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moorish

moorish

moorish Sentence Examples

  • Aguilar "of the Frontier" was so named in the middle ages from its position on the border of the Moorish territories, which were defended by the castle of Anzur, now a ruin; but the spacious squares and modern houses of the existing town retain few vestiges of Moorish dominion.

  • It is a modern town, although many of the houses have the flat roofs, view-turrets (miradores) and horseshoe arches characteristic of Moorish architecture.

  • He died suddenly in his tent at Jaen when preparing for a raid into the Moorish territory of Granada, on the 7th of September 1312.

  • Almansa is built at the foot of a white limestone crag, which is surmounted by a Moorish castle, and rises abruptly in the midst of a fertile and irrigated plain.

  • The town is a labyrinth of narrow, crooked streets, and some of its houses are Moorish in character.

  • both because of the Moorish element in the population of Spain, and because he was also sovereign of Naples and Sicily.

  • The public buildings of chief interest are the kasbah, the government offices (formerly the British consulate), the palaces of the governor-general and the archbishop - all these are fine Moorish houses; the "Grand" and the "New" Mosques, the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Philippe, the church of the Holy Trinity (Church of England), and the Bibliotheque Nationale d'Alger - a Turkish palace built in 1799-1800.

  • The interior of the mosque is square and is divided into aisles by columns joined by Moorish arches.

  • In its construction an attempt has been made to produce a building suitable for Christian worship whilst the architecture is Moorish in style.

  • The roof of the nave is of Moorish plaster work.

  • Haedo sets forth that a young Arab who had embraced Christianity and had been baptized with the name of Geronimo was captured by a Moorish corsair in 1569 and taken to Algiers.

  • Here are the summer palace of the governor-general, many fine Moorish and French villas and luxurious hotels, all surrounded by beautiful gardens.

  • basilica with a vaulted portico and a nave and two aisles begun in 1103, a mosaic pavement in the Cosmatesque style, a good ambo resting on columns and decorated with mosaics showing traces of Moorish influence, a Paschal candelabrum, and an organ gallery of similar style.

  • Its flat-roofed Moorish houses are enclosed by gardens of cactus, dwarf palm, orange and other subtropical plants, interspersed with masses of rock.

  • In Africa the Moorish prince, Firmus, raised the standard of revolt, being joined by the provincials, who had been rendered desperate by the cruelty and extortions of Count Romanus, the military governor.

  • It occupies a slight eminence, crowned by the ruins of a Moorish castle, and overlooking the Guadiana.

  • It is not mentioned by any Roman historian, and first rose to importance under Moorish rule.

  • In 1031 it became the capital of a small Moorish kingdom, and, though temporarily held by the Portuguese in 1168, it retained its independence until 1229, when it was captured by Alphonso IX.

  • Montefrio is largely Moorish in character, and dominated by a Moorish castle.

  • Troops were summoned to Seville and the war began by the siege of Alhama, a town eight leagues from Granada, the Moorish capital.

  • While the schools of Babylonia were flourishing as the religious head of Judaism, the West, and especially Spain under Moorish rule, was becoming the home of Jewish scholarship. On the breaking of the schools many of the fugitives fled o- g up Y g?

  • As vizier to the Moorish king at Granada, he was not only a patron of learning, but himself a man of wide knowledge and a considerable author.

  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

  • It resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, built in Byzantine style, with Moorish arabesques.

  • Close by stands a large royal palace, Moorish in style.

  • The Jews of Spain attained to high places in the service of the state from the time of the Moorish conquest in 711.

  • of Castile; and the five Moorish heads in its coat-of-arms commemorate the defence.

  • GUADIANA (anc. Anas, Moorish Wadi Ana), a river of Spain and Portugal.

  • Traces of Moorish influence are evident and the horseshoe arch is common.

  • A range of low hills intervenes between Felanitx and the Mediterranean; upon one summit, the Puig de San Sebastian, stands a Moorish castle with a remarkable series of subterranean vaults.

  • The cathedral occupies the site of a Moorish mosque built in 914.

  • Their houses, at any rate those in the towns, had thus the characteristics of Moorish villas; and in them they lived a Moorish life.

  • Henceforth Rodrigo Diaz began to live that life of a soldier of fortune which has made him famous, sometimes fighting under the Christian banner, sometimes under Moorish, but always for his own hand.

  • Cardona is a picturesque and old-fashioned town, with Moorish walls and citadel, and a 14th-century church.

  • Alora, which is an ancient and picturesque town, with several Moorish ruins, occupies an outlying hill of the Sierra de Tolox, and overlooks a fertile valley where maize, sugar-cane and datepalms are cultivated.

  • taught the people how to prepare dyes from the plants and lichens, and many of the patterns still show signs of Moorish origin.

  • It occupies a commanding position, while the remains of its walls, and of a fine Moorish castle on a rock that overhangs the town, show how admirably its natural defences were supplemented by art.

  • Originally a Moorish stronghold, it was captured in 1233 by James I.

  • The medieval building was demolished late in the 18th century, and the present castle erected in mingled Gothic and Moorish styles.

  • Since, however, Geber happened to be the name of a celebrated Moorish philosopher who flourished in about the iith or 12th century, it has been supposed that he was the founder of algebra, which has since perpetuated his name.

  • Turning to the Arabs in the West we find the same enlightened spirit; Cordova, the capital of the Moorish empire in Spain, was as much a centre of learning as Bagdad.

  • When the Moorish empire began to wane the brilliant intellectual gifts which they had so abundantly nourished during three or four centuries became enfeebled, and after that period they failed to produce an author comparable with those of the 7th to the 11th centuries.

  • The medical school owed its foundation largely to Jewish teachers, themselves educated in the Moorish schools of Spain, and imbued with the intellectual independence of the Averroists.

  • Cullera is a walled town, containing a ruined Moorish citadel, large barracks, several churches and convents and a hospital.

  • UDAD, Aoudad or Audad, the Moorish name of the Barbary sheep, or arui, Ovis (Ammotragus) lervia, the only wild sheep found in Africa, where it inhabits all the mountain ranges of the north, descending to the eastward far into the heart of the Sudan.

  • The pure Turks and the Kuluglis (sons of Turkish fathers by Moorish women or slave girls) are no longer numerous.

  • 4 There are some very beautiful doorways to mosques and other specimens of Moorish art at Gabes.

  • Among the cities famous in the annals of Arab-Berber, or Moorish, art and civilization, Tlemcen takes high rank.

  • The various quarters are grouped around the principal mosque - the Jewish to the south-west, the Moorish to the south-east, that of the merchants to the north-east, while the new town with the civic buildings lies to the north-west.

  • The military authorities occupy the Meshuar or citadel, built in 1145, which separates the Jewish and Moorish quarters and was formerly the palace of the rulers of Tlemcen.

  • The adjacent mosque is a beautiful specimen of Moorish art.

  • The Ebro and its tributaries have been utilized for irrigation since the Moorish conquest; the main stream becomes navigable by small boats about Tudela; but its value as a means of communication is almost neutralized by the obstacles in its channel, and seafaring vessels cannot proceed farther up than Tortosa.

  • issued an edict, which ordered them to renounce all their Moorish ways of life and to give up their children to be educated by Christian priests.

  • Since 1648 it has been the custom of Moorish sultans to despatch superfluous sons and daughters to Tafilalt, and as the males are all sharifs, the fanaticism against Europeans is comprehensible.

  • Tarrasa was a Roman Municipality, and a bishopric from the 5th century to the Moorish invasion in the 8th.

  • ALPUJARRAS, or [[Alpuxarras, The]] (Moorish al Busherat, " the grass-land"), a mountainous district of southern Spain, in the province of Granada, consisting principally of valleys which descend at right angles from the crest of the Sierra Nevada on the north, to the Sierras Almijara, Contraviesa and Gador, which sever it from the Mediterranean Sea, on the south.

  • Many of the names of places in the Alpujarras are of Moorish origin.

  • The old Moorish style of building about an open court, or patio, prevails, and the livingrooms of the family are on the second floor.

  • To the visitor from Europe the attraction of Tunis lies in the native city, where, in the Rue al Jezira, along which runs electric trams, he can see hundreds of camels in the morning bearing charcoal to market; where he may witness the motley life of the bazaars, or, by the Bab-Jedid, watch the snake-charmers and listen to the Moorish storytellers.

  • The Dar-el-Bey contains numerous rooms beautifully decorated in the Moorish style of the 18th century; and the judgment hall has a domed roof adorned with the delicate arabesque plaster-work known as Nuksh hadida.

  • North-east of the Palais de Justice, which like the Sadiki College is built in the Moorish style, rises the great dome, surrounded by smaller cupolas, of the largest mosque in the city, that named after Sidi Mahrez, a renowned saint of the 5th century of the Mahommedan era, whose tomb makes it a sancutary for debtors.

  • About a mile and a quarter from the Bab Bu Saadun, the north-west gate of the city, is the ancient palace called the Bardo, remarkable for the "lion court," a terrace to which access is gained by a flight of steps guarded by marble lions, and for some apartments in the Moorish style.

  • Its chief buildings are the cathedral, originally a mosque, and the ruined castle, which is the chief among many interesting relics of Moorish rule.

  • of Castile in 1240, and entrusted to the Order of Calatrava; in 1331 it was recaptured by the Moorish king of Granada; but in the following century it was finally reunited to Christian Spain.

  • The principal industries are tilework, inlaying with silver wire, and the manufacture of thick-soled yellow slippers, much-esteemed flintlocks, and artistic "towels" used as cape and skirt by Moorish country girls.

  • The houses are built with thick walls of stone and brick round open courts, in the Moorish style, and their ironbarred doors and windows give them the appearance of being a part of the fortifications.

  • Among other prominent buildings are the Oddfellows' temple (completed 1894), the public library, the art museum (1886), a Jewish synagogue (in Avondale), and the (Jewish) Plum Street temple (1866), Moorish in architecture.

  • The islanders are a Spanish race, very closely akin to the Catalans; but the long period of Moorish rule has left its mark on their physical type and customs. In character they are industrious and hospitable, and pique themselves on their loyalty and orthodoxy.

  • They became a separate Moorish kingdom in 1009, which, becoming extremely obnoxious for piracy, was the object of a crusade directed against it by Pope Paschal II., in which the Catalans took the lead.

  • For the period of Moorish rule, see Bosquejo historico de la domination islamita en las islas Baleares, by A.

  • Under Moorish rule (c. 713-1489) it was one of the three most important cities in the kingdom of Granada, with an extensive trade, and a population estimated at 50,000.

  • An old Moorish minaret has been turned into a clock tower.

  • Palma underwent considerable change in the 19th century, and the fine old-world Moorish character of the place suffered accordingly.

  • Alcaraz, which gives its name to the mountain range already mentioned, is a picturesque old town with the ruins of a Moorish castle, and a fine Roman aqueduct; pop. (1900) 45 01.

  • It is free from Moorish idioms, and, like Galician and Portuguese, it often retains the original Latin f which Castilian changes into h.

  • The forms Vandalusia and Vandalitia are undoubtedly ancient; many authorities, however, maintain that the name is derived from the Moorish Andalus or Andalosh, " Land of the West."

  • It is impossible to estimate the influence of the elder conquerors, Greek, Carthaginian and Roman; but there are clear traces of Moorish blood, with a less well-defined Jewish and gipsy strain.

  • The men are tall, handsome and well-made, and the women are among the most beautiful in Spain; while the dark complexion and hair of both sexes, and their peculiar dialect of Spanish, so distasteful to pure Castilians, are indisputable evidence of Moorish descent.

  • Third in importance of the towns on the Moorish coast, unimpeded by bar or serious rocks, the roadstead is exposed to the north-west winds.

  • The northern part of the kingdom, which was first freed from Moorish rule, is called Old Castile (Castilla la Vieja); the southern, acquired later, is called New Castile (Castilla la Nueva).

  • In Spain, under Moorish dominion, most of the important works of that period were composed in Arabic, and the influence of Arabic writers both on language and method may be seen in contemporaneous Hebrew compositions.

  • The principal buildings include the Greek Orthodox cathedral, finished in 1864 after the model of the church of St Isaac at St Petersburg; the Armenian church, in a mixed Gothic and Renaissance style, consecrated in 1875; a handsome new Jesuit church, and a new synagogue in Moorish style, built in 1877.

  • ABENCERRAGES, a family or faction that is said to have held a prominent position in the Moorish kingdom of Granada in the 15th century.

  • In the middle ages Baeza was a flourishing Moorish city, said to contain 50,000 inhabitants; but it was sacked in 1239 by Ferdinand III.

  • The influence of Moorish art is perceptible.

  • A cotton chemise, and a white manta wrapped in Moorish fashion over head and body, constitute the dress of the women; a cotton shirt and trousers that of the men.

  • Under Moorish rule, and up to the expulsion of the Moriscoes in 1609, it was the headquarters of a flourishing trade, and in modern times its industries have revived.

  • Palm-groves, churches with bluetiled cupolas, and houses with flat roofs and view-turrets (miradores) to some extent preserve the Moorish character of the town.

  • There are extensive orange-groves, watered by the irrigation canal of Castellon, which is a good example of Moorish engineering skill.

  • In Spain irrigation may be traced directly to the Moorish occupation, and almost everywhere throughout Asia and Africa where the Moslem penetrated is to be found some knowledge 'of irrigation.

  • By this dynasty the Moorish empire was extended over Tlemcen and a great part of Spain and Portugal.

  • The Murabti power was at its height at Yusef's death, and the Moorish empire then included all North-West Africa as far as Algiers, and all Spain south of the Tagus, with the east coast as far as the mouth of the Ebro, and the Balearic Islands.

  • See Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (London, 1899); the anonymous Raj(' el Kartas (Fez.

  • The edifices raised by the Moorish kings of Spain and the Moslem rulers of India may have been more splendid in their materials, and more elaborate in their details; the houses of the great men of Damascus may be more costly than were those of the Mameluke beys; but for purity of taste and elegance of design both are far excelled by many of the mosques and houses of Cairo.

  • A Moorish custom-house is placed on the Spanish border beyond the fort of Santa Isabel, and is the only authorized centre of trade on the Riff coast between Tetuan and the Algerian frontier.

  • North Africa from beyond the straits of Gibraltar to the Syrtes became again a Roman province, although the Moorish tribes of the interior maintained a species of independence; and part of southern Spain was also recovered for the empire.

  • For the vengeance of VOlundr there is a very close counterpart in the medieval versions of the vengeance of the Moorish slave on his master.

  • 1503), is different, for the Moorish slave casts himself down from a high tower.

  • Almod6var was a Moorish fortress in the middle ages, but contains little of antiquarian interest.

  • The town is largely modern; for over one thousand of its picturesque old Moorish houses, which formerly rose in terraces up the mountain side, were destroyed, together with five churches, the hospital, the theatre, the prison, and Boo of the inhabitants, in an earthquake which took place in 1884.

  • In the 15th century Alhama, and the neighbouring fortress of Loja, were generally regarded as the keys of the kingdom of Granada, and their capture went far to insure the overthrow of the Moorish power.

  • an ancient palace and fortress of the Moorish monarchs of Granada, in southern Spain, occupying a hilly terrace on the south-eastern border of the city of Granada.

  • In subsequent centuries the carelessness of the Spanish authorities permitted this masterpiece of Moorish art to be still further defaced; and in 1812 some of the towers were blown up by the French under Count Sebastiani, while the whole buildings narrowly escaped the same fate.

  • Moorish poets describe it as " a pearl set in emeralds," in allusion to the brilliant colour of its buildings, and the luxuriant woods round them.

  • The Moorish portion of the Alhambra resembles many medieval Christian strongholds in its threefold arrangement as a castle, a palace and a residential annexe for subordinates.

  • Beyond the Alcazaba Emery Walker se is the palace of the Moorish kings, or Alhambra properly so-called; and beyond this, again, is the Alhambra Alta (Upper Alhambra), originally tenanted by officials and courtiers.

  • In spite of the long neglect, wilful vandalism and ill-judged restoration which the Alhambra has endured, it remains the most perfect example of Moorish art in its final European development, - freed from the direct Byzantine influences which can be traced in the cathedral of Cordova, more elaborate and fantastic than the Giralda at Seville.

  • A narrow passage leads inward to the Plaza de los Aljibes (Place of the Cisterns), a broad open space which divides the Alcaz� from the Moorish palace.

  • The original furniture of the palace is represented by the celebrated vase of the Alhambra, a splendid specimen of Moorish ceramic art, dating from 1 3 20, and belonging to the first period of Moorish porcelain.

  • Of the outlying buildings in connexion with the Alhambra, the foremost in interest is the Palacio de Generalife or Gineralife (the Moorish Jennat al Arif, " Garden of Arif," or " Garden of the Architect ").

  • Its gardens, however, with their clipped hedges, grottos, fountains, and cypress avenues, are said to retain their original Moorish character.

  • The Torres Bermejas (Vermilion Towers), also on Monte Mauror, are a well-preserved Moorish fortification, with underground cisterns, stables, and accommodation for a garrison of 200 men.

  • The old town is surrounded by a Moorish wall with six gates; the newer portion is well and regularly built, and planted with numerous orange and other fruit trees.

  • Besides several modern churches, Budapest possesses a beautiful synagogue, in the Moorish style, erected in 1861, and another, in the Moorish-Byzantine style, built in 1872, while in 1901 the construction of a much larger synagogue was begun.

  • 115), a huge limestone edifice in the late Gothic style, covering an area of 34 acres, erected in 1883-1902; the Academy, in Renaissance style, erected in 1862-1864, containing a lofty reception room, a library, a historic picture gallery, and a botanic collection; the Redoute buildings, a large structure in a mixed Romanesque and Moorish style, erected for balls and other social purposes; the extensive custom-house at the lower end of the quays, and several fine hotels and insurance offices.

  • See Dr Arthur Leared, Morocco and the Moors (1891); Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (1899); and The Moors (1902); Frances Macnab, A Ride in Morocco (1902); and see under Morocco; Mauretania; Berbers, &C.

  • At an earlier period Arab and Moorish influence is no less apparent.

  • Villena is a labyrinth of winding alleys, which contain some interesting examples of Moorish domestic architecture.

  • It is dominated by a large and picturesque Moorish castle.

  • It must not be confused with the Moorish " fez," which is skull-shaped.

  • A striking contrast exists between the Moorish quarter, with its tortuous lanes and Oriental architecture, and the modern quarter, with its rectangular streets and wide open squares, frequently bordered with trees and adorned with fountains.

  • The palace, built by Ahmed Pasha, the last bey of Constantine, between 1830 and 1836, is one of the finest specimens of Moorish architecture of the 19th century.

  • ALCALA (Moorish al Kala, the "Fortress" or "Castle"), the name of thirteen Spanish towns, all founded or named by the Moors.

  • After its capture by Alphonso the Wise of Castile (1252-1284), the town was a Christian stronghold on the borders of Moorish territory.

  • Another church contains several Moorish banners, taken in 1483 at the battle of Zahara, a neighbouring village.

  • HASDAI IBN SHAPRUT, the founder of the new culture of the Jews in Moorish Spain in the 10th century.

  • The Moorish city was destroyed by Alphonso; it was first reoccupied by Spanish colonists from Gibraltar in 1704; and the modern town was erected in 1760 by King Charles III.

  • Architecture in Spain, emerging from the Gothic stage, developed an Early Renaissance style of bewildering richness by adopting elements of Arabic and Moorish decoration.

  • Near the town are the palaces of Rosenstein and Wilhelma; the latter, built (1842-1851) for King William of Wurttemberg in the Moorish style, is surrounded by beautiful gardens.

  • After 711 came the long period of Moorish (i.e.

  • It is manifested in their poetry and music even more than in their admirable costumes and in the good taste which has preserved the Roman or Moorish forms of their domestic pottery.

  • The native dances, slow but not ungraceful, and more restrained than those of Andalusia or the south of France, are obviously Moorish in origin, and depend for their main effects on the movement of the arms and body.

  • from tip to tip. The ox-yokes are often elaborately carved in a traditional pattern in which Gothic and Moorish designs are blended.

  • The Moors introduced many improvements, especially in the system of irrigation; the characteristic Portuguese wells with their perpetual chains or buckets are of Moorish invention, and retain their Moorish name of noras.

  • Skilful copies of Moorish metal-work may be purchased in the goldsmiths' and silversmiths' shops of.

  • Its inhabitants, surrounded by Moorish or Spanish enemies and distracted by civil war, derived such rudiments of civilization as they possessed from Arabic or Leonese sources.

  • Count Henry ruled as a vassal of Alphonso VI., whose Galician marches were thus secured against any sudden Moorish raid.

  • Alphonso was occupied in almost incessant border fighting against his Christian or Moorish neighbours.

  • Ferdinand was his son-in-law, and was probably disposed to leniency by the imminence of a Moorish invasion in which Portugal could render useful assistance.

  • At the beginning of his reign the religious fervour which had sustained the Almoravide dynasty was rapidly subsiding; in Portugal independent Moorish chiefs ruled over cities and petty states, ignoring the central government; in Africa the Almohades were destroying the remnants of the Almoravide power.

  • The Moorish garrisons of Palmella, Cintra and Almada soon capitulated, and in 1158 Alcacer do Sal, one of the chief centres of Moorish commerce, was taken by storm.

  • The monarchy owed its triumph to its championship of national interests, to the support of the municipalities and military orders, and to the prestige gained by the royal armies in the Moorish and Castilian wars.

  • There are some houses in the Moorish style and a mosque among the ruins bears date 636 A.H.

  • It is surrounded by ancient walls, and was formerly dominated by a Moorish castle, now in ruins.

  • After 711 it rose to some importance as a Moorish fortress and trading station, and was renamed Wad Ash, " Water of Life."

  • A dismantled castle, the Castillo de San Cristobal, overlooks the city, which contains four Moorish towers rising conspicuously above its modern streets.

  • Under its ancient name of Urci, Almeria was one of the chief Spanish harbours after the final conquest of Spain by the Romans in 19 B.C. It reached the summit of its prosperity in the middle ages, as the foremost seaport of the Moorish kingdom of Granada.

  • The territory was once densely wooded, and is said to derive its name from the Moorish Aldarra, " the place thick with trees"; but almost all the forests have been destroyed for fuel.

  • Its older parts, Moorish in many features and with narrow irregular streets, contrast with the modern parts, which have broad streets and squares, and many fine public buildings - theatre, town hall, hospitals, courts of justice and a bridge over the Sangonera.

  • 3) and the Moorish Lurka.

  • It was the key of Murcia during the Moorish wars, and was frequently taken and retaken.

  • In the middle ages it was a prosperous Moorish trading-station.

  • Alcazar is sometimes identified with the Roman Alce, captured by Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus in 180 B.C. It derives its existing name from its medieval Moorish castle (al-kasr), which was afterwards garrisoned by the knights of St John.

  • of the city - the best known being Saltair, which has a Moorish pavilion; and 5 m.

  • BOABDIL (a corruption of the name Abu Abdullah), the last Moorish king of Granada, called el chico, the little, and also el zogoybi, the unfortunate.

  • Alicante was the Roman Lucentum; but, despite its antiquity, it has few Roman or Moorish remains.

  • In Spain, again, where Ibn-Bajja, Ibn-Tufail and Ibn Rushd rivalled or exceeded the fame of the Eastern schools, the Arabians of pure blood were few, and the Moorish ruling class was deeply intersected by Jewish colonies, and even by the natives of Christian Spain.

  • Whilst the native Spaniards were narrowing the limits of the Moorish kingdoms, and whilst the generally fanatical dynasty of the Almohades might have been expected to repress speculation, the century preceding the close of Mahommedan sway saw philosophy cultivated by Avempace, Abubacer and Averroes.

  • The depopulation of Spain dates certainly from the Moorish conquest, possibly from the earlier Visigothic invasion.

  • Many of the old irrigation workssuch as those of the plain of Tarragonadate from the time of the Romans, and many others from the Moorish period, while new ones are still being laid out at the present day.

  • In 1236 Cordova was conquered, and Seville fell in 1248 with the help of a fleet from the Basque coast and of the Moorish king of Granada, who was Fernandos vassal, paying tribute and attending Cortes when summoned.

  • He did indeed add the town of Cadiz to his possessions with the help of his vassal, the Moorish king of Granada, but his reign is filled with quarrels between himself and his nobles.

  • of the Moorish Empire in Europe (3 vols., Philadelphia and London, 1904).

  • Avila also possesses an old Moorish castle (alcazar) used as barracks, a foundling hospital, infirmary, military academy, and training schools for teachers of both sexes.

  • The houses of Quito are chiefly of the old Spanish or Moorish style.

  • In Andalucia, Moorish cloisters and monastic calm, a house with its own farm, out-of this-world views.

  • We climbed the Moorish castle that overlooks the town only to find that some of it appears to be new.

  • In Andalucia, Moorish cloisters and monastic calm, a house with its own farm, out-of this-world views.

  • Meanwhile, Nemo has befriended the other denizens of the tank, who are led by scarred Moorish idol Gill.

  • At leisure Seville is the epitome of Spain: fiery flamenco, Moorish splendor, fragrant gardens, elegant plazas and more.

  • futuristic skyscrapers now tower above the ancient Moorish architecture - with pride, if not always with esthetic sense.

  • The reefs are teeming with colorful tropical fish such as angel, butterfly, surgeonfish and graceful moorish idols.

  • inscription on the tombstone to Victor the Moorish slave reveals that he was highly valued by his Spanish master.

  • Explore La Zisa, a Moorish palace turned into a museum of Arab culture.

  • Moorish Idols change to a darker color at night, to reduce their chances of being spotted by nocturnal predators.

  • futuristic skyscrapers now tower above the ancient Moorish architecture - with pride, if not always with esthetic sense.

  • " Unitarians," the name being corrupted through the Spanish), a Mahommedan religious power which founded the fifth Moorish dynasty in the 12th century, and conquered all northern Africa as far as Egypt, together with Moslem Spain.

  • All the Moorish dominions in Spain were lost in the next few years, partly by the Christian conquest of Andalusia, and partly by the revolt of the Mahommedans of Granada, who put themselves under the protection of the Christian kings and became their vassals.

  • Aguilar "of the Frontier" was so named in the middle ages from its position on the border of the Moorish territories, which were defended by the castle of Anzur, now a ruin; but the spacious squares and modern houses of the existing town retain few vestiges of Moorish dominion.

  • It is a modern town, although many of the houses have the flat roofs, view-turrets (miradores) and horseshoe arches characteristic of Moorish architecture.

  • He died suddenly in his tent at Jaen when preparing for a raid into the Moorish territory of Granada, on the 7th of September 1312.

  • Almansa is built at the foot of a white limestone crag, which is surmounted by a Moorish castle, and rises abruptly in the midst of a fertile and irrigated plain.

  • The town is a labyrinth of narrow, crooked streets, and some of its houses are Moorish in character.

  • both because of the Moorish element in the population of Spain, and because he was also sovereign of Naples and Sicily.

  • In these shops the few Moorish industries are carried on, such as embroidery in gold and silver thread, the making of kid slippers of every kind and colour, the manufacture of gold and silver ornaments.

  • The public buildings of chief interest are the kasbah, the government offices (formerly the British consulate), the palaces of the governor-general and the archbishop - all these are fine Moorish houses; the "Grand" and the "New" Mosques, the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Philippe, the church of the Holy Trinity (Church of England), and the Bibliotheque Nationale d'Alger - a Turkish palace built in 1799-1800.

  • The interior of the mosque is square and is divided into aisles by columns joined by Moorish arches.

  • In its construction an attempt has been made to produce a building suitable for Christian worship whilst the architecture is Moorish in style.

  • The roof of the nave is of Moorish plaster work.

  • Haedo sets forth that a young Arab who had embraced Christianity and had been baptized with the name of Geronimo was captured by a Moorish corsair in 1569 and taken to Algiers.

  • Here are the summer palace of the governor-general, many fine Moorish and French villas and luxurious hotels, all surrounded by beautiful gardens.

  • basilica with a vaulted portico and a nave and two aisles begun in 1103, a mosaic pavement in the Cosmatesque style, a good ambo resting on columns and decorated with mosaics showing traces of Moorish influence, a Paschal candelabrum, and an organ gallery of similar style.

  • Its flat-roofed Moorish houses are enclosed by gardens of cactus, dwarf palm, orange and other subtropical plants, interspersed with masses of rock.

  • In Africa the Moorish prince, Firmus, raised the standard of revolt, being joined by the provincials, who had been rendered desperate by the cruelty and extortions of Count Romanus, the military governor.

  • It occupies a slight eminence, crowned by the ruins of a Moorish castle, and overlooking the Guadiana.

  • It is not mentioned by any Roman historian, and first rose to importance under Moorish rule.

  • In 1031 it became the capital of a small Moorish kingdom, and, though temporarily held by the Portuguese in 1168, it retained its independence until 1229, when it was captured by Alphonso IX.

  • Montefrio is largely Moorish in character, and dominated by a Moorish castle.

  • Troops were summoned to Seville and the war began by the siege of Alhama, a town eight leagues from Granada, the Moorish capital.

  • While the schools of Babylonia were flourishing as the religious head of Judaism, the West, and especially Spain under Moorish rule, was becoming the home of Jewish scholarship. On the breaking of the schools many of the fugitives fled o- g up Y g?

  • As vizier to the Moorish king at Granada, he was not only a patron of learning, but himself a man of wide knowledge and a considerable author.

  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

  • It resembles a very large and elaborate mausoleum, built in Byzantine style, with Moorish arabesques.

  • Close by stands a large royal palace, Moorish in style.

  • The Jews of Spain attained to high places in the service of the state from the time of the Moorish conquest in 711.

  • of Castile; and the five Moorish heads in its coat-of-arms commemorate the defence.

  • GUADIANA (anc. Anas, Moorish Wadi Ana), a river of Spain and Portugal.

  • Traces of Moorish influence are evident and the horseshoe arch is common.

  • A range of low hills intervenes between Felanitx and the Mediterranean; upon one summit, the Puig de San Sebastian, stands a Moorish castle with a remarkable series of subterranean vaults.

  • The cathedral occupies the site of a Moorish mosque built in 914.

  • Their houses, at any rate those in the towns, had thus the characteristics of Moorish villas; and in them they lived a Moorish life.

  • Henceforth Rodrigo Diaz began to live that life of a soldier of fortune which has made him famous, sometimes fighting under the Christian banner, sometimes under Moorish, but always for his own hand.

  • Cardona is a picturesque and old-fashioned town, with Moorish walls and citadel, and a 14th-century church.

  • Alora, which is an ancient and picturesque town, with several Moorish ruins, occupies an outlying hill of the Sierra de Tolox, and overlooks a fertile valley where maize, sugar-cane and datepalms are cultivated.

  • taught the people how to prepare dyes from the plants and lichens, and many of the patterns still show signs of Moorish origin.

  • It occupies a commanding position, while the remains of its walls, and of a fine Moorish castle on a rock that overhangs the town, show how admirably its natural defences were supplemented by art.

  • Originally a Moorish stronghold, it was captured in 1233 by James I.

  • The medieval building was demolished late in the 18th century, and the present castle erected in mingled Gothic and Moorish styles.

  • Since, however, Geber happened to be the name of a celebrated Moorish philosopher who flourished in about the iith or 12th century, it has been supposed that he was the founder of algebra, which has since perpetuated his name.

  • Turning to the Arabs in the West we find the same enlightened spirit; Cordova, the capital of the Moorish empire in Spain, was as much a centre of learning as Bagdad.

  • When the Moorish empire began to wane the brilliant intellectual gifts which they had so abundantly nourished during three or four centuries became enfeebled, and after that period they failed to produce an author comparable with those of the 7th to the 11th centuries.

  • The medical school owed its foundation largely to Jewish teachers, themselves educated in the Moorish schools of Spain, and imbued with the intellectual independence of the Averroists.

  • Cullera is a walled town, containing a ruined Moorish citadel, large barracks, several churches and convents and a hospital.

  • UDAD, Aoudad or Audad, the Moorish name of the Barbary sheep, or arui, Ovis (Ammotragus) lervia, the only wild sheep found in Africa, where it inhabits all the mountain ranges of the north, descending to the eastward far into the heart of the Sudan.

  • The pure Turks and the Kuluglis (sons of Turkish fathers by Moorish women or slave girls) are no longer numerous.

  • 4 There are some very beautiful doorways to mosques and other specimens of Moorish art at Gabes.

  • Among the cities famous in the annals of Arab-Berber, or Moorish, art and civilization, Tlemcen takes high rank.

  • The various quarters are grouped around the principal mosque - the Jewish to the south-west, the Moorish to the south-east, that of the merchants to the north-east, while the new town with the civic buildings lies to the north-west.

  • The military authorities occupy the Meshuar or citadel, built in 1145, which separates the Jewish and Moorish quarters and was formerly the palace of the rulers of Tlemcen.

  • The adjacent mosque is a beautiful specimen of Moorish art.

  • The Ebro and its tributaries have been utilized for irrigation since the Moorish conquest; the main stream becomes navigable by small boats about Tudela; but its value as a means of communication is almost neutralized by the obstacles in its channel, and seafaring vessels cannot proceed farther up than Tortosa.

  • issued an edict, which ordered them to renounce all their Moorish ways of life and to give up their children to be educated by Christian priests.

  • Since 1648 it has been the custom of Moorish sultans to despatch superfluous sons and daughters to Tafilalt, and as the males are all sharifs, the fanaticism against Europeans is comprehensible.

  • Their origin is unknown, but according to local tradition they are the descendants of some Moorish sailors who were cast ashore many years ago in a shipwreck; their own tradition is that they are descended from the children of an Irish mother and a negro father, these children having intermarried with Indians of the Nanticoke tribe.

  • Tarrasa was a Roman Municipality, and a bishopric from the 5th century to the Moorish invasion in the 8th.

  • ALPUJARRAS, or [[Alpuxarras, The]] (Moorish al Busherat, " the grass-land"), a mountainous district of southern Spain, in the province of Granada, consisting principally of valleys which descend at right angles from the crest of the Sierra Nevada on the north, to the Sierras Almijara, Contraviesa and Gador, which sever it from the Mediterranean Sea, on the south.

  • Many of the names of places in the Alpujarras are of Moorish origin.

  • The old Moorish style of building about an open court, or patio, prevails, and the livingrooms of the family are on the second floor.

  • To the visitor from Europe the attraction of Tunis lies in the native city, where, in the Rue al Jezira, along which runs electric trams, he can see hundreds of camels in the morning bearing charcoal to market; where he may witness the motley life of the bazaars, or, by the Bab-Jedid, watch the snake-charmers and listen to the Moorish storytellers.

  • The Dar-el-Bey contains numerous rooms beautifully decorated in the Moorish style of the 18th century; and the judgment hall has a domed roof adorned with the delicate arabesque plaster-work known as Nuksh hadida.

  • North-east of the Palais de Justice, which like the Sadiki College is built in the Moorish style, rises the great dome, surrounded by smaller cupolas, of the largest mosque in the city, that named after Sidi Mahrez, a renowned saint of the 5th century of the Mahommedan era, whose tomb makes it a sancutary for debtors.

  • About a mile and a quarter from the Bab Bu Saadun, the north-west gate of the city, is the ancient palace called the Bardo, remarkable for the "lion court," a terrace to which access is gained by a flight of steps guarded by marble lions, and for some apartments in the Moorish style.

  • Its chief buildings are the cathedral, originally a mosque, and the ruined castle, which is the chief among many interesting relics of Moorish rule.

  • of Castile in 1240, and entrusted to the Order of Calatrava; in 1331 it was recaptured by the Moorish king of Granada; but in the following century it was finally reunited to Christian Spain.

  • In point of cleanliness Tetuan compares favourably with most Moorish towns.

  • The principal industries are tilework, inlaying with silver wire, and the manufacture of thick-soled yellow slippers, much-esteemed flintlocks, and artistic "towels" used as cape and skirt by Moorish country girls.

  • The houses are built with thick walls of stone and brick round open courts, in the Moorish style, and their ironbarred doors and windows give them the appearance of being a part of the fortifications.

  • Among other prominent buildings are the Oddfellows' temple (completed 1894), the public library, the art museum (1886), a Jewish synagogue (in Avondale), and the (Jewish) Plum Street temple (1866), Moorish in architecture.

  • The islanders are a Spanish race, very closely akin to the Catalans; but the long period of Moorish rule has left its mark on their physical type and customs. In character they are industrious and hospitable, and pique themselves on their loyalty and orthodoxy.

  • They became a separate Moorish kingdom in 1009, which, becoming extremely obnoxious for piracy, was the object of a crusade directed against it by Pope Paschal II., in which the Catalans took the lead.

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