ecclesiastical squabbles while the state of education and of public morals left much to be desired.

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  • The prize essay On the Principles of Natural Theology and Morals brings forward the same fundamental opposition - though in a special form.

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  • How could they make a man commander-in-chief who cannot mount a horse, who drops asleep at a council, and has the very worst morals!

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  • All takes place under the scrutiny of old Miss Loach, the self-appointed guardian of village morals.

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  • Rose 's text repeats almost wholesale the original text, omitting only the morals which Perrault had appended.

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  • He used the rhetorical device of ethos to convince his audience by appealing to their morals.

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  • These detectives were shown with questionable morals, almost borderline criminals, particularly with how they pursued their cases.

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  • These stories offer a biblical background for children of all ages and are filled with various morals and values normally taught in the Christian faith.

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  • The rules in a home shape ideals, morals, and values.

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  • Debate on the values and morals of your child and do what is best for her.

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  • Today's young adults are often flabbergasted by the morals and customs of their parents and especially their grandparents, and the elders share their amazement of how family values have evolved since 1960.

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  • The queen had strict morals and a love of the ornate that influenced fashion and interior design during the time of her reign.

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  • These sites are quite upfront about their morals and morality concerning sex and related issues.

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  • Silver the Hedgehog at first thought Sonic was his adversary, but now he has learned more about Sonic's personality and morals, and the two are friends.

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  • No matter how tempting it may be to give in to peer pressure, you'll feel better about yourself in the long run if you stay true to your morals and don't do anything that doesn't feel right to you.

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