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moon

moon

moon Sentence Examples

  • Clouds drifted away from a full moon, drenching the patio with soft lunar light.

  • The moon peeked shyly over the dunes and moved searching fingers of dim light across the dunes.

  • There would be no moon tonight.

  • There's this God-given gift hanging up there like a paper moon that only the five of us can make happen.

  • It was the sound I hated more on a telephone that Henri Mancini's version of Theme from Moon Glow or any other top one hundred hits of elevator music was, 'would you please hold'?

  • The room was dark aside from curtains opened to allow the moon to shine through.

  • The moon was covered by clouds, and she crumpled the notes she'd taken.

  • You see the stars and the moon instead of how dark the night is.

  • Stars and a half moon were bright, the sound of the ocean comforting.

  • The next eruption, and the one after it, gave insufficient light to help, but then a multiple display hung in the sky like a full moon, giving time for his eyes to search left and right.

  • Fred would be up till the moon was down, out spending Mrs. Worthington's Vegas spoils.

  • We were in Hawaii and pretty mellowed out on one of those perfect beach nights, watching the moon dance on the incoming surf.

  • The moon was non-existent, and the waves sparkled in starlight.

  • The other night, he sat on a beach with one Deidre and watched the moon cross the sky.

  • Only when the moon was halfway across the sky did he rouse himself.

  • The sound of the ocean was calming under the full moon, the steady ebb and flow of waves drawing him to sit on the beach.

  • "Whatever. It's a full moon tonight," she said hopefully.

  • She walked down the beach opposite the party, gaze alternating between the ocean at her feet and the full moon climbing into the sky.

  • The moon is full, the sky full of stars.

  • Death lets you see the stars and the moon instead of how dark the night is.

  • "Is kissing a stranger on the beach under the full moon on your bucket list?" he whispered.

  • She faced the ocean, the moon dangling low and large in the sky before her.

  • What happened to Death letting you see the stars and moon instead of how dark the night is?

  • Warden says one every moon cycle.

  • No, a different world completely, but similar in that it has a sun, moon, oceans, grass, and stuff.

  • A'Ran took in the home he had left several moon cycles before.

  • We have hidden on this moon in an unoccupied galaxy since.

  • He sat in the only seat in the tiny craft, studying Ne'Rin, who transmitted from A'Ran's battle command center on the moon that was his interim home.

  • He'd chosen to leave Ne'Rin on the moon this trip.

  • She tugged gently on the moon dangling from the necklace Kiera gave her for her wedding.

  • Kiera tugged at the moon on her necklace as she walked down the hall toward the video game room.

  • The next nearest is on the moon and a logistical nightmare.

  • She'd wondered why A'Ran's water supplies were located on the nearest moon, a logistical obstacle.

  • He watched as Mansr expertly organized the evacuations and aligned the space battle to keep the Yirkins' attention off the ships fleeing the planet's surface for the nearest moon, Kiera.

  • The moon can hold us, but we'll need food and supplies until the space battle is over.

  • He heard Mansr issue orders to others to rally on the moon and Jetr's voice come over the speakers.

  • Mison, I accept your prisoner exchange and will release your men on the moon nearest to Qatwal.

  • The pale glow of the moon shone through the uncurtained window, casting an elongated shadow from the overturned chair.

  • The Deans had utilized the site a half dozen times, including, in December, the council-sponsored full moon nighttime outing, followed by a dip in the town's hot spring pool.

  • I gaze out my window as the moon is slowly slipping away and I long for the warmth of the morning.

  • Jeff gave Dean a smile as big as a full moon.

  • As he headed for the door, Sarah called, "Don't forget tomorrow night's the full moon."

  • The full moon had always been a time that Sarah and Jackson spent together.

  • Well, I thought maybe I would wait until the next full moon, then find Elisabeth and let her rip out what's left of my guts.

  • Yes, I would have to go away at the full moon.

  • I have no control over what I do during the full moon, and after, have no memory of my time as a wolf, so I can't answer that.

  • He remembered that her phone went straight to voicemail the morning after the full moon.

  • He thought about the next full moon and wondered how they would deal with it.

  • It was a wolf howling at the full moon.

  • You know, the full moon is two days before Halloween this month.

  • This is where you could stay during the full moon.

  • If we were to be together at the full moon, do you think something would prevent her from killing me?

  • No, I plan to tell them at the Wolf Moon Festival.

  • She quietly said, "I'm sorry, I wanted to get through the next full moon before telling you."

  • Every year, the full moon in January is the Wolf Moon and there is a three day festival that all werewolves attend… kind of our high holiday.

  • We've been talking about the full moon.

  • They were determined to enjoy every minute of easiness before dealing with the reality of the full moon.

  • I will never be close enough to hurt you at the full moon again.

  • Everyone seemed happy to ignore the discussion about the full moon.

  • The band played "Fly Me to The Moon".

  • Not unless I catch him at the full moon.

  • Was there anything hinky in your local papers after the full moon.

  • I might not see you until the Wolf Moon Festival.

  • She had been planning to pay Elisabeth a surprise visit before the November full moon anyway.

  • Did Elisabeth tell you we spent the last full moon together?

  • Even if they were together at the full moon, neither would remember.

  • The full moon is in six days.

  • Sarah was determined to finish it before Elisabeth left for the full moon.

  • They finished one day before the full moon, and all stood admiring their accomplishment as Elisabeth said, I'm going to do some great work here.

  • That evening, Jackson and Elisabeth stayed up late as they had for the previous full moon, neither wanting to waste precious time together sleeping.

  • When they were about half way through the game he asked, "Do you think she will ever agree to stay for the full moon again?"

  • Jackson wore a wide grin as Elisabeth said, I don't know what I will do about the Wolf Moon Festival.

  • Perhaps I could go for the festivities then come back here before the full moon.

  • Jackson worried Elisabeth would miss her family, but she assured him that Christmas was not nearly as important as The Wolf Moon.

  • Wait. How did she morph into a wolf, it's not even close to a full moon?

  • Darkness settled into corners and crevices beyond the moon's touch.

  • "No more lunatic rages or attempts to blast himself to the moon or whatever he was doing last week," General Greene added with a shake of his head.

  • Her body shook off the chill by the first mile marker and by the second, the moon was directly overhead.

  • Follow this path until you reach a stream.  Follow the stream towards the smaller moon.  I'll catch up with you.  Whatever you do, don't leave the stream.

  • The water looked … black in the moonlight.  She took a step back and looked up towards the moons.  As Gabriel indicated, one moon was lower than the other.

  • The sounds of fighting grew faint and then disappeared.  The stream wound through the jungle until it reached a small waterfall that fed into a massive lake whose black surface reflected the stars and moon.  Katie slid down the hill beside the waterfall to the lake's edge, uncertain what to do.  Gabriel hadn't mentioned the stream ending or the lake.

  • I don't think both of us will make it out of the underworld.  It makes me think about all the things I wish I'd done before I died.  I wanted to backpack through Europe and go on a cruise somewhere warm.  I wanted to make love with you on the beach under the full moon.  Without worrying about demons or Kris or anything.

  • Rhyn gasped and struggled to sit.  Kiki's still body lay a few feet from him, the ocean lapping at his brother's feet.  The Caribbean night was humid and warm, and the moon large over head.

  • He hesitated and then held out a hand.  She took it.  His warm hands were rough and large.  He squeezed hers.  He led her away from the courtyard and lights into the dark night.  They walked hand in hand for a few moments, alone under the full moon.  She'd walked with him before, but this night, it was different.  She felt the shift between them.

  • Ethel looked at him as if he'd proposed a trip to the moon, stating emphatically the only activity worthy of sweat would take place in her king size bed.

  • The moon was out, the evening was mild and had circum­stances been different, Dean would have put in a plug for contin­uing the evening's pleasure.

  • Art Farmer was blowing trumpet with the Horace Silver quintet in a piece called "Moon Rays" that Fred wouldn't have lis­tened to on his own unless someone cut off his ears.

  • I don't know what Arthur Atherton is up to but he has no more evidence your husband is alive than the man in the moon.

  • The moon was full, the temperature cool for early August.

  • If they weren't there she would be able to look at the moon and know he could see it as well.

  • His eyes were brighter than the moon, greener than any gem she'd ever dreamt of.

  • Within a couple of hours, clouds blocked the moon, and the snow began again.

  • The sun had set, and the bright moon made the sand glow like snow.

  • Before the last full moon, you never desired to visit the villages, or even to venture outside our walls.

  • The moon is a fickle lover, like a beautiful woman…she gives her whole heart but once a month and leaves you before dawn…why fear you the night?

  • He appeared to be alone, and she took a deep breath to still her hammering heart before emerging into the small clearing lit by the moon.

  • The moon reached its peak before he'd finished inspecting the walls and greeting its guards.

  • She would die before the moon rose.

  • When the moon is at its highest, see that she's brought to me in the great hall for the ceremony.

  • The moon peered over the walls of the city, and he squinted toward it.

  • The moon was too bright for his eyes, and the cold ocean breeze burned his lungs.

  • A decal with the symbol of the White God – a sun and moon with an arrow through it – was in the corner of one window.

  • In the dim light of his bedroom, she was able to make out a small symbol on the metal: a moon in two separate phases, full and crescent.

  • A well-worn, silver medallion with a symbol of the sun and moon, pierced by an arrow, was at her chest.

  • Moon and stars were bright overhead.

  • Her gray eyes were almost the color of the moon overhead, her pale features obscured by curls that danced in an ocean breeze.

  • The silvery moon above was bright, and she admired what she thought might be her last vision of the star-speckled night sky.

  • It rippled with lightening and spread fast, soon blocking the moon before it rolled outward in every direction.

  • His novels, for the most part published first in London, reflect his wild adventurous life, the best known being The Son of the Wolf (1900); The Call of the Wild (1903); Moon Face (1906); Martin Eden (1909); South Sea Tales (1912), and his last, The Little Lady of the Big House (1916).

  • Archimedes concluded from his measurements that the sun's diameter was greater than 27' and less than 32'; and even Tycho Brahe was so misled by his measures of the apparent diameters of the sun and moon as to conclude that a total eclipse of the sun was impossible.'

  • These include the mutual distances of some of the stars in the Pleiades, a few observations of the apparent diameter of the sun, others of the distance of the moon from neighbouring stars, and a great number of measurements of the diameter of the moon.

  • (1773), p. 190) also gives results of measurements by Gascoigne of the diameters of the moon, Jupiter, Mars and Venus with his micrometer.

  • 21, p. 373, Adrien Auzout gives the results of some measures of the diameter of the sun and moon made by himself, and this communication led to the letters of Townley and Bevis above referred to.

  • By De la Rue's advice, Pritchard began his career there with a determination of the physical libration of the moon, or the nutation of its axis.

  • The same considerations serve to explain the moon and other satellites.

  • It ended the old Aristotelian distinction between the sphere beneath the moon and the starry spaces beyond.

  • He set up an " intelligence bureau " in Rome, instituted mysteries like those of Eleusis, from which his particular enemies the Christians and Epicureans were alike excluded as " profane," and celebrated a mystic marriage between himself and the moon.

  • He found the light of the sun to be 300 times more intense than that of the moon, and thus made some of the earliest measurements in photometry.

  • So it was in old Israel: the Sabbath was one of the stated religious feasts, like the new moon and the three great .agricultural sacrificial celebrations (Hosea ii.

  • In fact, the four quarters of the moon supply an obvious division of the month; and, wherever new moon and full moon are religious occasions, we get in the most natural way a sacred cycle of fourteen or 1 See, further, E.

  • For, if the Sun presides over the first hour of Sunday, and therefore also over the eighth, the fifteenth and the twenty-second, Venus will have the twenty-third hour, Mercury the twenty-fourth, and the Moon, as the third in order from the Sun, will preside over the first hour of Monday.

  • Mars, again, as third from the Moon, will preside over Tuesday (Dies Martis, Mardi), and so forth.

  • fifteen days, of which the week of seven or eight days (determined by half moon) is the half.

  • Thus the old Hindus chose the new and the full moon as days of sacrifice; the eve.

  • religious feasts - with the phases of the moon among the Semites.

  • Thus the Harranians had four sacrificial days in every month, and of these two at least were determined by the conjunction and opposition of the moon. ?

  • That full moon as well as new moon had a religious significance among the ancient Hebrews seems to follow from the fact that, when the great agricultural feasts were fixed to set days, the full moon was chosen.

  • 27, compared with verses 18, 24, an indication that in old times the feast of the new moon lasted two days., In that case a week of seven working days would occur only once in two months.

  • We cannot tell when the Sabbath became dissociated from the month; but the change seems to have been made before the Book of the Covenant, which already regards the Sabbath simply as an institution of humanity and ignores the new moon.

  • This name shabattu was certainly applied to the 15th day of the month, and am nuh libbi could mean "day of rest in the middle," referring to the moon's pause at the full.

  • On abstinence from work on the New Moon by Jewish women of the present time, see M.

  • 6 that even in later times there were two days at the new moon on which it was not proper to fast.

  • If the 15th always was full moon day, the 7th would coincide well with half moon, but the 21st and 28th would fall away considerably from the moon's phases.

  • JERICHO (im p ', i m', once rTnn;, a word of disputed meaning, whether "fragrant" or "moon [-god] city"), an important town in the Jordan valley some 5 m.

  • The "wisdom" personified by the moon-god is likewise an expression of the science of astrology in which the observation of the moon's phases is so important a factor.

  • With this " free " wave is combined a " forced " wave, generated, by the direct action of the sun and moon, within the Atlantic area itself.

  • All creatures he called his "brothers" or "sisters" - the chief example is the poem of the "Praises of the Creatures," wherein "brother Sun," "sister Moon," "brother Wind," and "sister Water" are called on to praise God.

  • The principal other ceremonies of this class are the new and full moon offerings, the oblations made at the commencement of the three seasons, the offering of first-fruits, the animal sacrifice, and the Agnihotra, or daily morning and evening oblation of milk, which, however, is also included amongst the grihya, or domestic rites, as having to be performed daily on the domestic fire by the householder who keeps no regular set of sacrificial fires.

  • The - - study of tidal strain in the earth's crust by Sir George Darwin has led that physicist to indicate the possibility of the triangular form and southerly direction of the continents being a result of the differential or tidal attraction of the sun and moon.

  • In 1847 an altazimuth was erected, designed by Airy to enable observations of the moon to be made not only on the meridian, but whenever she might be visible.

  • Shortly afterwards he undertook the further laborious task of reducing the enormous mass of observations of the moon made at Greenwich during the same period under the direction, successively, of J.

  • Hansen of two new inequalities in the moon's motion.

  • We note (a) that in the worship of Yahweh the sacred seasons of new moon and Sabbath are obviously lunar.

  • in early pre-exilian days, with the full moon.

  • While admitting that a special significance may have been attached in pre-exilian times to the full-moon Sabbath, and that the latter may have been specially intended in the combination " new moon and Sabbath " in the 8th-century prophets (Hos.

  • The general coincidence of the Sabbath or seventh day with the easily recognized first quarter and full moon established its sacred character as lunar as well as planetary.

  • (d) Lastly, the old genial life of the high places, in which the " new moon " or Sabbath or the annual festival was a sacrificial feast of communion, in which the members of the local community or clan enjoyed fellowship with one another - all this picturesque life ceased to be.

  • The other powers of nature have shrines dedicated to them in the altar: to the Earth on the north of the city, the altars to the Sun and Moon outside the north-eastern and north-western angles respectively of the Chinese city, and the altar of agriculture inside the south gate of the Chinese city.

  • He constructed a map of as many as 576 of these lines, the principal of which he denoted by the letters of the alphabet from A to G; and by ascertaining their refractive indices he determined that their relative positions are constant, whether in spectra produced by the direct rays of the sun, or by the reflected light of the moon and planets.

  • The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.

  • It can be shown that unless a quantity of meteors in collective mass equal to our moon were to plunge into the sun every year the supply of heat could not be sustained from this source.

  • With the Jewish Christians, whose leading thought was the death of Christ as the Paschal Lamb, the fast ended at the same time as that of the Jews, on the fourteenth day of the moon at evening, and the Easter festival immediately followed, without regard to the day of the week.

  • Although measures had thus been taken to secure uniformity of observance, and to put an end to a controversy which had endangered Christian unity, a new difficulty had to be encountered owing to the absence of any authoritative rule by which the paschal moon was to be ascertained.

  • Briefly, it may be explained here that Easter day is the first Sunday after the full moon following the vernal equinox.

  • This, of course, varies in different longitudes, while a further difficulty occurred in the attempt to fix the correct time of Easter by means of cycles of years, when the changes of the sun and moon more or less exactly repeat themselves.

  • An Anomalistic month is the time in which the moon passes from perigee to perigee, &c.

  • Of the names of the planets Estera (Ishtar Venus, also called Ruha d'Qudsha, "holy spirit"), Enba (Nebo, Mercury), Sin (moon), Kewan (Saturn), Bil (Jupiter), and Nirig (Nirgal, Mars) reveal their Babylonian origin; Il or Il Il, the sun, is also known as Kadush and Adunay (the Adonai of the Old Testament); as lord of the planetary spirits his place is in the midst of them; they are the source of all temptation and evil amongst men.

  • By some she is considered to have been a moon-goddess, her flight from Minos and her leap into the sea signifying the revolution and disappearance of the moon (Pausanias ii.

  • Even in the Leiden papyrus the astronomical symbols for the sun and moon are used to denote gold and silver, and in the Meteorologica of Olympiodorus lead is attributed to Saturn, iron to Mars, copper to Venus, tin to Hermes (Mercury) and electrum to Jupiter.

  • The problem of determining an orbit may be regarded as coeval with Hipparchus, who, it is supposed, found the moving positions of the apogee and perigee of the moon's orbit.

  • At the Hindu Festival of Dasara, which lasted nine days from the new moon of October, tents made of canvas or booths made of branches were erected in front of the temples.

  • Gold, the most perfect metal, had the symbol of the Sun, 0; silver, the semiperfect metal, had the symbol of the Moon, 0j; copper, iron and antimony, the imperfect metals of the gold class, had the symbols of Venus Mars and the Earth tin and lead, the imperfect metals of the silver class, had the symbols of Jupiter 94, and Saturn h; while mercury, the imperfect metal of both the gold and silver class, had the symbol of the planet,.

  • The end of this abutted on the land at the head of the present Grand Square, where rose the "Moon Gate."

  • This would seem to point to a time when the fixing of the sabbath was determined by the age of the moon, so that the first day of the Passover, which is on the 15th of Nisan, would always occur on a sabbath.

  • The tide-generating force is due to the attraction of the waters of the ocean by sun and moon.

  • There are therefore maxima and minima in the value of the tide-generating force, depending on the relative positions of the sun, earth and moon.

  • The orbits of earth and moon are elliptical, so that the earth is sometimes nearer, sometimes farther away from the sun, and the same is the case with the moon in relation to the earth.

  • The orbital planes of earth and moon are inclined to each other at an angle of 50.8 ° and at two points only in its orbit can the moon be situated in the plane of the ecliptic: the line joining these two points is called the "line of nodes."

  • In British Honduras an alkaline decoction prepared from the Moon plant (Calonictyon speciosum) is used for the same purpose.

  • Doubt was first thrown on the accuracy of this number by an announcement from Hansen in 1862 that the observed parallactic inequality of the moon was irreconcilable with the accepted value of the solar parallax, and indicated the much larger value 8.97".

  • The fourth method is through the parallactic inequality in the moon's motion.

  • For the relation of this inequality to the solar parallax see Moon.

  • The fifth method consists in observing the displacement in the direction of the sun, or of one of the nearer planets, due to the motion of the earth round the common centre of gravity of the earth and moon.

  • It requires a precise knowledge of the moon's mass.

  • The combined mass of the earth and moon admits of being determined by its effect in changing the position of the plane of the orbit of Venus.

  • earth's mass =14.60052 „ moon's „ =12.6895.

  • Putting a for the mean distance of the earth from the sun, and n for its mean motion in one second, we use the fundamental equation a3 n2 = Mo-1-M', Mo being the sun's mass, and M' the combined masses of the earth and moon, which are, however, too small to affect the result.

  • The determination of the solar parallax through the parallactic inequality of the moon's motion also involves two elements - one of observation, the other of purely mathematical theory.

  • The inequality in question has its greatest negative value near the time of the moon's first quarter, and the greatest positive value near the third quarter.

  • Meridian observations of the moon have been heretofore made by observing the transit of its illuminated limb.

  • In each case the results of the observations may be systematically in error, not only from the uncertain diameter of the moon, but in a still greater degree from the varying effect of irradiation and the personal equation of the observers.

  • Rest and exercise, however, temporarily restored his health, and he gave proof of the undiminished vigour of his powers by carrying off, in 1764, the prize offered by the Paris Academy of Sciences for the best essay on the libration of the moon.

  • The prize was again awarded to Lagrange; and he earned the same distinction with essays on the problem of three bodies in 1772, on the secular equation of the moon in 1774, and in 1778 on the theory of cometary perturbations.

  • Two altars, to the Sun and the Moon, stood before the former, and cult statues along the latter.

  • Among his other papers may be mentioned those dealing with the formation of fairy rings (1807), a synoptic scale of chemical equivalents (1814), sounds inaudible to ordinary ears (1820), the physiology of vision (1824), the apparent direction of the eyes in a portrait (1824) and the comparison of the light of the sun with that of the moon and fixed stars (1829).

  • The results of the theory of the diffraction patterns due to circular apertures admit of an interesting application to coronas, such as are often seen encircling the sun and moon.

  • - cl., of which the former was sung at the three great feasts - the encaenia, and the new moon, and the latter at the daily morning prayer.

  • RAINBOW, formerly known as the iris, the coloured rings seen in the heavens when the light from the sun or moon shines on falling rain; on a smaller scale they may be observed when sunshine falls on the spray of a waterfall or fountain.

  • The moon can produce rainbows in the same manner as the sun.

  • The colours are much fainter, and according to Aristotle, who claims to be the first observer of this phenomenon, the lunar bows are only seen when the moon is full.

  • Among the works which he translated into Syriac and of which his versions survive are treatises of Aristotle, Porphyry and Galen, 3 the Ars grammatica of Dionysius Thrax, the works of Dionysius the Areopagite, and possibly two or three treatises of Plutarch.4 His own original works are less important, but include a " treatise on logic, addressed to Theodore (of Merv), which is unfortunately imperfect, a tract on negation and affirmation; a treatise, likewise addressed to Theodore, On the Causes of the Universe, according to the Views of Aristotle, showing how it is a Circle; a tract On Genus, Species and Individuality; and a third tract addressed to Theodore, On the Action and Influence of the Moon, explanatory and illustrative of Galen's IIEpi rcptaiµwv r t µepwv, bk.

  • The assault was made by night by way of Euryelus under the uncertain light of the moon, and this circumstance turned what was very nearly a successful surprise into a ruinous defeat.

  • He dallied till the end of August, many weeks after the defeat, when the coming of Syracusan reinforcements decided him to depart; but on the 27th of that month was an eclipse of the moon, on the strength of which he insisted on a delay of almost another month.

  • Mead's treatise on The Power of the Sun and Moon over Human Bodies (1704), equally inspired by Newton's discoveries, was a premature attempt to assign the influence of atmospheric pressure and other cosmical causes in producing disease.

  • The fifth book, which has the most general interest, professes to explain the process by which the earth, the sea, the sky, the sun, moon and stars, were formed, the origin of life, and the gradual advance of man from the most savage to the most civilized condition.

  • moon, lune), and he further took the name Astruc, Don Astruc or En Astruc of Lunel.

  • Merodach next arranged the stars in order, along with the sun and moon, and gave them laws which they were never to transgress.

  • The zodiac was a Babylonian invention of great antiquity; and eclipses of the sun as well as of the moon could be foretold.

  • In other islands the natives venerated the sun, moon, earth and stars.

  • He sought to determine the distance and magnitude of the sun, to calculate the diameter of the earth and the influence of the moon on the tides.

  • The other was to show that the gravitation of the earth, following one and the same law with that of the sun, extended to the moon.

  • Newton's researches showed that the attraction of the earth on the moon was the same as that for bodies at the earth's surface, only reduced in the inverse square of the moon's distance from the earth's centre.

  • These are Mars and the moon.

  • In the case of the motion of the moon around the earth, assuming the gravitation of the latter to be subject to the modification in question, the annual motion of the moon's perigee should be greater by I 5" than the theoretical motion.

  • These demonstrations were of two kinds, one nocturnal, showing the moon and bright stars, the other diurnal, for day scenes.

  • He was well acquainted with the use of magnifying glasses and suggested a kind of telescope for viewing the moon, but does not seem to have thought of applying a lens to the camera.

  • He says they can be used for observation of the moon and stars and also for longitudes.

  • He was the first to describe an instrument fitted with a sight and paper screen for observing the diameters of the sun and moon in a dark room.

  • deals with astronomy - the moon, stars, and the zodiac, the sun, the planets, the seasons and the calendar.

  • With the splendour of the full moon falling upon him, his hand clasping his Shakespeare, and looking, as we are told, almost unearthly in the majestic beauty of his old age, Tennyson passed away at Aldworth on the night of the 6th of October 1892.

  • Shadows and reflections were ignored, and perspective, approximately correct for landscape distances, was isometrical for near objects, while the introduction of a symbolic sun or moon lent the sole distinction between a day and a night scene.

  • Shibuichi inlaid with shakudo used to be the commonest combination of metals in this class of decoration, and the objects usually depicted were bamboos, crows, wild-fowl under the moon, peony sprays and so forth.

  • He was the first to employ mercury for the air-pump, and devised a method of determining longitude at sea by observations of the moon among the stars.

  • Fasts, obligatory on all above seven years of age, are held on every Monday and Thursday, on every new moon, and at the passover (the 21st or 22nd of April).

  • In 1705 appeared The Consolidator, or Memoirs of Sundry Transactions from the World in the Moon, a political satire which is supposed to have given some hints for Swift's Gulliver's Travels; and at the end of the year Defoe performed a secret mission, the first of several of the kind, for Harley.

  • Like some other culture-heroes, he steals sun, moon and stars out of a box, so enlightening the dark earth.

  • Afterwards, the creator and the mother-egg became respectively the sun and the moon, represented by the Inca priest-king and his wife, the supposed descendants of Manco Capac. 11 Dualistic tendencies were also developed.

  • By uttering a sacred formula the good spirit throws the evil one into a state of confusion for a second 3000 years, while he produces the archangels and the material creation, including the sun, moon and stars.

  • 9, 10, 14, 15, that God divided the primeval waters into two parts by an intervening " firmament " or " platform," on which the sun, moon and stars (planets) were placed to mark times and to give light.

  • Berlin, 1884), holds that the purple or golden hair of Nisus is the sun, and Scylla the moon, and that the origin of the legend is to be looked for in a very ancient myth of the relations between the two, which he endeavours to explain with the aid of Indian and German parallels.

  • Journal, September 1897 and January 1901; To the Mountains of the Moon (London, 1901); The Tanganyika Problem (London, 1903); L.

  • The Olympic games, so famous in Greek history, were celebrated once every four years, between the new and full moon first following the summer solstice, on the small plain named Olympia in Elis, which was bounded on one side by the river Alpheus, on another by the small tributary stream the Cladeus, and on the other two sides by mountains.

  • Before the introduction of the Metonic cycle, the Olympic year began sometimes with the full moon which followed, at other times with that which preceded the summer solstice, because the year sometimes contained 384 days instead of 354.

  • But subsequently to its adoption, the year always commenced with the eleventh day of the moon which followed the solstice.

  • Thus, the moon was eclipsed on the 27th of August, a little before midnight,' in the year 413 before our era; and it is required.

  • But the addition was very far from being an improvement on the work of Calippus; for instead of a difference of only five hours and fifty-three minutes between the places of the sun and moon, which was the whole error of the Calippic period, this difference, in the period of eighty-four years, amounted to one day, six hours and forty-one minutes.

  • From the time of the emperor Yao, upwards of 2000 years B.C., the Chinese had two different years, - a civil year, which was regulated by the moon, and an astronomical year, which was solar.

  • Since the accession of the emperors of the Han dynasty, 206 B.C., the civil year of the Chinese has begun with the first day of that moon in the course of which the sun enters into the sign of the zodiac which corresponds with our sign Pisces.

  • As the /see' is longer than a synodic revolution of the moon, the sun cannot arrive twice at a chung-ki during the same lunation; and as there are only twelve tsee, the year can contain only twelve months having different names.

  • Each day of the cycle has a particular name, and as it is a usual practice, in mentioning dates, to give the name of the day along with that of the moon and the year, this arrangement affords great facilities in verifying the epochs of Chinese chronology.

  • Thus the first moon of the year 1873 being the first of a new cycle, the first moon of every sixth year, reckoned backwards or forwards from that date, as 1868, 1863, &c., or 1877, 1882, &c., also begins a new lunar cycle of sixty moons.

  • This is corroborated by a Babylonian tablet with observations of the moon (Brit.

  • Though the moon had risen about 6:30 P.M.

  • The rising moon shone fitfully through the clouds, and the " Glasgow " continued to fire at any ship that showed up, but as this only betrayed her position she ceased fire at 8:5 P.M.

  • Again, a Christian could not represent Christ as the son of the wife of the sun-god; for such is the natural interpretation of the woman crowned with the twelve stars and with her feet upon the moon.

  • As regards the teeth, we have the passage of a simply tubercular, or bunodont ((30vv6s, a hillock) type of molar into one in which the four main tubercles, or columns, have assumed a crescentic form, whence this type is termed selenodont (v€X vn, the new moon).

  • Moore, The Tanganyika Problem (1903), and To the Mountains of the Moon (Igo'); A.

  • with figures of the ancient moon-god, the twelve months, and the rabbit as the animal moon - emblem.

  • His only extant work is a short treatise (with a commentary by Pappus) On the Magnitudes and Distances of the Sun and Moon.

  • It was used for taking the altitudes of sun, moon and stars; for calculating latitude; for determining the points of the compass, and time; for ascertaining heights of mountains, &c.; and for construction of horoscopes.

  • Above the mountain of Mercury, and between the lines of head and heart is (6) the mountain of Mars, and above the line of the heart is (7) the mountain of the Moon.

  • The third and twelfth labours may be solar, the horned hind representing the moon, and the carrying of Cerberus to the upper world an eclipse, while the last episode of the hero's tragedy is possibly a complete solar myth developed at Trachis.

  • On the 3rd of September Henry Hudson, in the employ of the Dutch East India Company, entered New York Bay in the " Half Moon " in search of the " northwest passage."

  • Three gods of the inscriptions are named in the Koran - Wadd, Yaghuth and Nasr. In the god name Ta'lab there may be an indication of tree-worship. The many minor deities may be passed over; but we must mention the sanctuary of Riyam, with its images of the sun and moon, and, according to tradition, an oracle.

  • The various theories which identified him with the sun, the moon or the dawn, may be dismissed, as they do not rest on evidence to which value would now be attached.

  • ZODIAC (o ituKAos, from 'Cv&cov, " a little animal "), in astronomy and astrology, an imaginary zone of the heavens within which lie the paths of the sun, moon and principal planets.

  • The synodical revolution of the moon laid down the lines of the solar, its sidereal revolution those of the lunar zodiac. The first was a circlet of " full moons "; the second marked the diurnal stages of the lunar progress round the sky, from and back again to any selected star.

  • The moon was the earliest " measurer " both of time and space; but its services can scarcely have been rendered available until stellar " milestones " were established at suitable points along its path.

  • Now, since the moon revolves round the earth in 273 days, hesitation between the two full numbers might easily arise; yet the real explanation of the difficulty appears to be different.

  • denoted a necklace of twenty-seven pearls; 1 and the fundamental equality of the parts was figured in an ancient legend, by the compulsion laid upon King Soma (the Moon) to share his time impartially between all his wives, the twenty-seven daughters of Prajapati.

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