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mononucleosis

mononucleosis

mononucleosis Sentence Examples

  • causes Most commonly sore throats are caused by viruses eg adenoviruses, influenza, and sometimes glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis ).

  • infectious mononucleosis may be able to spread the infection to others for a period of weeks.

  • People who have infectious mononucleosis may be able to spread the infection to others for a period of weeks.

  • Analysis of immune activation and clinical events in acute infectious mononucleosis.

  • People who have infectious mononucleosis may be able to spread the infection to others for a period of weeks.

  • The virus is similar to the herpes virus, and to the Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mononucleosis.

  • Analysis of immune activation and clinical events in acute infectious mononucleosis.

  • EBV causes infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever), a self-limiting disease.

  • See also Coagulation disorders; Infectious mononucleosis; TORCH test.

  • The physician will also exclude other potential causes for the symptoms and rash, including rubella, infectious mononucleosis, bacterial infections such as Lyme disease, allergic reactions, and lupus.

  • The "other viruses" usually include syphilis, hepatitis B, coxsackie virus, Epstein-Barr virus (mononucleosis), varicella-zoster virus, and human parvovirus.

  • In adults, it produces symptoms resembling those of mononucleosis.

  • See also Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection; Infectious mononucleosis; Hepatitis B.

  • One other common cause of a viral sore throat is mononucleosis.

  • Mononucleosis occurs when the Epstein-Barr virus infects one specific type of lymphocyte.

  • Mononucleosis, sometimes called the kissing disease, is extremely common.

  • It is estimated that by the age of 35-40, 80-95 percent of Americans will have had mononucleosis.

  • Since symptoms are more severe in adolescents and adults, more cases are diagnosed as mononucleosis in this age group.

  • One of the main symptoms of mononucleosis is a severe sore throat.

  • If mononucleosis is suspected, the doctor may do a mono spot test to look for antibodies indicating the presence of the Epstein-Barr virus.

  • An inexpensive blood test can also determine the presence of antibodies to the mononucleosis virus.

  • Because a virus causes mononucleosis, there is no specific drug treatment available.

  • Nearly 90 percent of mononucleosis infections are mild.

  • Ninety percent of cases of mononucleosis clear up without medical intervention or complications, so long as dehydration does not occur.

  • In rare cases of mononucleosis, breathing may be obstructed because of swollen tonsils, adenoids, and lymph glands.

  • Infectious mononucleosis is a contagious illness caused by the Epstein-Barr virus that can affect the liver, lymph nodes, and oral cavity.

  • While mononucleosis is not usually a serious disease, its primary symptoms of fatigue and lack of energy can linger for several months.

  • Infectious mononucleosis, frequently called "mono" or the "kissing disease," is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) found in saliva and mucus.

  • People with weakened or suppressed immune systems, such as AIDS patients or those who have had organ transplants, are particularly vulnerable to the potentially serious complications of infectious mononucleosis.

  • While anyone, even young children, can develop mononucleosis, it occurs most often in young adults between the ages of 15 and 35 and is especially common in teenagers.

  • The mononucleosis infection rate among college students who have not previously been exposed to EBV has been estimated to be about 15 percent.

  • The EBV that causes mononucleosis is related to a group of herpes viruses, including those that cause cold sores, chickenpox, and shingles.

  • Mononucleosis is most commonly spread by contact with virus-infected saliva through coughing, sneezing, kissing, or sharing drinking glasses or eating utensils.

  • Complications that can occur with mononucleosis include a temporarily enlarged spleen or inflamed liver.

  • As a result, individuals living in a household or college dormitory with someone who has mononucleosis have a very small risk of being infected unless they have direct contact with the person's saliva.

  • If symptoms associated with a cold persist longer than two weeks, mononucleosis is a possibility; however, a variety of other conditions can produce similar symptoms.

  • If mononucleosis is suspected, a physician will typically conduct a physical examination, including a "Monospot" antibody blood test that can indicate the presence of proteins or antibodies produced in response to infection with the EBV.

  • The most effective treatment for infectious mononucleosis is rest and a gradual return to regular activities.

  • The sore throat and dehydration that usually accompany mononucleosis may be relieved by drinking water and fruit juices.

  • While antibiotics do not affect EBV, the sore throat accompanying mononucleosis can be complicated by a streptococcal infection, which can be treated with antibiotics.

  • While the severity and length of illness varies, most people diagnosed with mononucleosis are able to return to their normal daily routines within two to three weeks, particularly if they rest during this time period.

  • One of the most common problems in treating mononucleosis, particularly in teenagers, is that people return to their usual activities too quickly and then experience a relapse of symptoms.

  • The main concern for parents of children with mononucleosis is to keep the child resting until he or she fully recovers from the illness.

  • "Epstein-Barr Virus (Mononucleosis and Lymphoproliferative Disorders)."

  • G. "Infectious mononucleosis: return to play."

  • Diseases that involve lymph nodes throughout the body include mononucleosis, cytomegalovirus infection, toxoplasmosis, and brucellosis.

  • This syndrome (called a mononucleosis-like syndrome, after the disease mononucleosis that causes many of the same symptoms) has occurred in both infants and adults.

  • In some cases, the doctor may order blood tests for mononucleosis, since about one third of patients with mononucleosis develop streptococcal infections of the tonsils.

  • Other herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr, responsible for mononucleosis as well as the viruses causing the common cold, influenza (the flu) are all potential culprits for causing this condition.

  • Clearly the overwhelming majority of children that contract mononucleosis, cold sores, Lyme disease, cold or flu do not develop Bell's palsy.

  • Occasionally, a first-time infection with CMV may cause a mild illness called mononucleosis.

  • About 8 percent of all mononucleosis cases are due to CMV infection.

  • In making the diagnosis, the doctor examines the affected person's eyes, ears, nose, and throat in order to rule out other diseases that may cause fever and sore throat, such as infectious mononucleosis, a sinus infection, or strep throat.

  • This condition, called lymphoid hyperplasia, may also be associated with a variety of inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as Crohn's disease, gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, mononucleosis, and measles.

  • Less often, the hypertrophy is due to repeated throat infections by cold viruses, strep throat, mononucleosis, and in the past, diphtheria.

  • A throat culture or mononucleosis test usually reveals the identity of the germ.

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