Moon sentence examples

moon
  • You see the stars and the moon instead of how dark the night is.

    400
    201
  • The moon is full, the sky full of stars.

    378
    169
  • The moon peeked shyly over the dunes and moved searching fingers of dim light across the dunes.

    203
    127
  • He heard Mansr issue orders to others to rally on the moon and Jetr's voice come over the speakers.

    149
    87
  • The next nearest is on the moon and a logistical nightmare.

    86
    49
  • Fred would be up till the moon was down, out spending Mrs. Worthington's Vegas spoils.

    71
    43
  • I gaze out my window as the moon is slowly slipping away and I long for the warmth of the morning.

    70
    41
  • Clouds drifted away from a full moon, drenching the patio with soft lunar light.

    65
    40
  • Everything was stone-still, like the moon and its light and the shadows.

    59
    35
  • The room was dark aside from curtains opened to allow the moon to shine through.

    54
    24
  • Warden says one every moon cycle.

    52
    23
  • She tugged gently on the moon dangling from the necklace Kiera gave her for her wedding.

    42
    15
  • He'd chosen to leave Ne'Rin on the moon this trip.

    41
    15
  • To the right and high up in the sky was the sickle of the waning moon and opposite to it hung that bright comet which was connected in Pierre's heart with his love.

    40
    19
  • Toward midnight the voices began to subside, a cock crowed, the full moon began to show from behind the lime trees, a fresh white dewy mist began to rise, and stillness reigned over the village and the house.

    37
    17
  • This silence was broken by one of the brethren, who led Pierre up to the rug and began reading to him from a manuscript book an explanation of all the figures on it: the sun, the moon, a hammer, a plumb line, a trowel, a rough stone and a squared stone, a pillar, three windows, and so on.

    33
    19
  • There would be no moon tonight.

    27
    26
  • No, I plan to tell them at the Wolf Moon Festival.

    26
    18
  • Stars and a half moon were bright, the sound of the ocean comforting.

    26
    21
  • "Whatever. It's a full moon tonight," she said hopefully.

    25
    13
  • The full moon had always been a time that Sarah and Jackson spent together.

    24
    12
  • At midnight, when there was a moon, I sometimes met with hounds in my path prowling about the woods, which would skulk out of my way, as if afraid, and stand silent amid the bushes till I had passed.

    24
    14
  • If we were to be together at the full moon, do you think something would prevent her from killing me?

    23
    15
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?

    22
    13
  • There were stars in the sky and the new moon shone out amid the smoke that screened it.

    19
    15
  • Well, I thought maybe I would wait until the next full moon, then find Elisabeth and let her rip out what's left of my guts.

    18
    9
  • You know, the full moon is two days before Halloween this month.

    18
    12
  • The moon rose, and by its light he could see the dim form of the church tower, far away.

    17
    10
  • The moon can hold us, but we'll need food and supplies until the space battle is over.

    16
    8
  • It was the sound I hated more on a telephone that Henri Mancini's version of Theme from Moon Glow or any other top one hundred hits of elevator music was, 'would you please hold'?

    16
    18
  • There's this God-given gift hanging up there like a paper moon that only the five of us can make happen.

    15
    8
  • The moon was non-existent, and the waves sparkled in starlight.

    15
    9
  • We have hidden on this moon in an unoccupied galaxy since.

    15
    9
  • Only when the moon was halfway across the sky did he rouse himself.

    15
    10
  • The moon was covered by clouds, and she crumpled the notes she'd taken.

    15
    13
  • Death lets you see the stars and the moon instead of how dark the night is.

    14
    4
  • She faced the ocean, the moon dangling low and large in the sky before her.

    14
    5
  • We were in Hawaii and pretty mellowed out on one of those perfect beach nights, watching the moon dance on the incoming surf.

    14
    8
  • Gazing at the high starry sky, at the moon, at the comet, and at the glow from the fire, Pierre experienced a joyful emotion.

    14
    10
  • No, a different world completely, but similar in that it has a sun, moon, oceans, grass, and stuff.

    13
    7
  • He thought about the next full moon and wondered how they would deal with it.

    13
    14
  • Do you think the lovely moon was glad that I could speak to her?

    12
    6
  • What happened to Death letting you see the stars and moon instead of how dark the night is?

    12
    10
  • The other night, he sat on a beach with one Deidre and watched the moon cross the sky.

    12
    13
  • The sound of the ocean was calming under the full moon, the steady ebb and flow of waves drawing him to sit on the beach.

    11
    11
  • The next eruption, and the one after it, gave insufficient light to help, but then a multiple display hung in the sky like a full moon, giving time for his eyes to search left and right.

    10
    7
  • She walked down the beach opposite the party, gaze alternating between the ocean at her feet and the full moon climbing into the sky.

    9
    6
  • "Is kissing a stranger on the beach under the full moon on your bucket list?" he whispered.

    9
    8
  • The Deans had utilized the site a half dozen times, including, in December, the council-sponsored full moon nighttime outing, followed by a dip in the town's hot spring pool.

    9
    10
  • Mison, I accept your prisoner exchange and will release your men on the moon nearest to Qatwal.

    8
    6
  • It was dark in the room especially where they were sitting on the sofa, but through the big windows the silvery light of the full moon fell on the floor.

    8
    6
  • He sat in the only seat in the tiny craft, studying Ne'Rin, who transmitted from A'Ran's battle command center on the moon that was his interim home.

    8
    7
  • Farther back beyond the dark trees a roof glittered with dew, to the right was a leafy tree with brilliantly white trunk and branches, and above it shone the moon, nearly at its full, in a pale, almost starless, spring sky.

    8
    10
  • Outside, there was the same cold stillness and the same moon, but even brighter than before.

    7
    4
  • A'Ran took in the home he had left several moon cycles before.

    7
    5
  • Kiera tugged at the moon on her necklace as she walked down the hall toward the video game room.

    7
    6
  • The moon will not sour milk nor taint meat of mine, nor will the sun injure my furniture or fade my carpet; and if he is sometimes too warm a friend, I find it still better economy to retreat behind some curtain which nature has provided, than to add a single item to the details of housekeeping.

    7
    7
  • In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.

    6
    4
  • Let that sink in: By dividing work up among people so they could specialize, we went from bows and arrows to Apollo moon missions.

    6
    5
  • She'd wondered why A'Ran's water supplies were located on the nearest moon, a logistical obstacle.

    6
    6
  • I have no control over what I do during the full moon, and after, have no memory of my time as a wolf, so I can't answer that.

    6
    7
  • And this man was saying we were going to the moon in a rocket ship made of metals we hadn't even invented.

    6
    7
  • The pale glow of the moon shone through the uncurtained window, casting an elongated shadow from the overturned chair.

    6
    8
  • The full moon is in six days.

    5
    0
  • Wait. How did she morph into a wolf, it's not even close to a full moon?

    5
    0
  • I have, as it were, my own sun and moon and stars, and a little world all to myself.

    5
    5
  • He watched as Mansr expertly organized the evacuations and aligned the space battle to keep the Yirkins' attention off the ships fleeing the planet's surface for the nearest moon, Kiera.

    5
    6
  • The sun had set, and the bright moon made the sand glow like snow.

    4
    0
  • Moon and stars were bright overhead.

    4
    0
  • Within a couple of hours, clouds blocked the moon, and the snow began again.

    4
    3
  • Yes, I would have to go away at the full moon.

    3
    0
  • It was a wolf howling at the full moon.

    3
    0
  • This is where you could stay during the full moon.

    3
    0
  • We've been talking about the full moon.

    3
    0
  • I will never be close enough to hurt you at the full moon again.

    3
    0
  • The band played "Fly Me to The Moon".

    3
    0
  • A well-worn, silver medallion with a symbol of the sun and moon, pierced by an arrow, was at her chest.

    3
    0
  • Everyone seemed happy to ignore the discussion about the full moon.

    2
    0
  • Not unless I catch him at the full moon.

    2
    0
  • Was there anything hinky in your local papers after the full moon.

    2
    0
  • I might not see you until the Wolf Moon Festival.

    2
    0
  • Did Elisabeth tell you we spent the last full moon together?

    2
    0
  • Even if they were together at the full moon, neither would remember.

    2
    0
  • 0 new moon and spring.

    2
    1
  • 26, "the light laden moon" for "light-laden"; Revolt of Islam, 4805, "Our bark hung there, as one line suspended I Between two heavens," for "on a line."

    1
    0
  • In Consequence Of The Solar And Lunar Equations, It Is Evident That The Epact Or Moon'S Age At The Beginning Of The Year, Must, In The Course Of Centuries, Have All Different Values From One To Thirty Inclusive, Corresponding To The Days In A Full Lunar Month.

    1
    0
  • The 2Nd Of January Is Therefore The Day Of The New Moon, Which Is Indicated By The Epact Twenty Nine.

    1
    0
  • In Like Manner, If The New Moon Fell On The 4Th Of December, The Epact Of The Following Year Would Be Twenty Eight, Which, To Indicate The Day Of Next New Moon, Must Correspond To The 3Rd Of January.

    1
    0
  • He was captured, but the king again spared his life, though he was placed for the future in a dungeon where he could see neither moon nor sun.

    1
    0
  • Thus in 1852 he published new and accurate tables of the moon's parallax, which superseded J.

    1
    0
  • Idas and Lynceus were originally gods of light, probably the sun and moon, the herd of cattle (for the possession of which they strove with the Dioscuri) representing the heavenly bodies.

    1
    0
  • Jeff gave Dean a smile as big as a full moon.

    1
    1
  • Sarah was determined to finish it before Elisabeth left for the full moon.

    1
    1
  • Darkness settled into corners and crevices beyond the moon's touch.

    1
    1
  • The moon was full, the temperature cool for early August.

    1
    1
  • She would die before the moon rose.

    1
    1
  • The moon peered over the walls of the city, and he squinted toward it.

    1
    1
  • The moon was too bright for his eyes, and the cold ocean breeze burned his lungs.

    1
    1
  • (1773), p. 190) also gives results of measurements by Gascoigne of the diameters of the moon, Jupiter, Mars and Venus with his micrometer.

    1
    1
  • The same considerations serve to explain the moon and other satellites.

    1
    1
  • Thus the old Hindus chose the new and the full moon as days of sacrifice; the eve.

    1
    1
  • religious feasts - with the phases of the moon among the Semites.

    1
    1
  • On abstinence from work on the New Moon by Jewish women of the present time, see M.

    1
    1
  • 6 that even in later times there were two days at the new moon on which it was not proper to fast.

    1
    1
  • Hansen of two new inequalities in the moon's motion.

    1
    1
  • We note (a) that in the worship of Yahweh the sacred seasons of new moon and Sabbath are obviously lunar.

    1
    1
  • in early pre-exilian days, with the full moon.

    1
    1
  • While admitting that a special significance may have been attached in pre-exilian times to the full-moon Sabbath, and that the latter may have been specially intended in the combination " new moon and Sabbath " in the 8th-century prophets (Hos.

    1
    1
  • The general coincidence of the Sabbath or seventh day with the easily recognized first quarter and full moon established its sacred character as lunar as well as planetary.

    1
    1
  • 176 Jesus is invoked: "Jesus, of the gods first new moon, thou art God....

    1
    1
  • Jesus, 0 Lord, of waxing fame full moon, O Jesus.

    1
    1
  • In the Prologue to the "Parson's Tale" (so) there is, on the other hand, a mistake of Chaucer's own, which no judicious critic would think of removing, the constellation Libra being said to be "the moon's exaltation" when it should be Saturn's.

    1
    1
  • The world, according to Aristotle, consists of substances, each of which is a separate individual, this man, this horse, this animal, this plant, this earth, this water, this air, this fire; in the heavens that moon, that sun, those stars; above all, God.

    1
    1
  • Are the things which surround me in what I call the environment, - the men, the animals, the plants, the ground, the stones, the water, the air, the moon, the sun, the stars and God - are they shadows, unsubstantial things, as formerly Platonism made all things to be except the supernatural world of forms, gods and souls?

    1
    1
  • ESTABLISHMENT OF A PORT, the technical expression for the time that elapses between the moon's transit across the meridian at new or full moon at a given place and the time of high water at that place.

    1
    1
  • But in the early ages of the world, when mankind were chiefly engaged in rural occupations, the phases of the moon must have been objects of great attention and interest, - hence the month, and the practice adopted by many nations of reckoning time by the motions of the moon, as well as the still more general practice of combining lunar with solar periods.

    1
    1
  • It might have been suggested by the phases of the moon, or by the number of the planets known in ancient times, an origin which is rendered more probable from the names universally given to the different days of which it is composed.

    1
    1
  • In the Egyptian astronomy, the order of the planets, beginning with the most remote, is Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury, the Moon.

    1
    1
  • In like manner the first hour of the 3rd day would fall to the Moon, the first of the 4th day to Mars, of the 5th to Mercury, of the 6th to Jupiter, and of the 7th to Venus.

    1
    1
  • Moon's day.

    1
    1
  • of the moon is accomplished in about 292 days.

    1
    1
  • The difficulties that arose in attempting to avoid this inconvenience induced some nations to abandon the moon altogether, and regulate their year by the course of the sun.

    1
    1
  • The month, however, being a convenient period of time, has retained its place in the calendars of all nations; but, instead of denoting a synodic revolution of the moon, it is usually employed to denote an arbitrary number of days approaching to the twelfth part of a solar year.

    1
    1
  • When Regard Is Had To The Sun'S Motion Alone, The Regulation Of The Year, And The Distribution Of The Days Into Months, May Be Effected Without Much Trouble; But The Difficulty Is Greatly Increased When It Is Sought To Reconcile Solar And Lunar Periods, Or To Make The Subdivisions Of The Year Depend On The Moon, And At The Same Time To Preserve The Correspondence Between The Whole Year And The Seasons.

    1
    1
  • The Months Now Consisted Of Twenty Nine And Thirty Days Alternately, To Correspond With The Synodic Revolution Of The Moon, So That The Year Contained 354 Days; But A Day Was Added To Make The Number Odd, Which Was Considered More Fortunate, And The Year Therefore Consisted Of 355 Days.

    1
    1
  • It Is Therefore So Obviously Ill Adapted To The Computation Of Time, That, Excepting The Modern Jews And Mahommedans, Almost All Nations Who Have Regulated Their Months By The Moon Have Employed Some Method Of Intercalation By Means Of Which The Beginning Of The Year Is Retained At Nearly The Same Fixed Place In The Seasons.

    1
    1
  • In The Early Ages Of Greece The Year Was Regulated Entirely By The Moon.

    1
    1
  • On The Other Hand, The Exact Time Of A Synodic Revolution Of The Moon Is 29'530588 Days; 235 Lunations, Therefore, Contain 2 35 X 29 530588 = 6 939'6 8818 Days, Or 6 939 Days 16 Hours 31 Minutes, So That The Period Exceeds 235 Lunations By Only Seven And A Half Hours.

    1
    1
  • The Period Of Calippus, Therefore, Consisted Of Three Metonic Cycles Of 6940 Days Each, And A Period Of 6939 Days; And Its Error In Respect Of The Moon, Consequently, Amounted Only To Six Hours, Or To One Day In 304 Years.

    1
    1
  • Others Followed The Example Of The Jews, And Adhered To The 4Th Of The Moon; But These, As Usually Happened To The Minority, Were Accounted Heretics, And Received The Appellation Of Quartodecimans.

    1
    1
  • In Order To Terminate Dissensions, Which Produced Both Scandal And Schism In The Church, The Council Of Nicaea, Which Was Held In The Year 325, Ordained That The Celebration Of Easter Should Thenceforth Always Take Place On The Sunday Which Immediately Follows The Full Moon That Happens Upon, Or Next After, The Day Of The Vernal Equinox.

    1
    1
  • Should The 14Th Of The Moon, Which Is Regarded As The Day Of Full Moon, Happen On A Sunday, The Celebration Of Easter Was Deferred To The Sunday Following, In Order To Avoid Concurrence With The Jews And The Above Mentioned Heretics.

    1
    1
  • It Is To Be Regretted That The Reverend Fathers Who Formed The Council Of Nicaea Did Not Abandon The Moon Altogether, And Appoint The First Or Second Sunday Of April For The Celebration Of The Easter Festival.

    1
    1
  • The reason is that the sum of the solar and lunar inequalities, which are compensated in the whole period, may amount in certain cases to io, and thereby cause the new moon to arrive on the second day before or after its mean time.

    1
    1
  • As the cycle restores these phenomena to the same days of the civil month, they will fall on the same days in any two years which occupy the same place in the cycle; consequently a table of the moon's phases for 19 years will serve for any year whatever when we know its number in the cycle.

    1
    1
  • The Julian period, proposed by the celebrated Joseph Scaliger as an universal measure of chronology, is formed by taking the continued product of the three cycles of the sun, of the moon, and of the indiction,and is consequently 28 X 19X I 5= 7980 years.

    1
    1
  • Epact Is A Word Of Greek Origin, Employed In The Calendar To Signify The Moon'S Age At The Beginning Of The Year.

    1
    1
  • 4711,...4714 X; The Common Solar Year Containing 365 Days, And The Lunar Year Only 354 Days, The Difference Is Eleven; Whence, If A New Moon Fall On The 1St Of January In Any Year, The Moon Will Be Eleven Days Old On The First Day Of The Following Year, And Twentytwo Days On The First Of The Third Year.

    1
    1
  • But The Order Is Interrupted At The End Of The Cycle; For The Epact Of The Following Year, Found In The Same Manner, Would Be 29 11=40 Or 10, Whereas It Ought Again To Be 1S To Correspond With The Moon'S Age And The Golden Number 1.

    1
    1
  • The Solar Equation Occurs Three Times In 400 Years, Namely, In Every Secular Year Which Is Not A Leap Year; For In This Case The Omission Of The Intercalary Day Causes The New Moons To Arrive One Day Later In All The Following Months, So That The Moon'S Age At The End Of The Month Is One Day Less Than It Would Have Been If The Intercalation Had Been Made, And The Epacts Must Accordingly Be All Diminished By Unity.

    1
    1
  • He mentioned four: (1) by a watch to keep time exactly, (2) by the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, (3) by the place of the moon, (4) by a new method proposed by Mr Ditton.

    1
    1
  • As a goddess of the moon she wears a long robe, carries a torch, and her head is surmounted by a crescent.

    1
    1
  • Horrocks (1673); and a paper embodying his calculations of appulses to stars by the moon, which appeared in the Philosophical Transactions (iv.

    1
    1
  • If they weren't there she would be able to look at the moon and know he could see it as well.

    1
    2
  • His eyes were brighter than the moon, greener than any gem she'd ever dreamt of.

    1
    2
  • Thus, the moon was eclipsed on the 27th of August, a little before midnight,' in the year 413 before our era; and it is required.

    1
    2
  • The moon was the earliest " measurer " both of time and space; but its services can scarcely have been rendered available until stellar " milestones " were established at suitable points along its path.

    1
    2
  • The Mean Motion Of The Moon In Longitude, From The Mean Equinox, During A Julian Year Of 365.25 Days (According To Hansen'S Tables De La Lune, London, 1857, Pages 15, 16) Is, At The Present Date, 13X360° 477644"'409; That Of The Sun Being 360° 27".

    1
    2
  • Instead of empire and church, the sun and moon of the medieval system, a federation of peoples, separate in type and divergent in interests, yet bound together by common tendencies, common culture and common efforts, came into existence.

    1
    2
  • p. 359), gives the following extract from the Memoirs of the Emperor Khang: - " On the 1st day of the 6th moon I was walking in some fields where rice had been sown to be ready for the harvest in the 9th moon.

    1
    2
  • Mars, again, as third from the Moon, will preside over Tuesday (Dies Martis, Mardi), and so forth.

    0
    0
  • That full moon as well as new moon had a religious significance among the ancient Hebrews seems to follow from the fact that, when the great agricultural feasts were fixed to set days, the full moon was chosen.

    0
    0
  • This name shabattu was certainly applied to the 15th day of the month, and am nuh libbi could mean "day of rest in the middle," referring to the moon's pause at the full.

    0
    0
  • (d) Lastly, the old genial life of the high places, in which the " new moon " or Sabbath or the annual festival was a sacrificial feast of communion, in which the members of the local community or clan enjoyed fellowship with one another - all this picturesque life ceased to be.

    0
    0
  • The other powers of nature have shrines dedicated to them in the altar: to the Earth on the north of the city, the altars to the Sun and Moon outside the north-eastern and north-western angles respectively of the Chinese city, and the altar of agriculture inside the south gate of the Chinese city.

    0
    0
  • He constructed a map of as many as 576 of these lines, the principal of which he denoted by the letters of the alphabet from A to G; and by ascertaining their refractive indices he determined that their relative positions are constant, whether in spectra produced by the direct rays of the sun, or by the reflected light of the moon and planets.

    0
    0
  • The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.

    0
    0
  • It can be shown that unless a quantity of meteors in collective mass equal to our moon were to plunge into the sun every year the supply of heat could not be sustained from this source.

    0
    0
  • With the Jewish Christians, whose leading thought was the death of Christ as the Paschal Lamb, the fast ended at the same time as that of the Jews, on the fourteenth day of the moon at evening, and the Easter festival immediately followed, without regard to the day of the week.

    0
    0
  • Although measures had thus been taken to secure uniformity of observance, and to put an end to a controversy which had endangered Christian unity, a new difficulty had to be encountered owing to the absence of any authoritative rule by which the paschal moon was to be ascertained.

    0
    0
  • Briefly, it may be explained here that Easter day is the first Sunday after the full moon following the vernal equinox.

    0
    0
  • This, of course, varies in different longitudes, while a further difficulty occurred in the attempt to fix the correct time of Easter by means of cycles of years, when the changes of the sun and moon more or less exactly repeat themselves.

    0
    0
  • An Anomalistic month is the time in which the moon passes from perigee to perigee, &c.

    0
    0
  • Of the names of the planets Estera (Ishtar Venus, also called Ruha d'Qudsha, "holy spirit"), Enba (Nebo, Mercury), Sin (moon), Kewan (Saturn), Bil (Jupiter), and Nirig (Nirgal, Mars) reveal their Babylonian origin; Il or Il Il, the sun, is also known as Kadush and Adunay (the Adonai of the Old Testament); as lord of the planetary spirits his place is in the midst of them; they are the source of all temptation and evil amongst men.

    0
    0
  • By some she is considered to have been a moon-goddess, her flight from Minos and her leap into the sea signifying the revolution and disappearance of the moon (Pausanias ii.

    0
    0
  • The problem of determining an orbit may be regarded as coeval with Hipparchus, who, it is supposed, found the moving positions of the apogee and perigee of the moon's orbit.

    0
    0
  • At the Hindu Festival of Dasara, which lasted nine days from the new moon of October, tents made of canvas or booths made of branches were erected in front of the temples.

    0
    0
  • Gold, the most perfect metal, had the symbol of the Sun, 0; silver, the semiperfect metal, had the symbol of the Moon, 0j; copper, iron and antimony, the imperfect metals of the gold class, had the symbols of Venus Mars and the Earth tin and lead, the imperfect metals of the silver class, had the symbols of Jupiter 94, and Saturn h; while mercury, the imperfect metal of both the gold and silver class, had the symbol of the planet,.

    0
    0
  • The end of this abutted on the land at the head of the present Grand Square, where rose the "Moon Gate."

    0
    0
  • This would seem to point to a time when the fixing of the sabbath was determined by the age of the moon, so that the first day of the Passover, which is on the 15th of Nisan, would always occur on a sabbath.

    0
    0
  • The tide-generating force is due to the attraction of the waters of the ocean by sun and moon.

    0
    0
  • There are therefore maxima and minima in the value of the tide-generating force, depending on the relative positions of the sun, earth and moon.

    0
    0
  • The orbits of earth and moon are elliptical, so that the earth is sometimes nearer, sometimes farther away from the sun, and the same is the case with the moon in relation to the earth.

    0
    0
  • The orbital planes of earth and moon are inclined to each other at an angle of 50.8 ° and at two points only in its orbit can the moon be situated in the plane of the ecliptic: the line joining these two points is called the "line of nodes."

    0
    0
  • In British Honduras an alkaline decoction prepared from the Moon plant (Calonictyon speciosum) is used for the same purpose.

    0
    0
  • Doubt was first thrown on the accuracy of this number by an announcement from Hansen in 1862 that the observed parallactic inequality of the moon was irreconcilable with the accepted value of the solar parallax, and indicated the much larger value 8.97".

    0
    0
  • The fourth method is through the parallactic inequality in the moon's motion.

    0
    0
  • For the relation of this inequality to the solar parallax see Moon.

    0
    0
  • The fifth method consists in observing the displacement in the direction of the sun, or of one of the nearer planets, due to the motion of the earth round the common centre of gravity of the earth and moon.

    0
    0
  • It requires a precise knowledge of the moon's mass.

    0
    0
  • The combined mass of the earth and moon admits of being determined by its effect in changing the position of the plane of the orbit of Venus.

    0
    0
  • earth's mass =14.60052 „ moon's „ =12.6895.

    0
    0
  • Putting a for the mean distance of the earth from the sun, and n for its mean motion in one second, we use the fundamental equation a3 n2 = Mo-1-M', Mo being the sun's mass, and M' the combined masses of the earth and moon, which are, however, too small to affect the result.

    0
    0
  • The determination of the solar parallax through the parallactic inequality of the moon's motion also involves two elements - one of observation, the other of purely mathematical theory.

    0
    0
  • The inequality in question has its greatest negative value near the time of the moon's first quarter, and the greatest positive value near the third quarter.

    0
    0
  • Meridian observations of the moon have been heretofore made by observing the transit of its illuminated limb.

    0
    0
  • In each case the results of the observations may be systematically in error, not only from the uncertain diameter of the moon, but in a still greater degree from the varying effect of irradiation and the personal equation of the observers.

    0
    0
  • The prize was again awarded to Lagrange; and he earned the same distinction with essays on the problem of three bodies in 1772, on the secular equation of the moon in 1774, and in 1778 on the theory of cometary perturbations.

    0
    0
  • Two altars, to the Sun and the Moon, stood before the former, and cult statues along the latter.

    0
    0
  • Among his other papers may be mentioned those dealing with the formation of fairy rings (1807), a synoptic scale of chemical equivalents (1814), sounds inaudible to ordinary ears (1820), the physiology of vision (1824), the apparent direction of the eyes in a portrait (1824) and the comparison of the light of the sun with that of the moon and fixed stars (1829).

    0
    0
  • The results of the theory of the diffraction patterns due to circular apertures admit of an interesting application to coronas, such as are often seen encircling the sun and moon.

    0
    0
  • - cl., of which the former was sung at the three great feasts - the encaenia, and the new moon, and the latter at the daily morning prayer.

    0
    0
  • RAINBOW, formerly known as the iris, the coloured rings seen in the heavens when the light from the sun or moon shines on falling rain; on a smaller scale they may be observed when sunshine falls on the spray of a waterfall or fountain.

    0
    0
  • The moon can produce rainbows in the same manner as the sun.

    0
    0
  • The colours are much fainter, and according to Aristotle, who claims to be the first observer of this phenomenon, the lunar bows are only seen when the moon is full.

    0
    0
  • Among the works which he translated into Syriac and of which his versions survive are treatises of Aristotle, Porphyry and Galen, 3 the Ars grammatica of Dionysius Thrax, the works of Dionysius the Areopagite, and possibly two or three treatises of Plutarch.4 His own original works are less important, but include a " treatise on logic, addressed to Theodore (of Merv), which is unfortunately imperfect, a tract on negation and affirmation; a treatise, likewise addressed to Theodore, On the Causes of the Universe, according to the Views of Aristotle, showing how it is a Circle; a tract On Genus, Species and Individuality; and a third tract addressed to Theodore, On the Action and Influence of the Moon, explanatory and illustrative of Galen's IIEpi rcptaiµwv r t µepwv, bk.

    0
    0
  • The assault was made by night by way of Euryelus under the uncertain light of the moon, and this circumstance turned what was very nearly a successful surprise into a ruinous defeat.

    0
    0
  • He dallied till the end of August, many weeks after the defeat, when the coming of Syracusan reinforcements decided him to depart; but on the 27th of that month was an eclipse of the moon, on the strength of which he insisted on a delay of almost another month.

    0
    0
  • Mead's treatise on The Power of the Sun and Moon over Human Bodies (1704), equally inspired by Newton's discoveries, was a premature attempt to assign the influence of atmospheric pressure and other cosmical causes in producing disease.

    0
    0
  • The fifth book, which has the most general interest, professes to explain the process by which the earth, the sea, the sky, the sun, moon and stars, were formed, the origin of life, and the gradual advance of man from the most savage to the most civilized condition.

    0
    0
  • moon, lune), and he further took the name Astruc, Don Astruc or En Astruc of Lunel.

    0
    0
  • Merodach next arranged the stars in order, along with the sun and moon, and gave them laws which they were never to transgress.

    0
    0
  • The zodiac was a Babylonian invention of great antiquity; and eclipses of the sun as well as of the moon could be foretold.

    0
    0
  • In other islands the natives venerated the sun, moon, earth and stars.

    0
    0
  • He sought to determine the distance and magnitude of the sun, to calculate the diameter of the earth and the influence of the moon on the tides.

    0
    0
  • The other was to show that the gravitation of the earth, following one and the same law with that of the sun, extended to the moon.

    0
    0
  • Newton's researches showed that the attraction of the earth on the moon was the same as that for bodies at the earth's surface, only reduced in the inverse square of the moon's distance from the earth's centre.

    0
    0
  • These are Mars and the moon.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the motion of the moon around the earth, assuming the gravitation of the latter to be subject to the modification in question, the annual motion of the moon's perigee should be greater by I 5" than the theoretical motion.

    0
    0
  • These demonstrations were of two kinds, one nocturnal, showing the moon and bright stars, the other diurnal, for day scenes.

    0
    0
  • He was well acquainted with the use of magnifying glasses and suggested a kind of telescope for viewing the moon, but does not seem to have thought of applying a lens to the camera.

    0
    0
  • He says they can be used for observation of the moon and stars and also for longitudes.

    0
    0
  • He was the first to describe an instrument fitted with a sight and paper screen for observing the diameters of the sun and moon in a dark room.

    0
    0
  • deals with astronomy - the moon, stars, and the zodiac, the sun, the planets, the seasons and the calendar.

    0
    0
  • With the splendour of the full moon falling upon him, his hand clasping his Shakespeare, and looking, as we are told, almost unearthly in the majestic beauty of his old age, Tennyson passed away at Aldworth on the night of the 6th of October 1892.

    0
    0
  • Shadows and reflections were ignored, and perspective, approximately correct for landscape distances, was isometrical for near objects, while the introduction of a symbolic sun or moon lent the sole distinction between a day and a night scene.

    0
    0
  • Shibuichi inlaid with shakudo used to be the commonest combination of metals in this class of decoration, and the objects usually depicted were bamboos, crows, wild-fowl under the moon, peony sprays and so forth.

    0
    0
  • He was the first to employ mercury for the air-pump, and devised a method of determining longitude at sea by observations of the moon among the stars.

    0
    0
  • Fasts, obligatory on all above seven years of age, are held on every Monday and Thursday, on every new moon, and at the passover (the 21st or 22nd of April).

    0
    0
  • In 1705 appeared The Consolidator, or Memoirs of Sundry Transactions from the World in the Moon, a political satire which is supposed to have given some hints for Swift's Gulliver's Travels; and at the end of the year Defoe performed a secret mission, the first of several of the kind, for Harley.

    0
    0
  • Like some other culture-heroes, he steals sun, moon and stars out of a box, so enlightening the dark earth.

    0
    0
  • Afterwards, the creator and the mother-egg became respectively the sun and the moon, represented by the Inca priest-king and his wife, the supposed descendants of Manco Capac. 11 Dualistic tendencies were also developed.

    0
    0
  • By uttering a sacred formula the good spirit throws the evil one into a state of confusion for a second 3000 years, while he produces the archangels and the material creation, including the sun, moon and stars.

    0
    0
  • 9, 10, 14, 15, that God divided the primeval waters into two parts by an intervening " firmament " or " platform," on which the sun, moon and stars (planets) were placed to mark times and to give light.

    0
    0
  • Berlin, 1884), holds that the purple or golden hair of Nisus is the sun, and Scylla the moon, and that the origin of the legend is to be looked for in a very ancient myth of the relations between the two, which he endeavours to explain with the aid of Indian and German parallels.

    0
    0
  • Journal, September 1897 and January 1901; To the Mountains of the Moon (London, 1901); The Tanganyika Problem (London, 1903); L.

    0
    0
  • The Olympic games, so famous in Greek history, were celebrated once every four years, between the new and full moon first following the summer solstice, on the small plain named Olympia in Elis, which was bounded on one side by the river Alpheus, on another by the small tributary stream the Cladeus, and on the other two sides by mountains.

    0
    0
  • Before the introduction of the Metonic cycle, the Olympic year began sometimes with the full moon which followed, at other times with that which preceded the summer solstice, because the year sometimes contained 384 days instead of 354.

    0
    0
  • But subsequently to its adoption, the year always commenced with the eleventh day of the moon which followed the solstice.

    0
    0
  • But the addition was very far from being an improvement on the work of Calippus; for instead of a difference of only five hours and fifty-three minutes between the places of the sun and moon, which was the whole error of the Calippic period, this difference, in the period of eighty-four years, amounted to one day, six hours and forty-one minutes.

    0
    0
  • From the time of the emperor Yao, upwards of 2000 years B.C., the Chinese had two different years, - a civil year, which was regulated by the moon, and an astronomical year, which was solar.

    0
    0
  • Since the accession of the emperors of the Han dynasty, 206 B.C., the civil year of the Chinese has begun with the first day of that moon in the course of which the sun enters into the sign of the zodiac which corresponds with our sign Pisces.

    0
    0
  • As the /see' is longer than a synodic revolution of the moon, the sun cannot arrive twice at a chung-ki during the same lunation; and as there are only twelve tsee, the year can contain only twelve months having different names.

    0
    0
  • Each day of the cycle has a particular name, and as it is a usual practice, in mentioning dates, to give the name of the day along with that of the moon and the year, this arrangement affords great facilities in verifying the epochs of Chinese chronology.

    0
    0
  • Thus the first moon of the year 1873 being the first of a new cycle, the first moon of every sixth year, reckoned backwards or forwards from that date, as 1868, 1863, &c., or 1877, 1882, &c., also begins a new lunar cycle of sixty moons.

    0
    0
  • This is corroborated by a Babylonian tablet with observations of the moon (Brit.

    0
    0
  • Though the moon had risen about 6:30 P.M.

    0
    0
  • The rising moon shone fitfully through the clouds, and the " Glasgow " continued to fire at any ship that showed up, but as this only betrayed her position she ceased fire at 8:5 P.M.

    0
    0
  • Again, a Christian could not represent Christ as the son of the wife of the sun-god; for such is the natural interpretation of the woman crowned with the twelve stars and with her feet upon the moon.

    0
    0
  • As regards the teeth, we have the passage of a simply tubercular, or bunodont ((30vv6s, a hillock) type of molar into one in which the four main tubercles, or columns, have assumed a crescentic form, whence this type is termed selenodont (v€X vn, the new moon).

    0
    0
  • Moore, The Tanganyika Problem (1903), and To the Mountains of the Moon (Igo'); A.

    0
    0
  • with figures of the ancient moon-god, the twelve months, and the rabbit as the animal moon - emblem.

    0
    0
  • His only extant work is a short treatise (with a commentary by Pappus) On the Magnitudes and Distances of the Sun and Moon.

    0
    0
  • It was used for taking the altitudes of sun, moon and stars; for calculating latitude; for determining the points of the compass, and time; for ascertaining heights of mountains, &c.; and for construction of horoscopes.

    0
    0
  • Above the mountain of Mercury, and between the lines of head and heart is (6) the mountain of Mars, and above the line of the heart is (7) the mountain of the Moon.

    0
    0
  • The third and twelfth labours may be solar, the horned hind representing the moon, and the carrying of Cerberus to the upper world an eclipse, while the last episode of the hero's tragedy is possibly a complete solar myth developed at Trachis.

    0
    0
  • On the 3rd of September Henry Hudson, in the employ of the Dutch East India Company, entered New York Bay in the " Half Moon " in search of the " northwest passage."

    0
    0
  • Three gods of the inscriptions are named in the Koran - Wadd, Yaghuth and Nasr. In the god name Ta'lab there may be an indication of tree-worship. The many minor deities may be passed over; but we must mention the sanctuary of Riyam, with its images of the sun and moon, and, according to tradition, an oracle.

    0
    0
  • The various theories which identified him with the sun, the moon or the dawn, may be dismissed, as they do not rest on evidence to which value would now be attached.

    0
    0
  • ZODIAC (o ituKAos, from 'Cv&cov, " a little animal "), in astronomy and astrology, an imaginary zone of the heavens within which lie the paths of the sun, moon and principal planets.

    0
    0
  • The synodical revolution of the moon laid down the lines of the solar, its sidereal revolution those of the lunar zodiac. The first was a circlet of " full moons "; the second marked the diurnal stages of the lunar progress round the sky, from and back again to any selected star.

    0
    0
  • Now, since the moon revolves round the earth in 273 days, hesitation between the two full numbers might easily arise; yet the real explanation of the difficulty appears to be different.

    0
    0
  • denoted a necklace of twenty-seven pearls; 1 and the fundamental equality of the parts was figured in an ancient legend, by the compulsion laid upon King Soma (the Moon) to share his time impartially between all his wives, the twenty-seven daughters of Prajapati.

    0
    0
  • The successive entries of the moon and planets into the nakshatras (the ascertainment of which was of great astrological importance) were fixed by means of their conjunctions with the yogataras.

    0
    0
  • The mean place of the moon in them, published in all Hindu almanacs, is found to serve unexceptionally the ends of astral vaticination.6 The system upon which it is founded is of great antiquity.

    0
    0
  • In the Brahmana period they were distinguished as " deva " and " yama," the fourteen lucky asterisms being probably associated with the waxing, the fourteen unlucky with the waning moon.'

    0
    0
  • The various members of the body were parcelled out among the nakshatras, and a rotation of food was prescribed as a wholesome accompaniment of the moon's revolution among them.8 1 Max Muller, op. cit., p. lxiv.

    0
    0
  • The assertion, paradoxical at first sight, that the twenty-eight " hostelries " of the Chinese sphere had nothing to do with the moon's daily motion, seems to convey the actual fact.

    0
    0
  • 13 The use of the specially observed stars constituting or representing the sieu was as points of reference for the movements of sun, moon and planets.

    0
    0
  • The small stellar groups characterizing the Arab " mansions of the moon " (manazil alkamar) were more equably distributed than either the Hindu or Chinese series.

    0
    0
  • But, although they then received perhaps their earliest quasiscientific organization, the mansions of the moon had for ages previously figured in the popular lore of the Bedouin.

    0
    0
  • For genethliacal purposes the signs were divided into six solar and six lunar, the former counted onward from Leo, the " house " of the sun, the latter backward from the moon's domicile in Cancer.

    0
    0
  • A ram frequently stamped on coins of Antiochus, with head reverted towards the moon and a star (the planet Mars), signified Aries to be the lunar house of Mars.

    0
    0
  • This was followed by a long series of popular treatises in rapid succession, amongst the more important of which are Light Science for Leisure Hours and The Sun (1871); The Orbs around Us and Essays on Astronomy (1872); The Expanse of Heaven, The Moon and The Borderland of Science (1873); The Universe and the Coming Transits and Transits of Venus (1874);(1874); Our Place among Infinities (1875); Myths and Marvels of Astronomy (1877); The Universe of Stars (1878); Flowers of the Sky (1879); The Peotry of Astronomy (1880); Easy Star Lessons and Familiar Science Studies (1882); Mysteries of Time and Space and The Great Pyramid (1883); The Universe of Suns (1884); The Seasons (1885); Other Suns than Ours and Half-Hours with the Stars (1887).

    0
    0
  • The eldest, Lawrence Parsons, 4th earl of Rosse, and Baron Oxmantown, born on the 17th of November 1840, succeeded to the title on his father's death, and made many investigations on the heavenly bodies, particularly on the radiation of the moon and related physical questions; the youngest, the Hon.

    0
    0
  • The Passover was kept at the full moon of the lunar month Nisan, the first of the Jewish ecclesiastical year; the Paschal lambs were slain on the afternoon of the, 4th Nisan, and the Passover was eaten after sunset the same day - which, however, as the Jewish day began at sunset, was by their reckoning the early hours of the r 5th Nisan; the first fruits (of the barley harvest) were solemnly offered on the 16th.

    0
    0
  • These four lines of inquiry have shown that the Crucifixion fell on Friday, Nisan 14 (rather than 15), in one of the six years 28-33 A.D.; and therefore, if it is possible to discover (i.) exactly which moon or month was reckoned each year as the moon or month of Nisan, and (ii.) exactly on what day that particular moon or month was reckoned as beginning, it will, of course, be possible to tell in which of these years Nisan 14 fell on a Friday.

    0
    0
  • If the Paschal full moon was, as in later Christian times, the first after the spring equinox, the difficulty would be reduced to the question on what day the equinox was reckoned.

    0
    0
  • (ii.) The difficulty with regard to the day is, quite similarly, to know what precise relation the first day of the Jewish month bore to the astronomical new moon.

    0
    0
  • In later Christian times the Paschal month was calculated from the astronomical new moon; in earlier Jewish times all months were reckoned to begin at the first sunset when the new moon was visible, which in the most favourable circumstances would be some hours, and in the most unfavourable three days, later than the astronomical new moon.

    0
    0
  • But as it is quite inconceivable that the Jews of the Dispersion should not have known beforehand at what full moon they were to present themselves at Jerusalem for the Passover, it must be assumed as true in fact, whether or no it was true in theory, that the old empirical methods must have been qualified, at least partially, by permanent, that is in effect by astronomical rules.

    0
    0
  • Exactly what modifications were first made in the system under which each month began by simple observation of the new moon we do not know, and opinions are not agreed as to the historical value of the rabbinical traditions; but probably the first step in the direction of astronomical precision would be the rule that no month could consist of less than twenty-nine or more than thirty days - to which appears to have been added, but at what date is uncertain, the further rule that Adar, the month preceding Nisan, was always to be limited to twentynine.

    0
    0
  • 277) onwards accused the Jews of disregarding the (Christian) equinoctial limit, and of sometimes placing the Paschal full moon before it; and it is possible that in the time of Christ the 14th of Nisan might have fallen as far back as the 17th of March.

    0
    0
  • In the following table the first column gives the terminus paschalis, or 14th of the Paschal moon, according to the Christian calendar; the second gives the 14th, reckoned from the time of the astronomical new moon of Nisan; the third the 14th, reckoned from the probable first appearance of the new moon at sunset.

    0
    0
  • 29, according as the full moon falling about the, 8th of March is or is not reckoned the proper, Paschal moon.

    0
    0
  • It cannot be correct, since no full moon occurs near it in any of the possible years; yet it must be very early, too early to be explained with Dr Salmon (Dictionary of Christian Biography, iii.

    0
    0
  • Mr Fotheringham is of opinion that the evidence from Christian sources is too uncertain, and that the statements of the Mishnah must be the starting-point of the inquiry: taking then the phasis of the new moon as the true beginning of Nisan, he concludes that Friday cannot have coincided with Nisan 14 in any year, within the period A.

    0
    0
  • 2), the new moon was seen a day earlier than his rules allowed.

    0
    0
  • 2 There can scarcely be any doubt as to the origin of these seven (five) powers; they are the seven planetary divinities, the sun, moon and five planets.

    0
    0
  • 2 2 seq.) and similarly by the above-quoted passage in the Pistis-Sophia, where the archontes, who are here mentioned as five, are identified with the five planets (excluding the sun and moon).

    0
    0
  • These deities are not easily ' One of the most important sources for the ancient Mexican traditions and myths is the so-called " Codex Chimalpopoca," a manuscript in the Mexican language discovered by the Abbe analysed, but on the other hand Tonatiuh and Metztli, the sun and moon, stand out distinctly as nature gods, and the traveller still sees in the huge adobe pyramids of Teotihuacan, with their sides oriented to the four quarters, an evidence of the importance of their worship. The war-god Huitzilopochtli was the real head of the Aztec pantheon; his idol remains in Mexico, a huge block of basalt on which is sculptured on the one side his hideous personage, adorned with the humming-bird feathers on the left hand which signify his name, while the not less frightful war-goddess Teoyaomiqui, or " divine wardeath," occupies the other side.

    0
    0
  • Washington Moon in two works: The Revisers' English (London, 1882), and Ecclesiastical English (London, 1886).

    0
    0
  • In free space, light of all wave-lengths is propagated with the same velocity, as is shown by the fact that stars, when occulted by the moon or planets, preserve their white colour up to the last moment of disappearance, which would not be the case if one colour reached the eye later than another.

    0
    0
  • The river speeding on its course to the sea, the sun and moon, if not the stars also, on their never-ceasing daily round, the lightning, fire, the wind, the sea, all are in motion and therefore animate; but the savage does not stop short here; mountains and lakes, stones and manufactured articles, are for him alike endowed with souls like his own; he deposits in the tomb weapons and food, clothes and implements, broken, it may be, in order to set free their souls; or he attains the same result by burning them, and thus sending them to the Other World for the use of the dead man.

    0
    0
  • Acad., 1848) gave him a wider fame; he became in 1849 consulting astronomer to the American Nautical Almanac, and for this work prepared new tables of the moon (1852).

    0
    0
  • His more important books, of which English translations have been published, are the poems Gitanjali (Song Offerings) (1913), The Crescent Moon (1913), The Gardener (1913), Songs of Kabir (1915), Fruit Gathering (1916), Stray Birds (1917), The Lover's Gift and the Crossing (1918); the plays Chitra (1914), The King of the Dark Chamber (1914), The Post Office (1914),.

    0
    0
  • This comet had been observed in 1066, and the accounts which have been preserved represent it as having then appeared to be four times the size of Venus, and to have shone with a light equal to a fourth of that of the moon.

    0
    0
  • If he marries, it is to have children who may celebrate them after his death; if he has no children, he lies under the strongest obligation to adopt them from another family, ` with a view,' writes the Hindu doctor, ` to the funeral cake, the water and the solemn sacrifice.'" "May there be born in our lineage," so the Indian Manes are supposed to say, "a man to offer to us, on the thirteenth day of the moon, rice boiled in milk, honey and ghee."

    0
    0
  • It possesses in the sun and moon, which are in their nature almost quite pure, large reservoirs, in which the portions of light that have been rescued are stored up. In the sun dwells the primal man himself, as well as the glorious spirits which carry on the work of redemption; in the moon the mother of life is enthroned.

    0
    0
  • The twelve constellations of the zodiac form an ingenious machine, a great wheel with buckets, which pour into the sun and moon, those shining ships that sail continually through space, the portions of light set free from the world.

    0
    0
  • The worshipper turned towards the sun, or the moon, or the north, as the seat of light; but it is erroneous to conclude from this, as has been done, that in Manichaeism the sun and moon were themselves objects of worship. Forms of prayer used by the Manichaeans have been preserved to us in the Fihrist.

    0
    0
  • 470, descriptive of the conflagration of the world, we read of how, after Az and the demons have been struck down, the pious man is purified and led up to sun and moon and to the being of Ahura Mazda, the Divine.

    0
    0
  • The Use Of The Epacts Is To Show The Days Of The New Moons, And Consequently The Moon'S Age On Any Day Of The Year.

    0
    0
  • Hence, If In That Year The Epact Should Be 19, A New Moon Would Fall On The 2Nd Of December, And The Lunation Would Terminate On The 30Th, So That The Next New Moon Would Arrive On The 3 Ist.

    0
    0
  • As An Example Of The Use Of The Preceding Tables, Suppose It Were Required To Determine The Moon'S Age On The Loth Of April 183 2.

    0
    0
  • The 2Nd Of April Is Therefore The First Day Of The Moon, And The Loth Is Consequently The Ninth Day Of The Moon.

    0
    0
  • Again, Suppose It Were Required To Find The Moon'S Age On The 2Nd Of December In The Year 1916.

    0
    0
  • The 26Th Of November Is Consequently The First Day Of The Moon, And The 2Nd Of December Is Therefore The Seventh Day.

    0
    0
  • The Next, And Indeed The Principal Use Of The Calendar, Is To Find Easter, Which, According To The Traditional Regulation Of The Council Of Nice, Must Be Determined From The Following Conditions: 1St, Easter Must Be Celebrated On A Sunday; 2Nd, This Sunday Must Follow The 14Th Day Of The Paschal Moon, So That If The 14Th Of The Paschal Moon Falls On A Sunday Then Easter Must Be Celebrated On The Sunday Following; 3Rd, The Paschal In This Case The 18Th Of April Is Sunday, Then Easter Must Be Celebrated On The Following Sunday, Or The 25Th Of April.

    0
    0
  • 2Nd, Find In The Calendar (Table Iv.) The First Day After The 7Th Of March Which Corresponds To The Epact Of The Year; This Will Be The First Day Of The Paschal Moon.

    0
    0
  • 3Rd, Reckon Thirteen Days After That Of The First Of The Moon, The Following Will Be The 14Th Of The Moon Or The Day Of The Full Paschal Moon.

    0
    0
  • The Dominical Letter Of The Year, And Observe In The Calendar The First Day, After The Fourteenth Of The Moon, Which Corresponds To The Dominical Letter; This Will Be Easter Sunday.

    0
    0
  • moon is that of which the 14th day falls on or next follows the day of the vernal equinox; 4th the equinox is fixed invariably in the calendar on the 21st of March.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a misunderstanding has arisen from not observing that this regulation is to be construed according to the tabular full moon as determined from the epact, and not by the true full moon, which, in general, occurs one or two days earlier.

    0
    0
  • From these conditions it follows that the paschal full moon, or the 14th of the paschal moon, cannot happen before the 21st of March, and that Easter in consequence cannot happen before the 22nd of March.

    0
    0
  • If the 14th of the moon falls on the 21st, the new moon must fall on the.

    0
    0
  • 8th; for 21-13 = 8; and the paschal new moon cannot happen before the 8th; for suppose the new moon to fall on the 7th, then the full moon would arrive on the 20th, or the day before the equinox.

    0
    0
  • The following moon would be the paschal moon.

    0
    0
  • But the fourteenth of this moon falls at the latest on the 18th of April, or 29 days after the 20th of March; for by reason of the double epact that occurs at the 4th and 5th of April, this lunation has only 29 days.

    0
    0
  • at the 4th of April, which, therefore, is the day of the new moon.

    0
    0
  • 3rd, Since the new moon falls on the 4th, the full moon is on the 17th (4+13=17).

    0
    0
  • It is accordingly quite possible that a full moon may arrive after the true equinox, and yet precede the 21st of March.

    0
    0
  • This, therefore, would not be the paschal moon of the calendar, though it undoubtedly ought to be so if the intention of the council of Nice were rigidly followed.

    0
    0
  • In imitation of the Jews, who counted the time of the new moon, not from the moment of the actual phase, but from the time the moon first became visible after the conjunction, the fourteenth day of the moon is regarded as the full moon: but the moon is in opposition generally on the 16th day; therefore, when the new moons of the [[Table V]].

    0
    0
  • Let P = The Number Of Days From The 21St Of March To The 15Th Of The Paschal Moon, Which Is The First Day On Which Easter Sunday Can Fall; P= The Number Of Days From The 21St Of March To Easter Sunday; L = The Number Of The Dominical Letter Of The Year; 1 = Letter Belonging To The Day On Which The 15Th Of The Moon Falls: Then, Since Easter Is The Sunday Following The 14Th Of The Moon, We Have P=P (L 1), Which Is Commonly Called The Number Of Direction.

    0
    0
  • When P =I The Full Moon Is On The 21St Of March, And The New Moon On The 8Th (21 13 =8), Therefore The Moon'S Age On The 1St Of March (Which Is The Same As On The 1St Of January) Is Twentythree Days; The Epact Of The Year Is Consequently Twenty Three.

    0
    0
  • When P=2 The New Moon Falls On The Ninth, And The Epact Is Consequently Twenty Two; And, In General, When P Becomes I X, E Becomes 23 X, Therefore P E = I X 23 X =24, And P =24 E.

    0
    0
  • But It Is Evident That When 1 Is Increased By Unity, That Is To Say, When The Full Moon Falls A Day Later, The Epact Of The Year Is Diminished By Unity; Therefore, In General, When 1=4 X, E=23 X, Whence L E =27 And 1=27 E.

    0
    0
  • Instead, However, Of Employing The Golden Numbers And Epacts For The Determination Of Easter And The Movable Feasts, It Was Resolved That The Equinox And The Paschal Moon Should Be Found By Astronomical Computation From The Rudolphine Tables.

    0
    0
  • 33 Sec., And That The Year Commences On, Or Immediately After, The New Moon Following The Autumnal Equinox.

    0
    0
  • The Year 5606 Was The First Of A Cycle, And The Mean New Moon, Appertaining To The 1St Of Tisri For That Year, Was 1845, October I, 15 Hours 42 Min.

    0
    0
  • To Compute The Times Of The New Moons Which Determine The Commencement Of Successive Years, It Must Be Observed That In Passing From An Ordinary Year The New Moon Of The Following Year Is Deduced By Subtracting The Interval That Twelve Lunations Fall Short Of The Corresponding Gregorian Year Of 365 Or 366 Days; And That, In Passing From An Embolismic Year, It Is To Be Found By Adding The Excess Of Thirteen Lunations Over The Gregorian Year.

    0
    0
  • Thus To Deduce The New Moon Of Tisri, For The Year Immediately Following Any Given Year (Y), When Y Is Ordinary, Subtract (1 1 °) Days 15 Hours Ii Min.

    0
    0
  • It Will Also Be Requisite To Attend To The Following Conditions: If The Computed New Moon Be After 18 Hours, The Following Day Is To Be Taken, And If That Happen To Be Sunday, Wednesday Or Friday, It Must Be Further Postponed One Day.

    0
    0
  • If, For An Ordinary Year, The New Moon Falls On A Tuesday, As Late As 9 Hours 11 Min.

    0
    0
  • If, For A Year Immediately Following An Embolismic Year, The Computed New Moon Is On Monday, As Late As 15 Hours 30 Min.

    0
    0
  • The Intercalary Month, Veadar, Is Introduced In Embolismic Years In Order That Passover, The 15Th Day Of Nisan, May Be Kept At Its Proper Season, Which Is The Full Moon Of The Vernal Equinox, Or That Which Takes Place After The Sun Has Entered The Sign Aries.

    0
    0
  • The Gregorian epact being the age of the moon of Tebet at the beginning of the Gregorian year, it represents the day of Tebet which corresponds to January I; and thus the approximate date of Tisri I, the commencement of the Hebrew year, may be otherwise deduced by subtracting the epact from Sept.

    0
    0
  • The Years Of The Hegira Are Purely Lunar, And Always Consist Of Twelve Lunar Months, Commencing With The Approximate New Moon, Without Any Intercalation To Keep Them To The Same Season With Respect To The Sun, So That They Retrograde Through All The Seasons In About 321 Years.

    0
    0
  • His first important astronomical work was a careful investigation of the libration of the moon (Kosmographische Nachrichten, Nuremberg, 1750), and his chart of the full moon (published in 1775) was unsurpassed for half a century.

    0
    0
  • In 1755 he submitted to the English government an amended body of MS. tables, which James Bradley compared with the Greenwich observations, and found to be sufficiently accurate to determine the moon's place to 75", and consequently the longitude at sea to about half a degree.

    0
    0
  • Klinkerfuss published in 1881 photo-lithographic reproductions of Mayer's local charts and general map of the moon; and his star-catalogue was re-edited by F.

    0
    0
  • Philochorus in his Atthis (ap. Macrobius loc. cit.) further identified this divinity, at whose sacrifices men and women exchanged garments, with the moon.

    0
    0
  • It accordingly comments on the Sphaerica of Theodosius, the Moving Sphere of Autolycus, Theodosius's book on Day and Night, the treatise of Aristarchus On the Size and Distances of the Sun and Moon, and Euclid's Optics and Phaenomena.

    0
    0
  • The "mean moon" is a fictitious moon which moves around the earth with a uniform velocity and in the same time as the real moon.

    0
    0
  • He is remembered also for a curious work entitled The Discovery of a World in the Moon (1638, 3rd ed., with an appendix "The possibility of a passage thither," 1640).

    0
    0
  • the farther side of the moon, which is known to exist only by inference.

    0
    0
  • By inference we know that things, such as the farther side of the moon, which neither are, nor have been, nor can be, present to an experiencing subject on the earth, nevertheless exist.

    0
    0
  • a stone or a stick, a man or a moon.

    0
    0
  • This is to substitute " indirect experience " for all inference, and to maintain that when, starting from any " direct experience," I infer the back of the moon, which is always turned away from me, I nevertheless have experience of it; nay, that it is experience.

    0
    0
  • I, you, an animal, a plant, the earth, the moon, the sun, God.

    0
    0
  • The regularity of their diurnal revolutions could not escape notice, and a good deal was known 2000 years ago about the motions of the sun and moon and planets among the stars.

    0
    0
  • At the same time he thought of the possibility of terrestrial gravity extending to the moon, and made a calculation with regard to it.

    0
    0
  • Finally, he made substantial progress with more exact calculations of the motions of the solar system, especially for the case of the moon.

    0
    0
  • Differences of acceleration due to the attractions of the sun and moon are not important for terrestrial systems on a small scale, and can usually be ignored, but their effect (in combination with the rotation of the earth) is very apparent in the case of the ocean tides.

    0
    0
  • " Moon " is zlava in written and dawa in spoken language, in which -va is a suffix; the word itself is zla-, cognate to the Mongol ssara, Sokpa sara, Gyarung t-sile, Vayu cholo, &c. The common spoken word for " head " is go, written mgo, to which the Manipuri moko and the Mishmi mkura are related.

    0
    0
  • In post-Vedic literature soma is a regular name for the moon, which is regarded as being drunk up by the gods and so waning, till it is filled up again by the sun.

    0
    0
  • Hannibal's oath to Philip of Macedon; beside the named deities he invokes the gods of " sun and moon and earth, of rivers and meadows and waters " (Polyb.

    0
    0
  • &Aces, a threshing-floor, and afterwards applied to denote the disk of the sun or moon, probably on account of the circular path traced out by the oxen threshing the corn.

    0
    0
  • It was thence applied to denote any luminous ring, such as that viewed around the sun or moon, or portrayed about the heads of saints.

    0
    0
  • In physical science, a halo is a luminous circle, surrounding the sun or moon, with various auxiliary phenomena, and formed by the reflection and refraction of light by ice-crystals suspended in the atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • Encircling the sun or moon (S), there are two circles, known as FIG.

    0
    0
  • Philolaus supposed that the sphere of the fixed stars, the five planets, the sun, moon and earth, all moved round the central fire, which he called the hearth of the universe, the house of Zeus, and the mother of the gods (see Stob.

    0
    0
  • The scene of the future life may be thought of on earth, in some distant part of it, or above the earth, in the sky, sun, moon or stars, or beneath the earth.

    0
    0
  • He proposes thirty questions on these matters, among which are the following: "whether souls are conducted to heaven or hell immediately after death"; "whether the Embus of hell is the same as Abraham's bosom"; "whether the sun and moon will be really obscured at the day of judgment"; "whether all the members of the human body will rise with it"; "whether the hair and nails will reappear"; could thought become "more lawless and uncertain" ?

    0
    0
  • Further, we know that in the 8th century B.C., there were observatories in most of the large cities in the valley of the Euphrates, and that professional astronomers regularly took observations of the heavens, copies of which were sent to the king of Assyria; and from a cuneiform inscription found in the palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh, the text of which is given by George Smith,5 we learn that at that time the epochs of eclipses of both sun and moon were predicted as possible - probably by means of the cycle of 223 lunations or Chaldaean Saros - and that observations were made accordingly.

    0
    0
  • p. 331) takes him to be an agricultural divinity akin to the sun god, whose wife is the moon-goddess Penelope, from whom he is separated and reunited to her on the day of the new moon.

    0
    0
  • He had the idea of explaining the tides by the attraction of the moon.

    0
    0
  • AMASIS, or AMosIs (the Greek forms of the Egyptian name Ahmase, Ahmosi, " the moon is born," often written Aahmes or Ahmes in modern works), the name of two kings of ancient Egypt.

    0
    0
  • Moon); J.

    0
    0
  • An annual fair is held at Allahabad at the confluence of the streams on the occasion of the great bathing festival at the full moon of the Hindu month of Magh.

    0
    0
  • the supreme god) is the heaven, Mahomet is the sun, Salman the moon.

    0
    0
  • 237), or Qamaris, hold that the supreme god (`Ali) is the moon, not the sun.

    0
    0
  • Their poetry addressed to the moon is translated by C. Huart in the Journal asiatique, ser.

    0
    0
  • A further extension is given by some writers, who use the term as synonymous with the religions of primitive peoples, including under it not only the worship of inanimate objects, such as the sun, moon or stars, but even such phases of primitive philosophy as totemism.

    0
    0
  • p. 164) at the time of the full moon when all the household danced together before the doors of the houses.

    0
    0
  • The following is an analysis of the results obtained, showing the number of times the different grades were reached: - On one or two occasions at Jan Mayen auroral light is described as making the full moon look like an ordinary gas jet in presence of electric light, whilst rays could be seen crossing and brighter than the moon's disk.

    0
    0
  • (Vitruvius names Cicero and Lucretius as post nostram memoriam nascentes.) The subjects of the eight chapters are - (1) the signs of the zodiac and the seven planets; (2) the phases of the moon; (3) the passage of the sun through the zodiac; (4) and (5) various constellations; (6) the relation of astrological influences to nature; (7) the mathematical divisions of the gnomon; (8) various kinds of sundials and their inventors.

    0
    0
  • The Apology opens thus: "I, 0 king, by the providence of God came into the world; and having beheld the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, the sun and moon, and all besides, I 1 Codex Venet.

    0
    0
  • His consort was sometimes called Amaune (feminine of Amun), but more usually mother ": she was human-headed, wearing the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt, and their son was Khons (Chon or Chons), a lunar god, represented as a youth wearing the crescent and disk of the moon.

    0
    0
  • A third view, that Hera is the moon, is held by W.

    0
    0
  • This intimate relation with women has been held a proof that Hera was originally a moon-goddess, as the moon is often thought to influence childbirth and other aspects of feminine life.

    0
    0
  • Further, the Greeks themselves, who were always ready to identify Artemis with the moon, do not seem to have recognized any lunar connexion in Hera.

    0
    0
  • The origin of Hera's association with the cow is uncertain, but there is no need to see in it, with Roscher, a symbol of the moon.

    0
    0
  • The titles of several temple books are preserved recording the movements and phases of the sun, moon and stars.

    0
    0
  • Besides the sun and moon, five planets, thirty-six dekans, and constellations to which animal and other forms are given, appear in the early astronomical texts and paintings.

    0
    0
  • The moon was a male son :y, who likewise fared across the heavens in a boat; hence (X~ was often.

    0
    0
  • The ibis-god Thoth was early identified with the moon.

    0
    0
  • Certain of the carri al gods early became identified with cosmic divinities, and inst latter thus became the objects of a cult; so, for instance, in t Horus of Edfu was a sun-god, and Thoth in Hermopolis as gna was held to be the moon.

    0
    0
  • As such he is represented as a youthful god, wearing a skull-cap surmounted by the moon.

    0
    0
  • 7repi, near, y the earth), in astronomy that point of the moon's orbit or of the sun's apparent orbit at which the moon or sun approach nearest to the earth.

    0
    0
  • EVECTION (Latin for "carrying away"), in astronomy, the largest inequality produced by the action of the sun in the monthly revolution of the moon around the earth.

    0
    0
  • It may be considered as arising from a semi-annual variation in the eccentricity of the moon's orbit and the position of its perigee.

    0
    0
  • He also determined the mass of the moon, and from a discussion of the Greenwich transit circle observations between 1851 and 1865 he found for the constant of nutation the value 9.134".

    0
    0
  • Ba11, 3 Lamech is an adaptation of the Babylonian Lamga, a title of Sin the moon god, and synonymous with Ubara in the name Ubara-Tutu, the Otiartes of Berossus, who is the ninth of the ten primitive Babylonian kings, and the father of the hero of the Babylonian flood story, just as Lamech is the ninth patriarch, and the father of Noah.

    0
    0
  • Just as whatsoever stars there be, their radiance avails not the sixteenth part of the radiance of the moon.

    0
    0
  • libra, a balance), a slow oscillation, as of a balance; in astronomy especially the seeming oscillation of the moon around her axis, by which portions of her surface near the edge of the disk are alternately brought into sight and swung out of sight.

    0
    0
  • who arrived at any correct notion of the tides, and not only indicated their connexion with the moon, but pointed out their periodical fluctuations in accordance with the phases of that luminary.

    0
    0
  • The ephors were elected annually, originally no doubt by the kings, later by the people; their term of office began with the new moon after the autumnal equinox, and they had an official residence (Oop€Iov) in the Agora.

    0
    0
  • In Hamath we meet with the Baal of Heaven, Sun and Moon deities, gods of heaven and earth, and others.

    0
    0
  • In physical science, coronae (or "glories") are the coloured rings frequently seen closely encircling the sun or moon.

    0
    0
  • Days are distinguished as solar, sidereal or lunar, according as the revolution is taken relatively to the sun, the stars or the moon.

    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that the discussion of ancient eclipses of the moon, and their comparison with modern observations, show only a small and rather doubtful change, amounting perhaps to less than one-hundredth of a second per century.

    0
    0
  • The moon's apparent mean motion in longitude seems also to indicate slow periodic changes in the earth's rotation; but these are not confirmed by transits of Mercury, which ought also to indicate them.

    0
    0
  • He was often identified with the moon as a divider of time, and in this connexion, during the New Empire, the ape first appears as his sacred animal.

    0
    0
  • Although in his sixty-fourth year, he undertook to observe the moon through an entire revolution of her nodes (eighteen years), and actually carried out his purpose.

    0
    0
  • Halley's most notable scientific achievements were - his detection of the "long inequality" of Jupiter and Saturn, and of the acceleration of the moon's mean motion (1693), his discovery of the proper motions of the fixed stars (1718), his theory of variation (1683), including the hypothesis of four magnetic poles, revived by C. Hansteen in 1819, and his suggestion of the magnetic origin of the aurora borealis; his calculation of the orbit of the 1682 comet (the first ever attempted), coupled with a prediction of its return, strikingly verified in 1759; and his indication (first in 1679, and again in 1716, Phil.

    0
    0
  • Thus also the sun, moon and stars may be made to descend hither in appearance, and to be visible over the heads of our enemies, and many things of the like sort, which persons unacquainted with such things would refuse to believe."

    0
    0
  • With this last instrument he discovered in 1610 the satellites of Jupiter, and soon afterwards the spots on the sun, the phases of Venus, and the hills and valleys on the moon.

    0
    0
  • (3) As a Cassegrain reflector, for photographing the moon, planets or very bright nebulae on a large scale, as shown in fig.

    0
    0
  • As the first triad symbolized the three divisions of the universe - the heavens, earth and the watery element - so the second represented the three great forces of nature - the sun, the moon and the life-giving power.

    0
    0
  • The essential feature of this astral theology is the assumption of a close link between the movements going on in the heavens and occurrences on earth, which led to identifying the gods and goddesses with heavenly bodies - planets and stars, besides sun and moon - and to assigning the seats of all the deities in the heavens.

    0
    0
  • The personification of the two great luminaries - the sun and the moon - was the first step in the unfolding of this system, and this was followed by placing the other deities where Shamash and Sin had their seats.

    0
    0
  • To read the signs of the heavens was therefore to understand the meaning of occurrences on earth, and with this accomplished it was also possible to foretell what events were portended by the position and relationship to one another of sun, moon, planets and certain stars.

    0
    0
  • Its motion of 8.7" per year would carry it over a portion of the sky equal to the diameter of the full moon in about two centuries.

    0
    0
  • LUNATION, the period of return of the moon (luna) to the same position relative to the sun; for example, from full moon to full moon.

    0
    0
  • Newton, according to Dr Pemberton, thought in 1666 that the moon moves so like a falling body that it has a similar centripetal force to the earth, 20 years before he demonstrated this conclusion from the laws of motion in the Principia.

    0
    0
  • The moon suffers the interposition of the opaque earth.

    0
    0
  • The moon suffers deprivation of light.

    0
    0
  • For example, as he says, the sphericity of the moon is the real ground of the fact of its light waxing; but we can deduce either from the other, as follows: - i.

    0
    0
  • The moon is spherical.

    0
    0
  • The moon waxes.

    0
    0
  • .The moon waxes..

    0
    0
  • .The moon is spherical.

    0
    0
  • Eclipse of the moon, e.g.

    0
    0
  • is privation of light from the moon by the interposition of the earth between it and the sun.

    0
    0
  • Thus we see at once why the shadows cast by the sun or moon are in general so much less sharp than those cast by the electric arc. For, practically, at moderate distances the arc appears as a mere luminous point.

    0
    0
  • When the eclipse is total, there is a real geometrical shadow - very small compared with the penumbra (for the apparent diameters of the sun and moon are nearly equal, but their distances are as 370: I); when the eclipse is annular, the shadow is all penumbra.

    0
    0
  • In a lunar eclipse, on the other hand, the earth is the shadow-casting body, and the moon is the screen, and we observe things according to our first point of view.

    0
    0
  • The true equinox then moves around the mean equinox in a period equal to that of the moon's nodes.

    0
    0
  • Thus the moon would reach the earth in about five days.

    0
    0
  • The Gandharvas figure already in the Veda, either as a single divinity, or as a class of genii, conceived of as the body-guard of Soma and as connected with the moon.

    0
    0
  • The generally recognized principal Avatars do not, however, by any means constitute the only occasions of a direct intercession of the deity in worldly affairs, but - in the same way as to this day the eclipses of the sun and moon are ascribed by the ordinary Hindu to these luminaries being temporarily swallowed by the dragon Rahu (or Graha, " the seizer") - so any uncommon occurrence would be apt to be set down as a special manifestation of divine power; and any man credited with exceptional merit or achievement, or even remarkable for some strange incident connected with his life or death, might ultimately come to be looked upon as a veritable incarnation of the deity, capable of influencing the destinies of man, and might become an object of local adoration or superstitious awe and propitiatory rites to multitudes of people.

    0
    0
  • albus, white), "whiteness," a word used principally in astronomy for the degree of reflected light; the light of the sun which is reflected from the moon is called the .albedo of the moon.

    0
    0
  • His theory attempted to explain the separation of elements, the formation of earth and sea, of sun and moon, of atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • Among Newcomb's most notable achievements are his researches in connexion with the theory of the moon's motion.

    0
    0
  • For some years after the publication of Hansen's tables of the moon in 1857 it was generally believed that the theory of that body was at last complete, and that its motion could be predicted as accurately as that of the other heavenly bodies.

    0
    0
  • Newcomb showed that this belief was unfounded, and that as a matter of fact the moon was falling rapidly behind the tabular positions.

    0
    0
  • In his investigation he employed the eclipses of the moon recorded in the Almagest, the Arabian eclipses between A.D.

    0
    0
  • But the city was most famous for the temple just outside its walls in which stood the great idol or rather columnar emblem of Siva called Somnath (Moon's lord), which was destroyed by Mahmud of Ghazni.

    0
    0
  • He shifted his ground in politics with every new moon, and the world fastened on him the nickname, which he himself adopted in his "champagne" speech, of the weatherco