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monoxide

monoxide

monoxide Sentence Examples

  • with a thesis on the action of carbon monoxide on the blood.

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  • Lead monoxide is dimorphous, occurring as cubical dodecahedra and as rhombic octahedra.

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  • By passing carbon monoxide over heated potassium J.

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  • When kept fused in the presence of air lead readily takes up oxygen, with the formation at first of a dark-coloured scum, and then of monoxide PbO, the rate of oxidation increasing with the temperature.

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  • Cobalt monoxide, CoO, is prepared by heating the hydroxide or carbonate in a current of air, or by heating the oxide C0304 in a current of carbon dioxide.

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  • Titanium monoxide, TiO, is obtained as black prismatic crystals by heating the dioxide in the electric furnace, or with magnesium powder.

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  • The monoxide, PbO, occurs in nature as the mineral lead ochre.

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  • Hot concentrated sulphuric acid also decomposes allantoin, with production of ammonia, and carbon monoxide and dioxide.

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  • In 1862 Fleck passed a mixture of steam, nitrogen and carbon monoxide over red-hot lime, whilst in 1904 Woltereck induced combination by passing steam and air over red-hot iron oxide (peat is used in practice).

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  • In de Lambilly's process air and steam is led over white-hot coke, and carbon dioxide or monoxide removed from the escaping gases according as ammonium formate or carbonate is wanted.

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  • silver oxide is reduced to metallic silver at 170° C., lead dioxide to the monoxide and manganese dioxide to sesquioxide.

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  • Haemoglobin is composed of a basic albumin and an acid substance haematin; it combines readily with oxygen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to form loose compounds.

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  • It ignites when heated in air with the formation of the monoxide; dilute acids convert it into metallic lead and lead monoxide, the latter dissolving in the acid.

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  • A hydrated oxide, 2PbO H 2 O, is obtained when a solution of the monoxide in potash is treated with carbon dioxide.

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  • It is decomposed by acids into a mixture of lead monoxide and dioxide, and may thus be regarded as lead metaplumbate, PbPbO 3.

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  • With dry ammonia at 60° the metal forms strontium ammonium, which slowly decomposes in a vacuum at 20° giving Sr(NH 3) 2; with carbon monoxide it gives Sr(CO) 2; with oxygen it forms the monoxide and peroxide, and with nitric oxide it gives the hyponitrite (Roederer, Bull.

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  • The anhydrous chloride is formed by heating strontium or its monoxide in chlorine, or by heating the hydrated chloride in a current of hydrochloric acid gas.

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  • The sesquichloride, Ru 2 C1 6, is formed when a mixture of chlorine and carbon monoxide is passed over finely divided ruthenium heated to 350° C. (Joly, Comptes rendus, 1892, 114, p. 291).

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  • Accepting the doctrine of the tetravalency of carbon (its divalency in such compounds as carbon monoxide, various isocyanides, fulminic acid, &c., and its possible trivalency in M.

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  • In mining operations explosives are used on a large scale and the powder gases contain large quantities of the very poisonous gas, carbon monoxide, a small percentage of which may cause death, and even a minute percentage of which in the air will seriously affect the health.

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  • For the quantitative determination of cobalt, it is either weighed as the oxide, C0304, obtained by ignition of the precipitated monoxide, or it is reduced in a current of hydrogen and weighed as metal.

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  • Later, while attempting to utilize the gas for the production of electricity by means of a Grove gas battery, he noticed that the carbon monoxide contained in it combined with nickel.

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  • It reduces many metallic oxides, such as lead monoxide and cupric oxide, and decomposes water at a red heat.

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  • Molybdenum combines with oxygen to form many oxides, the most important of which are: the monoxide, MoO.n (H 2 O), the sesquioxide, M0203, the dioxide, MoO 2, and the trioxide, MoO 3.

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  • Molybdenum monoxide, MoO.n(H 2 O), is a black powder obtained when the dichloride is boiled with concentrated potash solution.

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  • The original hypothesis of Baeyer suggested that the course of events is the following: the carbon dioxide is decomposed into carbon monoxide and oxygen, while water is simultaneously split up into hydrogen and oxygen; the hydrogen and the carbon monoxide unite to form formaldehyde and the oxygen is exhaled.

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  • Soc., 1903, p. 420); and by the action of chlorine monoxide on sulphur at low temperature.

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  • Citric acid digested at a temperature below 40° C. with concentrated sulphuric acid gives off carbon monoxide and forms acetone dicarboxylic acid.

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  • Natural gas is found to consist mainly of the lower paraffins, with varying quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, in some cases also sulphuretted hydrogen and possibly ammonia.

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  • Carbon monosulphide, CS, is formed when a silent electric discharge is passed through a mixture of carbon bisulphide vapour and hydrogen or carbon monoxide (S.

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  • It follows therefore that two hydrocarbon radicals are bound to the carbon monoxide residue with the same strength as they combine to form a paraffin.

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  • Carbon monoxide takes part in the syntheses of sodium formate from sodium hydrate, or soda lime (at 200 0 -2 20 0), and of sodium acetate and propionate from sodium methylate and sodium ethylate at 160 0 -200°.

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  • Phosphorus pentachloride decomposes it into carbon monoxide and dioxide, the reaction being the one generally applied for the purpose of preparing phosphorus oxychloride.

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  • Graham showed that gold is capable of occluding by volume 0.48% of hydrogen, 0.20% of nitrogen, 0.29% of carbon monoxide, and 0.16% of carbon dioxide.

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  • Two oxides of the element are definitely known, viz., the dioxide, Te02, and the trioxide, Te03, whilst a monoxide, TeO, has also been described.

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  • Liebreich having apparently shown that it acts upon the blood in the same way as carbon monoxide to form a stable com pound.

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  • Crismer, and others, all conclusively show that acetylene is much less toxic than carbon monoxide, and indeed than coal gas.

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  • When, however, the air is present in much smaller ratio the combustion is incomplete, and carbon, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and water vapour are produced.

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  • Soc., 1903, p. 420); and by the action of chlorine monoxide on sulphur at low temperature.

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  • Two oxides of the element are definitely known, viz., the dioxide, Te02, and the trioxide, Te03, whilst a monoxide, TeO, has also been described.

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  • Although at the present time a marvellous improvement has taken place all round in the quality of the carbide produced, the acetylene nearly always contains minute traces of hydrogen, ammonia, sulphuretted hydrogen, phosphuretted hydrogen, silicon hydride, nitrogen and oxygen, and sometimes minute traces of carbon monoxide and dioxide.

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  • The tetroxide, 0s04, can be easily reduced to the metal by dissolving it in hydrochloric acid and adding zinc, mercury, or an alkaline formate to the liquid, or by passing its vapour, mixed with carbon dioxide and monoxide, through a red-hot porcelain tube.

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  • On heating in hydrogen, ammonia or carbon monoxide, or with carbon or sodium, it is reduced to the metallic state.

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  • Heated at 190-300° in a current of hydrogen it gives the oxide C0304, while at higher temperatures the monoxide is formed, and ultimately cobalt is obtained.

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  • Of especial note are the curious compounds formed by the union of carbon monoxide with platinous chloride, discovered by Paul Schiitzenberger and subsequently investigated by F.

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  • Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and carbon monoxide have the value 1.4; these gases have diatomic molecules, a fact capable of demonstration by other means.

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  • The value of d can be evaluated by considering the combustion of amorphous carbon to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

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  • It is remarkable that the difference in the heats of formation of ketones and the paraffin containing one carbon atom less is 67.94 calories, which is the heat of formation of carbon monoxide at constant volume.

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  • Acids decompose it into lead dioxide and monoxide, and the latter may or may not dissolve to form a salt; red lead may, therefore, be regarded as lead orthoplumbate, Pb2Pb04.

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  • Nitromethane, CH 3 NO 2, is a colourless oil which boils at 101° C. Fuming sulphuric acid decomposes it into carbon monoxide and hydroxylamine.

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  • The charging operation being completed, the temperature is raised, and as a consequence an evolution of carbon monoxide soon begins, and becomes visible by the gas bursting out into the characteristic blue flame.

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  • The reduction is not due to electrolysis, but to the action of carbon on alumina, a part of the carbon in the charge being consumed and evolved as carbon monoxide gas, which burns at the orifice in the cover so long as reduction is taking place.

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  • The monoxide or strontia, Sr(); is formed by strongly heating the nitrate, or commercially by heating the sulphide or carbonate in superheated steam (at about 500-600° C.).

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  • The acid may also be obtained by passing carbon monoxide over a mixture of sodium phenolate and sodium carbonate at 200°C.: Na2C03+ C 6 H 2 ONa+CO = C 7 H 4 O 2 Na 2 -{- HC02Na;and by heating sodium phenolate with ethyl phenyl carbonate to 200° C.: [[Cghso.

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  • Under very great pressures carbon monoxide, steam and nitrogen are the main products, but nitric oxide never quite disappears.

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  • The gases produced by such fire-damp or dust explosions contain carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in large proportion, and the majority of the deaths from such explosions are due to this " after-damp " rather than to the explosion itself.

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  • Balard discovered chlorine monoxide in 1834, investigating its properties and reactions; and his observations on hypochlorous acid and hypochlorites led him to conclude that " bleaching-powder " or " chloride of lime " was a compound or mixture in equimolecular proportions of calcium chloride and hypochlorite, with a little calcium hydrate.

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  • The gaseous mixture obtained by burning guncotton in a vacuum vessel contains steam, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, nitric oxide, and methane.

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  • It is probable that the carbon monoxide seriously affects the general health and vitality of the men, and renders them more likely to succumb to phthisis.

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  • carbon monoxide.

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  • Cobalt burns in nitric oxide at 150° C. giving the monoxide.

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  • As an example of the use of Ostwald's energy-equations for the indirect determination we may take the case of carbon monoxide.

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  • If now it is required to find the heat of formation of the compound CO, which cannot be directly ascertained, we have merely to subtract the second equation from the first, each symbol representing constant intrinsic energy, and thus we obtain C+0 - 00= 26300 cal., or C+0=C0+26300 cal., that is, the heat of formation of a gramme-molecule of carbon monoxide is 26300 cal.

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  • When heated in a current of carbon dioxide it forms the oxychloride CbOC1 3, and carbon monoxide.

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  • "Black damp" consists of accumulations of irrespirable gases, mostly nitrogen, which cause the lights to burn dimly, and the term "white damp" is sometimes applied to carbon monoxide.

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  • The simplest syntheses are undoubtedly those in which a carboxyl group is obtained directly from the oxides of carbon, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.

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  • If now, after a few moments' interval to allow some air to diffuse into the cylinder, a taper again be applied, an explosion takes place, due to a mixture of carbon monoxide and air.

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  • Calcium forms two oxides - the monoxide, CaO, and the dioxide, CaO 2.

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  • The monoxide and its hydrate are more familiarly known as lime (q.v.) and slakedlime.

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  • Exposed to moist air it rapidly oxidizes to the hydroxide; and it burns on heating in air with a yellow flame, yielding the monoxide and dioxide.

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  • The monoxide, Na 2 0, is obtained by heating the metal above 180° in a limited amount of slightly moist oxygen (Holt and Sims, Journ.

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  • Acids yield a sodium salt and free oxygen or hydrogen peroxide; with carbon dioxide it gives sodium carbonate and free oxygen; carbon monoxide gives the carbonate; whilst nitrous and nitric oxides give the nitrate.

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  • of carbon monoxide, 21.2 ccs.

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  • Three oxides of carbon are known, namely, carbon suboxide, C,02, carbon monoxide, CO, and carbon dioxide, C02.

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  • Carbon monoxide, CO, is found to some extent in volcanic gases.

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  • The volume composition of carbon monoxide is established by exploding a mixture of the gas with oxygen, two volumes of the gas combining with one volume of oxygen to form two volumes of carbon dioxide.

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  • Carbon dioxide dissociates, when strongly heated, into carbon monoxide and oxygen, the reaction being a balanced action; the extent of dissociation for varying temperatures and pressures has been calculated by H.

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  • It may be prepared by the direct union of carbon monoxide and chlorine in sunlight (Th.

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  • Suppl., 5, p. 236) by passing carbon monoxide and sulphur vapour through a tube at a moderate heat.

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  • It was found, however, that if the cooling be not sufficiently rapid explosions occurred owing to the combination of the metal with carbon monoxide (produced in the oxidation of the charcoal) to form the potassium salt of hexaoxybenzene.

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  • The monoxide, K 2 0, may be obtained by strongly heating the product or burning the metal in slightly moist air; by heating the hydroxide with the metal: 2KHO+2K= 2K 2 0+H 2; or by passing pure and almost dry air over the molten metal (Kiihnemann, Chem.

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  • Potassium hydroxide or caustic potash, KOH, formerly considered to be an oxide but shown subsequently to be a hydroxide of potassium, may be obtained by dissolving the metal or monoxide in water, but is manufactured by double decomposition from potassium carbonate and slaked lime: K 2 CO 3 -E-Ca(OH) 2 =2KOH+CaC03.

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  • It is a dark yellow powder, which fuses at a high temperature, the liquid on cooling depositing shining tabular crystals; at a white heat it loses oxygen and yields the monoxide.

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  • Exposed to moist air it loses oxygen, possibly giving the dioxide, K 2 0 2; water reacts with it, evolving much heat and giving caustic potash, hydrogen peroxide and oxygen; whilst carbon monoxide gives potassium carbonate and oxygen at temperatures below loo°.

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  • It is obtained by passing ammonia gas over hot coal; by subliming a mixture of ammonium chloride and potassium cyanide; by passing a mixture of ammonia gas and chloroform vapour through a red hot tube; and by heating a mixture of ammonia and carbon monoxide: CO+2NH 3 = NH 4 NC+H 2 0.

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  • When fused with potassium carbonate it yields potassium cyanide; warmed with dilute sulphuric acid it yields hydrocyanic acid, but with concentrated sulphuric acid it yields carbon monoxide: 6H 2 O + K 4 Fe(NC) 6 + 6H 2 SO 4 = 2K 2 SO 4 + FeSO 4 + 3(NH4)2S04 + 6C0.

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  • carbon monoxide is produced, a reaction which finds no parallel in the higher members of the series.

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  • Formates are also produced by the action of moist carbon monoxide on soda lime at 190-220° C. (V.

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  • When heated with zinc dust, tac: acid decomposes into carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

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  • The free acid, when heated with concentrated sulphuric acid, is decomposed into water and pure carbon monoxide; when heated with nitric acid, it is oxidized first to oxalic acid and finally to carbon dioxide.

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  • Concentrated sulphuric acid converts them into sulphates, with simultaneous liberation of carbon monoxide.

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  • It is a liquid which boils in vacuo at 150°, but at 192-195° C. under ordinary atmospheric pressure, with partial decomposition into carbon monoxide and ammonia.

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  • Everybody agrees that carbon is necessary for its appearance, but some believe it to be due to a hydrocarbon, others to carbon monoxide, and others to volatilized carbon.

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  • When heated in a current of carbon monoxide or dioxide, it is converted into oxide, some carbon and cyanogen being formed at the same time.

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  • The operation is essentially a dissociation of alumina into aluminium, which collects at the cathode, and into oxygen, which combines with the anodes to form carbon monoxide, the latter escaping and being burnt to carbon dioxide outside.

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  • Lead peroxide is reduced to the monoxide.

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  • Hydrochloric acid gives thallous chloride and chlorine; sulphuric acid gives off oxygen; and on heating it first gives the trioxide and afterwards the monoxide.

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  • civ., 1881, p. 450) in which barium monoxide is heated in a current of air, forming the dioxide, which when the retorts are exhausted yields up oxygen and leaves a residue of monoxide; but this method is now being superseded, its place being taken by the fractional distillation of liquid air (The Times, Engin.

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  • Ann., 1830, 21, p. 584); or by reducing the higher oxides with hydrogen or carbon monoxide.

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  • It is reduced to the monoxide when heated in a current of hydrogen.

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  • Manganous Sulphide, MnS, found native as manganese glance, may be obtained by heating the monoxide or carbonate in a porcelain tube in a current of carbon bisulphide vapour.

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  • Cerous chloride, CeC1 3, is obtained when the metal is burned in chlorine; when a mixture of cerous oxide and carbon is heated in chlorine; or by rapid heating of the dioxide in a stream of carbon monoxide and chlorine.

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  • The inflammable gas is carbon monoxide, which, however, does not burn with its proper purple flame, but with a flame tinged bright yellow by the sodium present.

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  • This carbon monoxide is formed by the action of coal on the lime, formed at this stage from the original limestone.

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  • When the " candles " of carbon monoxide appear, the pasty mass is quickly drawn out of the furnace into iron " bogies," where it solidifies into a grey, porous mass, the " black-ash."

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  • 18 95, p. 945) has obtained metallic nickel from the Canadian mattes by first roasting them and then eliminating copper by the action of sulphuric acid, the product so obtained being then exposed to the reducing action of producer gas at about 350° C. The reduced metal is then passed into a "volatilizer" and exposed to the action of carbon monoxide at about 80° C., the nickel carbonyl so formed being received in a chamber heated to 180-200° C., where it decomposes, the nickel being deposited and the carbon monoxide returned to the volatilizer.

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  • The monoxide, NiO, occurs naturally as bunsenite, and is obtained artificially when nickel hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate or sulphate is heated.

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  • A hydrated form, Ni 3 0 4 ..2H 2 O, is obtained when the monoxide is fused with sodium peroxide at a red heat and the fused mass extracted with water.

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  • Nickel Salts.-Only one series of salts is known, namely those corresponding to the monoxide.

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  • The monosulphide, NiS, is obtained by heating nickel with sulphur, by heating the monoxide with sulphuretted hydrogen to a red heat, and by heating potassium sulphide with nickel chloride to 160-180° C. When prepared by dry methods it is an exceedingly stable, yellowish, somewhat crystalline mass.

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  • Nickel carbonyl, Ni(CO) 4, is obtained as a colourless mobile liquid by passing carbon monoxide over reduced nickel at a temperature of about 60° C. (L.

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  • Soc., 1904, p. 203) have made an exhaustive study of its reactions, and find that it is decomposed by the halogens (dissolved in carbon tetrachloride) with liberation of carbon monoxide and formation of a nickel halide.

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  • Cyanogen iodide and iodine monoand tri-chloride effect similar decompositions with simultaneous liberation of iodine; sulphuric acid reacts slowly, forming nickel sulphate and liberating hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

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  • The metal is prepared by distilling the carbonate with carbon (an explosive compound similar to that obtained from potassium and carbon monoxide is liable to be formed simultaneously); by reducing the hydroxide with aluminium: 4RbOH+2A1=Rb 2 O Al203+2Rb+2H2 (N.

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  • On the other hand the stability of the known oxygen compounds increases with the atomic weight, thus iodine pentoxide is, at ordinary temperatures, a well-defined crystalline solid, which is only decomposed on heating strongly, whilst chlorine monoxide, chlorine peroxide, and chlorine heptoxide are very unstable, even at ordinary temperatures, decomposing at the slightest shock.

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  • Three oxides are known: chlorine monoxide, Cl 2 0, chlorine peroxide, C102, and chlorine heptoxide, C1207.

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  • Chlorine monoxide results on passing chlorine over dry precipitated mercuric oxide.

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  • Hypochlorous acid is formed when chlorine monoxide dissolves in water, and can be prepared (in dilute solution) by passing chlorine through water containing precipitated mercuric oxide in suspension.

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  • Molten copper absorbs carbon monoxide, hydrogen and sulphur dioxide; it also appears to decompose hydrocarbons (methane, ethane), absorbing the hydrogen and the carbon separating out.

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  • Cuprous oxide is reduced by hydrogen, carbon monoxide, charcoal, or iron, to the metal; it dissolves in hydrochloric acid forming cuprous chloride, and in other mineral acids to form cupric salts, with the separation of copper.

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  • Its solution in hydrochloric acid readily absorbs carbon monoxide and acetylene; hence it finds application in gas analysis.

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  • It carbonizes when heated with strong sulphuric acid, giving, among other products, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

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  • Three oxides of barium are known, namely, the monoxide, BaO, the dioxide, Ba02, and a suboxide, obtained by heating Ba0 with magnesium in a vacuum to 110o (Guntz, loc. cit., 1906, p. 359).

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  • The monoxide is formed when the metal burns in air, but is usually prepared by the ignition of the nitrate, oxygen and oxides of nitrogen being liberated.

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  • It is a greyish coloured solid, which combines very energetically with water to form the hydroxide, much heat being evolved during the combination; on heating to redness in a current of oxygen it combines with the oxygen to form the dioxide, which at higher temperatures breaks up again into the monoxide and oxygen.

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  • Barium hydroxide, Ba(OH) 2, is a white powder that can be obtained by slaking the monoxide with the requisite quantity of water, but it is usually made on the large scale by heating heavy spar with small coal whereby a crude barium sulphide is obtained.

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  • In the Brin process for the manufacture of oxygen, barium dioxide is obtained as an intermediate product by heating barium monoxide with air under pressure.

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  • Barium sulphide, BaS, is obtained by passing sulphuretted hydrogen over heated barium monoxide, or better by fusion of the sulphate with a small coal.

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  • Acad., 1906, p. 587) obtained carbon monoxide and dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and small quantities of oxygen from Weardale specimens by heating.

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  • Many derivatives are known, thus ortho-amino-benzophenone, melting at 106° C., can be obtained by reduction of the corresponding nitro compound; it condenses under the influence of heated lead monoxide to an acridine derivative and with acetone in presence of caustic soda it gives a quinoline.

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  • The chemical reactions are as follows: the treatment of the calcium phosphate with the acid gives phosphoric acid, H 3 PO 4, which at a red heat loses water to give metaphosphoric acid, HP03; this at a white heat reacts with carbon to give hydrogen, carbon monoxide and phosphorus, thus: 2HP06+ 6C= H2 +6CO+P2.

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  • At the temperature of the furnace the silica (sand) attacks the calcium phosphate, forming silicate, and setting free phosphorus pentoxide, which is attacked by the carbon, forming phosphorus and carbon monoxide.

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  • As phosphorus boils at 2 9 0°C. (554° F.), it is produced in the form of vapour, which, mingled with carbon monoxide, passes to the condenser, where it is condensed.

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  • It is reduced when heated with carbon to phosphorus, carbon monoxide being formed simultaneously.

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  • Attempts to eliminate water from this acid and so produce an unsaturated acid were unsuccessful; on warming with sulphuric acid, carbon monoxide is eliminated and cyclo-butanone (keto-tetramethylene) is probably formed.

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  • Confining ourselves to cases where titration methods are not employed, the general order is as follows: carbon dioxide, olefines, oxygen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and nitrogen (by difference).

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  • Carbon monoxide is absorbed by a solution of cuprous chloride in hydrochloric acid or, better, in ammonia.

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  • resultant action may be looked upon as giving a mixture meat by of equal volumes of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, both meatretted of which are inflammable but non-luminous gases.

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  • Coke or anthracite is heated to incandescence by an air blast in a generator lined with fire-brick, and the heated products of combustion as they leave the generator and enter the superheaters are supplied with more air, which causes the combustion of carbon monoxide present in the producer gas and heats up the fire-brick baffles with which the superheater is filled.

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  • The public at first strongly opposed its introduction on the ground of the poisonous properties of the carbon monoxide, which is present in it to the extent of about 28 to 30%.

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  • Still when this comes to be diluted with 60 to 75% of ordinary coal gas, containing as a rule only 4 to 6% of carbon monoxide, the percentage of poisonous monoxide in the mixture falls to below 16%, which experience has shown to be a fairly safe limit.

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  • In all the attempts to make water gas, up to that date, the incandescence of the fuel had been obtained by" blowing "so deep a bed of fuel that carbon monoxide and the residual nitrogen of the air formed the chief products, this mixture being known as" producer "gas.

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  • The effect of this arrangement is that the great body of coal reaches a higher temperature than in an ordinary fireplace, and this, together with the reduction of the carbon dioxide formed immediately above the grate by the red-hot coal in the upper part of the furnace, leads to the formation of carbon monoxide which later on, on the spot where the greatest heat is required, is burned into dioxide by admitting fresh air, preferably pre-heated.

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  • y, the working of the producer would be wrong, as in this case the layer of coke at the front side would be too low, and carbon dioxide would be formed in lieu of monoxide.

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  • The Mond gas in the dry state contains 15% carbon dioxide, io °,o monoxide, 23% hydrogen, 3% hydrocarbons, 49% nitrogen.

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  • Thisas, which is made for 10 or I I minutes, contains from 23 to 32% carbon monoxide, 7 to I 5% carbon dioxide, 2 to 3% hydrogen, a little methane, 64 to 66% nitrogen, and has a heating value of 950 calories per cub.

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  • The water-gas itself is made for 7 minutes, and has an average composition of 3.3% carbon dioxide, 44% carbon monoxide, o 4% methane, 48.6% hydrogen, 3.7% nitrogen, and a heating value of 2970 calories per cub.

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  • The blowing-up gas contains 17 or 18% carbon dioxide and 1.5% oxygen, with mere traces of carbon monoxide.

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  • The water-gas shows 4 to 5% carbon dioxide, 40% carbon monoxide, o 8% methane, 48 to 51% hydrogen, 4 or 5% nitrogen.

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  • 1910, p. 798) by treating iron from ferrous oxalate with carbon monoxide, and heating at 150°, is a pale yellow liquid which freezes at about - 20°, and boils at 102.5°.

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  • The halogens give ferrous and ferric haloids and carbon monoxide; hydrochloric and hydrobromic acids have no action, but hydriodic decomposes it.

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  • A typical member is nitric oxide; carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide may also be put in this class, but it must be remembered that these oxides may be regarded, in some measure at least, as the anhydrides of formic and hyponitrous acid, although, at the same time, it is impossible to obtain these acids by simple hydration of these oxides.

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  • Nitrogen), the mono-, diand trioxides being basic in character, the tetraand pentoxides being acidic and also feebly basic. The monoxide, V 2 0, is formed when the metal is oxidized slowly in air.

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  • In iron-smelting the ore is laid in a heap upon the fuel (charcoal) filling up the hearth, and is gradually brought to the metallic state by the reducing action of the carbon monoxide formed at the tuyere.

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  • Six weeks of smoking abstinence was confirmed by expired carbon monoxide.

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  • Carbon monoxide can escape from any fuel-burning appliance, furnace, water heater, fireplace, woodstove, or space heater.

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  • Gas stunning or killing, using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide.

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  • carbon monoxide inhibits the blood's capacity to carry oxygen.

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  • Cooking ranges, heaters, and charcoal grills also produce carbon monoxide.

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  • The problem is: Diesel engines do not emit enough carbon monoxide to kill anybody.

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  • Carbon monoxide detectors detect carbon monoxide detectors detect carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas with no smell, taste or color.

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  • Know that the products from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons include carbon monoxide.

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  • For live aboard's the use of a solid fuel cabin heater should be treated with caution as all wood smoke contains carbon monoxide.

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  • Red blood cells transport oxygen to body cells and remove carbon monoxide.

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  • Identifies the presence of any gas leaks or poisonous carbon monoxide.

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  • Gas installations can leak deadly carbon monoxide (CO ).

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  • Cars with LPG engines give out 75% less carbon monoxide than normal gasoline engines and its 50% cheaper than gasoline.

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  • Too much carbon monoxide makes a person dead, not drunk.

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  • Reciprocating engines uniformly produce much more carbon monoxide in their exhaust than the modern jet engine.

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  • Intoxication (e.g. carbon monoxide, organophosphates, mushrooms ): drug detected in body fluids.

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  • carbon monoxide poisoning can kill people within a matter of hours.

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  • carbon monoxide detector, you ask?

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  • carbon monoxide emissions maybe slightly higher than in gasoline.

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  • carbon monoxide fumes are believed to have come from a faulty gas fire in the lounge of the premises.

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  • carbon monoxide gas, the amount of infrared light which will pass through the sensing material declines.

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  • carbon monoxide gas exposure is fresh air.

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  • carbon monoxide in expired air was lower when the women used NRT than when they smoked.

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  • carbon monoxide in tobacco smoke exerts a negative effect on the heart by reducing the blood's ability to carry oxygen.

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  • Once inhaled, carbon monoxide combines with oxygen carrying hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin.

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  • combustion of hydrocarbons include carbon monoxide.

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  • Among the latter is chlorine monoxide, which initiates ozone destruction in the presence of sunlight.

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  • Where was our carbon monoxide detector, you ask?

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  • They protect the environment by using oxygen to convert poisonous carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons into harmless carbon dioxide and water.

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  • It may also occur as a result of the toxic effects of manganese, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, and other chemicals.

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  • Carbon monoxide related cerebral edema can cause irreversible damage to the brain which in turn can effect the nervous system.

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  • The concentration of carbon monoxide in exhaled air is then measured.

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  • A blocked flue can lead to carbon monoxide leaking into your home.

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  • Leaflet - ' Preventing carbon monoxide fumes ' Security Checklist Do not leave any cash around your home.

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  • Once inhaled, carbon monoxide combines with oxygen carrying hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin.

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  • Biomimetic sensors utilize a material that mimics the response of human hemoglobin to carbon monoxide.

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  • They deal with carbon monoxide and unburnt hydrocarbons which react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and water.

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  • Carbon monoxide replaces oxygen in the bloodstream causing hypoxia, an abnormal reduction of oxygen in the body tissues also called oxygen deficiency.

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  • The problem is: Diesel engines do not emit enough carbon monoxide to kill anybody.

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  • Carbon monoxide detectors detect carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas with no smell, taste or color.

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  • Cooking ranges, heaters, and charcoal grills also produce carbon monoxide.

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  • Red blood cells transport oxygen to body cells and remove carbon monoxide.

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  • For live aboard's the use of a solid fuel cabin heater should be treated with caution as all wood smoke contains carbon monoxide.

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  • Nearly all gasoline oxygenated to reduce carbon monoxide during winter months contains ethanol, although this is a relatively small market.

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  • monoxide in expired air was lower when the women used NRT than when they smoked.

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  • Identifies the presence of any gas leaks or poisonous carbon monoxide.

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  • Gas installations can leak deadly carbon monoxide (CO ).

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  • Cars with LPG engines give out 75% less carbon monoxide than normal gasoline engines and its 50% cheaper than gasoline.

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  • monoxide poisoning can kill people within a matter of hours.

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  • monoxide detector, you ask?

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  • monoxide fumes are believed to have come from a faulty gas fire in the lounge of the premises.

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  • monoxide emissions maybe slightly higher than in gasoline.

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  • monoxide detector alarms?

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  • monoxide yield in the vapor phase of the smoke was determined using ISO 8454.

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  • carbon monoxide inhibits the blood's capacity to carry oxygen.

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  • An Appeal A ban is called for on that ' lethal ' chemical - dihydrogen monoxide.

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  • nitrogen monoxide Properties: Colorless gas which is immediately oxidized upon exposure to air to brown fumes of nitrogen dioxide.

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  • Among the latter is chlorine monoxide, which initiates ozone destruction in the presence of sunlight.

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  • Air Pollution The principal pollutants from road transport include nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and particulates.

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  • Emissions dangerous to health include nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, lead and particulates.

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  • oxidation of ammonia to form nitrogen monoxide.

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  • oxidize>Oxidizing atmosphere A gas atmosphere which promotes oxidation by the predominance of carbon dioxide over carbon monoxide.

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  • pollutethan half of emissions of polluting agents such as nitrogen oxides or carbon monoxide come from road transport vehicles.

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  • Produced by smoldering fires, carbon monoxide reduces concentrations of reactive atmospheric chemicals called hydroxyl radicals that remove methane from the air.

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  • Gasoline engines produce more carbon monoxide but much less soot than diesel engines.

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  • sorbent materials are used to remove gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • Characterizing the catalyst using BET nitrogen sorption, carbon monoxide or hydrogen pulse chemisorption, and FTIR analysis.

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  • carbon monoxide.

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  • Cobalt burns in nitric oxide at 150° C. giving the monoxide.

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  • Three characteristic oxides of cobalt are known, the monoxide, CoO, the sesquioxide, C0203, and tricobalt tetroxide, C0304; besides these there are probably oxides of composition Co02, Co 8 0 9, C0607 and C0405.

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  • Cobalt monoxide, CoO, is prepared by heating the hydroxide or carbonate in a current of air, or by heating the oxide C0304 in a current of carbon dioxide.

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  • On heating in hydrogen, ammonia or carbon monoxide, or with carbon or sodium, it is reduced to the metallic state.

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  • Heated at 190-300° in a current of hydrogen it gives the oxide C0304, while at higher temperatures the monoxide is formed, and ultimately cobalt is obtained.

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  • For the quantitative determination of cobalt, it is either weighed as the oxide, C0304, obtained by ignition of the precipitated monoxide, or it is reduced in a current of hydrogen and weighed as metal.

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  • Hot concentrated sulphuric acid also decomposes allantoin, with production of ammonia, and carbon monoxide and dioxide.

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  • Later, while attempting to utilize the gas for the production of electricity by means of a Grove gas battery, he noticed that the carbon monoxide contained in it combined with nickel.

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  • It reduces many metallic oxides, such as lead monoxide and cupric oxide, and decomposes water at a red heat.

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  • Molybdenum combines with oxygen to form many oxides, the most important of which are: the monoxide, MoO.n (H 2 O), the sesquioxide, M0203, the dioxide, MoO 2, and the trioxide, MoO 3.

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  • Molybdenum monoxide, MoO.n(H 2 O), is a black powder obtained when the dichloride is boiled with concentrated potash solution.

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  • The original hypothesis of Baeyer suggested that the course of events is the following: the carbon dioxide is decomposed into carbon monoxide and oxygen, while water is simultaneously split up into hydrogen and oxygen; the hydrogen and the carbon monoxide unite to form formaldehyde and the oxygen is exhaled.

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  • There is no evidence that carbon monoxide is ever produced, indeed there are strong reasons for disbelieving in its occurrence.

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  • As an example of the use of Ostwald's energy-equations for the indirect determination we may take the case of carbon monoxide.

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  • If now it is required to find the heat of formation of the compound CO, which cannot be directly ascertained, we have merely to subtract the second equation from the first, each symbol representing constant intrinsic energy, and thus we obtain C+0 - 00= 26300 cal., or C+0=C0+26300 cal., that is, the heat of formation of a gramme-molecule of carbon monoxide is 26300 cal.

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  • Citric acid digested at a temperature below 40° C. with concentrated sulphuric acid gives off carbon monoxide and forms acetone dicarboxylic acid.

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  • Natural gas is found to consist mainly of the lower paraffins, with varying quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, in some cases also sulphuretted hydrogen and possibly ammonia.

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  • In contact with chlorine monoxide it forms carbonyl chloride and thionyl chloride (P. Schiitzenberger, Ber., 1869, 2, p. 219).

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  • Carbon monosulphide, CS, is formed when a silent electric discharge is passed through a mixture of carbon bisulphide vapour and hydrogen or carbon monoxide (S.

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  • The sesquichloride, Ru 2 C1 6, is formed when a mixture of chlorine and carbon monoxide is passed over finely divided ruthenium heated to 350° C. (Joly, Comptes rendus, 1892, 114, p. 291).

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  • with a thesis on the action of carbon monoxide on the blood.

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  • Of especial note are the curious compounds formed by the union of carbon monoxide with platinous chloride, discovered by Paul Schiitzenberger and subsequently investigated by F.

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  • Balard discovered chlorine monoxide in 1834, investigating its properties and reactions; and his observations on hypochlorous acid and hypochlorites led him to conclude that " bleaching-powder " or " chloride of lime " was a compound or mixture in equimolecular proportions of calcium chloride and hypochlorite, with a little calcium hydrate.

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  • Accepting the doctrine of the tetravalency of carbon (its divalency in such compounds as carbon monoxide, various isocyanides, fulminic acid, &c., and its possible trivalency in M.

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  • By passing carbon monoxide over heated potassium J.

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  • von Liebig discovered, in 1834, an interesting aromatic compound, potassium carbon monoxide or potassium hexaoxybenzene, the nature of which was satisfactorily cleared up by R.

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  • They also showed that carbon monoxide was given off towards the end of the reaction, and oxygen was not evolved unless the temperature exceeded 100 °.

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  • Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and carbon monoxide have the value 1.4; these gases have diatomic molecules, a fact capable of demonstration by other means.

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