Moral sentence examples

moral
  • Our efforts sometimes produced moral dilemmas.

    501
    282
  • Call it moral support.

    353
    238
  • There was a moral behind it, one that terrified her.

    194
    122
  • Their actions showed moral ambiguity.

    149
    111
  • There was no way to defend her moral objections without seeding doubt in his mind.

    86
    71
  • In spite of her strict moral standards on premarital relationships, Carmen was obviously stirred deeply by desire.

    74
    61
  • He had no faith in her self-control; her moral commitment.

    74
    65
  • Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep.

    71
    67
  • She was a master at building her own moral roadblocks, placing her goals frustratingly out of reach.

    49
    48
  • Watching his retreating back, it occurred to her once again that she might lose him over moral issues.

    48
    46
  • Drinking became more and more a physical and also a moral necessity.

    39
    33
  • Sarah related whole story, ending with, "Never thought I'd see the day that man would have a moral compass, let alone be one."

    36
    38
  • He plunked him­self down in the living room with a hit-me-with-your-best-shot look and lifted Mrs. Lincoln to his lap for moral support.

    32
    32
  • He maintains the unity and freedom of the soul, and the absolute obligation of the moral law.

    31
    31
  • Out of a moral bath.

    30
    41
  • The White God didn't invite the Original Vamp into his home out of a sense of kindness or moral obligation.

    28
    34
  • Then, again, La Fontaine seldom, if ever, appeals to our highest moral sense.

    27
    34
  • Vice and disease, which cast such a sombre moral hue over the world, seemed to have hardly any existence for him.

    26
    22
  • We will avoid war because it is unprofitable; and while that is not a moral reason, any reason that brings peace is fine by me.

    24
    28
  • That God is love and that the purpose of His love is the moral organization of humanity in the "Kingdom of God" - this idea, with its immense range of application-.-is applied in Ritschl's initial datum.

    23
    24
  • He wrote Practical Sermons (1858; edited by Noah Porter); Lectures on the Moral Government of God (2 vols., 1859), and Essays and Lectures upon Select Topics in Revealed Theology (1859), all published posthumously.

    22
    26
  • He was in no mood to argue against Claire Quincy's selfish interests in preserving the strained moral reputation of the long-dead ancestor.

    22
    28
  • The same society which produced his infamous favourites also produced St Philip of Moscow, and by refusing to listen to St Philip Ivan sank below even the not very lofty moral standard of his own age.

    21
    21
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.

    21
    25
  • Others, as most legislators, politicians, lawyers, ministers, and office-holders, serve the state chiefly with their heads; and, as they rarely make any moral distinctions, they are as likely to serve the devil, without intending it, as God.

    20
    19
  • All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.

    20
    22
  • That moment of moral hesitation which decides the fate of battles had arrived.

    18
    16
  • He puts ritual offences, however, in the same category with offences against the moral law, and he does not distinguish between immorality and practices that are survivals of old recognized customs: in ch.

    18
    18
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.

    18
    18
  • With God as "First Cause" or "Moral Legislator" theology has no concern; nor is it interested in the "speculative" problems indicated by the traditional doctrine of the Trinity.

    17
    19
  • Ezekiel's own moral code is that of the prophets, which insists on the practice of the fundamental civic virtues.

    17
    19
  • If the source of power lies neither in the physical nor in the moral qualities of him who possesses it, it must evidently be looked for elsewhere--in the relation to the people of the man who wields the power.

    17
    19
  • The nomination was brought about by the Cordoba clique, and Roca lacked the moral courage to oppose the decision.

    17
    21
  • It isn't violating any moral issue for you, is it?

    17
    22
  • These justifications release those who produce the events from moral responsibility.

    17
    22
  • The moral force of the attacking French army was exhausted.

    16
    16
  • Theologian, tutor, university reformer, a great master of a college, Jowett's best claim to the remembrance of succeeding generations was his greatness as a moral teacher.

    16
    17
  • But admiration of his talents must not blind us to his moral worthlessness, nor is it right to cast the blame for his excesses on the brutal and vicious society in which he lived.

    16
    22
  • As contrasted with Indra the war god, Varuna is the lord of the natural laws, the upholder of the physical and moral order of the universe.

    15
    15
  • Holiness, " the perfect accordance of the will with the moral law," demands an endless progress; and " this endless progress is only possible on the supposition of an endless duration of the existence and personality of the same rational being (which is called the immortality of the soul)."

    15
    15
  • Religious judgments of value determine objects according to their bearing on our moral and spiritual welfare.

    15
    18
  • It is sometimes levied as a reproach against Haggai that he makes no direct reference to moral duties.

    12
    11
  • And, if to satisfy these we were forced to maintain the existence of a world of moral standards, it was, thirdly, necessary to form some opinion as to the relation of these moral standards of value to the forms and facts of phenomenal existence.

    12
    16
  • About 1350 she went to Rome, partly to obtain from the pope the authorization of the new order, partly in pursuance of her self-imposed mission to elevate the moral tone of the age.

    12
    16
  • This is the moral of Lessing's Nathan the Wise, the hero of which is undoubtedly Mendelssohn.

    11
    13
  • Thus his moral ground is taken from under his feet.

    11
    14
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.

    11
    14
  • The moral hesitation which decided the fate of battles was evidently culminating in a panic.

    11
    15
  • In 1808 he was elected a member of the French Academy in place of Cabanis, and in 1832 he was also named a member of the Academy of Moral Sciences on its reorganization.

    10
    10
  • The Berlin of the day - the day of Frederick the Great - was in a moral and intellectual ferment.

    10
    15
  • The true method of science which he possessed forced him to condemn as useless the entire form which Schelling's and Hegel's expositions had adopted, especially the dialectic method of the latter, whilst his love of art and beauty, and his appreciation of moral purposes, revealed to him the existence of a transphenomenal world of values into which no exact science could penetrate.

    9
    13
  • However, notwithstanding the insistence on ritual, natural in a priest, his moral standard is high; following the prescription of Ex.

    9
    13
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.

    9
    13
  • To endow the universal substance with moral attributes, to maintain that it is more than the metaphysical ground of everything, to say it is the perfect realization of the holy, the beautiful and the good, can only have a meaning for him who feels within himself what real not imaginary values are clothed in those expressions.

    9
    14
  • In 1697 appeared the first volume of his Essays on Several Moral Subjects, to which a second was added in 1705, and a third in 1709.

    9
    15
  • Perhaps it need not be done so pedantically, thought Nicholas, or even done at all, but this untiring, continual spiritual effort of which the sole aim was the children's moral welfare delighted him.

    9
    17
  • For her there was no categorical imperative, no moral code save to follow the promptings of her heart.

    8
    9
  • It is by no means certain that he made the remark often attributed to him, "Let us enjoy the papacy since God has given it to us," but there is little doubt that he was by nature devoid of moral earnestness or deep religious feeling.

    8
    10
  • These temporary aims are like the broom fixed in front of a locomotive to clear the snow from the rails in front: they clear men's moral responsibilities from their path.

    8
    12
  • Lectures on the History of Ancient Philosophy by William Archer Butler (1814-1848;(1814-1848; lecturer on moral philosophy at Trinity College, Dublin), the value of which was greatly enhanced by Thompson's notes.

    7
    9
  • On the motion of Cabanis he was named associate of the Institute in the class of the moral and political sciences.

    6
    10
  • The fine insistence on individual moral responsibility in xviii.

    6
    10
  • To comprehend the real position we are forced to the conviction that the world of facts is the field in which, and that laws are the means by which, those higher standards of moral and aesthetical value are being realized; and such a union can again only become intelligible through the idea of a personal Deity, who in the creation and preservation of a world has voluntarily chosen certain forms and laws, through the natural operation of which the ends of His work are gained.

    6
    11
  • It would be wrong, however, to conclude that moral considerations have led up to this state of things.

    3
    2
  • His moral character was undoubtedly weak in other ways than this, but it is fair to remember that but for his astounding Confessions the more disgusting parts of it would not have been known, and that these Confessions were written, if not under hallucination, at any rate in circumstances entitling the self-condemned criminal to the benefit of considerable doubt.

    3
    2
  • The reputation which he gained from this work won for him the chair of ancient philosophy at the College de France (1838) and a seat at the Academy of Moral and Political Science (1839).

    3
    2
  • It was possible after all - but was it moral?

    3
    3
  • I'd go broke if everyone was that icky-sticky moral.

    3
    3
  • She had come to terms with her part in the surrogacy, but still wasn't sure it was moral.

    3
    3
  • The moral interest, which is so decisive on this question in the case of Kant, dominates Bishop Butler also.

    3
    3
  • Adam Ferguson (Institutes of Moral Philosophy, p. 119, new ed., 1800) argues that " the desire for immortality is an instinct, and can reasonably be regarded as an indication of that which the author of this desire wills to do."

    3
    3
  • The desire is reasonable, moral, social, religious; it has the same worth as the loftiest ideals, and worthiest aspirations of the soul of man.

    3
    3
  • The whole moral world is reduced to a point.

    3
    3
  • A moral paralysis creeps over us " (Natural Religion, Postscript).

    3
    3
  • The belief exercises a potent moral influence.

    3
    3
  • " The day," says Ernest Renan, " in which the belief in an after-life shall vanish from the earth will witness a terrific moral and spiritual decadence.

    3
    3
  • What they especially praise is the ethos or permanent moral level of his works as compared with those of the later "pathetic" school.

    3
    3
  • It was a time of moral reformation, when men were awaking to the need of better and purer living.

    3
    3
  • See John Clarke, Examination of the Notion of Moral Good and Evil advanced in a late book entitled The Religion of Nature Delineated (London, 1725); Drechsler, Ober Wollaston's Moral-Philosophie (Erlangen, 1802); Sir Leslie Stephen's History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1876), ch.

    2
    1
  • After his reception into the Church of Rome, Ward gave himself up to ethics, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

    2
    1
  • In 1851 he was made professor of moral philosophy at St Edmund's College, Ware, and was advanced to the chair of dogmatic theology in 1852.

    2
    1
  • Being thus composed, he is neither able to eat flesh like his father, nor herbs like his mother; therefore he perisheth from inanition"; the moral follows.

    2
    1
  • 4, 54 0 b, Bekk.), serves to point more than one moral.

    2
    1
  • Little more than half a century after the overthrow of the Jewish nationality, the Mishnah was practically completed, and by this code of rabbinic law - and law is here a term which includes the social, moral and religious as well as the ritual and legal phases of human activity - the Jewish people were organized into a community, living more or less autonomously under the Sanhedrin or Synedrium and its officials.

    2
    1
  • No community living in full accordance with that code could fail to reach a high moral and intellectual level.

    2
    1
  • The insurgents, who received moral support from Dr Sphakianakis, proclaimed the union of the island with Greece (March 1905), and their example was speedily followed by the assembly at Canea.

    2
    1
  • So, again, when Recejac defines mysticism as " the tendency to draw near to the Absolute in moral union.

    2
    1
  • In this year, Reid succeeded Adam Smith as professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow.

    2
    1
  • Yet it may be asserted that until the more durable and more reputable connexion with Mme de Nehra these love episodes were the most disgraceful blemishes in a life otherwise of a far higher moral character than has been commonly supposed.

    2
    1
  • This promise he brilliantly fulfilled by routing the forces of the Argive confederacy at the battle of Mantinea (418), the moral effect of which was out of all proportion to the losses inflicted on the enemy.

    2
    1
  • Kant, though pessimistic as regards the actual man, is optimistic regarding his moral capacity.

    2
    1
  • Despite the risks of failure and the probable consequences of such a failure, from the political and moral as well as the military point of view, it was considered essential both by Marshal Foch and Lord Haig that the attack on it should be carried out and that as soon as possible.

    2
    1
  • He claims for himself and his companions that they have lived a quiet and moral life, paying their dues and doing no wrong to their neighbours.

    2
    1
  • The canons respecting the clergy exhibit the clergy as already a special class with peculiar privileges, a more exacting moral standard, heavier penalties for delinquency.

    2
    2
  • His marvellous physical and moral equilibrium gave him an evenness of temper which always renaered his society charming.

    2
    2
  • He was one of the earliest political opponents of slavery, as distinguished from the radical Abolitionists, or the followers of William Lloyd Garrison, who eschewed politics and devoted themselves to a moral agitation.

    2
    2
  • In 1867 and 1868 he was crowned by the Academy of Moral Science for his work on Plato and Socrates.

    2
    2
  • But in all moral qualities the brilliant adventurer of the r 5th was infinitely superior to the brilliant adventurer of the r9th century.

    2
    2
  • All the evidence in Barclay's own work goes to prove that he was sincere in his reproof of contemporary follies and vice, and the gross accusations which John Bale 1 brings against his moral character may be put down to his hatred of Barclay's cloth.

    2
    2
  • At the end of nearly every section he adds an envoi of his own to drive home the moral more surely.

    2
    2
  • 30 of the finer feelings of moral evidence, which must, however, determine the action and opinions of our lives."

    2
    2
  • In The Idea of God as affected by Modern Knowledge (1885) Fiske discusses the theistic problem, and declares that the mind of man, as developed, becomes an illuminating indication of the mind of God, which as a great immanent cause includes and controls both physical and moral forces.

    2
    2
  • More original, perhaps, is the argument in the immediately preceding work, The Destiny of Man, viewed in the Light of his Origin (1884), which is, in substance, that physical evolution is a demonstrated fact; that intellectual force is a later, higher and more potent thing than bodily strength; and that, finally, in most men and some "lower animals" there is developed a new idea of the advantageous, a moral and non-selfish line of thought and procedure, which in itself so transcends the physical that it cannot be identified with it or be measured by its standards, and may or must be enduring, or at its best immortal.

    2
    2
  • In Germany at the same period the feudal system debarred the Jews from holding land, and though there was as yet no material persecution they suffered moral injury by being driven exclusively into finance and trade.

    2
    2
  • Jeff is very moral.

    2
    3
  • And, as the sympathizers with Hegel try to force mechanical necessity into the garb of absolute or ideal necessity, so they seek to show that moral necessity is only an inferior form of absolute or ideal or, we might say, mathematical necessity.

    1
    0
  • Theists, on the other hand, will contend that the distinctiveness of moral necessity is vital to religion.

    1
    0
  • All men may perhaps be aiming everywhere at the same moral ideal,' but it is absurd to.

    1
    0
  • On the other hand, in discussing the ontological argument, Lotze commits himself to a moral a priori (below, ad fin.).

    1
    0
  • This view seems to preserve all that is questionable in Libertarianism, while omitting its moral meaning.

    1
    0
  • We, from the altered modern point of view, may doubt whether Butler's curious account of the mechanism of moral psychology is a simple report of facts.

    1
    0
  • Butler divests himself in this book .of the principles of " liberty " and " moral fitness " in which personally he believes.3 Part i.

    1
    0
  • Butler is charged by Sir Leslie 'Stephen with arguing illegitimately - professing to make no appeal to " moral fitness," and yet contending that the facts of human life show (the beginnings of) moral retribution for good and evil.

    1
    0
  • Assuredly Butler did not mean to give him his right of speaking about moral evil and good when he waived the " high priori method of vindicating their real existence.

    1
    0
  • Yet it is a very grave question whether the idea of God's moral government admits of being argued as pure matter of fact.

    1
    0
  • (" the natural and moral proofs of a future life commonly insisted upon "); last sentence of part i., Conclusion (" the proper proofs of [natural] religion from our moral nature," &c.); part ii.

    1
    0
  • None the less, in the issue, it is the very element which goes beyond an appeal to facts - it is the depth and purity of Butler's moral nature - which fascinates the reader, and wins praise from Matthew Arnold or Goldwin Smith or even Leslie Stephen.

    1
    0
  • Wherever moral postulates make their presence felt, Butler's doctrine of man, as of God, leaps into new vigour.

    1
    0
  • The Three Sermons also point to a moral argument for theism, but forbear to press it (Sermon ii.; when the third sense of the word " Nature " is being explained).

    1
    0
  • In the practical questions which arose, and in the great debate which was political, economical and moral, she took a very active part.

    1
    0
  • Mrs Stowe used the reputation thus won in promoting a moral and religious enmity to slavery.

    1
    0
  • The moral training which he received from his grandfather and his mother must have been all but perfect.

    1
    0
  • (1) Mathematical geography, which deals with the form, size and movements of the earth and its place in the solar system; (2) Moral geography, or an account of the different customs and characters of mankind according to the region they inhabit; (3) Political geography, the divisions according to their organized governments; (4) Mercantile geography, dealing with the trade in the surplus products of countries; (5) Theological geography, or the distribution of religions.

    1
    0
  • When we come to consider the moral quality of the act of prayer, this contrast between the spirit of public and private religion is fundamental for all but the most advanced forms of cult.

    1
    0
  • Under Arnold's superintendence the school became not merely a place where a certain amount of classical or general learning was to be obtained, but a sphere of intellectual, moral and religious discipline, where healthy characters were formed, and men were trained for the duties, and struggles and responsibilities of life.

    1
    0
  • His interest also in public matters was incessant, especially ecclesiastical questions, and such as bore upon the social welfare and moral improvement of the masses.

    1
    0
  • The great peculiarity and charm of Dr Arnold's nature seemed to lie in the supremacy of the moral and the spiritual element over his whole being.

    1
    0
  • In the first half of the 13th century, Abraham ibn Ilasdai, a vigorous supporter of Maimonides, translated (or adapted) a large number of philosophical works from Arabic, among them being the Sepher ha-tappuah, based on Aristotle's de Anima, and the Mozene Zedeq of Ghazzali on moral philosophy, of both of which the originals are lost.

    1
    0
  • In spite of his inferior education, the contemporaries of Boniface trusted his prudence and moral character; yet when in financial straits he sold offices, and in 1399 transformed the annates into a permanent tax.

    1
    0
  • To form a true understanding of what is strictly implied in the word "nobility," in its social as opposed to a purely moral sense, it is needful to distinguish its meaning from that of several words with which it is likely to be confounded.

    1
    0
  • He married in 1895 Helen Dendy, herself the author of books on social problems. During 1903-8 he was professor of moral philosophy at St.

    1
    0
  • the Moral Self (1897); Principles of Individuality (1911); What Religion Is (1920) as well as translations of Hegel and Lotze.

    1
    0
  • With all its defective psychology, its barren logic, its immature technique, it emphasized two great and necessary truths, firstly, the absolute responsibility of the individual as the moral unit, and, secondly, the autocracy of the will.

    1
    0
  • Zeno was a pupil of Crates, from whom he learned the moral worth of self-control and indifference to sensual indulgence.

    1
    0
  • Even in the middle ages there were not wanting those - the St Victors, Bonaventura - who sought to vindicate mystical if not moral redemption as the central thought of Christianity.

    1
    0
  • - on Natural Religion - he defends a moral or punishing Deity against the sentimental softness of the age.

    1
    0
  • Unfortunately (perhaps) Butler prefers to argue on admitted principles; holds much of his own moral belief in reserve; tries to reduce everything to a question of probable fact.

    1
    0
  • But by treating the atonement simply as revealed (and unexplained) matter of fact - in spite of some partial analogies in human experience, a thing essentially anomalous - Butler repeats, and applies to the moral contents of Christianity, what Aquinas said of its speculative doctrines.

    1
    0
  • This gives a new and moral filling to the conception of " supernatural revelation."

    1
    0
  • But hereafter it may not prove possible for the apologist to assume as unchallenged the Christian moral outlook.

    1
    0
  • The economic and moral condition of the peasantry was little improved by freedom, and in many districts there were signs of positive impoverishment and demoralization.

    1
    0
  • It was not without secret satisfaction, therefore, that Prince Gorchakov watched the repeated defeats of the Austrian army in the Italian campaign of 1859, and he felt inclined to respond to the advances made to him by Napoleon III.; but the germs of a Russo-French alliance, which had come into existence immediately after the Crimean War, ripened very slowly, and they were completely destroyed in 1863 when the French emperor wounded Russian sensibilities deeply by giving moral and diplomatic support to the Polish insurrection.

    1
    0
  • Petitions continued to flow in to the emperor's cabinet, praying for a national representation, from the zemstvos, from the nobles and from the professional classes, and their moral was enforced by general agitation, by partial strikes, and by outrages which culminated at Moscow in the murder of the Grand-duke Sergius (February 4th, 1 9 05).

    1
    0
  • Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took a first-class both in the mathematical tripos and in the 2nd part of the moral sciences tripos, he remained at Cambridge as a lecturer, and became well known as a student of mathematical philosophy and a leading exponent of the views of the newer school of Realists.

    1
    0
  • The moral effect of the report, with the criticisms of the company's methods and recommendations appended thereto, is great, and it rarely happens that a company refuses to adopt, or at any rate to test, the recommendations so made.

    1
    0
  • and Mauss describe a sacrifice as "a religious act, which, by the consecration of a victim, modifies the moral state of the sacrificer or of certain material objects which he has in view," i.e.

    1
    0
  • Of this tradition the Naboth incident in the time of Ahab furnishes a clear example which brings to light the contrast between the Tyrian Baal-cult, which was scarcely ethical, and of which Jezebel and Ahab were devotees, and the moral requirements of the religion of Yahweh of which Elijah was the prophet and impassioned exponent.

    1
    0
  • But the prevalence of the worship of " other gods " and of graven images in these " high places," and the moral debasement of life which accompanied these cults, made it clear that the " high places " were sources of grave injury to Israel's social life.

    1
    0
  • The Mahratta Brahmans possess, in an intense degree, the qualities of that famous caste, physical, intellectual and moral.

    1
    0
  • There are no limits to the good results of his introduction of a true method of reasoning into the moral and political sciences.

    1
    0
  • Its nearness to Washington, the material and manufacturing resources concentrated in it, and the moral importance attached to its possession by both sides, caused it to be regarded as the centre of gravity of the military operations in the east to which the greatest leaders and the finest armies were devoted from 1861 to 1865.

    1
    0
  • It was to prevent any falling off from this high moral standard till it should become part of his being that his father kept the boy so closely with himself.

    1
    0
  • About this work he said little in the Autobiography, probably because his main concern there was to expound the influences that effected his moral and mental development.

    1
    0
  • Mill remarks that the uncertainty hanging over the very elements of moral and social philosophy proves that the means of arriving at the truth in those sciences are not yet properly understood.

    1
    0
  • By 1831 the period of depression had passed; Mill's enthusiasm for humanity had been thoroughly reawakened, and had taken the definite shape of an aspiration to supply an unimpeachable method of search for conclusions in moral and social science.

    1
    0
  • Be this as it may, enthusiastic as he was for a new logic that might give certainty to moral and social conclusions, Mill was no less resolute that the new logic should stand in no antagonism to the old.

    1
    0
  • He distinguishes a threefold sense of scripture, a grammaticohistorical, a moral and a pneumatic - the last being the proper and highest sense.

    1
    0
  • The pupils at Brienne, far from receiving a military education, were grounded in ordinary subjects, and in no very efficient manner, by brethren of the order, or society, of Minims. The moral tone of the school was low; and Napoleon afterwards spoke with contempt of the training of the "monks" and the manner of life of the scholars.

    1
    0
  • Still more important, perhaps, was the change in moral which the Spanish rising brought about.

    1
    0
  • Now he stood forth to the world as an unscrupulous aggressor; moral force, previously marshalled on the side of France, now began to pass to the side of his opponents.

    1
    0
  • The value of that unseen ally he well knew: "Once again, let me tell you," he wrote to General Clarke on the 10th of October 1809, "in war moral and opinion are more than half of the reality."

    1
    0
  • Treating of God in his various aspects "as a being of the understanding," "as a moral being or law," "as love" and so on, Feuerbach shows that in every aspect God corresponds to some feature or need of human nature.

    1
    0
  • Hence arise various mistaken beliefs, such as the belief in revelation which not only injures the moral As feudalism passed from its age of supremacy into its age of decline, its customs tended to crystallize into fixed forms.

    1
    0
  • His life, henceforth, was devoted to teaching (mainly philosophical) in the university - first as college tutor, afterwards, from 1878 until his death (at Oxford on the 26th of March 1882) as Whyte's Professor of Moral Philosophy.

    1
    0
  • In the light of this knowledge we shall be able to formulate the moral code, which, in turn, will serve as a criterion of actual civic and social institutions.

    1
    0
  • Carrying on the same analytical method into the special department of moral philosophy, Green held that ethics applies to the peculiar conditions of social life that investigation into man's nature which metaphysics began.

    1
    0
  • The faculty employed in this further investigation is no "separate moral faculty," but that same reason which is the source of all our knowledge - ethical and other.

    1
    0
  • As the result of this analysis, combined with an investigation into the surroundings man lives in, a "content" - a moral code - becomes gradually evolved.

    1
    0
  • the moral ideal, as a whole, can be realized only in some society of persons who, while remaining ends to themselves in the sense that their individuality is not lost but rendered more perfect, find this prefection attainable only when the separate individualities are integrated as part of a social whole.

    1
    0
  • Moral goodness cannot be limited to, still less constituted by, the cultivation of self-regarding virtues, but consists in the attempt to realize in practice that moral ideal which self-analysis has revealed to us as our ideal.

    1
    0
  • From this fact arises the ground of political obligation, for the institutions of political or civic life are the concrete embodiment of moral ideas in terms of our day and generation.

    1
    0
  • It is obvious that the final moral ideal is not realized in any body of civic institutions actually existing, but the same analysis which demonstrates this deficiency points out the direction which a true development will take.

    1
    0
  • He was remarkable for both his moral and physical courage, and in politics was notable for his independence of party.

    1
    0
  • Two years later, with that degree of moral courage which was one of his distinguishing characteristics, as it has been of his descendants, he, aided by Josiah Quincy, Jr., defended the British soldiers who were arrested after the "Boston Massacre," charged with causing the death of four persons, inhabitants of the colony.

    0
    0
  • He then draws a positive demonstration of the truth of his religion from the effects of the new faith, and especially from the excellence of its moral teaching, and concludes with a comparison of Christian and Pagan doctrines, in which the latter are set down with naïve confidence as the work of demons.

    0
    0
  • He secured an excellent set of scientific apparatus and improved the instruction in the natural sciences; he introduced courses in Hebrew and French about 1772; and he did a large part of the actual teaching, having courses in languages, divinity, moral philosophy and eloquence.

    0
    0
  • Charles, however, has given good grounds for supposing that it is merely a preface, and that the work went on to discuss grammar, logic (which Bacon thought of little service, as reasoning was innate), mathematics, general physics, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

    0
    0
  • He considered the incarnation of Christ as the necessary manifestation to man of an eternal sonship in the divine nature, apart from which those filial qualities which God demands from man could have no sanction; by faith as used in Scripture he understood to be meant a certain moral or spiritual activity or energy which virtually implied salvation, because it implied the existence of a principle of spiritual life possessed of an immortal power.

    0
    0
  • He was accused by the archbishop of Armagh of serious moral delinquency, and his recall was demanded both by the primate and the bishop of Meath.

    0
    0
  • Philip was by nature dull and phlegmatic. He had learnt morality from Fenelon's teaching, and showed himself throughout his life strongly adverse to the moral laxity of his grandfather and of most of the princes of his time.

    0
    0
  • The interest of insects to the eastern races was, however,economic, religious or moral.

    0
    0
  • Medical science has never gauged, perhaps never enough set itself to gauge the intimate connexion between moral fault and disease.

    0
    0
  • To what extent or in how many cases what is called illness is due to moral springs having been used amiss, whether by being over-used, or by not being used sufficiently, we hardly at all know, and we too little inquire.

    0
    0
  • Certainly it is due to this very much more than we commonly think, and the more it is due to this the more do moral therapeutics rise in possibility and importance " (Literature and Dogma, pp. 143-144).

    0
    0
  • The moral therapeutics consists in the influence of a powerful will over others.

    0
    0
  • As regards the theory, it may be pointed out: (I) that the nature or cosmical miracles - feeding of the five thousand, stilling of the storm, withering of the fig-tree - are as wellattested as the miracles of healing; (2) that many of the diseases, the cure of which is reported, are of a kind with which moral therapeutics could not effect anything; 1 (3) that Christ's own insight regarding the power by which he wrought His works is directly challenged by this explanation, for He never failed to ascribe His power to the Father dwelling in Him.

    0
    0
  • Their moral quality must correspond with the character of God; and they must be connected with teaching which to reason and conscience approves itself divine.

    0
    0
  • The existence of physical evil, and still more of moral evil, forbids the assumption without qualification that the real is the rational.

    0
    0
  • Their representation of the moral character, the religious consciousness, the teaching of Jesus, inspires confidence.

    0
    0
  • When the Church had established itself in the world, and possessed in its moral and religious.

    0
    0
  • The a posteriori evidence as regards both its moral and religious quality and its date is altogether inferior to the evidence of the Gospels.

    0
    0
  • The penitentiary system, according to which the priest enforced a code of moral law in the confessional by the sanction of penance - penance which must be performed as a condition of admission to the sacrament of the Eucharist - had been from early times a great instrument in the civilization of the raw Germanic races.

    0
    0
  • But the vices were not only vices of the government: they were also vices, partly inevitable, partly moral, in the governing race itself.

    0
    0
  • Left to itself, the native population lost physical and moral vigour.

    0
    0
  • on a kingdom founded by religious zeal on holy soil - whether the kingdom possessed that moral basis which alone can give a right of survival to any institution or organization.

    0
    0
  • But for Innocent these outbursts of the revivalist element, which always accompanied the Crusades, had their moral: "the very children put us to shame," he wrote; "while we sleep 1 Already under Innocent III.

    0
    0
  • The natural outcome of these experiences of the author is that he cannot recognize a moral government of the world.

    0
    0
  • Moral conduct is to be regulated not by divine law (of this nothing is said) but by human experience.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding some obvious moral and intellectual defects, he was the most eminent and the most disinterested of those who had co-operated with William I.

    0
    0
  • This was the problem that faced Ignatius, and in his endeavour to effect a needed reformation in the individual and in society his work and the success that crowned it place him among the moral heroes of humanity.

    0
    0
  • In 1866 he became professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow, and in 1893 succeeded Benjamin Jowett as master of Balliol.

    0
    0
  • in 1892; he was made a corresponding member of the French Academy of Moral and Political Science and a fellow of the British Academy.

    0
    0
  • Underlying all of these issues was of course the great moral and political problem as to whether slavery was to be confined to the south-eastern section of the country or be permitted to spread to the Pacific. The two questions not growing out of the Mexican War were in regard to the abolition of the slave trade in the District of Columbia, and the passage of a new fugitive slave law.

    0
    0
  • Telramund, again, is no ordinary operatic villain; there is genuine tragedy in his moral ruin; and even the melodramatic Ortrud is a much more life-like intrigante than might be inferred from Wagner's hyperbolical stage-directions, which almost always show his manner at its worst.

    0
    0
  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

    0
    0
  • The idea of this immense collection of ethical and moral precepts was first suggested to the poet by his favourite disciple Hasan, better known as Husam-uddin, who in 1258 became Jalal-uddin's chief assistant.

    0
    0
  • Recognizing that the true aim of the scheme of church reform brought forward in parliament in 1529 was to put down the only moral force that could withstand the royal will, he energetically opposed the reformation of abuses, which doubtless under other circumstances he would have been the first to accept.

    0
    0
  • There is further resemblance in the formal moral code, arranged by classes of persons, and having much the same contents in the two epistles (Eph.

    0
    0
  • Moralists generally, however, are agreed that in all moral judgments of this character there is an.

    0
    0
  • The part played by conscience in relation to general moral laws and particular cases will vary according to the view taken of the character of the general laws.

    0
    0
  • By the union of great moral qualities with high, though not the highest, intellectual faculties, he carried the Indian empire safely through the stress of the storm, and, what was perhaps a harder task still, he dealt wisely with the enormous difficulties arising at the close of such a war, established a more liberal policy and a sounder financial system, and left the people more contented than they were before.

    0
    0
  • He was a type of the French revolutionists, excitable, warm-hearted, half-educated, who lost their mental and moral balance in the chaos of the revolutionary period.

    0
    0
  • While not unaware that with this, as with all moral questions, there may be a certain borderland of practical difficulty, Friends endeavour to bring all things to the test of the Realities which, though not seen, are eternal, and to hold up the ideal, set forth by George Fox, of living in the.

    0
    0
  • Educated at several schools in London, he went to Edinburgh University in 1792, where he attended Dugald Stewart's moral philosophy class.

    0
    0
  • His encyclical issued at Easter 1902, and described by himself as a kind of will, was mainly a reiteration of earlier condemnations of the Reformation, and of modern philosophical systems, which for their atheism and materialism he makes responsible for all existing moral and political disorders.

    0
    0
  • When we consider its moral effects, whilst endeavouring to avoid exaggeration, we must yet pronounce its influence to have been profoundly detrimental.

    0
    0
  • The later moral schools of Greece scarcely at all concern themselves with the institution.

    0
    0
  • But it was in the 2nd century, as we have said, that " the victory of moral ideas " in this, as in other departments of life, became " decisive....

    0
    0
  • But in the meantime much might be done towards further mitigating the evils of slavery, especially by impressing on master and slave their relative duties and controlling their behaviour towards one another by the exercise of an independent moral authority.

    0
    0
  • All children under six years of age were to be at once free, and provision was to be made for their religious and moral instruction.

    0
    0
  • The Aryan folkreligion was polytheistic. Worship was paid to popular divinities, such as the war-god and dragon-slayer Indra, to natural forces and elements such as fire, but the Aryans also believed in the ruling of moral powers and of an eternal law in nature (v.

    0
    0
  • Ethically, too, the new doctrine stands on a higher plane, and represents, in its moral laws, a superior civilization.

    0
    0
  • Jose Zorrilla Y Moral >>

    0
    0
  • On the whole, his moral attitude is cynical, and he is inclined to regard self-interest as the best criterion.

    0
    0
  • From 1853 until his death, on the second of August 1859, he was president of the newly established Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he taught political economy, intellectual and moral philosophy, and natural theology.

    0
    0
  • With the moral and ecclesiastical decay of the papacy in the 9th and 10th centuries much of its territorial authority slipped from its grasp; and by the middle of the I ith century its rule was not recognized beyond Rome and the immediate vicinity.

    0
    0
  • As the three triads respectively represent intellectual, moral and physical qualities, the first is called the Intellectual, the second the Moral or Sensuous, and the third the Material World.

    0
    0
  • (I) The Spirit (neshamah), which is the highest degree of being, corresponds to and is operated upon by the Crown, which is the highest triad in the Sephiroth, and is called the Intellectual World; (2) the Soul (rah), which is the seat of the moral qualities, corresponds to and is operated upon by Beauty, which is the second triad in the Sephiroth, and is called the Moral World; and (3) the Cruder Soul (nephesh), which is immediately connected with the body, and is the cause of its lower instincts and the animal life, corresponds to and is operated upon by Foundation, the third triad in the Sephiroth, called the Material World.

    0
    0
  • That this brought moral laxity was a stronger reason for condemning the Kabbalah, 1 See F.

    0
    0
  • A brief description of how the Egyptians were punished through the very things with which they sinned (though the punishment was not fatal, for God loves all things that exist), and how judgments on the Canaanites were executed gradually (so as to give them time to repent), is followed by a dissertation on the origin, various forms, absurdity and results of polytheism and idolatry (xiii.-xv.): the worship of natural objects is said to be less blameworthy than the worship of images - this latter, arising from the desire to honour dead children and living kings (the Euhemeristic theory), is inherently absurd, and led to all sorts of moral depravity.

    0
    0
  • The figurative nature of the language respecting the future makes it difficult to determine precisely the thought of the book on this point; but it seems to contemplate continued existence hereafter for both righteous and wicked, and rewards and punishments allotted on the basis of moral character.

    0
    0
  • The reports of the earlier wise men, men of practical sagacity in political and social affairs, have come to us from unfriendly sources; it is quite possible that among them were some who took interest in life for its own sake, and reflected on its human moral basis.

    0
    0
  • For some the influence of this association was of a general nature, merely modifying their conception of the moral life; others adopted to a greater or less extent some of the peculiar ideas of the current systems of philosophy.

    0
    0
  • 6-8 (5-7), Eccles., Wisdom, are discussions of the moral government of the world; Prov., Pss.

    0
    0
  • treats of the autonomy of reason in the moral life; Pss.

    0
    0
  • Nor do the sages go beyond the old position in their ethical theory: they have no philosophical discussion of the basis of the moral life; their standard of good conduct is existing law and custom; their motive for right-doing is individual eudaemonistic, not the good of society, or loyalty to an ideal of righteousness for its own sake, but advantage for one's self.

    0
    0
  • I-I I; Eccles.), and, as a result, scepticism as to a moral government of the world.

    0
    0
  • The government was weak and lacked moral support in the whole island.

    0
    0
  • Lassalle, accused of moral complicity, was acquitted on appeal.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the Russians had not lost a single gun and the moral of their men had been improved by the result of the many minor encounters with the enemy; further, the and then began a series of rearguard actions and nocturnal retreats which completely accomplished their purpose of wearing down the French army.

    0
    0
  • Ultimately the sun went down on an undecided field on which 25,000 French and 38,000 Russians had fallen, but the, moral reaction on the former was far greater than on the latter.

    0
    0
  • The material loss inflicted on the French was not very great, but its effect in raising the moral of the raw Prussian cavalry and increasing their confidence in their old commander was enormous.

    0
    0
  • The moral effect, he promised himself, would be prodigious, and there was neither room nor food for these 100,000 elsewhere.

    0
    0
  • From these reveries he was at length awakened by news which indicated that the consequences of Macdonald's defeat had been far more serious to the moral of that command than he had imagined.

    0
    0
  • As a dramatist he worked more in the spirit of Plautus than of Ennius, Pacuvius, Accius or Terence; but the great Umbrian humorist is separated from his older contemporary, not only by his breadth of comic power, but by his general attitude of moral and political indifference.

    0
    0
  • Clement thus looks entirely at the enlightened moral elevation to which Christianity raises man.

    0
    0
  • For his moral doctrine he borrowed freely from Stoicism.

    0
    0
  • The Greeks are of an especially fine type, physical and moral, and noted all through Anatolia for energy and stability.

    0
    0
  • 23) that not Soult's corps alone, but three French corps, had come through the pass of Banos without opposition; that Soult himself was at Naval Moral, between him and the bridge of Almaraz on the Tagus, and that Cuesta was retreating from Talavera.

    0
    0
  • He was professor of moral philosophy at Bourges (1845-1848) and Strassburg (1848-- 1857), and of logic at the lycee Louis-le-Grand, Paris (1857-1864).

    0
    0
  • In 1864 he was appointed to the chair of philosophy at the Sorbonne, and elected a member of the academy of the moral and political sciences.

    0
    0
  • He is conceived as controlling or overcoming the forces of nature; and though an earlier mythology has supplied some of the ideas, yet, as with the opening chapters of Genesis, they are transfigured by the moral purpose which animates them, the purpose to subdue all things that could frustrate the destiny of God's anointed (v.

    0
    0
  • The philosophy of history, by which Hebrew prophets could read a deep moral significance into national disaster and turn the flank of resistless attack, became one of the most important elements in the nation's faith.

    0
    0
  • If the worldpowers were hard as flint in their dealings with Israel, the people of God were steeled to such moral endurance that each clash of their successive onsets kindled some new flame of devotion.

    0
    0
  • God being what He is, at once moral and all-powerful, the immoral life is doomed to overthrow, whether the immorality consist in grasping rapacity, proud self-aggrandizement, cruel exaction, exulting triumph or senseless idolatry.

    0
    0
  • He was also a member of the Academy, and of the Academy of Moral and Political Science, and curator of the Department of Antiquities at the Louvre (from 1870).

    0
    0
  • In 1896 he succeeded Eduard Zeller as professor of moral philosophy at Berlin.

    0
    0
  • Moral (1900).

    0
    0
  • casus, a point of law), the art of bringing general moral principles to bear on particular actions.

    0
    0
  • It is, in short, applied morality; anybody is a casuist who reflects about his duties and tries to bring them into line with some intelligible moral standard.

    0
    0
  • This concrete side of moral philosophy came specially into evidence when Stoicism was transplanted to Rome.

    0
    0
  • Such advice could not be grateful to the philosophers themselves - then a definite professional class, not unlike the "spiritual directors" of a later Rome, who earned their bread by smoothing away the doubts of the scrupulous on all matters intellectual and moral.

    0
    0
  • Raymond Thamin, Un Probleme moral dans l'antiquite (Paris, 1884).

    0
    0
  • The Anglican casuists are discussed in Whewell, Lectures on Moral Philosophy (London, 1862).

    0
    0
  • The tragedians used her story to point the moral of the instability of human happiness; Niobe became the representative of human nature, liable to pride in prosperity and forgetfulness of the respect and submission due to the gods.

    0
    0
  • But he taught that the state may interfere with legal or public duties only, and not with moral or private ones; He would not have even atheists punished, though they should be expelled the country, and he came forward as an earnest opponent of the prosecution of witches and of the use of torture.

    0
    0
  • The fundamental articles of Parker's religious faith were the three "instinctive intuitions" of God, of a moral law, and of immortality.

    0
    0
  • The schochat or butcher must be a devout Jew and of high moral character, and be duly licensed by the chief rabbi.

    0
    0
  • In this narrower sense the word has played a great part in ethical systems, which have spoken of the social or parental "affections" as in some sense a part of moral obligation.

    0
    0
  • Other requirements were sound health, high moral character and an honourable calling.

    0
    0
  • For the equites equo publico high moral character, good health and the equestrian fortune were necessary.

    0
    0
  • Two well-defined views in this way prevailed, to which was added a third, according to which the books, though not to be put in the same rank as the canonical scriptures of the Hebrew collection, yet were of value for moral uses and to be read in congregations, - and hence they were called " ecclesiastical " - a designation first found in Rufinus (ob.

    0
    0
  • Christians being released, in important particulars, from conformity to the Old Testament polity as a whole, a real difficulty attended the settlement of the limits and the immediate authority of the remainder, known vaguely as the moral law.

    0
    0
  • Its obligation rests on the good faith of the parties to the reference, and on the fact that, with the help of a world-wide press, public opinion can always be brought to bear on any state that seeks to evade its moral duty.

    0
    0
  • Each of the signatory powers is to designate within three months from the ratification of the convention four persons at the most, of recognized competence in international law, enjoying the highest moral consideration, and willing to accept the duties of arbitrators.

    0
    0
  • Lastly, there is the moral aspect of the problem.

    0
    0
  • He was thus a deity of the realms of air and light, and, by transfer to the moral realm, the god of truth and loyalty.

    0
    0
  • Moral Influence.

    0
    0
  • The necessity of moral rectitude was itself an incentive.

    0
    0
  • the unity of the political world and the debasement of its moral life.

    0
    0
  • The moral character of churchmen in Brazil has been severely criticized by many observers, and the ease with which disestablishment was effected is probably largely due to their failings.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the Jesuits undertook the moral and religious culture of the natives, and of the scarcely less savage colonists.

    0
    0
  • While the population of Brazil continued to increase, the moral and intellectual culture of its inhabitants was left in great measure to chance; they grew up with those robust and healthy sentiments which are engendered by the absence of false teachers, but with a repugnance to legal ordinances, and encouraged in their ascendancy over the Indians to habits of violence and oppression.

    0
    0
  • social disgrace) was "an act free from moral turpitude," although the law properly held it to be wilful murder.

    0
    0
  • This union took place in defiance of a prohibition which had been promulgated, in 1049, by the papal council of Reims. But the affinity of William and Matilda was so remote that political rather than moral considerations may have determined the pope's action.

    0
    0
  • During this period he published his poetical satire called Metamorphosis (1726), his Epistolae ad virum perillustrem (1727), his Description of Denmark and Norway (1729), History of Denmark, Universal Church History, Biographies of Famous Men, Moral Reflections, Description of Bergen (1737), A History of the Jews, and other learned and laborious compilations.

    0
    0
  • The governor was strongly opposed to this step, as he was anxious to protect the coal supply, and also feared the moral effect of a withdrawal.

    0
    0
  • Cobden's efforts in furtherance of free trade were always subordinated to what he deemed the highest moral purposes - the promotion of peace on earth and goodwill among men.

    0
    0
  • The moral superiority of Christianity to paganism was speedily obvious.

    0
    0
  • We cannot trace the gradations of this political revolution, but we know that it met with determined opposition from the crown, which resulted in the utter destruction of the Arpads, who, while retaining to the last their splendid physical qualities, now exhibited unmistakeable signs of moral deterioration, partly due perhaps to their too frequent marriages with semi-Oriental Greeks and semi-savage Kumanians.

    0
    0
  • But the moral tone of the Magyar church at this period was very low.

    0
    0
  • In these, as in many other of the romances of Josika, a high moral standard is aimed at.

    0
    0
  • It seems best to believe that Darius made an incursion in order to secure the frontier of the Danube, suffered serious reverses and retired with loss, and that this offered too good a chance to be missed for a moral tale about the discomfiture of the Great King by a few poor savages.

    0
    0
  • He also found time for philosophical speculations, and in 1830 he published his Inquiries concerning the Intellectual Powers of Man and the Investigation of Truth, which was followed in 1833 by a sequel, The Philosophy of the Moral Feelings.

    0
    0
  • The efforts made by the administration to restore the Boers to the land, to develop the material resources of the country, and to remove all barriers to the intellectual and moral development of the people, were soon, however, hampered by severe Economic commercial depression.

    0
    0
  • Nearly all the best writers are characterized by a certain naive and earnest piety which is attractive, and not infrequently display a force of moral indignation which arrests attention.

    0
    0
  • His eloge at the Academy of Moral and Political Science, of which he was a member, was pronounced by the comte de Remusat (February 16, 1845), and a Notice historique by F.

    0
    0
  • Ennius, Pacuvius, Accius and Lucilius is their relation to the national and moral spirit of the age in which they were written.

    0
    0
  • Occurring about 2.30, and almost simultaneously with the withdrawal of the Austrian guns on their left already alluded to, this may be said to have decided the battle, for although the Saxons still stood firm against the attacks of the Elbe army, and the reserves, both cavalry and infantry, attempted a series of counterstrokes, the advantage of position and moral was all on the side of the Prussians.

    0
    0
  • He studied with great distinction at Greif swald and at Wittenberg, and having made a special study of languages, theology and history, was appointed professor of Greek and Latin at Coburg in 1692, professor of moral philosophy in the university of Halle in 1693, and in 1705 professor of theology at Jena.

    0
    0
  • (5) They believe in the existence of one Supreme God - a God endowed with a distinct personality, moral attributes worthy of His nature and an intelligence befitting the Governor of the universe, and they worship Him alone.

    0
    0
  • (6) They believe in the immortality and progressive state of the soul, and declare that there is a state of conscious existence succeeding life in this world and supplementary to it as respects the action of the universal moral government.

    0
    0
  • They declare that moral righteousness, the gaining of wisdom, divine contemplation, charity and the cultivation of devotional feelings are their rites and ceremonies.

    0
    0
  • Moral or dietetic remedies were more often prescribed than drugs.

    0
    0
  • He found the medical profession of his time split up into a number of sects, medical science confounded under a multitude of dogmatic systems, the social status and moral integrity of physicians degraded.

    0
    0
  • Intellectual activity was not wanting, but the great achievements of the 18th century in philosophy and the moral sciences had fostered a love of abstract speculation; and some sort of cosmical or general system was thought indispensable in every department of special science.

    0
    0
  • Among the drawbacks of this temper, which on the whole made for progress, was the rise of a school of excessive scepticism, which, forgetting the value of the accumulated stores of empiricism, despised those degrees of moral certainty that, in so complex a study and so tentative a practice as medicine, must be our portion for the present, and even for a long future, however great the triumphs of medicine may become.

    0
    0
  • It is more difficult to infer the moral than the intellectual characteristics of a great writer from the personal impress left by him on his work.

    0
    0
  • All phenomena, moral as well as material, are contemplated by him in their relation to one great organic whole, which he acknowledges under the name of "Natura daedala rerum," and the most beneficent manifestations of which he seems to symbolize and almost to deify in the "Alma Venus," whom, in apparent contradiction to his denial of a divine interference with human affairs, he invokes with prayer in the opening lines of the poem.

    0
    0
  • Nothing can be more unlike the religious and moral attitude of Lucretius than the old popular conception of him as an atheist and a preacher of the doctrine of pleasure.

    0
    0
  • His moral attitude is also far removed from that of ordinary ancient Epicureanism or of modern materialism.

    0
    0
  • As for his moral character, the wholly intellectual cast of mind just referred to makes it difficult to judge that.

    0
    0
  • Although sustained by a fair number of guns and with the moral support of the 53rd Division, which had disembarked during the night, the 10th and 11th Divisions could make no headway.

    0
    0
  • Again, the contrast between Lazarus and Dives in the future state pictures vividly the reversals that are in store; but it is unreasonable to take it as implying that every poor man, whatever his moral character, will be blessed.

    0
    0
  • In 1759 Ferguson was appointed professor of natural philosophy in the university of Edinburgh, and in 1764 was transferred to the chair of "pneumatics" (mental philosophy) "and moral philosophy."

    0
    0
  • Finding himself unequal to the labour of teaching, he resigned his professorship in 1785, and devoted himself to the revision of his lectures, which he published (1792) under the title of Principles of Moral and Political Science.

    0
    0
  • As a believer in the progression of the human race, he placed the principle of moral approbation in the attainment of perfection.

    0
    0
  • By this principle Ferguson endeavours to reconcile all moral systems. With Hobbes and Hume he admits the power of self-interest or utility, and makes it enter into morals as the law of self-preservation.

    0
    0
  • As to church matters, the most prolific group is formed by general precepts based on religious and moral considerations, roughly 115, while secular privileges conferred on the Church hold about 62, and questions of organization some 20 clauses.

    0
    0
  • The former is divided into two sections: the first, of a metaphysical character, contains a sort of practical cosmography, chiefly based on Avicenna's theories, but frequently intermixed both with the freer speculations of the well-known philosophical brotherhood of Basra, the Ikhwan-es-safa'i, and purely Shiite or Isma`ilite ideas; the second, or ethical section of the poem, abounds in moral maxims and ingenious thoughts on man's good and bad qualities, on the necessity of shunning the company of fools and double-faced friends, on the deceptive allurements of the world and the secret snares of ambitious craving for rank and wealth.

    0
    0
  • A similar series of excellent teachings on practical wisdom and the blessings of a virtuous life, only of a severer and more uncompromising character, is contained in the Sa`adatnama; and, judging from the extreme bitterness of tone manifested in the "reproaches of kings and emirs," we should be inclined to consider it a protest against the vile aspersions poured out upon Nasir's moral and religious attitude during those persecutions which drove him at last to Yumgan.

    0
    0
  • He graduated at Western Reserve College in 1864 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1869; preached in Edinburg, Ohio, in 1869-1871, and in the Spring Street Congregational Church of Milwaukee in 5875-5879; and was professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College in 58 791881, and Clark professor of metaphysics and moral philosophy at Yale from 1881 till 5905, when he took charge of the graduate department of philosophy and psychology; he became professor emeritus in 1905.

    0
    0
  • However we may explain the inconsistency, we are precluded by the moral earnestness of the writer from assuming the visions to be pure inventions.

    0
    0
  • Many proposals were made, none of them of practical value, until Savonarola, who had Savon- as a already made a reputation as a moral reformer, began states= his famous series of political sermons.

    0
    0
  • His contributions to theological literature included treatises on Christian ethics and dogmatics, on moral philosophy, on baptism, and a sketch of the life of Jakob Boehme, who exercised so marked an influence on the mind of the great English theologian of the 18th century, William Law.

    0
    0
  • The chief of these are the following: the relation of vassal and lord; the principle that every holder of land is a tenant and not an owner, until the highest rank is reached, sometimes even the conception rules in that rank; that the tenure by which a thing of value is held is one of honourable service, not intended to be economic, but moral and political in character; the principle of mutual obligations of loyalty, protection and service binding together all the ranks of this society from the highest to the lowest; and the principle of contract between lord and tenant, as determining all rights, controlling their modification, and forming the foundation of all law.

    0
    0
  • In order to enforce this moral, he passes to "another sort of gnosis and instruction" (xviii.

    0
    0
  • While this class of literature had devoted itself chiefly to the finesses of the language, another set of works was given to meeting the requirements of moral education and the training of a gentleman.

    0
    0
  • Though the Nestorians were numerous, their moral influence and their church life had greatly deteriorated.

    0
    0
  • In 1694 he was elected a master in the university of Glasgow - an office that was converted into the professorship of moral philosophy in 1727, when the system of masters was abolished at Glasgow.

    0
    0
  • 1 In practice the prerogative is extremely valuable, when used with discretion, as a means of adjusting the different degrees of moral guilt in crimes or of rectifying a miscarriage of justice.

    0
    0
  • Since the authority of the League rested primarily on the moral support of its members, allied in common trade interests and acquiescing in the able leadership of Lubeck, its only means of compulsion was the "Verhansung," or exclusion of a recalcitrant town from the benefits of the trade privileges of the League.

    0
    0
  • In his public life he displayed many noble characteristics, - perfect simplicity and sincerity, intense moral earnestness, sturdy independence, absolute fearlessness.

    0
    0
  • After a regular term of office of six years of peace and moral and material progress Castilla resigned, and General Jose Echenique was elected president.

    0
    0
  • How far in all this and in the next vision the author is describing facts, and how far transforming his personal history into a type (after the manner of Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress), the better to impress his moral upon his readers, is uncertain.

    0
    0
  • Clement reaffirmed the infallibility of the pope, in matters of fact (1705), and, in 1713, issued the bull Unigenitus, condemning ioi Jansenistic propositions extracted from the Moral Reflections of Pasquier Quesnel.

    0
    0
  • There are in the town many memorials of John Kyrle, the Man of Ross, who died here in 1724, and is eulogized by Pope in his third Moral Epistle (1732).

    0
    0
  • is a collection of examples of military stratagems from Greek and Roman history, for the use of officers; a fourth book, the plan and style of which is different from the rest (more stress is laid on the moral aspects of war, e.g.

    0
    0
  • i t I l ion), a term specially applied to warriors of extraordinary strength and courage, and generally to all who were distinguished from their fellows by superior moral, physical or intellectual qualities.

    0
    0
  • Shiloh revealed to Grant the intensity of the struggle, and after that battle, appreciating to the full the material and moral factors with which he had to deal, he gradually trained his military character on those lines which alone could conduce to ultimate success.

    0
    0
  • Savonarola's writings may be classed in three categories: - (I) numerous sermons, collected mainly by Lorenzo Violi, one of his most enthusiastic hearers; (2) an immense number of devotional and moral essays and some theological works, of which Il Trionfo della Croce is the chief; (3) a few short poems and a political treatise on the government of Florence.

    0
    0
  • Although his faith in the dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church never swerved, his strenuous protests against papal corruptions, his reliance on the Bible as his surest guide, and his intense moral earnestness undoubtedly connect Savonarola with the movement that heralded the Reformation.

    0
    0
  • The most important of them was his j3tos 7-Cis `EXXaSos (Life in Greece), in which the moral, political and social condition of the people was very fully discussed.

    0
    0
  • Manual) of Epictetus, a handbook of moral philosophy, for many years a favourite instruction book with both Christians and pagans.

    0
    0
  • His youth was marked by a constant willingness to rebel against merely official authority; to genuine excellence, whether moral or intellectual, he was always ready to pay unbounded deference.

    0
    0
  • Comte is in no true sense a follower of Saint-Simon, but it was undoubtedly Saint-Simon who launched him, to take Comte's own word, by suggesting the two starting-points of what grew into the Comtist system - first, that political phenomena are as capable of being grouped under laws as other phenomena; and second, that the true destination of philosophy must be social, and the true object of the thinker must be the reorganization of the moral, religious and political systems. We can readily see what an impulse these far-reaching conceptions would give to Comte's meditations.

    0
    0
  • In the year of his marriage we find Comte writing to the most intimate of his correspondents: - " I have nothing left but to concentrate my whole moral existence in my intellectual work, a precious but inadequate compensation; and so I must give up, if not the most dazzling, still the sweetest part of my happiness."

    0
    0
  • thoughts to Comte, and that, in the portion of that work which treats of the logic of the moral sciences, a radical.

    0
    0
  • Comte at first fell in with the plan, but he speedily surprised and disconcerted Mill by boldly taking up the position of " high moral.

    0
    0
  • Still this partial divorce of himself from the record of the social and scientific activity of his time, though it may save a thinker from the deplorable evils of dispersion, moral and intellectual, accounts in no small measure for the exaggerated egoism, and the absence of all feeling for reality, which marked Comte's later days.

    0
    0
  • Their object is to constitute at length a real Providence in all departments, - moral, intellectual and material.

    0
    0
  • " Not only must political institutions and social manners, on the one hand, and manners and ideas, on the other, be always mutually connected; but further, this consolidated whole must be always connected by its nature with the corresponding state of the integral development of humanity, considered in all its aspects of intellectual, moral and physical activity."

    0
    0
  • Comte's immense superiority over such praeRevolutionary utopians as the Abbe Saint Pierre, no less than over the group of post-revolutionary utopians, is especially visible in this firm grasp of the cardinal truth that the improvement of the social organism can only be effected by a moral development, and never by any changes in mere political mechanism, or any violences in the way of an artificial redistribution of wealth.

    0
    0
  • A moral transformation must precede any real advance.

    0
    0
  • The power of the priesthood rests upon special knowledge of man and nature; but to this intellectual eminence must also be added moral power and a certain greatness of character, without which force of intellect and completeness of attainment will not receivethe confidence they ought to inspire.

    0
    0
  • As to later forms of religion, he appears to have held that they owe their vitality to their embodiment of the deep-seated moral feelings of our common humanity.

    0
    0
  • His exposition of this religion in his sermons and writings was simply an unfolding of its moral side.

    0
    0
  • It was a searching analysis of the financial and moral grounds on which the impost rested, and a historical justification and eulogy of it.

    0
    0
  • First among his moral attributes must be placed his religiousness.

    0
    0
  • The doctrine of emanation is thus to be distinguished from the cosmogonic theory of Judaism and Christianity, which explains human existence as due to a single creative act of a moral agent.

    0
    0
  • The theory of emanation, which had its source in certain moral and religious ideas, aims first of all at explaining the origin of mental or spiritual existence as an effluence from the divine and absolute spirit.

    0
    0
  • Here he " woke up to the interest of moral and metaphysical speculations."

    0
    0
  • In 1840 he was appointed professor of mental and moral philosophy and political economy in Manchester New College, the seminary in which he had himself been educated, and which had now removed from York to the city after which it was named.

    0
    0
  • And as these truths were self-evident, so the religion he deduced from them was sufficient, not only for his own moral and intellectual nature, but also for man as he conceived him, for history as he knew it, and for society as he saw it.

    0
    0
  • And when in 1890 he began to gather together the miscellaneous essays and papers written during a period of sixty years, he expressed the hope that, though " they could lay no claim to logical consistency," they might yet show " beneath the varying complexion of their thought some intelligible moral continuity," " leading in the end to a view of life more coherent and less defective than was presented at the beginning."

    0
    0
  • In the second of the above books his idea of religion is somewhat of an anachronism; as he himself confessed, he " used the word in the sense which it invariably bore half a century ago," as denoting " belief in an ever-living God, a divine mind and will ruling the universe and holding moral relations with mankind."

    0
    0
  • One naturally expects to find, and one does find, that this moral sunshine is associated with good temper.

    0
    0
  • The most celebrated among them were: Fujiwara Seikwa (1560-1619), who introduced his countrymen to the philosophy of Chu-Hi; Hayashi Rasan (1583-1657), who wrote 170 treatises on scholastic and moral subjects; Kaibara Ekken (i63o1714), teacher of a finc system of ethics; Arai Hakuseki (1657-1725), historian, philosopher, statesman and financier: and Muro KiusO, the second great exponent of Chu-His philosophy.

    0
    0
  • Apart from philosophical researches and the development of the drama, as above related, the Tokugawa era is remarkable for folk-lore, moral discourses, fiction and a peculiar form of poetry.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless pleasure forms an "inexpugnable element" of the moral aim (§ 16).

    0
    0
  • If this is as rapid as (or more rapid than) the rate of adaptation, there will be no actual growth of adaptation and so no moral progress.

    0
    0
  • In it, too, the sense of duty will have become otiose and have disappeared, being essentially a relic of the history of the moral consciousness.

    0
    0
  • Hence the fear with which the political, religious and social controls were regarded came to be associated also with the specifically moral control of lower by higher feelings, and engendered the coercive element in the feeling of obligation.

    0
    0
  • 1861, Education: Intellectual, Moral, Physical.

    0
    0
  • He subsequently professed himself a convert to the Anglican Church, and published a number of works, but was more esteemed for his ability than for his moral character.

    0
    0
  • Nannestad, consisting of moral and theological essays.

    0
    0
  • His chief works were Uber die von der neuesten Philosophie geforderte Trennung der Moral von der Religion (1804); Einleitung in das Evangelium Johannis (1806); and Institutiones theologicae dogmaticae (1815), to which W Steiger's Kritik des Rationalismus in Wegscheider' s Dogmatik (1830) was a reply.

    0
    0
  • The character of Defoe, both mental and moral, is very clearly indicated in his works.

    0
    0
  • His very anomalous position in regard to Mist is also indicative of a rather blunt moral perception.

    0
    0
  • But Amy, scarcely by her own fault, is drawn into certain breaches of definite moral laws which Defoe did understand, and she is therefore condemned, with hardly a word of pity, to a miserable end.

    0
    0
  • The same characteristics are curiously illustrated in his moral works.

    0
    0
  • He is, in fact, an instance of the tendency, which has so often been remarked by other nations in the English, to drag in moral distinctions at every turn, and to confound everything which is novel to the experience, unpleasant to the taste, and incomprehensible to the understanding, under the general epithets of wrong, wicked and shocking.

    0
    0
  • Origen indulged in many speculations which were afterwards condemned, but, as these matters were still open questions in his day, he was not reckoned a heretic. (iii.) In accordance with the New Testament use of the term heresy, it is assumed that moral defect accompanies the intellectual error, that the false view is held pertinaciously, in spite of warning, remonstrance and rebuke; aggressively to win over others, and so factiously, to cause division in the church, a breach in its unity.

    0
    0
  • 375) it was held to be not penal for a clergyman to speak of merit by transfer as a "fiction,"or to express a hope of the ultimate pardon of the wicked, or to affirm that any part of the Old or New Testament, however unconnected with religious faith or moral duty, was not written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

    0
    0
  • No one can doubt his real belief in religion in spite of many moral failings or weaknesses.

    0
    0
  • Appius also published a collection of moral maxims and reflections in verse.

    0
    0
  • Although Rome wanted creative force to add a great series of tragic dramas to the literature of the world, yet the spirit of elevation and moral authority breathed into tragedy by Ennius passed into the ethical and didactic writings and the oratory of a later time.

    0
    0
  • The Roman oratory of the law courts had to deal not with petty questions of disputed property, of fraud, or violence, but with great imperial questions, with matters affecting the well-being of large provinces and the honour and safety of the republic; and no man ever lived who, in these respects, was better fitted than Cicero to be the representative of the type of oratory demanded by the condition of the later republic. To his great artistic accomplishment, perfected by practice and elaborate study, to the power of his patriotic, his moral, and personal sympathies, and his passionate emotional nature, must be added his vivid imagination and the rich and copious stream of his language, in which he had no rival among Roman writers or speakers.

    0
    0
  • In his Commentaries, by laying aside the ornaments of oratory, he created the most admirable style of prose narrative, the style which presents interesting events in their sequence of time and dependence on the will of the actor, rapidly and vividly, with scarcely any colouring of personal or moral feeling, any oratorical passion, any pictorial illustration.

    0
    0
  • Self-culture rather than the fulfilment of public or social duty, as in the moral teaching of Cicero, is the aim of his teaching; and in this we recognize the influence of the empire in throwing the individual back on himself.

    0
    0
  • As Cicero tones down his oratory in his moral treatises, so Horace tones down the fervour of his lyrical utterances in his Epistles, and thus produces a style combining the ease of the best epistolary style with the grace and concentration of poetry - the style, as it has been called, of "idealized common sense," that of the urbanus and cultivated man of the world who is also in his hours of inspiration a genuine poet.

    0
    0
  • The immorality of Roman society not lvew literary only affords abundant material to the satirist, but deepens the consciousness of moral evil in purer and more thoughtful minds.

    0
    0
  • The literature of no time presents so powerfully the contrast between moral good and evil.

    0
    0
  • The first three represent the spirit of their age by exhibiting the power of the Stoic philosophy as a moral, political and religious force; the last is the most cynical exponent of the depravity of the time.

    0
    0
  • Iunius Iuvenalis or Juvenal (c. 47-130), sum up for posterity the moral experience of the Roman world from the accession of Tiberius to the death of Domitian.

    0
    0
  • The completion of the second Temple (516 B.C.) has been followed by disillusionment as to the anticipated prosperity, by indifference to worship, scepticism as to providence, and moral laxity.'

    0
    0
  • They had, in fact, no idea of doing wrong, and their moral feelings did not come into play.

    0
    0
  • in the Merlin proper, Gawain is a dominant personality, his feats rivalling in importance those ascribed to Arthur, but in the later forms such as the Merlin continuations, the Tristan, and the final Lancelot compilation, his character and position have undergone a complete change, he is represented as cruel, cowardly and treacherous, and of indifferent moral character.

    0
    0
  • The burden of the new prophecy seems to have been a new standard of moral obligations, especially with regard to marriage, fasting and martyrdom.

    0
    0
  • In place of an intense moral earnestness, we find in Tertullian a legal casuistry, a finical morality, from which no good could ever come.

    0
    0
  • In 1866 Maurice was appointed professor of moral philosophy at Cambridge, and from 1870 to 1872 was incumbent of St Edward's in that city.

    0
    0
  • The Religions of the World (1847); Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy (at first an article in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, 1848); The Church a Family (1850); The Old Testament (1851); Theological Essays (1853); The Prophets and Kings of the Old Testament (1853); Lectures on Ecclesiastical History (1854); The Doctrine of Sacrifice (1854); The Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old Testament (1855); The Epistles of St John (1857); The Commandments as Instruments of National Reformation (1866); On the Gospel of St Luke (1868); The Conscience: Lectures on Casuistry (1868); The Lord', Prayer, a Manual (1870).

    0
    0
  • So far as the numerous works are concerned it is evident that the writers who posed as Rosicrucians were moral and religious reformers, and utilized the technicalities of chemistry (alchemy), and the sciences.

    0
    0
  • In the moral man these factors are duly balanced.

    0
    0
  • "Whoever," he says, "is in the least versed in this moral kind of architecture will find the inward fabric so adjusted,.

    0
    0
  • Only when he has regulated his internal and his social relations by this ideal can he be regarded as truly moral.

    0
    0
  • So also he has drawn a close parallel between the moral and the aesthetic criteria.

    0
    0
  • From this principle, it follows (I) that the distinction between right and wrong is part of the constitution of human nature; (2) that morality stands apart from theology, and the moral qualities of actions are determined apart from the arbitrary will of God; (3) that the ultimate test of an action is its tendency to promote the general harmony or welfare; (4) that appetite and reason concur in the determination of action; and (5) that the moralist is not concerned to solve the problem of freewill and determinism.

    0
    0
  • From these results we see that Shaftesbury, opposed to Hobbes and Locke, is in close agreement with Hutcheson, and that he is ultimately a deeply religious thinker, inasmuch as he discards the