This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

morally

morally Sentence Examples

  • It was a big jump for someone so committed to being morally correct.

    22
    14
  • It was as if the minds of these morally exhausted men found relief in everyday, commonplace occurrences.

    8
    7
  • It is something to be able to paint a particular picture, or to carve a statue, and so to make a few objects beautiful; but it is far more glorious to carve and paint the very atmosphere and medium through which we look, which morally we can do.

    5
    4
  • But morally he stood aloof.

    4
    3
  • Then he will really feel morally responsible if he leaves them undone, hence the necessity of free-will.

    4
    3
  • Morally the wielder of power appears to cause the event; physically it is those who submit to the power.

    4
    3
  • Hermetically sealing itself from any intrusion from below, it deteriorated by close and constant intermarriage; and it was already, both morally and intellectually, below the level of the rest of the nation.

    3
    3
  • Hermetically sealing itself from any intrusion from below, it deteriorated by close and constant intermarriage; and it was already, both morally and intellectually, below the level of the rest of the nation.

    3
    3
  • From this position it easily followed that actions, being merely external, were morally indifferent, and that the true Gnostic should abandon himself to every lust with perfect indifference.

    1
    1
  • Does not Stephen himself rather say that morally good things are conditions of social, not personal welfare?

    1
    1
  • But his accomplishments and ability were such as would have secured for him influence and prominence in any age of the Church; and besides being highly gifted intellectually and morally, he was marked by those specially human qualities which command the interest of all students of life and character.

    1
    1
  • But his accomplishments and ability were such as would have secured for him influence and prominence in any age of the Church; and besides being highly gifted intellectually and morally, he was marked by those specially human qualities which command the interest of all students of life and character.

    1
    1
  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!

    1
    1
  • The bitter invectives against Ammon, Moab, Edom, Philistia, Tyre, Sidon and Egypt, put into Yahweh's mouth, are based wholly on the fact that these peoples are regarded as hostile and hurtful to Israel; Babylonia, though nowise superior to Egypt morally, is favoured and applauded because it is believed to be the instrument for securing ultimately the prosperity of Yahweh's people.

    0
    0
  • 11 -19) the conference reaffirmed strongly the necessity for definite Christian teaching in schools, "secular systems" being condemned as "educationally as well as morally unsound, since they fail to co-ordinate the training of the whole nature of the child" (Res.

    0
    0
  • of this group, though he was well aware that Celman, who was, his brother-in-law, was neither intellectually nor morally fitted for the post.

    0
    0
  • Moral elements must enter into theism at some point: and, as against empiricism, intuitionalism is morally strong.

    0
    0
  • It also provides penalties for breaches of duty by the seller, but grants him protection in cases where he is not morally responsible.

    0
    0
  • He was absolutely incorruptible, thus standing, morally as well as intellectually, far above the level of his age.

    0
    0
  • duly convoked it for this date to the town of Basel, and selected to preside over it the cardinal Julian Cesarini, a man of the greatest worth, both intellectually and morally.

    0
    0
  • Not very long after the disappearance of serfdom in the most advanced communities comes into sight the new system of colonial slavery, which, instead of being the spontaneous outgrowth of social necessities and subserving a temporary need of human development, was politically as well as morally a monstrous aberration.

    0
    0
  • The Pucelle, if morally inferior, is from a literary point of view of far more value.

    0
    0
  • A subsidy treaty with the sea powers (April 1 9, 1 794) filled his coffers; but the insurrection in Poland that followed the partition of 1793, and the threat of the isolated intervention of Russia, hurried him into the separate treaty of Basel with the French Republic (April 5, 1795), which was regarded by the great monarchies as a betrayal, and left Prussia morally isolated in Europe on the eve of the titanic struggle between the monarchical principle and the new political creed of the Revolution.

    0
    0
  • Thus he objects to the use of statistics because they favour that tendency to regard all men as mentally and morally equal which is so unhappily strong in modern times.

    0
    0
  • Ninety-eight divisions were in line and others in support, but neither physically nor morally were these troops all that could be desired.

    0
    0
  • It was perhaps impossible for him to renounce his rights, and his education, co-operating with his natural disposition, made it morally impossible for him to believe that he could be in the wrong.

    0
    0
  • Again, the army was morally weakened by a haunting dread of treason, and some of the chiefs, Ney for example, took the field with disturbing visions of the consequences of their late betrayal of the Bourbon cause, in case of Napoleon's defeat.

    0
    0
  • In the canonical Old Testament angels may inflict suffering as ministers of God, and Satan may act as accuser or tempter; but they appear as subordinate to God, fulfilling His will; and not as morally evil.

    0
    0
  • 2, means, literally, " from the beginning," to be physically born again; morally, to become as a little child; mystically, " from heaven, God," to be spiritually renewed.

    0
    0
  • It was answered that sin had not totally destroyed man's ethical nature, and that grace changed what was morally insensitive into what was morally sensitive, so that there could be a cooperation between God's grace and man's will.

    0
    0
  • In the prose romances he is a monarch, the splendour of whose court, whose riches and generosity, are the admiration of all; but morally he is no whit different from the knights who surround him; he takes advantage of his bonnes fortunes as do others.

    0
    0
  • He had early resolved never to be drawn into controversy; and he adhered to his resolution with a steadfastness which is the more extraordinary because he was, both intellectually and morally, of the stuff of which controversialists are made.

    0
    0
  • and Henry III., who were then morally responsible for the pontificate, at length disgusted the Romans, who drove him out in 1044 and appointed Silvester III.

    0
    0
  • "debt"), a term loosely applied to any action or course of action which is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion.

    0
    0
  • This increase of villenage morally depressed the peasantry, and widened still further the breach between the yeomanry and the gentry.

    0
    0
  • He felt that the institution was morally wrong, but held that Congress could not interfere with it in the states in which it existed, and ought not to hinder the natural tendency toward territorial expansion through a fear that the evil would spread.

    0
    0
  • There is no question of the legality of the pope's act; whether he was morally culpable, however, continues to be a matter of bitter controversy.

    0
    0
  • Sin is a necessity in each individual, and there is a total corruption of man's nature, physically as well as morally.

    0
    0
  • A good proof of the value of the system as remunerative and healthful, morally and physically, is seen in the growing desire of other countries to follow our lead.

    0
    0
  • But even the entrance upon the very first stage implies something more than, and something fundamentally different from, the life of an ordinary layman, however morally excellent this life may be.

    0
    0
  • He is thus received into the religion of Zoroaster, and is henceforth considered morally accountable for his acts.

    0
    0
  • Once Paul's apostolate - a personal one, parallel with the more collective apostolate of " the Twelve " - has proved itself by tokens of Divine approval, Peter and his colleagues frankly recognize the distinction of the two missions, and are anxious only to arrange that the two shall not fall apart by religiously and morally incompatible usages (Acts xv.).

    0
    0
  • The Finns are morally upright, hospitable, faithful and submissive, with a keen sense of personal freedom and independence, but also somewhat stolid, revengeful and indolent.

    0
    0
  • It is on the contrary over-developed in them, but ill-informed and working in ways unessential or even morally harmful.

    0
    0
  • He and his followers maintained that the will of man is determined by the practical judgment of the mind; that the cause of men's doing good or evil proceeds from the knowledge which God infuses into them; and that God does not move the will physically, but only morally, by virtue of its dependence on the judgment of the mind.

    0
    0
  • utilis, useful), the form of ethical doctrine which teaches that conduct is morally good according as it promotes the greatest happiness of the greatest number of people.

    0
    0
  • He never faced the question how a man is to be induced to act morally in cases where these governmental sanctions could be evaded or did not exist in the particular state in which a man chanced to find himself.

    0
    0
  • The best feature of the Data of Ethics is its anti-ascetic vindication of pleasure as man's natural guide to what is physiologically healthy and morally good.

    0
    0
  • Belief is not intellectual merely, but is determined by an act of will affirming what we hold to be morally good.

    0
    0
  • The black man is not simply a morally and intellectually undeveloped European, and education, except in rare instances, does not put him on an equality with the European.

    0
    0
  • Those who, as it has been happily put, identify Rabelais with Pantagruel, strive in vain, on any view intellectually consistent or morally respectable, to account for the vast ocean of pure or impure laughter and foolery which surrounds the few solid islets of sense and reason and devotion.

    0
    0
  • Sir Edward Grey affirmed that the Congo State had" morally forfeited every right to international recognition,"and quoted with approval Lord Cromer's statement that the Congo system was the worst he had ever seen.

    0
    0
  • Superior, probably, both intellectually and morally to his great rival Nubar, he lacked the latter's broad statesmanship as well as his pliability.

    0
    0
  • This relationship is morally and legally regarded as not less binding than kinship by birth.

    0
    0
  • If in the West Athanasianism is a datum, but unexamined, and not valued for its own sake, Augustinianism is a bold interpretation of the essential piety of the West, but an interpretation which not i even piety can long endure - morally burdensome if religiously mpressive.

    0
    0
  • In later Greek philosophy the term KaXdv (" honestum ") became still more technical in the signification of " morally good."

    0
    0
  • What he really means is less paradoxically stated in the general proposition that " originally and in reality it is natural and (morally speaking) necessary that the will should be determined in every action by the reason of the thing and the right of the case,"` as it is natural and (absolutely speaking) necessary that the understanding should submit to a demonstrated truth."

    0
    0
  • On the contrary, he is careful to point out, first, that immoderate social affections defeat themselves, miss their proper end, and are therefore bad; secondly, that as an individual's good is part of the good of the whole " self-affections " existing in a duly limited degree are morally good.

    0
    0
  • Calm self-love Hutcheson regards as morally indifferent; though he enters into a careful analysis of the elements of happiness,' in order to show that a true regard for private interest always coincides with the moral sense and with benevolence.

    0
    0
  • On this latter point Reid, in his Essays on the Active Powers of the Human Mind (1788), states a conclusion more in harmony with common sense, only maintaining that " no act can be morally good in which regard for what is right has not some influence."

    0
    0
  • He explains also that to seek one's own happiness cannot be prescribed as a duty, because it is an end to which every man is inevitably impelled by natural inclination: but that just because each inevitably desires his own happiness, and therefore desires that others should assist him in time of need, he is bound to make the happiness of others his ethical end, since he cannot morally demand aid from others, without accepting the obligation of aiding them in like case.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in his view, not merely natural inclinations towards pleasures, or the desires for selfish happiness, require to be morally resisted; but even the prompting of the individual's conscience, the impulse to do what seems to him right, if it comes into conflict with the common sense of his community.

    0
    0
  • To this revolt, and to the general tendency to find the principle of morality in an ideal good present to the consciousness of all persons capable of acting morally, the widespread recognition of reason as the ultimate court of appeal alike in religion or politics, and latterly in economics also, has no doubt contributed largely.

    0
    0
  • Oliver's severe conduct at Drogheda and elsewhere is not morally defensible, but such methods were common in the wars of the period, and much may be urged in his favour.

    0
    0
  • In order to preserve popular favor and their direction of the Republic, the Girondins had not dared to pronounce against the sentence of death, but had demanded an appeal to the people which was rejected; morally weakened by this equivocal attitude they were still more so by foreign events.

    0
    0
  • The Liberals left office after having done all that was morally and materially possible, considering the extremely difficult, indeed inextricable, situation in which they found the country in October 1897.

    0
    0
  • He was only five years old when his father died, and his sister Henriette, twelve years older than Ernest, a girl of remarkable character, was henceforth morally the head of the household.

    0
    0
  • It was a big jump for someone so committed to being morally correct.

    0
    0
  • Everyone seemed to have a different perspective on what was morally acceptable – especially when it came to sex.

    0
    0
  • Because reporters have to be seen to be morally and politically correct, I cannot condone these actions.

    0
    0
  • The use of cluster bombs seems morally dubious.

    0
    0
  • Am I morally obliged to kill him myself or may I arrange for our vicar to do it?

    0
    0
  • It is clear that the suffering associated with the cloning process makes the procedure morally abhorrent.

    0
    0
  • Such discrimination, whether we focus on it or not, is morally abhorrent.

    0
    0
  • The bible does not allow us to think that ignorance automatically means we are morally acceptable.

    0
    0
  • Is it merely throwing insults to say that a particular opinion is morally bankrupt?

    0
    0
  • betterment of humanity, of standing up for what we know to be morally right.

    0
    0
  • She's settled in and now I feel like I'm being morally blackmailed.

    0
    0
  • Is it possible for groups, as distinct from their members, to be morally blameworthy for bringing about harm?

    0
    0
  • The first argument, similarly, does not seem obviously compatible with a morally egalitarian theory such as Rawls's.

    0
    0
  • Tho stupid and morally corrupt in the petty sense, I do not think this man would order a murder.

    0
    0
  • We consider them to have been morally culpable to some extent.

    0
    0
  • In 1787, the topic for this essay contest was the question of whether the slave trade was morally defensible.

    0
    0
  • Arm across shoulder a morally depraved woman in at the.

    0
    0
  • A morally depraved woman is transferred into literature in gates.

    0
    0
  • engaged the viewer morally, forcing us to face the possibility that he was, indeed, sorry for his crimes.

    0
    0
  • exculpatees the line is very fine between empathically understanding the motives of historical actors and morally exculpating their actions.

    0
    0
  • fall from grace Henri Meyer was a man of a morally neutral disposition.

    0
    0
  • fester indefinitely in a foreign jail under any conditions let alone without charge is morally reprehensible.

    0
    0
  • Of course, the anarchist must still explain why hierarchies emerge and are so durable if they are so clearly morally illegitimate.

    0
    0
  • Embryo research will always remain morally impermissible for a large section of the population.

    0
    0
  • Britain is weaker and Britain is morally indefensible while she rules India.

    0
    0
  • Scientists should stop manipulating public opinion to promote research that's both morally and scientifically indefensible.

    0
    0
  • In line with the zoocentric approach, Sandoe et al presuppose that the way a result is achieved is morally indifferent.

    0
    0
  • Compensation is regarded as morally acceptable, while a bribe, however politely disguised as a cash inducement, is a matter for outrage.

    0
    0
  • I noticed an insinuation in her response that this was a morally preferable position.

    0
    0
  • I would be interested to see how you would answer this in a way which was not " morally intolerable " .

    0
    0
  • Not only this - is it morally justifiable for people to be punished differently for the same thing?

    0
    0
  • justifymeans war in the interests of National interest is morally justified.

    0
    0
  • If we say " No ", we become lawbreakers and subject to fines - which we agree are morally allowable.

    0
    0
  • He said the bombing raids were neither legally or morally legitimate.

    0
    0
  • Mr Galloway said: " The sanctions are morally wrong and have led to appalling misery and death among the Iraqi people.

    0
    0
  • The Good, the Bad and the Obligatory Colin McGinn has argued that ordinary morality requires that each of us be morally perfect.

    0
    0
  • Unlike the republican ideal of ' civic virtue ' then, ' social capital ' is morally neutral.

    0
    0
  • I think it's right that if there had been something morally objectionable, I suppose I would have.

    0
    0
  • Hence, I am morally obligated to see to its occurrence.

    0
    0
  • Conclusion At times Ross suggests that acts that are prima facie obligatory tend to be morally obligatory.

    0
    0
  • obsessive quest for revenge is morally pure!

    0
    0
  • In line one, God becomes the universal Father; in line two, human sin becomes foolish, not morally outrageous.

    0
    0
  • We are to partake of the bread morally, we all partake of the one loaf.

    0
    0
  • No one is going to argue that we can be certain about what is morally permissible.

    0
    0
  • That seems to me to be morally preferable than throwing away embryos that you can't use in an IVF program.

    0
    0
  • Such law is presumably animated by concern about the morally problematic nature of such actions.

    0
    0
  • They were doctrinally sound and morally pure; but they were spiritually dead.

    0
    0
  • George explains well a number of the morally questionable tricks used on people during negotiations.

    0
    0
  • They have now - and not just in the case of Iraq - become morally questionable.

    0
    0
  • To the Samurai, the Ninja really were morally reprehensible.

    0
    0
  • Her right is not reduced or diminished merely because her decision to exercise it may appear morally repugnant ' .

    0
    0
  • A practice I think most people find morally repugnant.

    0
    0
  • Had the council not thought hunting to be morally repulsive, the resolution would not have been made.

    0
    0
  • sanctimonious attitude that claimed that New Labor was morally superior to the Conservative Party.

    0
    0
  • self-questioning intellect examines itself, morally this is conscience which elicits self-reproach.

    0
    0
  • The Life Aquatic might feature a morally questionable lead, but retains a reassuring sense of quirky otherworldliness.

    0
    0
  • The attempt to morally justify suicide bombing seems especially specious.

    0
    0
  • Poor little Wei, she'd always been the put upon Cinderella to a family of morally bankrupt ugly stepsisters.

    0
    0
  • Shopkeepers are not necessarily morally superior or better behaved than bus drivers.

    0
    0
  • As I will explain, the practice of racially-based vote suppression is not only morally despicable and illegal.

    0
    0
  • They are now wasting further billions to prop up a sinking titanic of enterprise that's morally, scientifically as well as financially bankrupt.

    0
    0
  • uncompromising moral stance they have isolated themselves from the " morally fragile " majority of society.

    0
    0
  • In other words, Thank You For Smoking is exactly the kind of satire Hollywood loves, politically correct and morally unimpeachable.

    0
    0
  • During the meal, one of the tutors would read extracts from morally uplifting writings, on which the boys could later be questioned.

    0
    0
  • Other staying upright almost morally obliged have more than.

    0
    0
  • God has also been believed to be the ultimate justification for living a loving and morally upright life.

    0
    0
  • They do not even give hope that we can become morally virtuous.

    0
    0
  • Yet the truly virtuous person performs a morally right action for its own sake.

    0
    0
  • CNA is not, by itself, morally wrong.

    0
    0
  • The chief of these men of good-will were Alexis Adashev and the monk Sylvester, men of so obscure an origin that almost every detail of their lives is conjectural, but both of them, morally, the best Muscovites of their day.

    0
    0
  • His system shows the influence of Kant's destructive criticism of the claims of Pure Reason, recognition of the value of morally conditioned knowledge, and doctrine of the kingdom of ends; of Schleiermacher's historical treatment of Christianity, regulative use of the idea of religious fellowship, emphasis on the importance of religious feeling; and of Lotze's theory of knowledge and treatment of personality.

    0
    0
  • But he conceives of him, on the other hand, as limited locally and morally - as having his special abode in the Jerusalem temple, or elsewhere in the midst of the Israelite people, and as dealing with other nations solely in the interests of Israel.

    0
    0
  • The bitter invectives against Ammon, Moab, Edom, Philistia, Tyre, Sidon and Egypt, put into Yahweh's mouth, are based wholly on the fact that these peoples are regarded as hostile and hurtful to Israel; Babylonia, though nowise superior to Egypt morally, is favoured and applauded because it is believed to be the instrument for securing ultimately the prosperity of Yahweh's people.

    0
    0
  • 11 -19) the conference reaffirmed strongly the necessity for definite Christian teaching in schools, "secular systems" being condemned as "educationally as well as morally unsound, since they fail to co-ordinate the training of the whole nature of the child" (Res.

    0
    0
  • of this group, though he was well aware that Celman, who was, his brother-in-law, was neither intellectually nor morally fitted for the post.

    0
    0
  • From this position it easily followed that actions, being merely external, were morally indifferent, and that the true Gnostic should abandon himself to every lust with perfect indifference.

    0
    0
  • Crispis position was shaken by a morally plausible but juridically untenable charge of bigamy, ~ li while on the 8th of March the election of Cairoli, an a t~o opponent of the ministry and head of the extremer section of the Left, to the presidency of the Chamber, induced Depretis to tender his resignation to the new king.

    0
    0
  • Moral elements must enter into theism at some point: and, as against empiricism, intuitionalism is morally strong.

    0
    0
  • But this God of Aristotle's is a cold consciousness, imitated only by the contemplative virtue of the philosopher, not by the morally active citizen.

    0
    0
  • The things which make for our ultimate welfare are the things we call morally good.

    0
    0
  • Does not Stephen himself rather say that morally good things are conditions of social, not personal welfare?

    0
    0
  • But morally he stood aloof.

    0
    0
  • They laid great stress on purity of morals; and convinced that the Utraquist Church was morally corrupt, they founded a number of independent societies, first at Kremsir and Meseritsch in Moravia, and then at Wilenow, Diwischau and Chelcic in Bohemia.

    0
    0
  • Ford by no means stood alone among English dramatists in his love of abnormal subjects; but few were so capable of treating them sympathetically, and yet without that reckless grossness or extravagance of expression which renders the morally repulsive aesthetically intolerable, or converts the horrible into the grotesque.

    0
    0
  • It also provides penalties for breaches of duty by the seller, but grants him protection in cases where he is not morally responsible.

    0
    0
  • He was absolutely incorruptible, thus standing, morally as well as intellectually, far above the level of his age.

    0
    0
  • In the conflict between her sense of what was morally just and her sense of duty to the state she laid herself open to the scoffing taunt of Frederick of Prussia, who said that in_the first partition of Poland elle pleurait et prenait toujours.

    0
    0
  • duly convoked it for this date to the town of Basel, and selected to preside over it the cardinal Julian Cesarini, a man of the greatest worth, both intellectually and morally.

    0
    0
  • Not very long after the disappearance of serfdom in the most advanced communities comes into sight the new system of colonial slavery, which, instead of being the spontaneous outgrowth of social necessities and subserving a temporary need of human development, was politically as well as morally a monstrous aberration.

    0
    0
  • He answered these attacks in kind, sometimes perhaps with unnecessary vehemence and rancour, but he never faltered in his work, and, an optimist by nature, a disciple of his friend George Combe, and a believer in the indefinite improvability of mankind, he was sustained throughout by his conviction that nothing could so much benefit the race, morally, intellectually and materially, as education.

    0
    0
  • The Pucelle, if morally inferior, is from a literary point of view of far more value.

    0
    0
  • A subsidy treaty with the sea powers (April 1 9, 1 794) filled his coffers; but the insurrection in Poland that followed the partition of 1793, and the threat of the isolated intervention of Russia, hurried him into the separate treaty of Basel with the French Republic (April 5, 1795), which was regarded by the great monarchies as a betrayal, and left Prussia morally isolated in Europe on the eve of the titanic struggle between the monarchical principle and the new political creed of the Revolution.

    0
    0
  • Thus he objects to the use of statistics because they favour that tendency to regard all men as mentally and morally equal which is so unhappily strong in modern times.

    0
    0
  • Ninety-eight divisions were in line and others in support, but neither physically nor morally were these troops all that could be desired.

    0
    0
  • It was perhaps impossible for him to renounce his rights, and his education, co-operating with his natural disposition, made it morally impossible for him to believe that he could be in the wrong.

    0
    0
  • Again, the army was morally weakened by a haunting dread of treason, and some of the chiefs, Ney for example, took the field with disturbing visions of the consequences of their late betrayal of the Bourbon cause, in case of Napoleon's defeat.

    0
    0
  • In the canonical Old Testament angels may inflict suffering as ministers of God, and Satan may act as accuser or tempter; but they appear as subordinate to God, fulfilling His will; and not as morally evil.

    0
    0
  • 2, means, literally, " from the beginning," to be physically born again; morally, to become as a little child; mystically, " from heaven, God," to be spiritually renewed.

    0
    0
  • It was answered that sin had not totally destroyed man's ethical nature, and that grace changed what was morally insensitive into what was morally sensitive, so that there could be a cooperation between God's grace and man's will.

    0
    0
  • In his later years Lithuania was in a state of chronic revolt, while Poland was bankrupt both morally and materially.

    0
    0
  • In the prose romances he is a monarch, the splendour of whose court, whose riches and generosity, are the admiration of all; but morally he is no whit different from the knights who surround him; he takes advantage of his bonnes fortunes as do others.

    0
    0
  • He had early resolved never to be drawn into controversy; and he adhered to his resolution with a steadfastness which is the more extraordinary because he was, both intellectually and morally, of the stuff of which controversialists are made.

    0
    0
  • and Henry III., who were then morally responsible for the pontificate, at length disgusted the Romans, who drove him out in 1044 and appointed Silvester III.

    0
    0
  • "debt"), a term loosely applied to any action or course of action which is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion.

    0
    0
  • This increase of villenage morally depressed the peasantry, and widened still further the breach between the yeomanry and the gentry.

    0
    0
  • He felt that the institution was morally wrong, but held that Congress could not interfere with it in the states in which it existed, and ought not to hinder the natural tendency toward territorial expansion through a fear that the evil would spread.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, such a thing is both physically and morally impossible.

    0
    0
  • There is no question of the legality of the pope's act; whether he was morally culpable, however, continues to be a matter of bitter controversy.

    0
    0
  • Sin is a necessity in each individual, and there is a total corruption of man's nature, physically as well as morally.

    0
    0
  • A good proof of the value of the system as remunerative and healthful, morally and physically, is seen in the growing desire of other countries to follow our lead.

    0
    0
  • But even the entrance upon the very first stage implies something more than, and something fundamentally different from, the life of an ordinary layman, however morally excellent this life may be.

    0
    0
  • He is thus received into the religion of Zoroaster, and is henceforth considered morally accountable for his acts.

    0
    0
  • Rapid settlement, excessive prices, reckless waste of money, and wild commercial ventures that glutted San Francisco with all objects usable and unusable made the following years astounding from an economic point of view; but not less bizarre was the social development, nor less extraordinary the problems of state-building in a society " morally and socially tried as no other American community ever has been tried " (Royce).

    0
    0
  • Once Paul's apostolate - a personal one, parallel with the more collective apostolate of " the Twelve " - has proved itself by tokens of Divine approval, Peter and his colleagues frankly recognize the distinction of the two missions, and are anxious only to arrange that the two shall not fall apart by religiously and morally incompatible usages (Acts xv.).

    0
    0
  • Then he will really feel morally responsible if he leaves them undone, hence the necessity of free-will.

    0
    0
  • The Finns are morally upright, hospitable, faithful and submissive, with a keen sense of personal freedom and independence, but also somewhat stolid, revengeful and indolent.

    0
    0
  • It is on the contrary over-developed in them, but ill-informed and working in ways unessential or even morally harmful.

    0
    0
  • He and his followers maintained that the will of man is determined by the practical judgment of the mind; that the cause of men's doing good or evil proceeds from the knowledge which God infuses into them; and that God does not move the will physically, but only morally, by virtue of its dependence on the judgment of the mind.

    0
    0
  • utilis, useful), the form of ethical doctrine which teaches that conduct is morally good according as it promotes the greatest happiness of the greatest number of people.

    0
    0
  • He never faced the question how a man is to be induced to act morally in cases where these governmental sanctions could be evaded or did not exist in the particular state in which a man chanced to find himself.

    0
    0
  • The best feature of the Data of Ethics is its anti-ascetic vindication of pleasure as man's natural guide to what is physiologically healthy and morally good.

    0
    0
  • Belief is not intellectual merely, but is determined by an act of will affirming what we hold to be morally good.

    0
    0
  • The black man is not simply a morally and intellectually undeveloped European, and education, except in rare instances, does not put him on an equality with the European.

    0
    0
  • Those who, as it has been happily put, identify Rabelais with Pantagruel, strive in vain, on any view intellectually consistent or morally respectable, to account for the vast ocean of pure or impure laughter and foolery which surrounds the few solid islets of sense and reason and devotion.

    0
    0
  • Sir Edward Grey affirmed that the Congo State had" morally forfeited every right to international recognition,"and quoted with approval Lord Cromer's statement that the Congo system was the worst he had ever seen.

    0
    0
  • Superior, probably, both intellectually and morally to his great rival Nubar, he lacked the latter's broad statesmanship as well as his pliability.

    0
    0
  • This relationship is morally and legally regarded as not less binding than kinship by birth.

    0
    0
  • If in the West Athanasianism is a datum, but unexamined, and not valued for its own sake, Augustinianism is a bold interpretation of the essential piety of the West, but an interpretation which not i even piety can long endure - morally burdensome if religiously mpressive.

    0
    0
  • In later Greek philosophy the term KaXdv (" honestum ") became still more technical in the signification of " morally good."

    0
    0
  • What he really means is less paradoxically stated in the general proposition that " originally and in reality it is natural and (morally speaking) necessary that the will should be determined in every action by the reason of the thing and the right of the case,"` as it is natural and (absolutely speaking) necessary that the understanding should submit to a demonstrated truth."

    0
    0
  • On the contrary, he is careful to point out, first, that immoderate social affections defeat themselves, miss their proper end, and are therefore bad; secondly, that as an individual's good is part of the good of the whole " self-affections " existing in a duly limited degree are morally good.

    0
    0
  • Calm self-love Hutcheson regards as morally indifferent; though he enters into a careful analysis of the elements of happiness,' in order to show that a true regard for private interest always coincides with the moral sense and with benevolence.

    0
    0
  • On this latter point Reid, in his Essays on the Active Powers of the Human Mind (1788), states a conclusion more in harmony with common sense, only maintaining that " no act can be morally good in which regard for what is right has not some influence."

    0
    0
  • It cannot reasonably be subordinated even to the moral faculty; in fact, a man who doubts the coincidence of the two - which on religious grounds we must believe to be complete in a morally governed world - is reduced to the " miserable dilemma whether it is better to be a fool or a knave."

    0
    0
  • He explains also that to seek one's own happiness cannot be prescribed as a duty, because it is an end to which every man is inevitably impelled by natural inclination: but that just because each inevitably desires his own happiness, and therefore desires that others should assist him in time of need, he is bound to make the happiness of others his ethical end, since he cannot morally demand aid from others, without accepting the obligation of aiding them in like case.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in his view, not merely natural inclinations towards pleasures, or the desires for selfish happiness, require to be morally resisted; but even the prompting of the individual's conscience, the impulse to do what seems to him right, if it comes into conflict with the common sense of his community.

    0
    0
  • To this revolt, and to the general tendency to find the principle of morality in an ideal good present to the consciousness of all persons capable of acting morally, the widespread recognition of reason as the ultimate court of appeal alike in religion or politics, and latterly in economics also, has no doubt contributed largely.

    0
    0
  • Oliver's severe conduct at Drogheda and elsewhere is not morally defensible, but such methods were common in the wars of the period, and much may be urged in his favour.

    0
    0
  • In order to preserve popular favor and their direction of the Republic, the Girondins had not dared to pronounce against the sentence of death, but had demanded an appeal to the people which was rejected; morally weakened by this equivocal attitude they were still more so by foreign events.

    0
    0
  • The Liberals left office after having done all that was morally and materially possible, considering the extremely difficult, indeed inextricable, situation in which they found the country in October 1897.

    0
    0
  • He was only five years old when his father died, and his sister Henriette, twelve years older than Ernest, a girl of remarkable character, was henceforth morally the head of the household.

    0
    0
  • Can one be well while suffering morally?

    0
    0
  • Have you helped them physically and morally?

    0
    0
  • But it is a good thing for proprietors who perish morally, bring remorse upon themselves, stifle this remorse and grow callous, as a result of being able to inflict punishments justly and unjustly.

    0
    0
  • They were doctrinally sound and morally pure; but they were spiritually dead.

    0
    0
  • George explains well a number of the morally questionable tricks used on people during negotiations.

    0
    0
  • They have now - and not just in the case of Iraq - become morally questionable.

    0
    0
  • To hunt, to chase, and to kill animals for sport will now be a crime as well as a morally reprehensible act.

    0
    0
  • To the Samurai, the Ninja really were morally reprehensible.

    0
    0
  • Her right is not reduced or diminished merely because her decision to exercise it may appear morally repugnant '.

    0
    0
  • A practice I think most people find morally repugnant.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, God has ordained, even in the bible, morally repugnant things, by the standards of human morality.

    0
    0
  • Had the council not thought hunting to be morally repulsive, the resolution would not have been made.

    0
    0
  • Accompanying this vicious attack on our party was a sanctimonious attitude that claimed that New Labor was morally superior to the Conservative Party.

    0
    0
  • MedXXXVII:1 The self-questioning intellect examines itself, morally this is conscience which elicits self-reproach.

    0
    0
  • The Life Aquatic might feature a morally questionable lead, but retains a reassuring sense of quirky otherworldliness.

    0
    0
  • The attempt to morally justify suicide bombing seems especially specious.

    0
    0
  • Shopkeepers are not necessarily morally superior or better behaved than bus drivers.

    0
    0
  • As I will explain, the practice of racially-based vote suppression is not only morally despicable and illegal.

    0
    0
  • They are now wasting further billions to prop up a sinking titanic of enterprise that's morally, scientifically as well as financially bankrupt.

    0
    0
  • Democracies, old and new, are threatened and morally troubled as well by the violence unleashed in uncivil wars.

    0
    0
  • By assuming a heroic, uncompromising moral stance they have isolated themselves from the " morally fragile " majority of society.

    0
    0
  • Whatever you do, or do not do, there will be morally undesirable consequences.

    0
    0
  • In other words, Thank You For Smoking is exactly the kind of satire Hollywood loves, politically correct and morally unimpeachable.

    0
    0
  • During the meal, one of the tutors would read extracts from morally uplifting writings, on which the boys could later be questioned.

    0
    0
  • Other staying upright almost morally obliged have more than.

    0
    0
  • God has also been believed to be the ultimate justification for living a loving and morally upright life.

    0
    0
  • Story-telling is not an morally neutral, value-free exercise.

    0
    0
  • They do not even give hope that we can become morally virtuous.

    0
    0
  • Yet the truly virtuous person performs a morally right action for its own sake.

    0
    0
  • CNA is not, by itself, morally wrong.

    0
    0
  • Overall, you must decide if you're morally OK with watching television programs without commercials and in a format not approved by the original network.

    0
    0
  • This would place them at stage three, making women appear to be inferior morally to men.

    0
    0
  • These behaviors, though deemed morally wrong by most societies, may also be symptoms of deeper psychological troubles.

    0
    0
  • Moral choice-Deciding whether to act in the morally right way.

    0
    0
  • Moral judgment-Perceiving an act as morally right or wrong.

    0
    0
  • If you're morally opposed to abortion and don't feel ready to raise your baby, adoption may be the best choice for you.

    0
    0
  • I want to make certain that the man has some character and morally aligns with me.

    0
    0
  • My goal always is to assist my students to grow intellectually, socially, morally, emotionally, physically and spiritually.

    0
    0
  • These bonds should be reaffirming as they morally strengthen those who practice these values.

    0
    0
  • A number of TV critics deemed the show "morally reprehensible," and the ratings were no picnic either.

    0
    0
  • The morally ambiguous Gaius Baltar is an absolutely brilliant scientist and physicist.

    0
    0
  • But he conceives of him, on the other hand, as limited locally and morally - as having his special abode in the Jerusalem temple, or elsewhere in the midst of the Israelite people, and as dealing with other nations solely in the interests of Israel.

    0
    1
  • The things which make for our ultimate welfare are the things we call morally good.

    0
    1
  • Moreover, such a thing is both physically and morally impossible.

    0
    1
  • Rapid settlement, excessive prices, reckless waste of money, and wild commercial ventures that glutted San Francisco with all objects usable and unusable made the following years astounding from an economic point of view; but not less bizarre was the social development, nor less extraordinary the problems of state-building in a society " morally and socially tried as no other American community ever has been tried " (Royce).

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →