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montrose

montrose

montrose Sentence Examples

  • How about we go into Montrose this afternoon and buy a real suitcase?

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  • "Let's get going to Montrose and find you some luggage," he called.

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  • Dean boiled every inch of the remaining trip to Montrose.

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  • It was four o'clock and he'd just returned from Montrose to find Cynthia still damp from her shower.

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  • A quick search of the Montrose phone book surprisingly found a listing that seemed to be what he was seeking.

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  • Then Harold added, There used to be an Art Dawkins in Montrose.

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  • She called from the Montrose airport and booked for a whole week.

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  • I'm the one who chauffeurs you all over Montrose!

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  • We ate in Montrose.

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  • A typical year saw four hundred inches of snow fall atop Red Mountain, a hundred and seventy-five inches in Ouray, and perhaps a foot in Montrose, all within fifty miles.

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  • Dean had been successful, for a four-figure charge, in securing a one way ticket with an open ended return, from Montrose, via Denver and Chicago, to Indianapolis.

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  • They say the flight isn't canceled yet so let's hope Montrose stays clear enough, at least for another hour or two.

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  • The trip to the Montrose airport was slow.

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  • Neither spoke until the lights of Montrose glowed through the snow.

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  • They took her to the Montrose hospital, too.

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  • Her body had been cut free and moved to the downstairs to await a hearse from Montrose.

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  • He called back later and left word that he was staying in Virginia and he'd arranged with a Montrose funeral home to have her cremated.

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  • The only sound he remembered was ambulance siren on its long journey to the Montrose hospital.

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  • In a cave, still called "Lord Huntly's Cave," in a rocky glen in the vicinity, George, marquess of Huntly, lay hid during Montrose's campaign in 1644-45.

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  • It contains 30 islands, the largest of which is Inchmurrin, a deer park belonging to the duke of Montrose.

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  • and the emperor Titus, the history of the Black Prince, the life of Sir Philip Sidney, that of Montrose, and finally that of Sir W.

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  • west of Montrose, and has a station on the loop line of the Caledonian railway from Forfar to Bridge of Dun.

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  • In 1452 the earl of Huntly crushed the insurrection led by the earl of Crawford at the battle of Brechin Muir, and in 1645 the town and castle were harried by the marquis of Montrose.

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  • Brechin - which is controlled by a provost, bailies and council - unites with Arbroath, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose to return one member to parliament.

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  • JOSEPH HUME (1777-1855), British politician, was born on the 22nd of January 1777, of humble parents, at Montrose, Scotland.

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  • He was afterwards successively elected for Middlesex (1830), Kilkenny (1837) and for the Montrose burghs (1842), in the service of which constituency he died.

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  • Three times, in July 1638, and in March and June 1639, Montrose entered Aberdeen, where he succeeded in effecting his object, on the second occasion carrying off the head of the Gordons, the marquess of Huntly, as a prisoner to Edinburgh, though in so doing, for the first and last time in his life, he violated a safeconduct.

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  • In July 1639, after the signature of the treaty of Berwick, Montrose was one of the Covenanting leaders who visited Charles.

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  • In the Scottish parliament which met in September, Montrose found himself in opposition to Argyll, who had made himself the representative of the Presbyterian and national party, and of the middle classes.

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  • Montrose, on the other hand, wished to bring the king's authority to bear upon parliament to defeat this object, and offered him the support of a great number of nobles.

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  • Montrose was of necessity driven to play something of a double part.

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  • After the invasion had been crowned with success, Montrose still continued to cherish his now hopeless policy.

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  • When Charles visited Scotland to give his formal assent to the abolition of Episcopacy, Montrose communicated to him his belief that Hamilton was a traitor.

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  • Upon the king's return to England Montrose shared in the amnesty which was tacitly accorded to all Charles's partisans.

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  • For a time Montrose retired, perforce, from public life.

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  • But in 1644, when a Scottish army entered England to take part against the king, Montrose, now created a marquess, was at last allowed to try what he could do.

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  • Highlanders had never before been known to combine together, but Montrose knew that most of the clans detested Argyll, and the clans rallied to his summons.

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  • The fiery enthusiasm of the Gordons and other clans often carried the day, but Montrose relied more upon the disciplined infantry which had followed Alastair Macdonald from Ireland.

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  • Now Montrose found himself apparently master of Scotland.

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  • Charles had been defeated at Naseby on the 14th of June, and Montrose must come to his help if there was to be still a king to proclaim.

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  • David Leslie, the best of the Scottish generals, was promptly despatched against Montrose to anticipate the invasion.

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  • On the 12th of September he came upon Montrose, deserted by his Highlanders and guarded only by a little group of followers, at Philiphaugh.

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  • Montrose cut his way through to the Highlands; but he failed to organize an army.

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  • Montrose was to appear once more on the stage of Scottish history.

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  • In March 1650 Montrose landed in the Orkneys to take the command of a small force which he had sent on before him.

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  • Montrose >>

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  • The regent Moray, the marquess of Montrose, and Napier of Merchiston were buried within its walls and are commemorated by monuments, and among the memorial tablets is one to R.

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  • Almost opposite to it stands Moray House, from the balcony of which the 8th earl of Argyll watched Montrose led to execution (1650).

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  • Close by is the scene of the battle of the 2nd of February 1645, in which Montrose completely defeated the earl of Argyll.

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  • When, after the battle of Kilsyth, Scotland was at the mercy of Montrose and his army, Leslie was recalled from England in 1645, and made lieutenant-general of horse.

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  • In September he surprised and routed Montrose at Philiphaugh near Selkirk, and was rewarded by the committee of estates with a present of -50,000 merks and a gold chain; but his victory was marred by the butchery of the captured Irish - men, women and children - to whom quarter had been given.

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  • In 1650 he was sent against Montrose, who was defeated and captured by Major Strachan, Leslie's advanced guard commander; and later in the year, all parties having for the moment combined to support Charles II., Leslie was appointed to the -chief command of the new army levied for the purpose on behalf of Charles II.

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  • The former difficulties with the Des Moines Rapids of the Mississippi (which are passable for rafts and light boats at high water) have been overcome by a canal from Keokuk to Montrose constructed by the National Government.

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  • south, gives the title of earl of Kincardine to the duke of Montrose.

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  • It is situated at the mouth of Bervie Water and is the terminus of the North British railway's branch line from Montrose, which lies 14 m.

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  • Bervie unites with Arbroath, Brechin, Forfar and Montrose in returning one member (for the "Montrose burghs") to parliament.

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  • On the opposite bank of the river is Montrose, Iowa (pop. in 1900, 748), served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway.

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  • The points of interest on its shores are Lochearnhead (at the southern extremity of Glen Ogle), which has a station on the CallanderOban railway, and the ruins of St Blane's chapel; Edinample Castle, an old turreted mansion belonging to the marquess of Breadalbane, situated in well-wooded grounds near the pretty falls of the Ample; Ardvorlich House, the original of Darlinvarach in Scott's Legend of Montrose, and the village of St Fillans at the foot of the loch, the terminus of the branch line of the Caledonian railway from Perth.

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  • The principal places of interest on the banks of the Earn are Dunira, the favourite seat of Henry Dundas, ist Viscount Melville, who took the title of his barony from the estate and to whose memory .an obelisk was raised on the adjoining hill of Dunmore; the village of Comrie; the town of Crieff; the ruined castle of Innerpeffray, founded in 1610 by the ist Lord Maderty, close to which is the library founded in 1691 by the 3rd Lord Maderty, containing some rare black-letter books and the Bible that belonged to the marquess of Montrose; Gascon Hall, now in ruins, but with traditions reaching back to the days of Wallace; Dupplin Castle, a fine Tudor mansion, seat of the earl of Kinnoull, who derives from it the title of his viscounty; Aberdalgie, Forgandenny and Bridge of Earn, a health resort situated amidst picturesque surroundings.

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  • and Queen Anne attempted to subsidize the chiefs in order to preserve tranquillity, but the wars of Montrose and Dundee, and the Jacobite insurrections of 1715 and 1745, showed how futile were all such efforts.

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  • Montrose plundered it twice in 1645.

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  • The islands were the rendezvous of Montrose's expedition in 1650 which culminated in his imprisonment and death.

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  • He and his son Robert, afterwards the 2nd earl, fought under Montrose for Charles I.

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  • The connexion of the family with Gothenburg dates from 1802, when Robert Dickson, a native of Montrose in Scotland, founded the business in which he was joined in 1807 by his brother James.

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  • On the decay of Kincardine, the original capital, Stonehaven became the county town in 1600, and suffered heavily during the covenanting troubles, Montrose setting it on fire in 1645.

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  • Churches of this order were founded in Paisley, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leith, Arbroath, Montrose, Aberdeen, Dunkeld, Cupar, Galashiels, Liverpool and London, where Michael Faraday was long an elder.

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  • ANDREW MELVILLE (1545-1622), Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer, was the youngest son of Richard Melville (brother to Melville of Dysart), proprietor of Baldovy near Montrose, at which place Andrew was born on the 1st of August 1545.

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  • The rudiments of Latin he obtained at the grammar school of Montrose, after leaving which he learned Greek for two years under Pierre de Marsilliers, a Frenchman whom John Erskine of Dun had induced to settle at Montrose; and such was Melville's proficiency that on going to the university of St Andrews he excited the astonishment of the professors by using the Greek text of Aristotle, which no one else there understood.

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  • The town was taken by Montrose in 1644, by Cromwell in 1651, and was occupied by Viscount Dundee in 1689.

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  • Afterwards it changed hands several times, but was finally acquired from the Montrose family by Sir John Maxwell of Pollok.

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  • His mother, Isabel Fenton, of a good family which had suffered from connexion with the Stuart rising of 1745, resolved that he should receive a first-rate education, and sent him first to the parish school and then to the Montrose Academy, where he remained till the unusual age of seventeen and a half.

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  • In 1891 a tract of 150 acres, known as Montrose Park and containing many handsome residences, was annexed to the village.

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  • His early life has been the subject of many conjectures; but apparently he graduated M.A., probably at King's College, Aberdeen, and taught as a schoolmaster at Montrose.

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  • He went from place to place in peril of his life denouncing the errors of Rome and the abuses in the church at Montrose, Dundee, Ayr, in Kyle, at Perth, Edinburgh, Leith, Haddington and elsewhere.

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  • The Scottish seaboard is divided for administrative purposes into twenty-seven fishery districts, namely, on the east coast, Eyemouth, Leith, Anstruther, Montrose, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, Fraserburgh, Banff, Buckie, Findhorn, Cromarty, Helmsdale, Lybster, Wick (15); on the north, Orkney, Shetland (2); on the west, Stornoway, Barra, Loch Broom, Loch Carron and Skye, Fort William, Campbeltown, Inverary, Rothesay, Greenock, Ballantrae (10).

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  • From two reports printed by the Scottish Burgh Record Society in 1881, it appears that the number of vessels belonging to the principal ports - Leith, Dundee, Glasgow, Kirkcaldy and Montrose - in 1656 was 58, the tonnage being 3140, and that by 1692 they had increased to 97 of 5905 tons.

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  • Menteith certainly received the blood-money, boo yearly in land, and Wallace, like Montrose, was hanged, disembowelled and quartered (at London, August 1305).

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  • The martyr of an impossible loyalty, Wallace shares the illustrious immortality of the great Montrose, and is by far the most popular hero of his country's history.

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  • Constant meetings hurled protestations against the bishops; no man was more active than the young Montrose.

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  • was rescinded, the law and custom of forty years were abolished, conformist clerics were expelled, and the earl of Argyll appeared as leader of the extreme party, while Montrose was the general of the armed Covenanters.

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  • Traquhair, as royal commissioner, prorogued parliament; negotiations with the king in London had no result; and in 1640 the prorogation was contemned, and though opposed by Montrose, the parliament constituted itself, with no royal warrant.

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  • War was at hand, but Montrose formed a party by " the band of Cumbernauld," to suppress the practical dictatorship of his rival and enemy, Argyll, who, he understood, was to be one of a triumvirate, and absolute north of Forth.

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  • On the 20th of August Montrose was the first of the Covenanting army to cross the Tweed; Newcastle was seized, and Charles, unsupported by England, entered on the course of the Long Parliament and the slaying of Strafford.

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  • Montrose kept his word, while Hamilton stooped to sign the Covenant.

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  • Montrose lay in prison while Charles I.

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  • All that is known of Montrose, in this matter, is that from prison he had written thrice to Charles, and that Charles had intended to show his third letter to Argyll, Hamilton and Lanark, on the very day when they, suspecting a plot, retired into the country (12th of October).

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  • Lanark, from Oxford, fled to join the Covenanters; Charles imprisoned Hamilton in Cornwall; Montrose was made a marquis; Leslie, with a large Scottish force and 4000 horse, besieged Newcastle.

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  • Montrose arrived a day too late for Marston Moor (2nd of July 1644); Rupert took his contingent; he entered Scotland in disguise, met the ill-armed Irish levies under Colkitto, raised the Gordons and Ogilvies, who supplied his cavalry, raised the fighting Macdonalds, Camerons and Macleans; in six pitched battles he routed Argyll and all the Covenanting warriors of Scotland, and then, deserted by Colkitto and the Gordons, and surprised by Leslie's cavalry withdrawn from England, was defeated at Philiphaugh near Selkirk, while men and women of his Irish contingent were shot or hanged months after the battle.

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  • It would have been wiser to put the revenges as reprisals for the undeniable horrors committed by Montrose's Irish levies.

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  • The surrender of Charles to the Scots, the surrender by the Scots of Charles to the English, for £ 200,000 of arrears of pay, with hopes of another f200,000 (February 1647), were among the consequences of Montrose's defeat.

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  • But Montrose (January 1650) was sent by Charles to " search his death," as he said, in an expedition to the north of Scotland, while, in the absence of his stainless servant, Charles actually signed the treaty of Breda (1st of May).

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  • In April Montrose was abandoned by his royal master, and was defeated at Carbiesdale, on the south side of the kyle, or estuary, of Shin and Oykel; he was betrayed, insulted, bullied by the preachers, and, going to his death like a bridegroom to the altar, was hanged at Edinburgh, on the 10th of May.

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  • " Great in life, Montrose was yet greater in his death."

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  • Claverhouse, now Viscount Dundee, despairing of his party, and under apprehension of an attack in arms, rode northward Killie- with a handful of horse, and began to play the part of Montrose, while the Convention offered the crown to William and Mary, adding the claim of right to dethrone a king who had infringed the laws.

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  • Through a series of confusions and blunders, Mar prematurely raised on the 16th of September 1715 the standard of King James, and though in command of a much larger army than ever followed Montrose, was baffled by Argyll, who held Stirling with a very small force.

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  • Mar's highlanders began to desert; his council was a confusion of opinions and discontents, and when, after many dangers and in the worst of health, James joined the Jacobites at Perth, it was only to discourage his friends by his gloom, and to share their wintry flight before Argyll to Montrose.

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  • The reward which many of the clansmen of the Peninsula and Waterloo received may be appreciated by those who read the introduction to Scott's Legend of Montrose.

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  • Lang; Miss Shield's King over the Water and Martin Haile's James Francis Stuart (the old Chevalier); Omond's Lord Advocates of Scotland; Willcock's The Great Marquess (of Argyll); Napier's Lives of Montrose and Dundee; Clarke and Foxcroft's Life of Bishop Burnet; Sir Herbert Maxwell's Robert Bruce and Book of Douglas, with all Sir W.

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  • Château Montrose, St Estephe.

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  • The chief British ports for the landing of flax are: - Belfast, Dundee, Leith, Montrose, London and Arbroath, the two former being the chief centres of the flax industry.

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  • It was occupied by the marquess of Montrose prior to the battle of Tippermuir in 1644, stormed by the Cromwellians in 1653, and garrisoned on behalf of James II.

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  • Employing the same unscrupulous and treacherous methods which had proved so fatal to his father, he simultaneously supported and encouraged the expedition of Montrose and the royalists, and negotiated with the covenanters.

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  • In acting thus he did not scruple to desert his own royalist followers, and to repudiate and abandon the great and noble Montrose, whose heroic efforts he was apparently merely using in order to extort better terms from the covenanters, and who, having been captured on the 4th of May, was executed on the 21st in spite of some attempts by Charles to procure for him an indemnity.

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  • He proceeded to Falkland near Perth and passed through Aberdeen, where he saw the mutilated arm of Montrose suspended over the city gate.

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  • Dundes, now Lord Melville, became first lord of the admiralty, and the cabinet further included Lord Camden, Lord Mulgrave and the duke of Montrose.

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  • The burgh unites with Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin and Inverbervie (the Montrose group of burghs) in returning one member to parliament.

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  • 1648), the general whose strategy in opposition to the marquess of Montrose was so diligently stultified by the committee of estates.

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  • The only other important conflict belongs to the Covenanters' time, when the marquess of Montrose was defeated at Philiphaugh in 1645.

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  • The town is under the jurisdiction of a provost, bailies and council, and, with Brechin, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose, returns one member to parliament.

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  • Since 1885, when the duke of Montrose constructed a road over the eastern shoulder of Craigmore to join the older road at the entrance of the Trossachs pass, Aberfoyle has become the alternative route to the Trossachs and Loch Katrine.

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  • The castle was burned by the Macleans in 1644, in the interest of the marquess of Montrose, and not again restored.

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  • It contains the outlying villages of Greenwood, Montrose and Boyntonville; and, larger than these, Wakefield, near the centre of the township. In this village is the town hall, the gift of Cyrus Wakefield (1811-1873), and the Beebe Town Library, founded in 1856 as the Public Library of South Reading, and later renamed in honour of Lucius Beebe, a generous patron.

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  • crossed the stream in 1296 with his invading host, and Montrose with the Covenanters in 1640.

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  • How about we go into Montrose this afternoon and buy a real suitcase?

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  • Martha was making herself scarce in her room before her luggage-buying expedition to Montrose, thirty-five miles away.

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  • "Let's get going to Montrose and find you some luggage," he called.

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  • Dean boiled every inch of the remaining trip to Montrose.

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  • It was four o'clock and he'd just returned from Montrose to find Cynthia still damp from her shower.

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  • A quick search of the Montrose phone book surprisingly found a listing that seemed to be what he was seeking.

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  • Then Harold added, There used to be an Art Dawkins in Montrose.

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  • Paul waved and announced something about leaving tomorrow, the soonest they could get an airline booking from Montrose.

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  • She called from the Montrose airport and booked for a whole week.

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  • I'm the one who chauffeurs you all over Montrose!

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  • We ate in Montrose.

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  • Mrs. Martin is off to a WCTU meeting in Montrose and Joshua rented a sleigh at the Union Livery that just opened.

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  • A typical year saw four hundred inches of snow fall atop Red Mountain, a hundred and seventy-five inches in Ouray, and perhaps a foot in Montrose, all within fifty miles.

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  • Dean had been successful, for a four-figure charge, in securing a one way ticket with an open ended return, from Montrose, via Denver and Chicago, to Indianapolis.

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  • They say the flight isn't canceled yet so let's hope Montrose stays clear enough, at least for another hour or two.

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  • The trip to the Montrose airport was slow.

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  • Neither spoke until the lights of Montrose glowed through the snow.

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  • They took her to the Montrose hospital, too.

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  • Her body had been cut free and moved to the downstairs to await a hearse from Montrose.

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  • He called back later and left word that he was staying in Virginia and he'd arranged with a Montrose funeral home to have her cremated.

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  • The only sound he remembered was ambulance siren on its long journey to the Montrose hospital.

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  • Two days and nights had passed since Dean's siren-serenaded ride to the Montrose Hospital and subsequent forty-eight hour stay in its friendly confines.

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  • Royalist forces under James Grahame, 1 st Marquis of Montrose defeat the covenanters under the Earl of Argyll.

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  • In 1645, he commanded the detachment sent from Lord Leven's army against the Marquis of Montrose.

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  • But Montrose remained devoted to the service of King Charles.

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  • dower house, along with a house in Montrose.

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  • The English Civil Wars Open James Graham had become earl of Montrose in 1626.

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  • This earned the enmity of the Royalist Marquis of Montrose who mistrusted Argyll.

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  • John Buchanan, the last laird, sold his ancestral estate in 1682 to the Marquess of Montrose.

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  • Like a Scottish Robin Hood, Rob Roy hid in the hills and led raids against Montrose and other nobles.

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  • The match itself was a totally one-sided affair in which Montrose outclassed the Loons.

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  • Montrose were far outclassed by Thistle who combined speed, with strong forward running and accurate passing.

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  • pa jobs in Montrose, Motherwell or Moray.

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  • Recently I was in Montrose to see the 70-year-old concrete suspension bridge which is the only access from the south.

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  • In a cave, still called "Lord Huntly's Cave," in a rocky glen in the vicinity, George, marquess of Huntly, lay hid during Montrose's campaign in 1644-45.

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  • It contains 30 islands, the largest of which is Inchmurrin, a deer park belonging to the duke of Montrose.

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  • and the emperor Titus, the history of the Black Prince, the life of Sir Philip Sidney, that of Montrose, and finally that of Sir W.

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  • west of Montrose, and has a station on the loop line of the Caledonian railway from Forfar to Bridge of Dun.

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  • In 1452 the earl of Huntly crushed the insurrection led by the earl of Crawford at the battle of Brechin Muir, and in 1645 the town and castle were harried by the marquis of Montrose.

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  • Brechin - which is controlled by a provost, bailies and council - unites with Arbroath, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose to return one member to parliament.

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  • JOSEPH HUME (1777-1855), British politician, was born on the 22nd of January 1777, of humble parents, at Montrose, Scotland.

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  • He was afterwards successively elected for Middlesex (1830), Kilkenny (1837) and for the Montrose burghs (1842), in the service of which constituency he died.

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  • JAMES GRAHAM MONTROSE, MARQUESS OF (1612-1650), was born in 1612, and became 5th earl of Montrose (see above) by his father's death in 1626.

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  • Three times, in July 1638, and in March and June 1639, Montrose entered Aberdeen, where he succeeded in effecting his object, on the second occasion carrying off the head of the Gordons, the marquess of Huntly, as a prisoner to Edinburgh, though in so doing, for the first and last time in his life, he violated a safeconduct.

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  • In July 1639, after the signature of the treaty of Berwick, Montrose was one of the Covenanting leaders who visited Charles.

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  • In the Scottish parliament which met in September, Montrose found himself in opposition to Argyll, who had made himself the representative of the Presbyterian and national party, and of the middle classes.

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  • Montrose, on the other hand, wished to bring the king's authority to bear upon parliament to defeat this object, and offered him the support of a great number of nobles.

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  • Montrose was of necessity driven to play something of a double part.

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  • After the invasion had been crowned with success, Montrose still continued to cherish his now hopeless policy.

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  • When Charles visited Scotland to give his formal assent to the abolition of Episcopacy, Montrose communicated to him his belief that Hamilton was a traitor.

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  • Upon the king's return to England Montrose shared in the amnesty which was tacitly accorded to all Charles's partisans.

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  • For a time Montrose retired, perforce, from public life.

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  • But in 1644, when a Scottish army entered England to take part against the king, Montrose, now created a marquess, was at last allowed to try what he could do.

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  • Highlanders had never before been known to combine together, but Montrose knew that most of the clans detested Argyll, and the clans rallied to his summons.

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  • The fiery enthusiasm of the Gordons and other clans often carried the day, but Montrose relied more upon the disciplined infantry which had followed Alastair Macdonald from Ireland.

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  • Now Montrose found himself apparently master of Scotland.

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  • Charles had been defeated at Naseby on the 14th of June, and Montrose must come to his help if there was to be still a king to proclaim.

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  • David Leslie, the best of the Scottish generals, was promptly despatched against Montrose to anticipate the invasion.

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  • On the 12th of September he came upon Montrose, deserted by his Highlanders and guarded only by a little group of followers, at Philiphaugh.

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  • Montrose cut his way through to the Highlands; but he failed to organize an army.

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  • Montrose was to appear once more on the stage of Scottish history.

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  • In March 1650 Montrose landed in the Orkneys to take the command of a small force which he had sent on before him.

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  • The principal authorities for Montrose's career are Wishart's Res gestae, eec. (Amsterdam, 5647); Patrick Gordon's Short Abridgment of Britane's Distemper (Spalding Club); and the comprehensive work of Napier, Memorials of Montrose, is abundantly documented, containing Montrose's poetry, in which is included his celebrated lyric "My dear and only love."

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  • The regent Moray, the marquess of Montrose, and Napier of Merchiston were buried within its walls and are commemorated by monuments, and among the memorial tablets is one to R.

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  • Almost opposite to it stands Moray House, from the balcony of which the 8th earl of Argyll watched Montrose led to execution (1650).

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  • Close by is the scene of the battle of the 2nd of February 1645, in which Montrose completely defeated the earl of Argyll.

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  • When, after the battle of Kilsyth, Scotland was at the mercy of Montrose and his army, Leslie was recalled from England in 1645, and made lieutenant-general of horse.

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  • In September he surprised and routed Montrose at Philiphaugh near Selkirk, and was rewarded by the committee of estates with a present of -50,000 merks and a gold chain; but his victory was marred by the butchery of the captured Irish - men, women and children - to whom quarter had been given.

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  • In 1650 he was sent against Montrose, who was defeated and captured by Major Strachan, Leslie's advanced guard commander; and later in the year, all parties having for the moment combined to support Charles II., Leslie was appointed to the -chief command of the new army levied for the purpose on behalf of Charles II.

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  • The former difficulties with the Des Moines Rapids of the Mississippi (which are passable for rafts and light boats at high water) have been overcome by a canal from Keokuk to Montrose constructed by the National Government.

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  • south, gives the title of earl of Kincardine to the duke of Montrose.

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  • It is situated at the mouth of Bervie Water and is the terminus of the North British railway's branch line from Montrose, which lies 14 m.

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  • Bervie unites with Arbroath, Brechin, Forfar and Montrose in returning one member (for the "Montrose burghs") to parliament.

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  • On the opposite bank of the river is Montrose, Iowa (pop. in 1900, 748), served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway.

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  • The points of interest on its shores are Lochearnhead (at the southern extremity of Glen Ogle), which has a station on the CallanderOban railway, and the ruins of St Blane's chapel; Edinample Castle, an old turreted mansion belonging to the marquess of Breadalbane, situated in well-wooded grounds near the pretty falls of the Ample; Ardvorlich House, the original of Darlinvarach in Scott's Legend of Montrose, and the village of St Fillans at the foot of the loch, the terminus of the branch line of the Caledonian railway from Perth.

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  • The principal places of interest on the banks of the Earn are Dunira, the favourite seat of Henry Dundas, ist Viscount Melville, who took the title of his barony from the estate and to whose memory .an obelisk was raised on the adjoining hill of Dunmore; the village of Comrie; the town of Crieff; the ruined castle of Innerpeffray, founded in 1610 by the ist Lord Maderty, close to which is the library founded in 1691 by the 3rd Lord Maderty, containing some rare black-letter books and the Bible that belonged to the marquess of Montrose; Gascon Hall, now in ruins, but with traditions reaching back to the days of Wallace; Dupplin Castle, a fine Tudor mansion, seat of the earl of Kinnoull, who derives from it the title of his viscounty; Aberdalgie, Forgandenny and Bridge of Earn, a health resort situated amidst picturesque surroundings.

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  • and Queen Anne attempted to subsidize the chiefs in order to preserve tranquillity, but the wars of Montrose and Dundee, and the Jacobite insurrections of 1715 and 1745, showed how futile were all such efforts.

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  • Montrose plundered it twice in 1645.

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  • The islands were the rendezvous of Montrose's expedition in 1650 which culminated in his imprisonment and death.

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  • He and his son Robert, afterwards the 2nd earl, fought under Montrose for Charles I.

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  • The connexion of the family with Gothenburg dates from 1802, when Robert Dickson, a native of Montrose in Scotland, founded the business in which he was joined in 1807 by his brother James.

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  • On the decay of Kincardine, the original capital, Stonehaven became the county town in 1600, and suffered heavily during the covenanting troubles, Montrose setting it on fire in 1645.

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  • Churches of this order were founded in Paisley, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leith, Arbroath, Montrose, Aberdeen, Dunkeld, Cupar, Galashiels, Liverpool and London, where Michael Faraday was long an elder.

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  • ANDREW MELVILLE (1545-1622), Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer, was the youngest son of Richard Melville (brother to Melville of Dysart), proprietor of Baldovy near Montrose, at which place Andrew was born on the 1st of August 1545.

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  • The rudiments of Latin he obtained at the grammar school of Montrose, after leaving which he learned Greek for two years under Pierre de Marsilliers, a Frenchman whom John Erskine of Dun had induced to settle at Montrose; and such was Melville's proficiency that on going to the university of St Andrews he excited the astonishment of the professors by using the Greek text of Aristotle, which no one else there understood.

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  • The town was taken by Montrose in 1644, by Cromwell in 1651, and was occupied by Viscount Dundee in 1689.

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  • Afterwards it changed hands several times, but was finally acquired from the Montrose family by Sir John Maxwell of Pollok.

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  • His mother, Isabel Fenton, of a good family which had suffered from connexion with the Stuart rising of 1745, resolved that he should receive a first-rate education, and sent him first to the parish school and then to the Montrose Academy, where he remained till the unusual age of seventeen and a half.

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  • In 1891 a tract of 150 acres, known as Montrose Park and containing many handsome residences, was annexed to the village.

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  • His early life has been the subject of many conjectures; but apparently he graduated M.A., probably at King's College, Aberdeen, and taught as a schoolmaster at Montrose.

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  • He went from place to place in peril of his life denouncing the errors of Rome and the abuses in the church at Montrose, Dundee, Ayr, in Kyle, at Perth, Edinburgh, Leith, Haddington and elsewhere.

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  • The Scottish seaboard is divided for administrative purposes into twenty-seven fishery districts, namely, on the east coast, Eyemouth, Leith, Anstruther, Montrose, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, Fraserburgh, Banff, Buckie, Findhorn, Cromarty, Helmsdale, Lybster, Wick (15); on the north, Orkney, Shetland (2); on the west, Stornoway, Barra, Loch Broom, Loch Carron and Skye, Fort William, Campbeltown, Inverary, Rothesay, Greenock, Ballantrae (10).

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  • From two reports printed by the Scottish Burgh Record Society in 1881, it appears that the number of vessels belonging to the principal ports - Leith, Dundee, Glasgow, Kirkcaldy and Montrose - in 1656 was 58, the tonnage being 3140, and that by 1692 they had increased to 97 of 5905 tons.

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  • Menteith certainly received the blood-money, boo yearly in land, and Wallace, like Montrose, was hanged, disembowelled and quartered (at London, August 1305).

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  • The martyr of an impossible loyalty, Wallace shares the illustrious immortality of the great Montrose, and is by far the most popular hero of his country's history.

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  • Constant meetings hurled protestations against the bishops; no man was more active than the young Montrose.

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  • was rescinded, the law and custom of forty years were abolished, conformist clerics were expelled, and the earl of Argyll appeared as leader of the extreme party, while Montrose was the general of the armed Covenanters.

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  • Traquhair, as royal commissioner, prorogued parliament; negotiations with the king in London had no result; and in 1640 the prorogation was contemned, and though opposed by Montrose, the parliament constituted itself, with no royal warrant.

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  • War was at hand, but Montrose formed a party by " the band of Cumbernauld," to suppress the practical dictatorship of his rival and enemy, Argyll, who, he understood, was to be one of a triumvirate, and absolute north of Forth.

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  • On the 20th of August Montrose was the first of the Covenanting army to cross the Tweed; Newcastle was seized, and Charles, unsupported by England, entered on the course of the Long Parliament and the slaying of Strafford.

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  • In Scotland the secret of the Cumbernauld band came out; Montrose, Napier and other friends were imprisoned on the strength of certain ambiguous messages to Charles, and on the 27th of July, being called before parliament, Montrose said - " My resolution is to carry with me honour and fidelity to the grave."

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  • Montrose kept his word, while Hamilton stooped to sign the Covenant.

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  • Montrose lay in prison while Charles I.

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  • All that is known of Montrose, in this matter, is that from prison he had written thrice to Charles, and that Charles had intended to show his third letter to Argyll, Hamilton and Lanark, on the very day when they, suspecting a plot, retired into the country (12th of October).

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  • Lanark, from Oxford, fled to join the Covenanters; Charles imprisoned Hamilton in Cornwall; Montrose was made a marquis; Leslie, with a large Scottish force and 4000 horse, besieged Newcastle.

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  • Montrose arrived a day too late for Marston Moor (2nd of July 1644); Rupert took his contingent; he entered Scotland in disguise, met the ill-armed Irish levies under Colkitto, raised the Gordons and Ogilvies, who supplied his cavalry, raised the fighting Macdonalds, Camerons and Macleans; in six pitched battles he routed Argyll and all the Covenanting warriors of Scotland, and then, deserted by Colkitto and the Gordons, and surprised by Leslie's cavalry withdrawn from England, was defeated at Philiphaugh near Selkirk, while men and women of his Irish contingent were shot or hanged months after the battle.

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  • It would have been wiser to put the revenges as reprisals for the undeniable horrors committed by Montrose's Irish levies.

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  • The surrender of Charles to the Scots, the surrender by the Scots of Charles to the English, for £ 200,000 of arrears of pay, with hopes of another f200,000 (February 1647), were among the consequences of Montrose's defeat.

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  • Huntly, as a Royalist, was decapitated at Edinburgh; and the envoys of Charles, thanks to the advice of Montrose, failed to induce him to stamp himself a recreant and a hypocrite by signing any covenants.

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  • But Montrose (January 1650) was sent by Charles to " search his death," as he said, in an expedition to the north of Scotland, while, in the absence of his stainless servant, Charles actually signed the treaty of Breda (1st of May).

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  • In April Montrose was abandoned by his royal master, and was defeated at Carbiesdale, on the south side of the kyle, or estuary, of Shin and Oykel; he was betrayed, insulted, bullied by the preachers, and, going to his death like a bridegroom to the altar, was hanged at Edinburgh, on the 10th of May.

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  • " Great in life, Montrose was yet greater in his death."

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  • Claverhouse, now Viscount Dundee, despairing of his party, and under apprehension of an attack in arms, rode northward Killie- with a handful of horse, and began to play the part of Montrose, while the Convention offered the crown to William and Mary, adding the claim of right to dethrone a king who had infringed the laws.

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  • Through a series of confusions and blunders, Mar prematurely raised on the 16th of September 1715 the standard of King James, and though in command of a much larger army than ever followed Montrose, was baffled by Argyll, who held Stirling with a very small force.

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  • Mar's highlanders began to desert; his council was a confusion of opinions and discontents, and when, after many dangers and in the worst of health, James joined the Jacobites at Perth, it was only to discourage his friends by his gloom, and to share their wintry flight before Argyll to Montrose.

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  • The reward which many of the clansmen of the Peninsula and Waterloo received may be appreciated by those who read the introduction to Scott's Legend of Montrose.

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  • Lang; Miss Shield's King over the Water and Martin Haile's James Francis Stuart (the old Chevalier); Omond's Lord Advocates of Scotland; Willcock's The Great Marquess (of Argyll); Napier's Lives of Montrose and Dundee; Clarke and Foxcroft's Life of Bishop Burnet; Sir Herbert Maxwell's Robert Bruce and Book of Douglas, with all Sir W.

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  • Château Montrose, St Estephe.

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  • The chief British ports for the landing of flax are: - Belfast, Dundee, Leith, Montrose, London and Arbroath, the two former being the chief centres of the flax industry.

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  • It was occupied by the marquess of Montrose prior to the battle of Tippermuir in 1644, stormed by the Cromwellians in 1653, and garrisoned on behalf of James II.

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  • Employing the same unscrupulous and treacherous methods which had proved so fatal to his father, he simultaneously supported and encouraged the expedition of Montrose and the royalists, and negotiated with the covenanters.

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  • In acting thus he did not scruple to desert his own royalist followers, and to repudiate and abandon the great and noble Montrose, whose heroic efforts he was apparently merely using in order to extort better terms from the covenanters, and who, having been captured on the 4th of May, was executed on the 21st in spite of some attempts by Charles to procure for him an indemnity.

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  • He proceeded to Falkland near Perth and passed through Aberdeen, where he saw the mutilated arm of Montrose suspended over the city gate.

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  • Dundes, now Lord Melville, became first lord of the admiralty, and the cabinet further included Lord Camden, Lord Mulgrave and the duke of Montrose.

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  • The burgh unites with Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin and Inverbervie (the Montrose group of burghs) in returning one member to parliament.

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  • 1648), the general whose strategy in opposition to the marquess of Montrose was so diligently stultified by the committee of estates.

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  • The only other important conflict belongs to the Covenanters' time, when the marquess of Montrose was defeated at Philiphaugh in 1645.

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  • The town is under the jurisdiction of a provost, bailies and council, and, with Brechin, Forfar, Inverbervie and Montrose, returns one member to parliament.

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  • Since 1885, when the duke of Montrose constructed a road over the eastern shoulder of Craigmore to join the older road at the entrance of the Trossachs pass, Aberfoyle has become the alternative route to the Trossachs and Loch Katrine.

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  • The castle was burned by the Macleans in 1644, in the interest of the marquess of Montrose, and not again restored.

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  • It contains the outlying villages of Greenwood, Montrose and Boyntonville; and, larger than these, Wakefield, near the centre of the township. In this village is the town hall, the gift of Cyrus Wakefield (1811-1873), and the Beebe Town Library, founded in 1856 as the Public Library of South Reading, and later renamed in honour of Lucius Beebe, a generous patron.

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  • crossed the stream in 1296 with his invading host, and Montrose with the Covenanters in 1640.

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  • Montrose began brightly, but were no doubt stunned when the home side who grabbed the lead after just three minutes.

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  • Recently I was in Montrose to see the 70-year-old concrete suspension bridge which is the only access from the south.

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  • Kris joined Montrose in the middle of January in a swop deal that saw Elliott Smith move to East Fife.

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  • I let the Montrose go (she is heading across toward Wemyss Bay) and await the tardy arrival of Saint Columba.

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