Monte sentence example

monte
  • Monte Venda, their highest peak, is 1890 ft.

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  • Katie pretended to listen as Hannah discussed the Paris fashion show she'd attended and the month in Monte Carlo she'd spend in January to escape the coldest weather.

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  • Names like The Morning Star, The Monte Carlo, The Clipper, The Cottage and The Club were on the west side.

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  • They rolled past South Fork, and 20 miles later, Del Norte, where the lead cadre of bikers hummed their way toward Monte Vista, 14 miles further, and then the final 17 miles to Alamosa.

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  • On the 3rd of July he defeated the Austrians at Monte Saello, on the 7th at Lodzone, on the 10th at Darso, on the 16th at Condino, on the 19th at Ampola, on the 21st at Bezzecca, but, when on the point of attacking Trent, he was ordered by General Lamarmora to retire.

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  • Physically its continuity is broken by Monte Urticu and several smaller hills which rise within it, but these are all composed of volcanic rock and are the remains of Tertiary volcanoes.

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  • Until Trajan formed the port of Centumcellae (Civitavecchia) Ostia was the best harbour along the low sandy coast of central Italy between Monte Argentario and Monte Circeo.

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  • Having received his elementary education at the monastery of Monte Cassino, he studied for six years at the university of Naples, leaving it in his-sixteenth year.

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  • He refused the archbishopric of Naples and the abbacy of Monte Cassino.

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  • Rosas met the allies at the head of a body of troops fully equal in numbers to their own, but was crushingly routed, February 3rd, at Monte Caseros, about io m.

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  • It forms, like Giglio and Monte Cristo, part of a sunken mountain range extending towards Corsica and Sardinia.

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  • The northern portion, measured from the Alps at the Monte Viso to the mouth of the Po, has a breadth of about 270 m., while the maximum breadth, from the Rocca Chiardonnet near Susa to a peak in the valley of the Isonzo, is 354 m.

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  • Below Aosta also the Dora Baltea receives several considerable tributaries, which descend from the glaciers between Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa.

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  • Or the west side of the lake the Toccia or Tosa descends from the pass of the Gries nearly due south to Domodossola, where it receives the waters of the Doveria from the Simplon, and a few miles lower down those of the Val d'Anzasca from the foot of Monte Rosa, and 12 m.

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  • The Oglio, a more considerable stream than either of the last two, rises in the Monte Tonale above Edolo, and descends through the Val Camonica to Lovere, where it expands into a large lake, called Iseo from the town of that name on its southern shore.

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  • As they extend towards the east they increase in elevation; the Monte Bue rises to 5915 ft., while the Monte Cimone, a little farther east, attains 7103 ft.

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  • The highest point in this part of the range is the Monte Falterona, above the sources of the Arno, which attains 5410 ft.

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  • Beginning from the group called the Alpi della Luna near the sources of the Tiber, which attain 4435 ft., they are continued by the Monte Nerone (5010 ft.), Monte Catria (5590), and Monte Maggio to the Monte Pennino near Nocera (5169 ft.), and thence to the Monte della Sibilla, at the source of the Nar or Nera, which attains 7663 ft.

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  • Proceeding thence southwards, we find in succession the Monte Vettore (8128 ft.), the Pizzo di Sevo (7945 ft.), and the two great mountain masses of the Monte Corno, commonly called the Gran Sasso d'Italia, the most lofty of all the Apennines, attaining to a height of 9560 ft., and the Monte della Maiella, its highest summit measuring 9170 ft.

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  • These are the Monte Terminillo, near Leonessa (7278 ft.), and the Monte Velino near the Lake Fucino, rising to 8192 ft., both of which are covered with snow from November till May.

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  • Thus the Gran Sasso and the Maiella are separated by the deep valley of the Aterno, while the Tronto breaks through the range between Monte Vettore and the Pizzo di Sevo.

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  • Another lateral rsnge, the Prato Magno, which branches off from the central chain at the Monte Falterona, and separates the upper valley of the Arno from its second basin, rises to 5188 ft.; while a similar branch, called the Alpe di Catenaja, of inferior elevation, divides the upper course of the Arno from that of the Tiber.

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  • The rest of this tract is for the most part a hilly, broken country, of moderate elevation, but Monte Amiata, near Radicofani, an isolated mass of volcanic origin, attains a height of 5650 ft.

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  • This volcanic tract extends across the Campagna of Rome, till it rises again in the lofty group of the Alban hills, the highest summit of which, the Monte Cavo, is 3160 ft.

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  • Besides these offshoots of the Apennines there are in this part of Central Italy several detached mountains, rising almost like islands on the seashore, of which the two most remarkable are the Monte Argentaro on the coast of Tuscany near Orbetello (2087 ft.) and the Monte Circello (1771 ft.) at the angle of the Pontine Marshes, by the whole breadth of which it is separated from the Volscian Apennines.

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  • The Arno, which has its source in the Monte Falterona, one of the most elevated summits of the main chain of the Tuscan Apennines, flows nearly south till in the neighborhood of Arezzo it turns abruptly north-west, and pursues that course as far as Pontassieve, where it again makes a sudden bend to the west, and pursues a westerly course thence to the sea, passing through Florence and Pisa.

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  • The Nera, which rises in the lofty group of the Monte della Sibilla, is a considerable stream, and brings with it the waters of the Velino (with its tributaries the Turano and the Salto), which joins it a few miles below its celebrated waterfall at Terni.

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  • On the east side in like manner the Monte Gargano (3465 ft.), a detached limestone mass which projects in a bold spur-like promontory into the Adriatic, forming the only break in the otherwise uniform coast-line of Italy on that sea, though separated from the great body of the Apennines by a considerable interval of low country, may be considered as merely an outlier from the central mass.

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  • From the neighborhood of Potenza, the main ridge of the Apennines is continued by the Monti della Maddalena in a direction nearly due south, so that it approaches within a short distance of the Gulf of Policastro, whence it is carried on as far as the Monte Pollino, the last of the lofty summits of the Apennine chain, which exceeds 7000 ft.

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  • The Monte Volture, which rises in the neighborhood of Melfi and Venosa to 4357 ft., is of volcanic origin, and in great measure detached from the adjoining mass of the Apennines.

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  • Proceeding south from the Trigno, already mentioned as constituting the limit of Central Italy, there are (1) the Biferno and (2) the Fortore, both rising in the mountains of Samnium, and flowing into the Adriatic west of Monte Gargano; (3) the Cervaro, south of the great promontory; and (4) the Ofanto, the Aufidus of Horace, whose description of it is characteristic of almost all the rivers of Southern Italy, of which it may be taken as the typical representative.

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  • South of Elba are the equally insignificant islets of Pianosa and Montecristo, while the more considerable island of Giglio lies much nearer the mainland, immediately opposite the mountain promontory of Monte Argentaro, itself almost an island.

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  • The lakes of Bolsena (Vulsiniensis), of Bracciano (Sabatinus), of Vico (Ciminus), of Albano (Albanus), of Nemi (Nemorensis), and other smaller lakes belong to this district; while between its south-west extremity and Monte Circello the Pontine Marshes form a broad strip of alluvial soil infested by malaria.

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  • The Apulian volcanic formation consists of the great mass of Monte Volture, which rises at the west end of the plains of Apulia, on the frontier of Basilicata, and is surrounded by the Apennines on its south-west and north-west sides.

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  • The fortresses in the basin of the Po chiefly belong to the era of divided Italy and are now out of date; the chief coast fortresses are Vado, Genoa, Spezia, Monte Argentaro, Gacta, Straits of Messina, Taranto, Maddalena.

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  • Some Norman adventurers, on pilgrimage to St Michaels shrine on Monte Gargano, lent their swords in 1017 to the Lombard cities of Apulia against the Greeks.

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  • On the 24th he captured Monte Rotondo, but did not enter Rome as the expected insurrection had not broken out.

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  • Among them were John of Monte Corvino, a Franciscan monk, Andrew of Perugia, John Marignioli and Friar Jordanus, who visited the west coast of India, and above all Friar Odoric of Pordenone.

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  • The highest point is the Monte Solaro (1920 ft.) on the west, while at the east end the cliffs rise to a height of 900 ft.

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  • At Langres he discovered Cicero's Oration for Caecina, at Monte Cassino a MS. of Frontinus.

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  • At the foot of the fortress of Mont Dauphin it receives (left) the Guil, which flows through the Queyras valley from near the foot of Monte Viso.

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  • It soon becomes the boundary for a while between the departments of the HautesAlpes and of the Basses-Alpes, and receives successively the considerable Ubaye river, flowing from near the foot of Monte Viso past Barcelonnette (left), and then the small stream of the Luye (right), on which, a few miles above, is Gap. It enters the Basses-Alpes shortly before reaching Sisteron, where it is joined (right) by the wild torrent of the Busch, flowing from the desolate region of the Devoluy, and receives the Bleone (left) (on which Digne, the capital of the department, is situated) and the Asse (left), before quitting the department of the Basses-Alpes just as it is reinforced (left) by the Verdon, flowing from the lower summits of the Maritime Alps past Castellane.

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  • Then appeared, under the influence of the school of law at Pavia, the Liber legis Langobardorum, also called Liber Papiensis (beginning of Tith century), and the Lombarda (end of 11th century) in two forms - that given in a Monte Cassino MS. and known as the Lombarda -Casinensis, and the Lombarda Vulgata.

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  • To the south-east of the lake is the Monte Nuovo, a volcanic hill upheaved in 1538, with a deep extinct crater in the centre.

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  • He accordingly retired into the solitudes of Pietralata, and subsequently founded with some companions under a rule of his own creation the abbey of San Giovanni in Fiore, on Monte Nero, in the massif of La Sila.

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  • The caves of Cotilla near Havana, of Bellamar near Matanzas, of Monte Libano near Guantanamo, and those of San Juan de los Remedios, are the best known, but there are scores of others.

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  • He painted the "Battle of Joshua" in the Quirinal Gallery, the "Crucifixion of St Andrew" in the church of that saint on Monte Cavallo, various works for the Jesuits, some also in co-operation with his brother.

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  • The best crystallized specimens of any mica are afforded by the small brilliant crystals of biotite, which encrust cavities in the limestone blocks ejected from Monte Somma, Vesuvius.

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  • Michel, whence he is also sometimes called Robertus de Monte.

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  • The same architect designed the superb aqueduct by which the city is supplied with water from Monte Francoa, some nine miles off.

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  • Three miles to the N.W., at the foot of the Monte Leano, was the shrine of the nymph Feronia, where the canal following the Via Appia through the marshes ended.

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  • Gubbio is situated at the foot and on the steep slopes of Monte Calvo, from 1568 to 1735'ft.

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  • This was the beginning of a determined struggle for supremacy, carried on for many years, between the different classes of citizens, locally termed ordini or monti - the lower classes striving to grasp the reins of government, the higher classes already in office striving to keep all power in their own hands, or to divide it in proportion to the relative strength of each monte.

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  • From this renewal dates the formation of the new order or monte dei riformatori, the title henceforth bestowed on all citizens, of both the less and the greater people, who had reformed the government and begun to participate in it in 1368.

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  • In spite of its wide basis and great energy, the monte dei riformatori, the heart of the new government, could not satisfactorily cope with the attacks of adverse factions and treacherous allies.

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  • Thus began a new order or monte del popolo, composed of families of the same class as the riformatori, but having had no part in the government during the latter's rule.

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  • Meanwhile the monte of the nine, the chief promoters of the revolution of 1480, were exposed to the growing hatred and envy of their former allies, the monte del popolo, who, conscious of their superior strength and numbers, now sought to crush the noveschi and rise to power in their stead.

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  • The monte del popolo seized the lion's share of the government; the riformatori were recalled, the aggregati abolished and the noveschi condemned to perpetual banishment from the government and the city.

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  • The city then placed itself under the protection of the emperor .Charles V., created a magistracy of "ten conservators of the liberties of the state" (December 1524), united the different monti in one named the "monte of the reigning nobles," and, rejoicing to be rid of the last of the Petrucci, dated their public books, ab instaurata libertate year I., II., and so on.

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  • He sent the celebrated Franciscan missionary, John of Monte Corvino, with some companions to labour among the Tatars and Chinese.

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  • The Palazzo Fodri, now the Monte di Pieta, has a beautiful 15thcentury frieze of terra-cotta bas-reliefs, as have some other palaces in private hands.

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  • The study of Hippocrates, Galen, and other classics was recommended by Cassiodorus (6th century), and in the original mother-abbey of Monte Cassino medicine was studied; but there was not there what could be called a medical school; nor had this foundation any connexion (as has been supposed) with the famous school of Salerno.

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  • Among the earliest were Nicolaus Leonicenus of Vicenza (1428-1524), Giovanni de Monte or Montanus (1498-1552), and many others in Italy.

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  • In this Italy, and especially the renowned school of Padua, took the first step, where Giovanni De Monte (Montanus), (1498-1552), already mentioned as a humanist, gave clinical lectures on the patients in the hospital of St Francis, which may still be read with interest.

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  • It lies at the mouth of a deep ravine, in a sheltered situation, at the foot of Monte Cerreto (4314 ft.), in the centre of splendid coast scenery, and is in consequence much visited by foreigners.

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  • Pietra serena or macigno, a stone of a firm texture also used for building purposes, is quarried at Monte Ceceri below Fiesole.

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  • The old systems of raising revenue no longer corresponded to the needs of the republic, and as early as 1336 the various loans made to the state were consolidated into one national debt (monte).

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  • His foreign policy, which was magnificent but expensive, rendered further forced loans necessary, and he also laid hands on the Monte delle Doti, an insurance institution to provide dowries for girls.

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  • The parlamenti were abolished and a monte di pieta to advance money at reasonable interest was created.

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  • Passing northward by Nanking and crossing the Yangtsze-kiang, Odoric embarked on the Great Canal and travelled to Cambalec (otherwise Cambaleth, Cambaluc, &c.) or Peking, where he remained for three years, attached, no doubt, to one of the churches founded by Archbishop John of Monte Corvino, at this time in extreme old age.

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  • In the vicinity are the troglodyte caverns of Monte Scaglioso, still inhabited by some of the lower classes, and other caves with 13thcentury frescoes.

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  • The latter, a man of inferior ability and daring, sold Pisa to the count of Virtu, receiving in exchange 200,000 florins, Piombino, and the islands of Elba, Pianosa and Monte Cristo.

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  • Forbes was also interested in geology, and published memoirs on the thermal springs of the Pyrenees, on the extinct volcanoes of the Vivarais (Ardeche), on the geology of the Cuchullin and Eildon hills, &c. In addition to about 150 scientific papers, he wrote Travels through the Alps of Savoy and Other Parts of the Pennine Chain, with Observations on the Phenomena of Glaciers (1843); Norway and its Glaciers (1853); Occasional Papers on the Theory of Glaciers (1859); A Tour of Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa (1855).

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  • But it is evident that he must have written his work De Eruditione Filiorum Regalium (where he styles himself as "Vincentius Belvacensis, de ordine praedicatorum, qualiscumque lector in monasterio de Regali Monte") after this date and yet before January 1260, the approximate date of his Tractatus Consolatorius.

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  • It contains numerous illustrations; maps of the routes of the ancient aqueducts and the city of Rome in the time of Frontinus; a photographic reproduction of the only MS. (the Monte Cassino); several explanatory chapters, and a concise bibliography, in which special reference is made to P. d Tissot, E tude sur la condition des agrimensores (1879).

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  • This precipice, known as Monte Somma, forms the wall of an ancient prehistoric crater of vastly greater size than that of the present volcano.

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  • The present crater-wall of Monte Somma is doubtless a relic of that time.

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  • The town is finely situated on and between the slopes of the two extremities of the promontory of Monte Conero, Monte Astagno to the S., occupied by the citadel, and Monte Guasco to the N., on which the cathedral stands (300 ft.).

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  • It is true that the Florentine Simone Sigoli, who visited Cairo in 1384, in his Viaggio al Monte Sinai still speaks of "Presto Giovanni" as a monarch dwelling in India; but it is the India which is conterminous with the dominions of the soldan of Egypt, and whose lord is master of the Nile, to close or open its discharge upon Egypt.

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  • Seen from the Adriatic, Monte Corno, as it is someti, mes called, from its resemblance to a horn, affords a magnificent spectacle; the Alpine region beneath its summit is still the home of the wild boar, and here and there are dense woods of beech and pine.

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  • The group has numerous other lofty peaks, of which the chief are the Pizzo d Intermesole (8680 ft.), the Corno Piccolo (8650 ft.), the Pizzo Cefalone (8307 ft.) and the Monte della Portella (7835 ft.).

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  • Entering the army as captain in 1859 he fought through the campaign of 1866 with the rank of major-general, leading his brigade into action at Custozza and being wounded at Monte Torre.

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  • Near the cathedral is the monte de piedad, or government pawnshop, endowed in 1775 by Pedro Romero de Terreros (conde de Regla) with £75,000, and at one time carrying on a regular banking business including the issue of banknotes.

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  • Afterwards giving up the direction of these, he migrated to Monte Cassino and there established the monastery which became the centre whence his Rule and institute spread.

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  • From Monte Cassino he founded a monastery at Terracina.

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  • There is some ground for believing that it was the third-abbot of Monte Cassino who began to spread a knowledge of the Rule beyond the circle of St Benedict's own foundations.

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  • About 580-590 Monte Cassino was sacked by the Lombards, and the community came to Rome and was established in a monastery attached to the Lateran Basilica, in the centre of the ecclesiastical world.

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  • In 150o the Portuguese Pedro Alvarez Cabral, while on his way to the East Indies, sighted the coast of Brazil at Monte Pascoal in the Aimores, and took formal possession.

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  • On the south, east and west, these ranges, though wild and rugged, are of no great elevation, but on the north the Pyrenees attain their greatest altitude in the peaks of Aneto (11,168 ft.) and Monte Perdido (10,998 ft.) - also known as Las Tres Sorores, and, in French, as Mont Perdu.

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  • Melfi is picturesquely situated on the lower slopes of Monte Vulture, 1J91 ft.

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  • The Waldensian valleys lie to the south-west of Turin, in the direction of Monte Viso, but include no high or snowy mountains, while the glens themselves are (with one or two exceptions) fertile and well wooded.

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  • In quick succession he acted as chief-of-staff of the 4th Division, and commanded the 74th Infantry Regiment on Monte Sabotino.

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  • After the capture of Monte Kuk and Monte Vodice this appointment was confirmed, and he received another step of promotion.

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  • Calogera, called Monte Castellaccio, is a Cyclopean wall, about 66 ft.

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  • We have seen St Benedict evangelizing the pagan population round Monte Cassino; and a considerable time each day is assigned to the reading of the Fathers.

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  • The highest point (Monte Calvo) is 3465 ft.

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  • The modern village, which was called Monte Fortino until 1870, owes its present name to an unwarrantable identification of the site with the ancient Volscian Artena, destroyed in 404 B.C. Another Artena, which belonged to the district of Caere, and lay between it and Veii, was destroyed in the period of the kings,and its site is quite unknown.

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  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.

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  • In that year the monastery of Monte Cassino was founded in the West, while the school of Athens was closed in the East.

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  • Learning flourished at Monte Cassino under the rule of the Abbot Desiderius (afterwards Pope Victor III.).

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  • Giovanni in Monte, Bologna; and Francia, on inspecting it, took so much to heart his own inferiority, at the advanced age of about sixty-six, to the youthful Umbrian, that he sickened and shortly expired on the 6th of January 1517.

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  • The Mistecas, or Mixtecas, and Zapotecas, who occupy the southern slopes of the central plateau, especially Puebla, Morelos, Oaxaca and Guerrero, form another distinct race, whose traditional history goes back to the period when the structures now known as Mitla, Monte Alban, Xochicalco and Zaachila were built.

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  • He became a monk of Monte Cassino, was taken to Rome by Urban II., and made chancellor and cardinal-deacon of Sta Maria in Cosmedin.

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  • The count of Monte Verde, the Bourbon governor, had little difficulty in defeating Miranda, and on the 26th of July the general capitulated on condition that he should be deported to the United States.

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  • His rule was diffused with miraculous rapidity from the parent foundation on Monte Cassino through the whole of western Europe, and every country witnessed the erection of monasteries far exceeding anything that had yet been seen in spaciousness and splendour.

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  • In later times the place became a municipium, and unimportant Roman remains still exist upon the hill known as Monte di Canne.

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  • Just within the frontier of Lucania rises Monte Pollino, 7325 ft., the highest peak in the southern Apennines.

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  • For all that, St Celestine, during his brief tenure of the papacy, tried to spread his ideas among the Benedictines, and induced the monks of Monte Cassino to adopt his idea of the monastic life instead of St Benedict's; for this purpose fifty Celestine monks were introduced into Monte Cassino, but on Celestine's abdication of the papacy the project fortunately was at once abandoned.

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  • The principal peaks in the Julian Alps are the Monte Canin (8469 ft.), the Manhart (8784 ft.), the Jalouc (8708 ft.), the Krn (7367 ft.), the Matajur (5386 ft.), and the highest peak in the whole range, the Triglav or Terglou (9394 ft.).

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  • Behind is a range of hills, the most conspicuous of which, the Monte Nero, is crowned by a frequented pilgrimage church and also by villas and hotels, to which a funicular railway runs.

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  • To the north lies the highest point of the Monte Gargano (3460 ft.).

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  • Soon he entered a monastery on the lake of Como, and before 782 he had become an inmate of the great Benedictine house of Monte Cassino, where he made the acquaintance of Charlemagne.

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  • In 787 he returned to Italy and to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 13th of April in one of the years between 794 and 800.

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  • He executed this after his return to Monte Cassino, and it was largely used in the Frankish churches.

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  • Among these, Torquemada, Rodericus Sancius de Arevalo, Capistrano and Piero del Monte were especially active for the restoration of the papacy.

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  • After a protracted conclave Giovanni Maria del Monte was elected, on the 7th of February 1550, as Pope Julius III.

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  • From a point between Curzola and the north shore of the spur of Monte Gargano there is a ridge giving shallower water, and a broken chain of a few islets extends across the sea.

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  • The deepest part of the sea lies east of Monte Gargano, south of Ragusa, and west of Durazzo, where a large basin gives depths of 500 fathoms and upwards, and a small area in the south of this basin falls below 800.

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  • A great portion of Istria belongs to the Karst region, and is occupied by the so-called Istrian plateau, flanked on the north and east by high mountains, which attain in the Monte Maggiore an altitude of 4573 ft.

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  • The cathedral, erected between 1298 and 1448 on Monte Taber, an oval hill which forms the highest point of the Rambla, is one of the finest examples of Spanish Gothic; although it is not designed on a great scale and some parts have been freely modernized.

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  • As its remains testify, the Roman city occupied Monte Taber.

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  • To the east this plain stretches in an unbroken level, as far as the eye can follow it, towards Venice and the Adriatic; on the southern side the line of the Apennines from Bologna to Genoa closes the view; to the west rise the Maritime, Cottian and Graian Alps, with Monte Viso as their central point; while northward are the Pennine, Helvetic and Rhaetian Alps, of which Monte Rosa, the Saasgrat and Monte Leone are the most conspicuous features.

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  • From the Rocher des Trois Eveques the watershed runs due north for a long distance, though of the two loftiest peaks of this region one, the Aiguille de Chambeyron (11,155 ft.), is just to the west, and the other, the Monte Viso (12,609 ft.), is just to the east of the watershed.

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  • Thence after a short dip to the south-east, our chain takes near the Great St Bernard Pass the generally eastern direction that it maintains till it reaches Monte Rosa,whence it bends northwards, making one small dip to the east as far as the Simplon Pass.

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  • But, though it rises in a number of lofty peaks, such as the Mont Velan (12,353 ft.), the Matterhorn (14,782 ft.), the Lyskamm (14,889 ft.), the Nord End of Monte Rosa (15,132 ft.), and the Weissmies (13,226 ft.), yet many of the highest points of the region, such as the Grand Combin (14,164 ft.), the Dent Blanche (14,318 ft.), the Weisshorn (14,804 ft.), the true summit or Dufourspitze (15,217 ft.) of Monte Rosa itself, and the Dom (14,942 ft.), all rise on its northern slope and not on the main watershed.

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  • Thence to the St Gotthard the divide runs north-east, all the higher summits (including the Monte Leone, 11,684 ft., and the Pizzo Rotondo, 10,489 ft.) rising on it, a curious contrast to the long stretch just described.

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  • As a proof of the rapidly-growing activity of Englishmen, it may be pointed out that while before 1858 only four summits (the Miterhorn, or central peak of the Wetterh6rner, the highest point of Monte Rosa, Laquinhorn and Pelmo) were first ascended by Englishmen, in the case of the second list only five (Grand Combin,Wildspitze,Marmolata, Langkofel and Meije) were not so conquered (if the present writer, an American, be included among the English pro hac vice).

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  • The hills on the right bank Geology, of the Tiber culminating in Monte Mario (455 ft.) belong to the first of these, being of the Pliocene formation; they consist of a lower bluish-grey clay and an upper group of yellow sands and gravels.

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  • This clay since Roman times has supplied the material for brick-making, and the valleys which now separate the different summits (Janiculum, Vatican, Monte Mario) are in considerable measure artificial.

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  • The Alban Mount (Monte Cavo) is almost the highest point on the rim of the inner crater, while Mount Algidus and Tusculum are on the outer ring wall of the larger (earlier) crater.

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  • Bola and Pedum were probably in the same neighbourhood, Labici on an outlying summit (Monte Compatri) of the Alban Hills below Tusculum, and Corbio (probably at Rocca Priora) on a rocky summit east of the same city.

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  • Corniculum, farther west, stood on the summit of one of three conical hills that rise abruptly out of the plain at the distance of a few miles from Monte Gennaro, the nearest of the Apennines, and which were thence known as the Montes Corniculani.

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  • The cities of the Latin league continued to hold general meetings or assemblies from time to time at the grove of the Aqua Ferentina, a sanctuary at the foot of the Alban Hills, perhaps in a valley below Marino, while they had also a common place of worship on the summit of the Alban Mount (Monte Cavo), where stood the celebrated temple of Jupiter Latiaris.

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  • Sinuessa, on the sea-coast between the Liris (Garigliano) and the Vulturnus, at the foot of the Monte Massico, was the last town in Latium according to the official use of the term and was sometimes assigned to Campania, while Suessa was more assigned to Latium.

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  • Living as a hermit on Monte Morrone near Sulmone in the Abruzzi, he attracted other ascetics about him and organized them into a congregation of the Benedictines which was later called the Celestines.

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  • At the dissolution of monasteries in 1866 Monte Cassino was spared, owing mainly to a remonstrance by English well-wishers of United Italy.

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  • Partly from the olive trees that abound there, and partly out of devotion to the Passion, Accona was christened Monte Oliveto, whence the order received its name.

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  • It occupies a ridge or promontory, which juts out into the Adriatic Sea, under the bare limestone mass of Monte Sergio.

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  • Between the seaward ridge and the mountain, the Stradone, or main street, runs along a narrow valley which, until the 13th century, was a marshy channel, dividing the Latin island of Ragusa from the Slavonic settlement of Dubrovnik, on the lower slopes of Monte Sergio.

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  • Among other modern thoroughfares, the Via di Circonvallazione a Monte, laid out since 1876 on the hills at the back of the town, leads by many curves from the Piazza Manin along the hill-tops westward, and finally descends into the Piazza Acquaverde; its entire length is traversed by an electric tramway, and it commands magnificent views of the town.

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  • Typical cemeteries are those of Monte Finocchito near Noto, of Noto itself, of Pantalica and of Leontini.

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  • The oldest is Aime or Amato of Monte Cassino, who exists only in an Old-French translation.

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  • Falling ill at the synod, Vicar returned to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 16th of September 1087.

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  • Victor III., while abbot of Monte Cassino contributed personally to the literary activity of the monastery.

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  • Six miles to the south is the large Benedictine monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, founded in 1320, famous for the frescoes by Luca Signorelli (1497-1498) and Antonio Bazzi, called Sodoma (1505), in the cloister, illustrating scenes from the legend of St Benedict; the latter master's work is perhaps nowhere better represented than here.

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  • Their presence has also been traced near Monte Maggiore, in Istria, where such significant family names as Novlian (from Novi), Ottocian (from Ottocac) and Clissan (from Clissa), were noted by Franceschi in 1879.

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  • The river Darro, which foams through a deep ravine on the north, divides the plateau from the Albaicin district of Granada; the Assabica valley, containing the Alhambra Park, on the west and south, and beyond this valley the almost parallel ridge of Monte Mauror, separate it from the Antequeruela district.

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  • The Villa de los Martires (Martyrs' Villa), on the summit of Monte Mauror,commemorates by its name the Christian slaves who were employed to build the Alhambra, and confined here in subterranean cells.

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  • The Torres Bermejas (Vermilion Towers), also on Monte Mauror, are a well-preserved Moorish fortification, with underground cisterns, stables, and accommodation for a garrison of 200 men.

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  • Several Roman tombs were discovered in 1829 and 1857 at the base of Monte Mauror.

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  • Of the later itineraries the Descriptio terrae sanctae,, by the Dominican Burchardus de Monte Sion, enjoyed the widest vogue.

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  • In 1303 Lodovicus de Bello Monte, prebendary of Salisbury, obtained a grant of a Saturday market at the manor of Caine, and a three days' fair at the feast of St Mary Magdalene; the latter was only abandoned in the 19th century.

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  • A week later some hundreds of insurgents attacked the powder magazine at San Juan del Monte, but were completely routed.

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  • The province is as a whole mountainous, the highest point being the Monte Pollino (7325 ft.) on the boundary of the province of Cosenza, while the Monte Vulture, at the N.W.

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  • Between the Val Lagarina and the Vallarsa and along the Val Terragnolo the Italian lines formed a dangerously exposed salient, running down from the high slopes and completely dominated by the Austrian guns on Monte Biaena, Monte Ghello, Monte Finonchio and the Folgaria plateau.

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  • The forward lines on Monte Armentera and Monte Salubio were poorly adapted for defence, but had been strongly fortified, while the line east of the Maso torrent, which Cadorna had indicated as the main line of defence, had undergone little preparation.

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  • But the main line between the Posina and the Astico, which ran by Monte Maggio (5,730ft.), Monte Toraro (6,1.75 ft.), Campomolon (6,030 ft.) and Spitz Tonezza (5,512 ft.), was not satisfactory for defensive purposes.

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  • The Ancona Bde., freshly come into line, lay from Monte Maggio to Campomolon, while the Cagliari Bde.

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  • Against the forward line between Monte Maronia and Soglio d'Aspio the Austrian attack made no headway at first, the Cagliari Bde.

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  • Here, too, practically nothing had been done to prepare the reserve positions, and owing to a mistaken order the retiring troops had not occupied Monte Pasubio, the key position now that Col Santo had gone.

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  • The 35th Div., with its reinforcements from the 9th, came back to the line Monte Aralta (south of the Posina) - Monte Cimone - Barcarola, but the Italian centre was now broken.

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  • On May 21 the order was given to retire to the line Monte Verena - Cima di Campolongo, and the stay on this line was short.

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  • Stiff fighting took place beneath Soglio di Campiglia and Pria Fora, and the Italians withdrew to the mountain line which had been hastily prepared from Forni Alti by Monte Spin to Pria Fora.

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  • Retiring on the night of May 29, the troops that were to fall back upon Pria Fora lost their way in the dark and kept too far south, halting on Monte Ciove, the ridge that joins Pria Fora to Monte Novegno and Monte Brazome.

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  • Although the Grenadiers finally lost the summit of Cengio, they held on to the lower slopes above Schiri, and Dankl was unable to make headway in the valley, while the right of the division was swung back to the western slopes of Monte Pau.

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  • After four days' heavy fighting east of the Campomulo valley and towards the head of the Val Frenzela, on the evening of June 8 the Italian right on Monte Castelgomberto was forced to retire from the summit of the mountain, but no ground was lost towards the Val Frenzela.

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  • On June 15 the Austrian command issued an army order saying that Monte Lemerle would fall in two days, and that only three mountains blocked the way to Milan.

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  • The Archduke Charles made his last infantry attack on June 14, at the close of three days' heavy fighting for Monte Ciove, in which the Cagliari Bde.

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  • Petitti had established his divisional command far forward on Monte Novegno, where it came under the heaviest shell-fire.

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  • The last Austrian blow was struck on June 18, south of Monte Lemerle, in vain, when already the first move of the Italian counter-attack had taken place.

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  • The line chosen by Krauss ran from south of Rovereto in front of Col Santo to the Borcola Pass; thence along the rim of the Arsiero plateau, north of the Posina and east of the Upper Astico; thence north-eastward across the Val d'Assa to Monte Mosciagh, and thence northward to the old frontier.

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  • Farther south, repeated attempts were made to retake Monte Cimone, which the Archduke Charles had wished to abandon, but which Krauss insisted should be held.

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  • Although Alpine troops gained a footing north of the summit they were subsequently blown off by a mine, and Monte Cimone, which rises sheer-sided, like a vast battleship, between the Astico and the Rio Freddo, completely dominating the Arsiero basin, remained in Austrian hands.

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  • At length want of provisions forced him into the plain, and there by the river Sarno, almost in sight of Pompeii, was fought (553) a battle which is generally named from the overlooking range of Mons Lactarius (Monte Lettere).

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  • It is situated on the Gulf of Quarnero in a sheltered position at the foot of the Monte Maggiore (4580 ft.), and is surrounded by beautiful woods of laurel.

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  • Among the most important are the Sacro Monte (1486) at Varallo in Piedmont, and those at Guimiliau (1581), Plougastel (1602), St Thegonnec (1610), and Pleyben near Quimper (1670), in Brittany, all in good preservation.

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  • The great Benedictine abbey of Fulda occupies the place in the ecclesiastical history of Germany which Monte Cassino holds in Italy, St Gall in South Germany, Corvey in Saxony, Tours in France and Iona in Scotland.

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  • Between Monte Rombon and Monte San Gabriele,, Capello had some 2,200 guns and nearly Boo trench mortars.

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  • Corps, whose left wing held the Plezzo basin and was in contact with the Carnia Force on Monte Rombon.

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  • On the right of the XXVII., holding the line as far as the Sella di Dol between Monte Santo and Monte San Gabriele, were Caviglia's XXIV.

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  • The Gorizia sector, from Monte Santo to the Vippacco, was occupied by the VI.

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  • This line, running up to Monte Plezia, had been held, until the eve of the battle, by a Bersaglieri brigade which formed the extreme right wing of the IV.

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  • Only one battalion, however, was placed on Monte Plezia; the rest of this regiment (the 76th) lay at Passo di Zagradan, high upon the ridge to the west, and the other regiment of the brigade (the 75th), together with the brigade command, was nearly three m.

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  • A gallant detachment (Alpini and details of the Etna brigade), finding retreat impossible, held out for days on Monte Nero till the battle had gone far to the W., and all their food and ammunition were gone.

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  • The occupation of Caporetto threatened to open another route nearly as short, but the possession of Monte Maggiore and the Stol, together with Monte Matajur, gave good hope that the advance of the enemy might be quickly brought to a halt when it had outrun the protecting fire of its own guns.

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  • Cadorna ordered the Carnia force to occupy Monte Maggiore and block the Val d'Uccea " at all costs," and sent up a division to support the troops on the Stol.

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  • He gave orders for resistance to be made on three successive lines, but all of these radiated from Monte Maggiore, which was the key position.

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  • Krauss was pressing upon the Stol, and finding a weak resistance; the Potenza brigade was falling back from Creda; Monte Matajur had fallen, practically undefended.

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  • Army, was of opinion that he could hold on a line from Monte Maggiore to Monte Carnizza and thence across the valleys to Monte Korada.

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  • Fortunately, the plans for defence had been well and truly laid by Cadorna in the limited time that was available, and, still more fortunately, his foresight had caused elaborate preparations to be made on Monte Grappa.

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  • Nor were the numerous gallant attempts to capture the all-important ridge of Monte Tomba-Monfenera, which ran down from the Grappa massif to the Piave, more successful in breaking through the thin Italian lines.

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  • The attacking columns reached the crest of Monte Tomba, but their bolt was shot; and Monfenera still held firm and raked their left flank.

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  • Conrad and Krauss continued their attempts to break through on the mountain front, but Krauss confined his efforts to the positions west of Monte Grappa and the worrying Solarolo salient.

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  • Next day, by a skilfully conducted attack following a liberal use of gas shells, he pinched up the Meletta-Badenecche salient, occupying both Tondarecar and Badenecche and taking Monte Fior and Castelgomberto in the rear.

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  • The salient was quickly wiped out, several thousand prisoners were taken, and both Col del Rosso and Monte Melago were captured.

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  • He opened his attack on Dec. z i by a push on each wing of his front, from the Brenta valley and Monte Pertica against Col della Berretta, and against both sides of the Solarolo salient.

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  • Four days more, and Krauss's men had captured Monte Asolone, which looks down the Valle di Santa Felicita to the longed-for haven of the plain.

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  • The recovery of the Italian army on Monte Grappa and the Piave, after the initial failures and the heart-breaking experiences of the long retreat, was a remarkable feat of courage and will.

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  • Two miles to the east in a ravine below Monte Subasio is the hermitage delle Carceri (2300 ft.), partly built, partly cut out of the solid rock, given to St Francis by Benedictine monks as a place of retirement.

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  • He died in 1503 at Naples, where a remarkable group of terra-cotta .figures, life-sized and painted, still adorns his tomb in the church of Monte Oliveto.

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  • In 1824 the Real del Monte mines were sold to an English company and became the centre of a remarkable mining speculation - the company ruining itself with lavish expenditures and discontinuing work in 1848.

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  • Of charitable and reformatory institutions a soldiers' and sailors' home (1889) is maintained at Monte Vista, a school for the deaf and blind (1874) at Colorado Springs, an insane asylum (1879) at Pueblo, a home for dependent and neglected children (1895) at Denver, an industrial school for girls (1887) near Morrison, and for boys (1881) at Golden, a reformatory (1889) at Buena Vista, and a penitentiary (1868) at Canyon City.

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  • Seven miles to the north of Gerz is the Monte Santo (2275 ft.), a muchfrequented place on which stands a pilgrimage church.

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  • The Serra Grandola and Monte Cereal, two low ranges stretching from north to south, skirt the coast of southern Estremadura.

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  • Between the Tagus and Cape St Vincent the principal rivers are the Sado, which is formed by the junction of several lesser streams and flows north-west to the port of Setubal; and the Mira, which takes a similar direction from its headwaters south of Monte Vigia to the port of Villa Nova de Milfontes.

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  • For an account of the Monte Pio Geral, which is a combined bank, pawnbroking establishment and benefit society, see Pawnbroking; the deposits in the Monte Pio and the State Savings Bank amounted in 1910 to some £5,228,000.

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  • The order of Passionist Fathers, the full title of which is the "Congregation of the Discalced Clerks of the Most Holy Cross and Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ," was founded by St Paul of the Cross (Paolo della Croce, 16941 7 75; canonized 1867) in 1720, but full sanction was not obtained for the order till 1737, when the first monastery was established at Monte Argentario, Orbetello.

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  • He accompanied Massena to Genoa, and acted as his principal lieutenant throughout the protracted siege of that city, during which he operated with a detached force without the walls, and after many successful actions he was wounded and taken prisoner at Monte Cretto on the 13th of April 1800.

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  • This hill, partly natural and partly artificial, was once the site of a Roman fortification, and in old records is known as Moaldes, Monhault, or Monthault (de monte alto).

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  • When health failed him, he retired to Monte Pulciano, where from 1607 to 1611 he acted as bishop. In 1610 he published his De Potestate summiPontificis in rebus temporalibus directed against the posthumous work of William Barclay of Aberdeen, which denied the temporal power of the pope.

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  • It is situated on the west coast of Istria, and possesses an interesting cathedral, built on the summit of the promontory Monte di Sant' Eufemia.

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  • Arriving at Tabriz, then the chief city of Mongol Persia, and indeed of all Western Asia, Monte Corvino moved down to India to the Madras region or " Country of St Thomas, " from which he wrote home, in December 1291 (or 1292), the earliest noteworthy account of the Coromandel coast furnished by any Western European.

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  • On the north slope of this peninsula, where the plain ends and the coast abruptly bends to the west, stands the town of Castellammare, near the site of Stabiae, at the foot of Monte Sant' Angelo, which rises suddenly from the sea to a height of 4722 ft.

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  • Farther west, on the coast, and provided with a convenient harbour, stands Pozzuoli (Puteoli), a city containing many Roman remains, but now chiefly remarkable for the large gunworks erected by Messrs Armstrong & Co.; and beyond it, round the Bay of Baiae, are Monte Nuovo, a hill thrown up in a single night in September 1538; the classic site of Baiae; the Lucrine Lake; Lake Avernus; the Lake of Fusaro (Acherusia Palus); the Elysian t Fields; and the port and promontory of Misenum.

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  • Giuseppe, Monte Calvario, Avvocata, Stella, San Carlo all' Arena, Vicaria, San Lorenzo, Mercato, Pendino and Porto, but also the suburban districts of Vomero, Posilipo, Fuorigrotta, Miano and Piscinola, has been built over in every direction, one great incentive being the creation of an industrial zone to the eastward of the city.

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  • New styles were devised to express this new relation; thus the abbot of Monte Cassino was called abbas abbatum, while the chiefs of other orders had the titles abbas generalis, or magister or minister generalis.

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  • A neolithic settlement and necropolis were discovered in 1897 at the foot of Monte Pellegrino, on the N.E.

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  • Monte Pellegrino Arenella quasanta Harbour Cast 1 ammare orta Felice lie themselves prove their date.

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  • These all lie on to the south of the city, towards the hill called Monte Griffone (Griffon-Greek), and the Giant's Cave, which has furnished rich stores for the palaeontologist.

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  • It also contains many villas of the wealthy inhabitants of Palermo, among the most beautiful of which is La Favorita, at the foot of Monte Pellegrino on the west, belonging to the Crown.

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  • Monte Alegre reaches an altitude of several hundred feet.

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  • The highest point (the Monte Bue) reaches 59'5 ft.

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  • The range is crossed by several railways - the line from Savona to Turin (with a branch at Ceva for Acqui), that from Genoa to Ovada and Acqui, the main lines from Genoa to Novi, the junction for Turin and Milan (both of which 2 pass under the Monte dei Giovi, the ancient Mons Ioventius, by which the ancient Via Postumia ran from Genua to Dertona), and that from Spezia to Parma under the pass of La Cisa.

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  • The highest point of the chain is Monte Cimone (7103 ft.).

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  • The highest point is the Monte Nerone (501 o ft.).

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  • To the north are the Monti Sibillini, the highest point of which is the Monte Vettore (8128 ft.).

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  • Farther south three parallel chains may be traced, the westernmost of which (the Monti Sabini) culminates to the south in the Monte Viglio (7075 ft.), the central chain in the Monte Terminillo (7260 ft.), and farther south in the Monte Velino (8160 ft.), and the eastern in the Gran Sasso d'Italia (9560 ft.), the highest summit of the Apennines, and the Maiella group (Monte Amaro, 9170 ft.).

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  • In the southern Apennines, to the south of the Sangro valley, the three parallel chains are broken up into smaller groups; among them may be named the Matese, the highest point of which is the Monte Miletto (6725 ft.).

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  • The promontory of Monte Gargano, on the east, is completely isolated, and so are the volcanic groups near Naples.

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  • The highest point is the Monte Pollino (7325 ft.).

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  • The range produces no minerals, but there are a considerable number of good mineral springs, some of which are thermal (such as Bagni di Lucca, Monte Catini, Monsummano, Porretta, Telese, &c.), while others are cool (such as Nocera, Sangemini, Cinciano, &c.), the water of which is both drunk on the spot and sold as table water elsewhere.

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  • The city occupies a narrow sandy peninsula, which terminates on the northern or seaward side in a lofty mass of sandstone, Monte Urgull; it is flanked on the east by the estuary of the river Urumea, on the west by the broad bay of La Concha.

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  • The old town, rebuilt after the fire of 1813, lies partly at the foot of Monte Urgull, partly on its lower slopes.

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  • The town lay upon the Monte Varvaro (1345 ft.); considerable remains of its external walls, of houses and of a temple of Demeter are to be seen.

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  • The latter, beginning as a compilation from Robert de Monte and the letters of Foliot, becomes an original authority about 1172, and a contemporary record about 1181.

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  • The highest summit in the province is the Monte Adi (4931 ft.).

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  • It includes the towns of Monaco (3292), Condamine (6218) and Monte Carlo (3794) The principality at one time included Mentone and Roccabruna, now known as Roquebrune, which towns, however, were ceded to France in 1861 for a sum of four million francs.

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  • His first patron was the Marchese Guidubaldo del Monte of Pesaro, a man equally eminent in science, and influential through family connexions.

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  • Galileo received, as the result of a conference between Cardinals Bellarmin and Del Monte, a semi-official warning to avoid theology, and limit himself to physical reasoning.

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  • The central Pyrenees extend eastward from the Port de Canfranc to the valley of Aran, and include the highest summits of the whole chain, Aneto or Pic de Nethou (11,168 ft.), in the Maladetta ridge, Posets (11,047 ft.), and Mont Perdu or Monte Perdido (10,997 ft.).

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  • On the lower slopes of the mountains and on all the parts left uncultivated the prevailing form of vegetation consists of a dense growth of shrubs with thick leathery leaves, such as are known to the French as maquis, to the Italians as macchic, and to the Spaniards as monte bajo,2 shrubs which, however much they resemble each other in external appearance, belong botanically to a great variety of families.

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  • To secure his position he at once entered into relation with the Normans, now firmly established in southern Italy, and later in the year the new alliance was cemented at Melfi, where Nicholas II., accompanied by Hildebrand, Cardinal Humbert and the abbot Desiderius of Monte Cassino, solemnly invested Robert Guiscard with the duchies of Apulia, Calabria and Sicily, and Richard of Aversa with the principality of Capua, in return for 'oaths of fealty and the promise of assistance in guarding the rights of the Church.

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  • The floras which it chiefly resembles are first, that of Monte Bolca, and second, that of the Gres du Soissonais, which latter Gardner thinks may be of the same age, and not earlier, as is generally supposed.

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  • The city is still supplied with water by an aqueduct, to which belongs the huge bridge called the Ponte delle Torri, crossing the ravine which divides the town from the Monte Luco (2723 ft.).

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  • The Monte Luco, which commands a splendid view, has several hermitages upon it.

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  • She darted down the hill, reaching the bottom as a perfectly restored blue '72 Monte Carlo came to a halt.

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  • Andrew blackman monte carlo has one of whom to million almost.

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  • One memorable section set the turbulence of a Full Monte workout against the calm of a trombone chorale.

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  • They started in Monte ' with the perfect antidote for a New Year hangover in the form of a lifeboat drill for everybody.

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  • In the foothills around Monte Toro, at least 4 booted eagles were visible, soaring effortlessly on the thermals.

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  • To the rear of the villa is a small, secluded lawn and a lockable gate leading directly into Monte Carvoeiro.

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  • A new Monte Carlo Markov chain method has the capacity to perform Bayesian phylogenetic inference in a relaxed clock framework.

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  • Man, the satisfaction I got from freaking my wife out with the 2 card monte!

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  • Has been exhausted have become accepted insights quot monte claim would cost.

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  • The upper plots are for data and the lower plots are for two track monte carlo.

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  • This work involves studies of the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm for generating dynamical quarks.

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  • The DC characteristics of the standard devices were then calibrated and modeled using a compound semiconductor Monte Carlo device simulator.

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  • Radio Monte Carlo - Broadcasts from Montevideo, Uruguay, on 930 kHz mediumwave and on 9595 kHz shortwave as well in RealAudio.

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  • Here we use Monte Carlo method to simulate the spectra that may have been measured by the Compton suppression spectrometer.

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  • She meets the wealthy widower Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) in Monte Carlo, where they fall in love and get married.

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  • The highest point in the north-east group of the island (called Gallura) is Monte Limbara (4468 ft.), S.E.

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  • The north-western portion of the island, called the Nurra, lies to the west of Sassari and to the north of Alghero, and is entirely volcanic; so are the mountains to the south of it, near the west coast; the highest point is the Monte Ferru (3448 ft.).

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  • South-west of it, and entirely separated by it from the rest of the island, are the mountain groups to the north and south of Iglesias, the former culminating in the Punta Perda de Sa Mesa or Monte Linas (4 0 55 ft.), and the latter, in the district known as the Sulcis, reaches 3661 ft.

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  • That river has its origin as a mountain torrent descending from two little dark lakes on the north flank of Monte Viso, at a height of more than 6000 ft.

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  • Notwithstanding its extent, the Lago di Garda is not fed by the snows of the high Alps, nor is the stream which enters it at its northern extremity (at Riva) commonly known as the Mincio, though forming the main source of that river, but is termed the Sarca; it rises at the foot of Monte Tonale.

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  • Valerius Messalla, censor in 154 B.C. It ran first up the Anio valley past Varia, and then, abandoning it at the 36th mile, where the Via Sublacensis diverged, ascended to Carseoli (q.v.), and then again to the lofty pass of Monte Bove (4003 ft.), whence it descended again to the valley occupied by the Lago di Fucino.

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  • The monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore is an extensive building of considerable artistic interest, enhanced by frescoes of Signorelli and Sodoma; it is now a national monument occupied by two or three monks as custodians, though it could accommodate three hundred.

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  • Of these the highest is the Monte del Hacko, the ancient Abyla, one of the "Pillars of Hercules," which faces Gibraltar and rises 636 ft.

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  • Philip was sent to his father's childless brother Romolo, a merchant at San Germano, a Neapolitan town near the base of Monte Cassino, to assist him in his business, and with the hope that he might inherit his possessions.

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  • Those whose specialty requires solving stochastic PDEs use the Monte Carlo methods developed at Los Alamos during WWII.

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  • Themes consist of ideas such as; A Night in Paris, Masquerade Ball, Hollywood, Monte Carlo, and many, many more.

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  • Lounge in Monte Carlo or explore ancient Croatia.

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  • This roundtrip cruise leaves from Monte Carlo, Monaco.

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  • Monte Carlo Fan Company - Monte Carlo Fans are engineered by self-proclaimed architects of air and light who work to build the world's greatest ceiling fans.

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  • If you want something a little bit different, give Monte Carlo a good long look.

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  • He lives at the foot of Monte Moro Mountain with the view of a statue from 1866.

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  • Monte Antico's Toscano Red is always a safe bet.

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  • El Monte RV - This national RV rental company has four locations in Texas.

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  • Some joined Serge Diaghilev's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and later made their way to the United States.

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  • Eastpak, whose motto is "Built to Resist" was originally started in 1960 by Monte Goldman to make products such as duffel bags for the military.

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