This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

mommsen

mommsen

mommsen Sentence Examples

  • On the Propertii see Mommsen in Hermes, iv.

  • Mommsen in Corp. inscr.

  • (1866);Mommsen inA bhandlungen der sachsischen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, iii.

  • Schanz and TeuffelSchwabe; Mommsen, Hist.

  • (1868); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen and P. M.

  • Mommsen, Prov.

  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (Eng.

  • Mommsen.

  • trans., p. 162); see also Mommsen, Hist.

  • humanistika Vetenskapssamfundet i Upsala, v., 1897, in which it is argued against Mommsen that Sulla did not deprive the tribunes of the right of proposing rogations.

  • See also Mommsen's History of Rome, vol.

  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (trans.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Although the offerings at the festival were bloodless, the ceremony of the presentation of the airapxai was probably accompanied by animal sacrifice (Farnell, Foucart); Mommsen, however, considers the offerings to have been pastry imitations.

  • Mommsen (Unteritalische Dialekten, p. 345) pointed out that in the social war all the coins of Pompaedius Silo have the Latin legend "Italia," while the other leaders in all but one case used Oscan.

  • Mommsen pointed out (Unterital.

  • - Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, ii.

  • He has little to say of the inner history and policy of the kingdom of Theodoric: his interests lie, as Mommsen says, within a triangle of which the three points are Sirmium, Larissa and Constantinople.

  • Otherwise, as Mommsen says, the Getica is a mera epitome, laxata ea et perversa, historiae Gothicae Cassiodorianae.

  • - The classical edition is that of Mommsen (in Mon.

  • The best MS. is the Heidelberg MS., written in Germany, probably in the 8th century; but this perished in the fire at Mommsen's house.

  • (Munich, 1861); Ebert's Geschichte der Christlich-Lateinischen Literatur (Leipsic, 1874); Wattenbach's Deutschlands Geschichtsquellen im Mittelalter (Berlin, 1877); and the introduction of Mommsen to his edition.

  • 4 A useful compendium of Greek and Turkish ornithology by Drs Kruper and Hartlaub is contained in Mommsen's Griechische Jahrzeiten for 1875 (Heft III.).

  • Herzog, Galliae Narbonensis Historia (Leipzig, 1864); Mommsen, Hist.

  • and 857 sqq., and Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire, (Eng.

  • Mommsen in Corp. Inscr.

  • Documents relating to Great Britain (Oxford, 1869); the latest edition is that by Theodor Mommsen in Monum.

  • 49, De haruspicum responses, 19, Pro Sestio, 47, Pro Rabirio, passim; Mommsen, Hist.

  • According to Mommsen, they were persons who possessed the equestrian census, but no public horse.

  • p. 208; Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, iii.

  • p. 241; Mommsen, Hist.

  • The worst form of such praedial slavery existed in Sicily, whither Mommsen supposes that its peculiarly harsh features had been brought by the Carthaginians.

  • According to Mommsen, Solinus also used a chronicle (possibly by Cornelius Bocchus) and a Chorographia pliniana, an epitome of Pliny's work with additions made about the time of Hadrian.

  • The commentary by Saumaise in his Plinianae exercitationes (1689) is indispensable; best edition by Mommsen (1895), with valuable introduction on the MSS., the authorities used by Solinus, and subsequent compilers.

  • " The end of the catacomb graves," writes Mommsen (Cont.

  • Without resorting to this exaggeration, Mommsen can speak with perfect truth of the " enormous space occupied by the burial vaults of Christian Rome, not surpassed even by the cloacae or sewers of Republican Rome," but the data are too vague to warrant any attempt to define their dimensions.

  • Such an idea is justly stigmatized by Mommsen as ridiculous, and reflecting a discredit as unfounded as it is unjust on the imperial police of the capital.

  • Mommsen, in the Contemporary Review, May 1871.

  • Mommsen (Corp. inscr.

  • de Moor (1877); Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.

  • According to Mommsen, the aerarii were originally the non-assidui (non-holders of land), excluded from the tribes, the comitia and the army.

  • The expressions "tribu movere" and "aerarium facere," regarded by Mommsen as identical in meaning ("to degrade from a higher tribe to a lower"), are explained by A.

  • Greenidge, Infamia in Roman Law (1894), where Mommsen's theory is criticized; E.

  • During the early period of the Roman Empire the Thracian kings were allowed to maintain an independent sovereignty, while acknowledging the suzerainty of Rome, and it was not until the reign of Vespasian that the country was reduced to the form of a province (Kalopathakas, De Thracia, provincia romana, 1894; Mommsen, Roman Provinces, Eng.

  • Ancyr., Mommsen, Res gestae divi Augusti (1883); and Inscr.

  • Mommsen, Feste der Stadt Athen (1898); E.

  • Mommsen, Romische Forschungen, ii.

  • According to Mommsen, although the institution was not intended to be permanent, in later times vacancies in the ranks were filled in this manner, with the result that service in the cavalry, with either a public or a private horse, became obligatory upon all Roman citizens possessed of a certain income.

  • To this period Mommsen assigns the regulation, generally attributed to Augustus, that the sons of senators should be knights by right of birth.

  • After the reign of Marcus Aurelius (according to Mommsen) the equites were divided into: (a) viri eminentissimi, the prefects of the praetorian guard; (b) viri perfectissimi, the other prefects and the heads of the financial and secretarial departments; (c) viri egregii, first mentioned in the reign of Antoninus Pius, a title by right of the procurators generally.

  • Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, iii.; J.

  • Mommsen in Heroin, xvi.

  • Mommsen in C.I.L.

  • Among critical estimates of Terence may be mentioned Sainte-Beuve's in Nouveaux lundis (3rd and 10th of August 1863), and Mommsen's in the History of Rome, book iv., chapter xiii.

  • We must, however (as Mommsen points out in C.I.L.

  • Mommsen, Geschichte der riimsschen Provinzen, chap. xiii.; W.

  • Mommsen was of the opinion that sacrilegium had no settled meaning in the laws of the 4th century.

  • Zippel, Die romische Herrschaft in Illyrien (Leipzig, 1877); Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (Eng.

  • This was adopted by Mommsen (Hermes, xxii.

  • Mommsen remarks (Corp. inscr.

  • 20; Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (Eng.

  • Mommsen in Monumenta Germaniae Historica: Auctores Antiquissimi, xii., 1894 condensed English translation by T.

  • Mommsen in Mon.

  • Mommsen, 1882).

  • Mommsen, History of Rome; E.

  • Of these four fragments only one survives, but with the aid of transcripts of the other three made by Cyriacus of Ancona in 1442, the whole was restored by Mommsen [C.I.L.

  • It was afterwards maintained by Mommsen (1868) that the books were in strictly chronological order, that the letters in each book were in general arranged in order of date, that all of them were later than the death of Domitian (September 96), that the several books were probably published in the following order: i.

  • Keil (Leipzig, 1870), with full index of names by Mommsen; for plain text, Keil (1853), &c., C. F.

  • On the chronology of the letters, &c., Mommsen, in Hermes, iii.

  • i.; Mommsen, in Hist.

  • We may without hesitation follow the opinion of Mommsen, who maintains that the limes was not intended, like Hadrian's Wall between the Tyne and the Solway, and like the great wall of China, to oppose an absolute barrier against incursions from the outside.

  • The question whether Trajan's Oriental policy was wise is answered emphatically by Mommsen in the affirmative.

  • The assertion of Mommsen that the Tigris was a more defensible frontier than the desert line which separated the Parthian from the Roman Empire can hardly be accepted.

  • A paper by Mommsen in Hermes, iii.

  • Mommsen in Neues Archiv der Gesellschaft fur dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde, xix.

  • (1877); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire, Eng.

  • The different kinds of praefects are fully discussed in Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht (1887) vols.

  • Mommsen deals very cursorily with the praefectus castrorum, but there is a special article by G.

  • Horace was born here, the son of a freedman, in 65 B.C. It remained an important place under the Empire as a station on the Via Appia, though Mommsen's description of it (Corp. Inscr.

  • Mommsen in the Chronica minora of the Monumenta Germaniae historica (1892).

  • Teuffel, Caecilius Statius, Pacuvius, Attius, Afranius (1858); and Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.

  • Its history in the Samnite period is unknown; but the coins of Fistelia (or Fistlus in Oscan) probably belong to Puteoli, as Mommsen thought.

  • Mommsen in Corp. Inscrip. Latin., x., Berlin, 1883, 1748), though Beloch inclines to place it on the promontory S.

  • assumed the title of king before; but he now became "totius Orientis imperator," not indeed joint-ruler, nor Augustus, but "independent lieutenant of the emperor for the East" (Mommsen, Provinces, ii.

  • Mommsen and P. Meyer, Theodosii libri XVI.

  • see Mommsen's appendix to vol.

  • See Mommsen's appendix to his Roman History (vol.

  • Some remnants of the Boii are mentioned as dwelling near Bordeaux; but Mommsen inclines to the opinion that the three groups (in Bordeaux, Bohemia and the Po districts) were not really scattered branches of one and the same stock, but that they are instances of a mere similarity of name.

  • Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen in Hermes, xiii.

  • Dittenberger; Roman history and constitutional antiquities that of Theodor Mommsen (1817-1903), who was associated in Latin epigraphy with E.

  • A conference held in June 1900, in which the speakers included Mommsen and von Wilamowitz, Harnack and Diels, was followed by the " Kiel Decree " of the 26th of November.

  • 553; Festus, s.v.; Mommsen, Hist.

  • Brandis, to the basis of Assyrian standards; Mommsen, to coin weights; and P. Bortolotti to Egyptian units; but F.

  • Silver stood to copper in Egypt as 80 to 1 (Brugsch), or 120 to 1 (Revillout); in early Italy and Sicily as 250 to 1 (Mommsen), or 120 to 1 (Soutzo), under the empire 120 to 1, and under Justinian 100 to 1.

  • Mommsen, Histoire de la monnaie romaine;

  • xxviii.) couples her name with that of Cornelia, the mother of the Gracchi, as an example of the Roman matron 1 In spite of the explicit statements of Suetonius, Plutarch and Appian that Caesar was in his fifty-sixth year at the time of his murder, it is, as Mommsen has shown, practically certain that he was born in 102 B.C., since he held the chief offices of state in regular order, beginning with the aedileship in 65 B.C., and the legal age for this was fixed at 37-38.

  • 2 The statement of Dio and Suetonius, that a general cura legum et morum was conferred on Caesar in 46 B.C., is rejected by Mommsen.

  • This last conception lay beyond the horizon of Caesar, as of all ancient statesmen, but his first act on gaining control of Italy was to enfranchise the Transpadanes, whose claims he had consistently advocated, and in 45 B.C. he passed the Lex Julia Municipalis, an act of which considerable fragments are inscribed on two bronze tables found at Heraclea near Tarentum.3 This law deals inter alia with the police and the sanitary arrangements of the city of Rome, and hence it has been argued by Mommsen that it was Caesar's intention to reduce Rome to the level of a municipal town.

  • Mommsen interprets this policy as signifying that "the rule of the urban community of Rome over the shores of the Mediterranean was at an end," and says that the first act of the "new Mediterranean state" was "to atone for the two greatest outrages which that urban community had perpetrated on civilization."

  • Mommsen in his History of Rome (Eng.

  • The internal structure of the comitia centuriata underwent a great change during the Republic - a change which has been conjecturally attributed to the censorship of Flaminius in 220 B.C. (Mommsen, Staatsrecht, iii.

  • Mommsen's interpretation (Staatsrecht, iii.

  • Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, iii.

  • (Freiburg, 1893), for Municipal Laws and references to Mommsen's commentary in C.I.L.; E.

  • For the gilds see Mommsen, De collegiis et sodaliciis Romanorum (Keil, 1843); Liebenam, Geschichte u.

  • c. (see Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire, Eng.

  • Mommsen, Corpus inscriptionum latinarum, iii.

  • Kluckhohn, Luise, Konigin von Preussen (1876); Mommsen and Treitschke, Konigin Luise (1876); in English, Hudson, Life and Times of Louisa, Queen of Prussia (1874); G.

  • (1904); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen thinks that he had incurred the displeasure of Augustus by his conduct as praetor, and that his African appointment after so many years was due to his exceptional fitness for the post.

  • For the history of the Sabine district see Mommsen, C.I.L.

  • He says this was mainly concerned with the property of which account was taken at the census; it was therefore in 1 Mommsen (Staatsrecht, P. 275, n.

  • Haverfield, The Romanization of Roman Britain (Oxford, 1906), and his articles in the Victoria County History; also the chapter in Mommsen's Roman Provinces; and an article in the Edinburgh Review, 1899.

  • Mommsen has located the battle near the source of the Hunte, north of Osnabruck, and outside the range of hills; but most scholars prefer some site in the central part of the mountain-chain.

  • Mommsen takes the latter view.

  • For the identification of the two, see Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, ii.

  • - For a fuller treatment of all these points see Mommsen, Staatsrecht, ii.

  • Mommsen, Feste der Stadt Athen (1898); A.

  • Mommsen (Roman History, i.

  • The list gives only twenty-nine names, and Mommsen proposes to insert Signini.

  • beyond the city gates (Mommsen, History of Rome, i.

  • To an earlier stage of the Latin league, perhaps to about 430 B.C. (Mommsen, op. cit.

  • 4 Of the gentes from which these tribes took their names, six entirely disappeared in later days, while the other ten can be traced as patrician - a proof that the patricians were not noble families in origin (Mommsen, Romische Forschungen, i.

  • The formation (according to the traditional dating in 495 or 471 B.C.) of the tribus Clustumina (the only one of the earlier twenty-one tribes which bears a local name) is both a consequence of an extension of territory and of the establishment of the assembly of the plebs by tribes, for which an inequality of the total number of divisions was desirable (Mommsen, History of Rome, i.

  • After the dissolution of the Latin league which followed upon the defeat of the united forces of the Samnites and of those Latin and Volscian cities which had revolted against Rome, two new tribes, Maecia and Scaptia, 3 were created in 332 B.C. in connexion with the distribution of the newly acquired lands (Mommsen, History, i.

  • Mommsen, Corp. Inscr.

  • Ribbeck, Scenicae romanorum poesis fragmenta (1897-1898); see Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen, The Provinces of the Roman Empire, ch.

  • Mommsen, Die Ortlichkeit der Varusschlacht (1885); E.

  • Mommsen (Berlin, 1870).

  • Mommsen declared in 1901, has any claim to political respect.

  • collated and the great pains taken to ensure textual accuracy on the part of the different editors, among whom may be mentioned Mommsen aud Lappenberg.

  • Mommsen, however, held that plebeians were legally eligible, though none were actually appointed for 451.

  • Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.

  • The peoples of the south (Lucanians, Bruttians, Mamertines) show a Greek principle of nomenclature (Mommsen, Unterital.

  • Muller (1884 and 1893), C. Pascal, Studi sugli scrittori Latini (1900); see also Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.

  • Mommsen, Staatsrecht III.

  • Mommsen, although these scholars think that it was written about a century later.

  • Mommsen for the Monumenta Germaniae historica.

  • Mommsen, I.N.

  • Hence it is that, while many made their escape from Pompeii (which was overwhelmed by the fall of the small stones and afterwards by the rain of ashes), comparatively few can have managed to escape from Herculaneum, and these, according to the interpretation given to the inscription preserved in the National Museum (Mommsen, I.N.

  • Their language is preserved for us in a scanty group of perhaps fifty inscriptions of which only a few contain more than proper names, and in a few glosses in ancient writers collected 'by Mommsen (Unteritalische Dialekte, p. 70).

  • The only satisfactory transcripts are those given by (1) Mommsen (loc. cit.) and by (2) I.

  • It is therefore safest to rely on the texts collected by Mommsen, cumbered though they are by the various readings given to him by various authorities.

  • Mommsen's first attempt at dealing with the inscriptions and the language attained solid, if not very numerous, results, chief of which were the genitival character of the endings - aihi and ihi; and the conjunctional value of in91 (loc. cit.

  • 42, assert that at first the praetorship was open to patricians only, but Mommsen (Rim.

  • Of the war that followed we have very various accounts; Mommsen leans to that which is least favourable to the Romans.

  • Mommsen's Die unteritalischen Dialekte (1850) is not without value even now.

  • In the recovery of a more real standard, we owe much to men like Mommsen, Ramsay, Blass and Harnack, trained amid other methods and traditions than those which had brought the constructive study of Acts almost to a deadlock.

  • It was of Phoenician origin, but continued to exist in Roman times, as the inscriptions show, though they give but little information (Mommsen in Corp. Inscr.

  • Mommsen (Rom.

  • also Schiller's Nero, pp. 261 seq.; Mommsen in Hermes, xiii.

  • Mommsen, Berlin, 1898); Simeon of Durham, Opera, i.

  • Kiessling, "De C. Helvio Cinna Ponta" in Commentationes Philologicae in honorem Mommsen (1878); O.

  • Mommsen in Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, iii.

  • Mommsen (Corpus Inscrip. Lat., Berlin, 1883,1883, ix.

  • Modern scholars regard her as a goddess akin to Ops, Acca Larentia and Dea Dia; or as the goddess of the new year and the returning sun (according to Mommsen, ab angerendo = are) roi, ava Apeo Oat rae it Xtov).

  • Mommsen, Rdmische Staatsrecht, iii.

  • The members of the last-named board were appointed by the praetor urbanus of Rome to administer justice in ten Campanian towns (list in Mommsen), and received their name from the two most important of these.

  • See Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, ii.

  • Mommsen and others support Diodorus, but the question still remains open.

  • Mommsen, Romisches Strafrecht (1899); Kleinfeller in Pauly-Wissowa's Realencyclopadie.

  • A careful study of the fragments does not justify Mommsen's glowing account.

  • As Mommsen remarks, the clauses of the sentences are often arranged on the thread of the relative pronoun like thrushes on a string.

  • Fischer, Waldeyer and von Bergmann among scientists and surgeons; Mommsen, Treitschke and Sybel among historians, Harnack among theologians, Brunner among jurists.

  • See Mommsen, "Die echte and die falsche Larentia," in Romische Forschungen, ii.

  • Thus Mommsen (History of Rome) indiscriminately describes the supremacy of Rome over Armenia as " suzerainty " or " protectorate."

  • For the fullest account of the lictors, see Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, i.

  • An independent value attaches to the ancient palimpsest of Verona, of which the first complete account was given by Mommsen in Abhandl.

  • It contains the third, fourth, fifth and fragments of the sixth book, and, according to Mommsen, whose conclusions are accepted by Madvig (Emend.

  • The most recent and best edition is that of Schwartz in the Berlin Academy's Greek Fathers, of which the first half has appeared, accompanied by the Latin version of Rufinus edited by Mommsen.

  • Theodor Mommsen >>

  • Holder as above; on the subjugation of the Senones by the Romans, Mommsen, Hist.

  • p. 46, Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, vol.

  • Teuffel, Caecilius Statius, &c. (1858): Mommsen, Hist.

  • 198, with Mommsen's commentary; A.

  • It is a soft, silvery 1 Mommsen in C.I.L.

  • Mommsen, Delphika, 1878).

  • THEODOR MOMMSEN (1817-1903), German historian and archaeologist, was born on the 30th of November 1817 at Garding, in Schleswig.

  • They had already made a grant to Mommsen, and in 1844 Savigny proposed that he should be appointed to carry out the great work.

  • Meanwhile Mommsen continued his work in Italy: he drew up a full memorandum explaining the principles on which a Corpus inscriptionum should be compiled, and on which alone he could undertake the editorship. As a specimen he collected the inscriptions of Samnium, and in 1852 published those of the kingdom of Naples.

  • During 1848,, when the extreme party was in the ascendant, Mommsen supported the monarchy against the Republicans.

  • Mommsen found an asylum in Switzerland, and became professor at Zurich: he repaid the hospitality of the Republic by writing exhaustive monographs on Roman Switzerland, His spare time was occupied with the Roman History, the three volumes of which appeared between 1854 and 1856.

  • Mommsen was henceforward fully occupied: with work of a more technical nature.

  • Mommsen died at Charlottenburg on the ist of November 1903.

  • A full list of his works is given by Zangemeister, Mommsen als Schriftsteller (1887; continued by Jacobs, 1905).

  • Hirschfeld, Gedeichtnisrede auf Theodor Mommsen (1904).

  • Mommsen, Corpus inscriptionum Latinarum, iii.

  • It seems probable that at the end of the republic the coinage for the west of Sicily was struck here (Mommsen, Rom.

  • A fortunate chance has preserved to us a large number of the inscriptions set up in the Forum (Mommsen, Corpus inscr.

  • The apparently needless cruelty of Mummius in Corinth, by no means characteristic of him, is explained by Mommsen as due to the instructions of the senate, prompted by the mercantile party, which was eager to get rid of a dangerous commercial rival.

  • Gerlach (1871); see also Mommsen, Hist.

  • See Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen in Hermes, xxiv., and on his tariff system, Diocletian, Edict Of.

  • Mommsen, however, considers the mercuriales to be a purely local gild - the pagani of the Circus valley.

  • Mommsen, Ephem.

  • Ahrens, Die drei Volkstribunen (Leipzig, 1836); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen has edited the Chronica majora or Chronicon de sex aetatibus (from the creation to A.D.

  • Mommsen, Die Schweiz in romischer Zeit (Zurich, 1854); J.

  • Holmes, Caesar's Conquest of Gaul (1899) and Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen, Das Edict Diocletians (1851); M.

  • There is an edition of the whole by Mommsen, with notes by H.

  • In history the tribe appears only for a brief space, from 340 to 295 B.C. (Mommsen, C.I.L.

  • On the Propertii see Mommsen in Hermes, iv.

  • Mommsen in Corp. inscr.

  • (1866);Mommsen inA bhandlungen der sachsischen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, iii.

  • Cincius, the author of various political and antiquarian treatises (de Fastis, de Comitiis, de Priscis Verbis), who lived in the Augustan age, to which period Mommsen, considering them a later fabrication, refers the Greek annals of L.

  • Schanz and TeuffelSchwabe; Mommsen, Hist.

  • (1868); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen and P. M.

  • Mommsen, Prov.

  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (Eng.

  • In the same year he was deprived of his proconsulship and his property confiscated; subsequently (the chronology is obscure, see Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.

  • trans., p. 162); see also Mommsen, Hist.

  • The "half lion, half fox," as his enemies called him, the "Don Juan of politics" (Mommsen), the man who carried out a policy of "blood and iron" with a grim humour, amused himself in his last days with actors and actresses, with dabbling in poetry, and completing the Memoirs (commentarii, inropviigara) of his eventful life (see H.

  • humanistika Vetenskapssamfundet i Upsala, v., 1897, in which it is argued against Mommsen that Sulla did not deprive the tribunes of the right of proposing rogations.

  • See also Mommsen's History of Rome, vol.

  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (trans.

  • Wordsworth, Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin (1874); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen, Feste der Stadt Athen, p. 365 foll.) that the festival, originally held in autumn, was subsequently placed later, so as to synchronize with the winter Dionysia.

  • Although the offerings at the festival were bloodless, the ceremony of the presentation of the airapxai was probably accompanied by animal sacrifice (Farnell, Foucart); Mommsen, however, considers the offerings to have been pastry imitations.

  • Mommsen (Unteritalische Dialekten, p. 345) pointed out that in the social war all the coins of Pompaedius Silo have the Latin legend "Italia," while the other leaders in all but one case used Oscan.

  • Mommsen pointed out (Unterital.

  • - Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, ii.

  • He has little to say of the inner history and policy of the kingdom of Theodoric: his interests lie, as Mommsen says, within a triangle of which the three points are Sirmium, Larissa and Constantinople.

  • Otherwise, as Mommsen says, the Getica is a mera epitome, laxata ea et perversa, historiae Gothicae Cassiodorianae.

  • - The classical edition is that of Mommsen (in Mon.

  • The best MS. is the Heidelberg MS., written in Germany, probably in the 8th century; but this perished in the fire at Mommsen's house.

  • (Munich, 1861); Ebert's Geschichte der Christlich-Lateinischen Literatur (Leipsic, 1874); Wattenbach's Deutschlands Geschichtsquellen im Mittelalter (Berlin, 1877); and the introduction of Mommsen to his edition.

  • 4 A useful compendium of Greek and Turkish ornithology by Drs Kruper and Hartlaub is contained in Mommsen's Griechische Jahrzeiten for 1875 (Heft III.).

  • Herzog, Galliae Narbonensis Historia (Leipzig, 1864); Mommsen, Hist.

  • Mommsen, which had nearly the same significance for the Roman East as the victory of the Goths at the mouth of the Danube and the fall of Decius; the emperor was captured (A.D.

  • and 857 sqq., and Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire, (Eng.

  • Documents relating to Great Britain (Oxford, 1869); the latest edition is that by Theodor Mommsen in Monum.

  • 49, De haruspicum responses, 19, Pro Sestio, 47, Pro Rabirio, passim; Mommsen, Hist.

  • According to Mommsen, they were persons who possessed the equestrian census, but no public horse.

  • p. 208; Mommsen, Romisches Staatsrecht, iii.

  • p. 241; Mommsen, Hist.

  • We must distinguish from the later slavery at Rome what Mommsen calls " the old, in some measure innocent slavery, under which the farmer tilled the land along with his slave, or, if he possessed more land than he could manage, placed the slave - either as a steward, or as a sort of lessee obliged to render up a portion of the produce - over a detached farm.

  • The worst form of such praedial slavery existed in Sicily, whither Mommsen supposes that its peculiarly harsh features had been brought by the Carthaginians.

  • According to Mommsen, Solinus also used a chronicle (possibly by Cornelius Bocchus) and a Chorographia pliniana, an epitome of Pliny's work with additions made about the time of Hadrian.

  • The commentary by Saumaise in his Plinianae exercitationes (1689) is indispensable; best edition by Mommsen (1895), with valuable introduction on the MSS., the authorities used by Solinus, and subsequent compilers.

  • " The end of the catacomb graves," writes Mommsen (Cont.

  • Without resorting to this exaggeration, Mommsen can speak with perfect truth of the " enormous space occupied by the burial vaults of Christian Rome, not surpassed even by the cloacae or sewers of Republican Rome," but the data are too vague to warrant any attempt to define their dimensions.

  • Such an idea is justly stigmatized by Mommsen as ridiculous, and reflecting a discredit as unfounded as it is unjust on the imperial police of the capital.

  • It must suffice to say that the earliest examples are only to be distinguished from the mural decorations employed by their pagan contemporaries (as seen at Pompeii and r Mommsen's chosen example of an ancient burial-chamber, extending itself into a catacomb, or gathering subterranean additions round it till a catacomb was established, is that of the cemetery of St Domitilla, traditionally identified with a granddaughter of Vespasian, and the catacomb of Santi Nereo ed Achilleo on the Appian and Ardeatine way.

  • Mommsen, in the Contemporary Review, May 1871.

Browse other sentences examples →