Moors sentence example

moors
  • A year or two later he went into Spain to preach to the Moors, but had again to return without accomplishing his object (1215 probably).
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  • The Moors being vanquished, now came the turn of the Jews.
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  • It is much visited for the sake of its mild climate, the grand cliffs, moors and hills of the neighbourhood, and the beach, admirably suited for bathing.
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  • Under the Moors it was of great importance as the key of the Ebro valley.
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  • Though sacked by the Goths in the 5th century, and later by the Moors, it is still surrounded by massive walls of Roman origin.
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  • On the moors to the north-west, and including Rivington Pike (1192 ft.), is another public park, and there are various smaller pleasure grounds.
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  • Bog Xerophytes live in the peaty soil of fens and moors which are physically wet, but which are said to be physiologically dry.
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  • The European country which had come the most completely under the influence of Arab culture now began to send forth explorers Spanish to distant lands, though the impulse came not from the Moors but from Italian merchant navigators in Spanish explora- service.
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  • The fact that many of the most important works were written in Arabic, the vernacular of the Spanish Jews under the Moors, which was not understood in France, gave rise to a number of translations into Hebrew, chiefly by the family of Ibn Tibbon (or Tabbon).
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  • Orihuela was captured by the Moors in 713, and retaken by James I.
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  • The years from 1195 to 1203 have been filled up with fabulous stories of missions to the Moors; but Dominic stayed at Osma, preaching much in the cathedral, until 1203, when he accompanied the bishop on an embassy in behalf of the king of Castile to "The Marches."
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  • From the 8th century to the 13th it was held by the Moors, who finally failed to recapture it from the Spaniards in 1332.
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  • The Kabyles, Mzabites, Tuareg, Arabs and Moors all profess Mahommedanism, though it is only among the Arabs that its tenets are held in any purity.
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  • The Kuluglis,descendants of Turks by native women - once a distinct race noted for their energy, bravery and pride - have almost ceased to exist as a separate people, being merged in the Moors.
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  • In 1197 Calatrava fell into the hands of the Moors and the order removed to the castle of Salvatierra, but recovered their town in 1212.
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  • In 1835 Abd-el-Kader, on whose appearance the Moors retired, sought to re-establish the ancient empire of Tlemcen, but he retreated before General Clausel in 1836.
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  • On the moors in late summer the mantis (kama-kiri-niushi) is commonly met with, and the cricket (kurogi) and the cockroach, abound.
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  • Its citadel was founded as a Christian fortress after the defeat of the Moors at Las Navas de Tolosa (1212).
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  • Arouj and Khair-ed-Din joined the exiled Moors of Granada in raids on the Spanish coast.
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  • In 1415 Ceuta was taken from the Moors by his sons who had been born to him by his wife Philippa, daughter of John, duke of Lancaster; specially distinguished in the siege was Prince Henry afterwards generally known as "the Navigator."
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  • He grew up resolved to emulate the medieval knights who had reconquered Portugal from the Moors.
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  • In Indian River Hundred, Sussex county, there formerly lived a community of people, - many of whom are of the fair Caucasian type, - called " Indians " or " Moors "; they are now quite generally dispersed throughout the state, especially in Kent and Sussex counties.
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  • It was razed by the Moors and rebuilt later by the Christians.
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  • While yet a young man (212) he forced his neighbour Syphax, prince of western Numidia, who had recently entered into an alliance with Rome, to fly to the Moors in the extreme west of Africa.
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  • The inhabitants are the descendants of the Moors, who, after the Spanish conquest of Granada in 1492, vainly sought to preserve the last relics of their independence in their mountain fastnesses.
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  • These districts were never wholly subdued when the Moors overran the country (711-713).
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  • Ramiro soon rid himself of his rival, and welded Sobrarbe, Ribagorza and Aragon into a single kingdom, which thenceforward grew rapidly in size and power and shared with Castile the chief part in the struggle against the Moors.
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  • It was delivered from the Moors by Ferdinand III.
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  • Many smaller lakes, however, contain them, and they are also found in peat moors on the sites of ancient lakes now drained or silted up, as at Laibach in Carniola.
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  • The streets are fairly wide and straight, and several of the houses belonging to aristocratic Moors, descendants of those expelled from Spain, have fine courts surrounded by arcades, some with marble fountains and planted with orange trees.
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  • The present town of Tetuan dates from 1492, when the Andalusian Moors first reared the walls and then filled the enclosure with houses.
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  • It was taken on the 4th of February 1860 by the Spaniards under O'Donnell, and almost transformed by them into a European city before its evacuation on the 2nd of May 1862, but so hateful were the changes to the Moors that they completely destroyed all vestiges of alteration and reduced the city to its former state.
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  • A Hindu strain is evident in Java and others of the western islands; Moors and Arabs (that is, as the names are used in the archipelago, Mahommedans from various countries between Arabia and India) are found more or less amalgamated with many of the Malay peoples; and the Chinese form, from an economical point of view, one of the most important sections of the community in many of the more civilized districts.
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  • In the 11 th and 12th centuries the chivalry of Spain and southern France took up the struggle with the Moors as a holy war.
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  • 423 the islands were seized by the Vandals and in 798 by the Moors.
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  • (3) The so-called " Moors," generally of mixed blood, inhabit the towns and villages near the sea-coast.
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  • It was conquered by the Moors in 712, but these invaders were in turn dispossessed by the Spaniards and the troops of Charlemagne in 788.
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  • The tower of the Kutubia is a memorial of the constructive genius of the early Moors; both it and the similar Hasan tower at Rabat are after the type of the contemporary Giralda at Seville, and if tradition may be trusted, all three were designed by the same architect, Jabir.
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  • It lies in the uppermost part of the valley of the South Tyne, among the high bleak moors of the Pennines.
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  • Though the fairy belief is universally human, the nearest analogy to the shape which it takes in Scotland and Ireland - the "pixies" of south-western England - is to be found in Jan or Jinnis of the Arabs, Moors and people of Palestine.
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  • The latter, often also called Ox-bird, Plover's Page, Purre and Stint, - names which it shares with some other species, - not only breeds commonly on many of the elevated moors of Britain, but in autumn resorts in countless flocks to the shores.
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  • It is peculiarly adapted for peaty soils, and is accordingly a favourite crop in the fen lands of England, and on recently reclaimed mosses and moors elsewhere.
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  • His surname "of Antequera" was given him because he was besieging that town, then in the hands of the Moors, when he was told that the cortes of Aragon had elected him king in succession to his uncle Martin, the last male of the old line of Wilfred the Hairy.
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  • He restrained the follies of his sister-in-law, and kept the realm quiet, by firm government, and by prosecuting the war with the Moors.
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  • With the rise of the Medici came a rapid increase of prosperity; Cosmo, Francis and Ferdinand erected fortifications and harbour works, warehouses and churches, with equal liberality, and the last especially gave a stimulus to trade by inviting "men of the East and the West, Spanish and Portuguese, Greeks, Germans, Italians, Hebrews, Turks, Moors, Armenians, Persians and others," to settle and traffic in the city, as it became in 1606.
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  • In the west the Herauch, a thick fog arising from the burning of the moors, is a plague of frequent occurrence.
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  • Of the entire area of the country 28.6% is arable, 16.2 in meadow or pasture land, 14% in forests, 37.2% in uncultivated moors, heaths, &c.; from 17 to 18% is in possession of the state.
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  • Insurrections amongst the Moors, Jews, and Brigantes in Britain were easily put down.
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  • On the high moors between Chollerford and Gilsland its traces are still plain, as it climbs from hill to hill and winds along perilous precipices.
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  • In 713, two years after the defeat and death of Roderick, the last Visigothic king, all Spain, except Galicia and Asturias, fell into the hands of the Moors.
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  • The Asturians chose him as their king in 718, and although Galicia was lost in 734, the Moors proved unable to penetrate into the remoter fastnesses held by the levies of Pelayo.
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  • It is, on the whole, true that by the exclusion of the Moors they lost their opportunity of playing any conspicuous part in the literary and artistic development of Spain.
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  • The Franks and the Langobardi remained in Gaul and Italy, but they gradually became denationalized and absorbed in the native populations, while in Spain Teutonic nationality came to an end with the overthrow of the Visigothic kingdom by the Moors, if not before.
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  • The Moors first entered the province in 711, and only in 1492 was their power finally broken by the capture of Granada.
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  • The name Castile is commonly said to be derived from the numerous frontier forts (castillos) erected in the middle ages as a defence against the Moors.
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  • In both the Castiles the central plateau has a naturally fertile soil, for after rain a luxuriant vegetation appears; but drought is common, owing to the insufficient volume of the rivers, and the failure of the Spaniards to extend the fine system of irrigation which the Moors originated.
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  • The transformation of Castile from a small county in the north of what is now Old Castile into an independent monarchy, was one of the decisive events in the reconquest of Spain from the Moors.
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  • Mazagan was built in 1506 by the Portuguese, who abandoned it to the Moors in 1769 and established a colony, New Mazagan, on the shores of Para in Brazil.
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  • Not far from the town, by the banks of the river Makhazan, is the site of the battle fought in 1578 between Dom Sebastian, king of Portugal, and the Moors under Abd el Malek, in which the Moors were victorious, though both kings perished, as well as the deposed Mahommed XI., who had called in the Portuguese to his aid against Abd el Malek.
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  • Barcinona or Bardjaluna, as it was then called, was captured by the Moors in 713, and in 801 it passed, with the rest of Catalonia, under the dominion of the Franks.
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  • Soon after the greater crusading societies had been formed similar orders, such as those of St James of Compostella, Calatrava and Alcantara, were established to fight the Moors in Spain instead of the Saracens in the Holy Land.
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  • They were all originally founded as military religious orders, like the crusading Templars and the Hospitallers, but to fight for the true faith against the Moors in Spain.
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  • It gained great reputation in the wars against the Moors and became very wealthy.
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  • The Order of Knights of Alcantara, instituted about 1156 by the brothers Don Suarez and Don Gomez de Barrientos for protection against the Moors.
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  • Until about 1213 they were known as the Knights of San Julian del Pereyro; but when the defence of Alcantara, newly wrested from the Moors by Alphonso IX.
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  • In 1787 the Moors were still building pirate vessels here, the timber for which came from the neighbouring forest of M'amora.
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  • In 1662 as part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza on her marriage to Charles II., it came into the possession of the English, and they defended it against Mulai Ismail in 1680, but in 1684 it was decided, on account of expense, to abandon the place to the Moors.
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  • It lies on the river Darwen, which traverses a densely populated manufacturing district, and is surrounded by high-lying moors.
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  • It is a small, twiggy, resinous fragrant shrub found on bogs and moors in the British Islands, and widely distributed in the north temperate zone.
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  • This is also the case with numerous other plants of moors and woodlands - e.g.
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  • Inland are bare moors, diversified by narrow dales.
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  • (For physical geography, see MoRocco.) Mauretania, or Maurusia as it was called by Greek writers, signified the land of the Mauri, a term still retained in the modern name of Moors.
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  • Water from moors and peatbogs or from gravel or ferruginous sandstone is generally of small utility so far as plant food is concerned.
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  • Many portions of the plain are covered by moors and swamps of large extent, called Moose.
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  • The Eifel presents a sterile, thinly-peopled plateau, covered by extensive moors in several places.
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  • Long stretches of ground are covered by moors, and there turfcutting forms the principal occupation of the inhabitatits.
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  • In north Germany peat is also of importance as a fuel; the area of the peat moors in Prussia is estimated at 8000 sq.
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  • Ferdinand, who showed himself docile to the influence of Berengaria, so long as she lived, married the wife she found for him, Beatrice, daughter of the emperor Philip (of Hohenstaufen), and followed her advice both in prosecuting the war against the Moors and in the steps which she took to secure his peaceful succession to Leon on the death of his father in 1231.
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  • Then the stream began to rise again, first with the influx of the learning of the Spanish Moors, then with the new knowledge of Greek brought from Constantinople in the 14th century.
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  • Melilla, the first place captured by Spain on the African mainland, was seized from the Moors in 1490.
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  • See Budgett Meakin, The Land of the Moors (London, 1901), ch.
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  • The park (Alameda de la Alhambra), which in spring is overgrown with wild-flowers and grass, was planted by the Moors with roses, oranges and myrtles; its most characteristic feature, however, is the dense wood of English elms brought hither in 1812 by the duke of Wellington.
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  • This is the Puerta Judiciaria rre de 1 a Plaza de la Artilleria 1 l � Plaza de t orte de los Picos (Gate of Judgment), a massive horseshoe archway, surmounted by a square tower, and used by the Moors as an informal court of justice.
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  • There is a fountain in the middle of this hall, and the roof - a dome honeycombed with tiny cells, all different, and said to number 5000 - is a magnificent example of the so-called " stalactite vaulting " of the Moors.
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  • Almaden, the Sisapon of the Romans, is celebrated for its mercury mines, which were extensively wrought by the Romans and Moors, and are still productive, the ore increasing in richness with the depth of the descent.
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  • In that area the Grampians rise into wide flat-topped heights or moors often more than 3000, and in a few places exceeding 4000 ft.
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  • It runs from the mouth of Loch Ryan in a sinuous north-easterly direction, keeping near the northern limit of the region till it reaches the basin of the Nith, where it quits the Uplands altogether, descends into the lowlands of Ayrshire, and, after circling round the headwaters of the Nith, strikes south-eastwards across half the breadth of the Uplands, then sweeps north and eastwards between the basins of the Clyde, Tweed and Annan, and then through the moors that surround.
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  • No contrast, for instance, can be greater than that between the wide elevated moors of the eastern Grampians, and the crested ridges of western Inverness-shire and Argyllshire - Loch Hourn, Glen Nevis, Glencoe - or that between the broad uplands of Peeblesshire and the precipitous heights of Galloway.
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  • These alluvial terraces form a strip of low fertile land between the edge of the sea and the rising ground of the interior, and among the western fjords sometimes supply the only arable soil in their neighbourhood, their flat green surfaces presenting a strong contrast to the brown and barren moors that rise from them.
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  • And to the soil created by the decay of the limestones is due a greener verdure than that of the surrounding moors.
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  • The grouse moors occupy an extensive area and are widely distributed.
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  • Bruce died, outworn by war and hardships, on the 7th of June 1329: his body was buried in Dunfermline abbey; his heart, which Douglas was bearing to the Holy Land, was brought home again, after Douglas's chivalrous death in battle with the Moors in Spain.
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  • The term "Moors" has no real ethnological value.
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  • The subsequent conquest of Spain was effected chiefly by Berber tribes, but the Moslems in the peninsula - known to the Christian nations as Moors - always had a strong strain of Arab blood and in most respects became Arabized.
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  • The race was also influenced considerably by intermarriage with the natives of Spain, and when the Moors were finally expelled from that country they had become almost entirely distinct from their Berber kinsfolk, to whom they were known as Andalusians.
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  • While the mountainous parts of Morocco continued to be occupied by pure Berber people, the Shluh or Shilluh, the Andalusian Moors flocked to 5 Proc. Zool.
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  • The Moors are ethnically a very hybrid race with more Arab than Berber blood.
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  • The typical Moors of Morocco are a handsome race, with skin the colour of coffee-and-milk, with black eyes and black silky hair, and the features of Europeans.
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  • There is a general tendency to obesity, which is much admired by the Moors in their women, young girls being stuffed like chickens, with paste-balls mixed with honey, or with spoonfuls of olive oil and sesame, to give them the necessary corpulence.
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  • The Moors are an intellectual people, courteous in manner and not altogether unlettered; but they are cruel, revengeful and bloodthirsty.
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  • Among the pirates who infested the Mediterranean none were worse than the Moors.
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  • Slavery flourishes, and slave auctions, conducted like those of cows and mules, take place on the afternoons of stated days, affording a lounge for the rich Moors, who discuss the "goods" offered and seek for bargains.
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  • As professional story-tellers many Moors are remarkable, but the national music is monotonous and not very harmonious.
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  • See Dr Arthur Leared, Morocco and the Moors (1891); Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (1899); and The Moors (1902); Frances Macnab, A Ride in Morocco (1902); and see under Morocco; Mauretania; Berbers, &C.
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  • From the first da Gama encountered hostility from the " Moors," or rather Arabs, who monopolized the sea-borne trade; but he seems to have found favour with the zamorin, or Hindu raja of Malabar.
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  • Besides making war upon the Moors, he was, like his father, frequently embroiled with the church.
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  • During the remaining twenty years of his life, James was much concerned in warring with the Moors in Murcia, not on his own account, but on behalf of his son-in-law Alphonso the Wise of Castile.
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  • Next turning his arms against the Moors, he obtained, on the 26th July 1139, the famous victory of Ourique, and immediately of ter was proclaimed king by his soldiers.
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  • Alphonso continued to distinguish himself by his exploits against the Moors, from whom he wrested Santarem in 1146 and Lisbon in 1147.
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  • In 1184, in spite of his great age, he had still sufficient energy to relieve his son Sancho, who was besieged in Santarem by the Moors.
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  • After having been for nearly a century and a half in the hands of the Moors, Mondonedo was recaptured by Ordono I.
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  • The church of San Lorenzo (1270-1300) is noteworthy for the beautiful tracery of its Gothic windows; its nave is said to have been a Roman temple, converted by the Moors into a mosque and by Ramon Berenguer IV., last count of Barcelona, into a church.
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  • Under the Moors Lareda became one of the principal cities of the province of Saragossa; it became tributary to the Franks in 793, but was reconquered in 797.
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  • The fame of its ten bells dates from the wars between Spaniards and Moors in which "Arcos of the Frontier" received its name.
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  • It lies in the centre of extensive moors and in appearance resembles a Dutch town.
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  • It is a very prosperous port and its trade, carried on mainly by water, is mostly in the agricultural produce of the extensive moors and pasture lands which lie around it.
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  • Mahommedans who do not acknowledge the spiritual authority of the Ottoman sultan, such as the Persians and Moors, look to their own rulers for the proclamation of a jihad; there has been in fact no universal warfare by Moslems on unbelievers since the early days of Mahommedanism.
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  • In the Spanish peninsula, the chief importance of the numerous small towns lay in the part they played as fortresses during the unceasing wars with the Moors.
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  • Algeciras was perhaps the of the Romans, but it was probably refounded in 713 by the Moors, who retained possession of it until 1344.
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  • It is said that during this siege gunpowder was first used by the Moors in the wars of Europe.
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  • The coast is cliff-bound and very beautiful both to the north and to the south, while inland the Esk traverses a lovely wooded vale, surrounded by open, high-lying moors.
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  • It was followed by the expulsion of Jews and Moors, and by arts the establishment of the Inquisition on a solid basis, with powers formidable to the freedom of all Spaniards from the peasant to the throne.
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  • The Moors, who occupied Minorca in the 8th century, were expelled by James I.
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  • The tree is not at present indigenous in southern Britain, but when planted in suitable ground multiplies rapidly by the wind-sown seeds; on many of the sandy moors and commons natural pine woods of large extent have been thus formed during the last fifty years.
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  • As far up as Hawes, the dale presents a series of landscapes in which the broken limestone crags of the valley-walls and the high-lying moors beyond them contrast finely with the rich land at the foot of the hills.
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  • He took refuge in a mountain fortress called Pappua on the Numidian frontier, and there, after enduring great hardships in the squalid dwellings of the Moors, surrendered to his pursuers in March 534.
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  • The influence of the Moors was greatest south of the Tagus.
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  • So complete was the intellectual triumph of the Moors that an intermediate " Mozarabic " population arose, Portuguese in blood, Christian in religion, but Arab in language and manners.
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  • The Moors introduced many improvements, especially in the system of irrigation; the characteristic Portuguese wells with their perpetual chains or buckets are of Moorish invention, and retain their Moorish name of noras.
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  • Towards the close of the 11th century crusading knights came from every part of Europe to aid the kings of northern and central Spain in driving out the Moors.
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  • The county of Portugal, which had already been won back from the Moors (1055-1064), was included in Theresa's dowry.
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  • He left Theresa to govern Portugal north of the Mondego during the minority of her infant son Affonso Henriques (Alphonso I.): south of the Mondego the Moors were still supreme.
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  • He had already won many victories over the Moors.
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  • On the 25th of July 1139 he defeated the combined forces of the Moors on the plains of Ourique, in Alemtejo.
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  • Legend has magnified the victory into the rout of 200,000 Moslems under five kings; but so far was the battle from being decisive that in 1140 the Moors were able to seize the fortress of Leiria, built by Alphonso in 1135 as an outpost for the defence of Coimbra, his capital.
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  • In 1171 Alphonso concluded a seven years' truce with the Moors; weakened by his wound and by old age, he could no longer take the field, and when the war broke out afresh he delegated the chief command to his son Sancho.
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  • Between 1179 and 1184 the Moors retrieved many of their losses in Alemtejo, but were unable to retake Santarem and Lisbon.
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  • He granted fresh charters to many cities, legalizing the system of self-government which the Romans had bequeathed to the Visigoths and the Moors had retained or improved.
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  • Elvas was taken from the Moors in 1226, and in 1227 Sancho assumed control of the kingdom.
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  • He continued the crusade against the Moors, who were driven from their last strongholds in Alemtejo, and in 1239-1244, after a dispute with ROme which was once more ended by the imposition of an interdict and the submission of the Portuguese ruler, he won many successes in the Algarve.
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  • A second stage was reached shortly afterwards by the conquest of Algarve, the last remaining stronghold of the Moors.
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  • The Moors had made Alemtejo the granary of Portugal, but war had undone their work, and large tracts of land were now barren and depopulated.
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  • The three eldest sons of King John and Queen Philippa - Edward, Pedro and Henry, afterwards celebrated as Prince Henry the Navigator - desired to win knighthood by service against the Moors, the historic enemies of their country and creed.
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  • The long struggle to expel the Moors, with the influence of foreign Crusaders and the military orders, had given a religious sanction to the desire for martial fame.
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  • On land he again defeated the Moors, who attempted to re-take Ceuta in 1418; but in an expedition to Tangier, undertaken in 1436 by King Edward (1433-1438), the Portuguese army was defeated, and could only escape destruction by surrendering as a hostage Prince Ferdinand, the king's youngest brother.
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  • Under Alphonso V., surnamed the African (1443-1481), the Gulf of Guinea was explored as far as Cape St Catherine, and three expeditions (1458, 1461, 1471) were sent to Morocco; in 1471 Arzila (Asila) and Tangier were captured from the Moors.
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  • Equally barren was the intermittent fighting in Morocco, which was regarded as a crusade against the Moors.
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  • Centuries of fighting against the Moors and Castilians had already left Portugal thinly populated.; large tracts of land were uncultivated, especially in Alemtejo, and wolves were still common throughout the kingdom.
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  • The king was a strong-willed and weak-minded ascetic, who entrusted his empire to the Jesuits, refused to marry, although the dynasty was threatened with extinction, and Disaster spent years in preparing for a crusade against the Al Kasr. Moors.
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  • The close relations that prevailed between the reigning houses of Portugal, Provence and Aragon, cemented by intermarriages, introduced a knowledge of the gay science, but it reached Portugal by many other ways - by the crusaders who came to help in fighting the Moors, by the foreign prelates who occupied Peninsular sees, by the monastic and military orders who founded establishments in Portugal, by the visits of individual singers to court and baronial houses, but chiefly perhaps by the pilgrims who streamed from every country along the Frankish way to the far-famed shrine of Santiago de Compostela.
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  • Epic poetry in Portugal developed much later than lyric, but the signal victory of the united Christian hosts over the Moors at the battle of the Salado in 1340 gave occasion to an epic by Alphonso Giraldes of which some fragments remain.
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  • Alphonso the Battler won his great successes in the middle Ebro, where he expelled the Moors from Saragossa; in the great raid of 1125, when he carried away a large part of the subject Christians from Granada, and in the south-west of France, where he had rights as king of Navarre.
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  • Though he died in 1134 after an unsuccessful battle with the Moors at Braga, he has a great place in the reconquest.
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  • East of the Pennines, isolated on three sides by lowlands and on the fourthsideby the North Sea, lie the high moors of the North Riding of Yorkshire, with the Cleveland Hills, and, to the south, the Yorkshire Wolds of the East Riding.
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  • Neither of these systems has any great elevation; the moors, towards their north-western edge, reaching an extreme of 1489 ft.
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  • On the Yorkshire coast the Cleveland Hills and the high moors are cut off on the seaward side in magnificent cliffs, which reach the greatest elevation of sea-cliffs on the English coast (666 ft.).
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  • Across the moors, on the western side of the anticline, the vast and dense population of the Lancashire coal-field is crowded in the manufacturing towns surrounding the great commercial centre, Manchester, which itself stands on the edge of the Triassic plain.
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  • The Trent runs north in the southern half of this plain, the Ouse runs south through the northern half, which is known as the Vale of York, lying low between the Pennine heights on the west and the Yorkshire moors on the east.
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  • Where the plain reaches the sea, the soft rocks are cut back into the estuary of the Tees, and there Middlesbrough stands at the base of the Moors.
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  • The escarpment runs north from Portland Island on the English Channel, curves north-eastward as the Cotteswold Hills, rising abruptly from the Severn plain to heights of over Iwo ft.; it sinks to insignificance in the Midland counties, is again clearly marked in Lincolnshire, and rises in the North Yorkshire moors to its maximum height of over 1500 ft.
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  • Throughout its whole extent it yields valuable building-stone, and in the Yorkshire moors the great abundance of iron ore has created the prosperity of Middlesbrough, on the plain below.
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  • Geographical considerations govern these conditions to a very great extent; thus the counties first indicated lie almost entirely within the area of the low-lying and fertile Eastern Plain, while the smallest areas of cultivation are found in the counties covering the Pennine hill-system, with its high-lying uncultivated moors.
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  • He extended his dominions southward in Estremadura at the expense of the Moors.
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  • The Chalk rises up above the Gault and forms the high ground of Dunshill Moors and the Chiltern Hills.
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  • The town several times sustained siege and capture between its occupation by the Moors in the 8th century and its capitulation in 1641 to the troops of Louis XIII.
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  • It is doubtful whether any opposition between crescent and cross, as symbols of Islam and Christianity, was ever intended by the Turks; and it is an historical error to attribute the crescent -to the Saracens of crusading times or the Moors in Spain.
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  • But the mountains of Wales and the moors of Cornwall and Cumbria did not greatly tempt the settler.
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  • In July he invaded Scotland at the head of a formidable army of55,000 men, and on the 22nd of that month brought Wallace to action on the moors above Falkirk.
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  • To the north, in Longdendale, there are five lakes belonging to the water-supply system of Manchester, formed by damming the Etherow, a stream which descends from the high moors north-east of Glossop. The town is governed by a mayor, 6 aldermen and 18 councillors.
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  • In 718, it was occupied by the Moors, who were only expelled in 1304, and made an unsuccessful attempt to recapture the city in 1331.
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  • The town has been several times unsuccessfully besieged by the Moors - one siege, under Mulai Ismail, lasting twenty-six years (1694-1720).
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  • >> 0'1, r: -?-:w ry See de Prado, Recuerdos de Africa; historia de la plaza de Ceuta (Madrid, 1859-1860); Budgett Meakin, The Land of the Moors (London, 1901), chap. xix., where many works dealing with Spanish Morocco are cited.
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  • Arab astronomy, transported by the Moors to Spain, flourished temporarily at Cordova and Toledo.
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  • He was the third (or, counting children who died in infancy, the fifth) son of John (Joao) I., the founder of the Aviz dynasty, under whom Portugal, victorious against Castile and against the Moors of Morocco, began to take a prominent place among European nations; his mother was Philippa, daughter of John of Gaunt.
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  • About this time, moreover, it is probable that he had begun to gather information from the Moors with regard to the coast of "Guinea" and the interior of Africa.
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  • A Latin inscription on the town-hall records the fact that this place was the residence of the first Spanish kings after the spread of the Moors over the Peninsula.
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  • His tenure of office was very short, for on the 4th of May 1664 he allowed himself to be entrapped into an ambush by the Moors, who carried on incessant irregular warfare against the English garrison, and was killed, together with nineteen officers and nearly five hundred men of his garrison.
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  • Early in the 8th century Jaca fell into the possession of the Moors, by whose writers it is referred to under the name of Dyaka as one of the chief places in the province of Sarkosta (Saragossa).
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  • In that year he accompanied King Sebastian (1557-1578) in his invasion of Morocco, and was taken prisoner by the Moors at the battle of Alcazar-Kebir, in which the king was slain.
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  • The neighbouring country is exceedingly picturesque, with highlying moors intersected by narrow, well-wooded valleys.
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  • By this war of magnificence he caused an interruption of half a century in the growth of national sentiment, which was only revived by Henry II.; and he was not alone in thus leaving the bone for the shadow: his contemporaries, Ferdinand the Catholic when delivered from the Moors, and Henry VII.
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  • The former range, on the west, runs nearly due north from Grantham to Lincoln, and thence to the Humber, traversing the Heaths of Lincolnshire, which were formerly open moors, rabbit warrens and sheep walks, but are now enclosed and brought into high cultivation.
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  • Early in the 8th century Gijon was captured and strengthened by the Moors, who used the stones of the Roman city for their fortifications, but were expelled by King Pelayo (720-737).
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  • On the side of Portugal a tract of inhospitable country sled originally to the separation between the two kingdoms, inasmuch as it caused the reconquest of the comparatively populous maritime tracts from the Moors to be carried out independently of that of the eastern kingdoms, which were also well peopled.
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  • On the north-west the valley of the Sil and a series of valleys farther south, along both of which military roads have been carried from an early period, open tip comrntinication between Leon and the hill country of Galicia, which explains why this province was united to Leon even before the conquest of Portugal from the Moors.
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  • The Moors decimated the native population; when they in turn were expelled, the country lost not only a numerically large section of its inhabitants, but the section best able to develop its natural wealth.
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  • In general it is in a backward condition, and is now much less productive than in the time of the Romans and again under the Moors.
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  • Aragon and Estremadura, the two most thinly peopled of all the old provinces, and the eastern half of Andalusia (above Seville), have all suffered particularly in this manner, later occupiers never having been able to rival the Moors in overcoming the sterility of nature, as in Aragon, or in taking advantage of its fertility, as in Andalusia and the Tierra de Barros.
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  • Its cultivation was introduced by the Arabs in the 12th century or later, and was of great importance in the kingdom of Granada at the time of the expulsion of the Moors (1489), but has since undergone great vicissitudes, first in consequence of the introduction of the cane into America, and afterwards because of the great development of beet-sugar in central Europe.
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  • The expulsion of the Moors from Granada was contemporaneous with the discovery of the New World.
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  • Hundreds of thousands of Moors were driven out from the country on subsequent occasions, and in the act Spain lost the best of her agriculturists and handicraftsmen.
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  • The Moors, so called, who afterwards filled the kingdom of Aragon were of native blood.
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  • Castile, by its geographical position as the centre of Spain from Cantabria to the Sierra Morena, was the forefront of the struggle with the Moors.
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  • The young ~ kings uncle Ferdinand (called of Anteqiiera because he was besieging that town, which he took from the Moors, when he heard in 1412 that he had been declared heir to the crown of Aragon by the Cortes of Caspe) acted as regent.
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  • Moors, whose princes intrigued against one another, and were to the last ready to aid the Christians in the hope of obtaining a small fragment of territory for themselves.
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  • We offer charming, en-suite ground floor rooms with every convenience, in the idyllic and spectacular North Yorkshire Moors.
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  • Contrary to what the RSPB and English Nature would have us believe, curlews are doing fine on upland moors managed for grouse shooting.
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  • Pony trekking available over the moors, with coarse fishing nearby.
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  • Please wear good footwear for walking on the Moors.
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  • Care with route finding across the moors, rough pastures and through coniferous forests was needed.
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  • On higher ground, such as the moors and uplands of Cumnock and around Muirkirk, peats and peaty gleys can be found.
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  • Fountains ' grange at Cowton, in the North York Moors, lay some twenty miles north of the abbey.
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  • Away from the misty moors, it is the leafy lanes of South Cornwall which are thought to be haunted by the past.
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  • Then we head to the heather-covered moors for a change of transport.
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  • Ride across the windswept moors, or gallop along the beaches for an exhilarating experience.
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  • Nationwide coverage From city centers to upland moors, Siteplan provides map extracts for any location in Great Britain.
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  • Rolling green hills and desolate moors, or gritty, industrial cities?
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  • It is an area of stark beauty and a must for walkers who enjoy more of a challenge across the bleak moors.
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  • She spends all of her free time with her horse Martini roaming the open moors.
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  • The economy in Scotland, where many grouse moors are located, is boosted by £ 17 million per year.
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  • The heather uplands and peat moors form part of a Special Protection Area, that is of international importance for breeding birds.
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  • In summer, the rare ring ouzel can sometimes be seen flying above the high moors of The Long Mynd.
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  • The Moors for the Future restoration work falls into three main areas: The establishment of moorland vegetation on bare peat damaged by fires.
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  • Inland lochans can hold red-throated divers, while, in summer, the hill ridges and moors have golden plover, curlew and skylark.
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  • Both strike a discordant note in the typical Dartmoor landscape of steep-sided wooded valleys carrying rivers and streams down from the moors.
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  • Before then a sequence of six tributary burns draining the moors to the west of the river had to be crossed by stone viaducts.
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  • We also spent some of the day on the very windy moors walking around with heather up to our knees.
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  • See further Berbers, Morocco, Moors, Kabyles, Mzabites.
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  • Just as in the Mediterranean region, the degeneration of forests has given rise to mhquis and garigues, so in western Europe, the degeneration of forests has brought about different types ot grassland, heaths, and moors.
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  • Mariana holds that the founding of the Inquisition, by giving a new impetus to the idea of a united kingdom, made the country more capable of carrying to a satisfactory ending the traditional wars against the Moors.
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  • Garcia Ordonez accused him to Alphonso of keeping back part of the tribute received from Seville, and the king took advantage of the Cid's absence on a raid against the Moors to banish him from Castile.
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  • Besides the Afri (Aourigha) of the territory of Carthage, the principal tribes that took part in the wars against the Romans were the Lotophagi, the Garamantes, the Maces, the Nasamones in the regions of the S.E., the Misulani or Musulamii (whence the name Mussulman), the Massyli and the Massaesyli in the E., who were neighbours of the Moors.
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  • Immediately after the expulsion of the Moors in 1492, their conquerors began, by successive acts of vandalism, to spoil the marvellous beauty of the Alhambra.
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  • This is the Puerta Judiciaria rre de 1 a Plaza de la Artilleria 1 l � Plaza de t orte de los Picos (Gate of Judgment), a massive horseshoe archway, surmounted by a square tower, and used by the Moors as an informal court of justice.
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  • The Moors are temperate in their diet and simple in their dress, though among the richer classes of the towns the women cover themselves with silks, gold and jewels, while the men indulge to excess their love of fine horses and splendid arms. The national fault is gross sensuality.
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  • Of games the young Moors play a great number; the principal one is a kind of football, more like that of Siam and Burma than that of England; wrestling and fencing are popular, but the chief amusement of the adult Moors is the "powder-play" (la ` ab el bariid), which consists of a type of military tournament, the horsemen going through lance and musket exercises or charging in review fashion, firing volleys as they gallop. Other recreations much in favour throughout Morocco are music, singing, jugglery, snake-charming and acrobatic performances.
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  • Behaim relates that in 734 - a date which is probably a misprint for 714 - and after the Moors had conquered Spain and Portugal, the island of Antilia or "Septe Cidade" was colonized by Christian refugees under the archbishop of Oporto and six bishops.
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  • In the thirty-second year of this reign, the " bill for the breed of horses " was passed, the preamble of which runs thus: - " Forasmuch as the generation and breed of good and strong horses within this realm extendeth not only to a great help and defence of the same, but also is a great commodity and profit to the inhabitants thereof, which is now much decayed and diminished, by reason that, in forests, chases, moors and waste grounds within this realm, little stoned horses and nags of small stature and of little value be not only suffered to pasture thereupon, but also to cover mares feeding there, whereof cometh in manner no profit or commodity."
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  • A punctual arrival was made at the Moors Center in Danby, leaving me with 40 minutes to spare.
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  • North Yorkshire Moors Railroad 18 Miles of preserved steam railroad running through the spectacular scenery of the North Yorkshire Moors.
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  • Search for relax and recharge accommodation in South West England www.relaxsouthwest.co.uk Langstone Manor Park, Tavistock, Devon Cottage perfect, moors perfect.
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  • Walk on rugged hillsides, through forests, over grouse moors and rolling farmland to the coastal cliff tops.
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  • The ecology of severe moorland fire on the North York Moors: seed distribution and seedling establishment of Calluna vulgaris.
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  • A man is found dead on the moors with burn marks, and there are sightings of UFOs in the area.
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  • Spend a day tootling along the flat trail or take a detour onto one of the many paths up the moors.
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  • This is because while there was an indigenous population on the islands, its geographic location made it into a crossroads for the Moors, the Chinese, the Japanese, the Spanish, and more.
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  • The Moors also decorated their clothing with embroidery -- a style that was an influence in many European countries.
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  • A ruined castle, near the city, recalls its strategic importance in the 8th century, when Asturias, Galicia and Leon were the headquarters of resistance to the Moors.
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  • Sueca has a thriving trade in grain and fruit from the Jucar valley, which is irrigated by waterways created by the Moors.
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  • Algiers, however, continued of comparatively little importance until after the expulsion from Spain of the Moors, many of whom sought an asylum in the city.
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  • Under the Moors it became an independent principality, which was destroyed by Ferdinand II.
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  • Obviously no more than this is possible until physiologists are able to state much more precisely than at present what is the influence of common salt on the plants of salt-marshes, of the action of calcium carbonate on plants of calcareous soils, and of the action of humous compounds on plants of fens and peat moors.
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  • Physically wet but physiologically dry ha bit ats,f with the accompanying plant communities of fens, moors, and salt marshes.
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  • He sent embassies to all the princes of Christendom and to the Moors.
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  • For many years Torquemada had been persuading the sovereigns to make an attempt once for all to rid the country of the hated Moors.
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  • It is pleasantly situated at the junction of several small streams forming the river Lune, in a deep valley surrounded by high-lying moors.
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  • But the reconquest of Andalusia by the Christians associated towards the end of the 15th century with the establishment of the Inquisition, introduced a spirit of intolerance which led to the expulsion of the Jews and Moors.
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  • In Spain its revival was due to the Saracens, and by them, and their successors the Moors, agriculture was carried to a high pitch of excellence.
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  • In fulfilment of a vow to visit the Holy Sepulchre, which he could not accomplish in person, Bruce requested Douglas to carry his heart there, but his faithful follower perished on the way, fighting in Spain against the Moors, and the heart of Bruce, recovered by Sir William Keith, found its resting-place at Melrose.
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  • He was engaged in war with the Moors and gained a victory over them at Alcacer do Sal in 1217.
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  • In IIIo, for example, he was enabled to capture Sidon by the aid of Sigurd of Norway, the Jorsalafari, who came to the Holy Land with a fleet of 55 ships, starting in 1107, and in a three years' "wandering," after the old Norse fashion, fighting the Moors in Spain, and fraternizing with the Normans in Sicily.
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  • Crusaders from the Low Countries, England and the Scandinavian north took the coast route round western Europe; and it was natural that, landing for provisions and water, they should be asked, and should consent, to lend their aid to the natives against the Moors.
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  • In defiance of an army which marched to the relief of the beleaguered city under Yusef the Almoravide, the Cid took Valencia after a siege of nine months, on the 15th of June 10 94 - the richest prize which up to that time had been recovered from the Moors.
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  • His widow maintained Valencia for three years longer against the Moors, but was at last compelled to evacuate the city, taking with her the body of the Cid to be buried in the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, in the neighbourhood of Burgos.
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  • Son and nobles alike supported the Moors, when he tried to unite the nation in a crusade; and when he allied himself with the rulers of Morocco they denounced him as an enemy of the faith.
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  • In 1442, when the Portuguese under Prince Henry the Navigator were exploring the Atlantic coast of Africa, one of his officers, Antam Gonsalves, who had captured some Moors, was directed by the prince to carry them back to Africa.
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  • He received from the Moors in exchange for them ten blacks and a quantity of gold dust.
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  • Blocks of these minerals lie scattered on the sides and ridges of the mountains and in the beds of the streams; and extensive turf moors occupy many of the mountain slopes and valleys.
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  • The east moors, stretching towards the outlet of the Rhymney river, have become an important metallurgical quarter.
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  • Antequera was captured from the Moors in 1410, and became until 1492 one of the most important outposts of the Christian power in Spain.
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  • In 734 it was occupied by the Moors, who in turn were driven out by Alphonso I.
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  • Some changes were eventually necessitated by the wars with the Moors and the Vandals.
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  • The Berber tribes, whose racial unity is attested by their common spoken language and by the comparatively numerous Berber inscriptions that have come down to us, bore in ancient times the generic names of Numidians, Gaetulians and Moors or Maurusiani.
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  • Early in 1070 the reduction of the north was completed by a march over the moors to Chester, which had not hitherto submitted but was now placed under an earl of William's choice.
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  • The town has been identified with the Roman Complutum, which was destroyed about the year moo, and was rebuilt by the Moors in 1083.
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  • For some time the Salernitan medicine held its ground, and it was not till the conquest of Toledo by Alphonso of Castile that any large number of Western scholars came in contact with the learning of the Spanish Moors, and systematic efforts were made to translate their philosophical and medical works.
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  • On the commons or moors burgesses have rights of pasture.
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  • In the 13th century the craft of glass-making was practised by the Moors in Almeria, and was probably a survival from Roman times.
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  • The system of decorating vases and vessels by means of strands of glass trailed upon the surface in knots, zigzags and trellis work, was adopted by the Moors and is characteristic of Roman craftsmanship. Glassmaking was continued at Pinar de la Vidriera and at Al Castril de la Pena into the 17th century.
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  • It is a thriving industrial town, devoid of any great antiquarian or architectural interest, though founded by the Moors.
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  • It is surrounded by Roman walls, which were partly rebuilt by the Moors, and it contains an interesting fortified palace, owned by the dukes of Medinaceli.
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  • The inhabitants of the coast towns belong, in large part, to the class generally known as "Moors."
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  • Among the "Moors" the descendants of the Andalusian refugees form an exclusive and aristocratic class.
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  • Traces of Christianity remained among the Kabyles till after the conquest of Granada (1492),(1492), when the influx of Andalusian Moors from Spain completed the conversion of those tribes.
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  • The morality of the age was lax, and more especially so in Spain and Portugal, where the looseness of the marriage tie and the example of the Moors encouraged polygamy.
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  • Hostilities with the Castilians and with the Moors occupied many years of his reign, during which he gained some successes; but by consenting to the barbarous murder of Inez de Castro, who was secretly espoused to his son Peter, he has fixed an indelible stain on his character.
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  • Saragossa Irom the Moors, and was married to Urraca, queen of Castile and Leon.
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  • Berenguer Ramon I.1018-1035Held Barcelona, Vich and Manresa with land con quered from the Moors to the south.
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  • The conquest of Granada in 1492 by the Catholic sovereigns of Spain drove many Moors into exile.
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  • Paracelsus, a 15th-century Swiss alchemist, extolled the rejuvenating value of mud from Austrian moors.
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  • Also on the 3 rd a male blackcap was singing in Lower Moors.
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  • Flushes on the acidic Barden and Blubberhouses moors are home to bog pimpernel and bog pondweed.
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  • Being built midway between the Sierra de Priego and Sierra Parapanda, and commanding the open valley between these ranges, it became one of the chief frontier fortresses of the Moors in the 15th century.
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  • It lies partly on a peninsula between the river and the sea, partly on the wooded uplands which enclose the valley and rise gradually to the high moors beneath Heytor.
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