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momentary

momentary

momentary Sentence Examples

  • I spent so much time on the phone talking to the Calvias she wouldn't have gotten through, Cynthia said the next morning, after breakfast was cleared, the wash loaded, and domestic matters reasonably settled—a momentary break.

  • The momentary pause of the space battle quickly turned to chaos, and Mansr was struggling to outmaneuver the ships darting away from the planet.

  • David Dean felt a momentary twinge of the here-we-go-agains that floated by on the wings of his wife's question.

  • In the momentary silence that ensued Dean heard an outside door slam.

  • He felt a momentary tightness until he recognized Randy Byrne behind the wheel.

  • In 1864 a tremendous flood almost ruined it, and another flood in 1878, and a famous strike in Denver and Leadville in 1879-1880 were further, but only momentary, checks to its prosperity.

  • In momentary peril of death for fifteen years, he restored in the Vivarais and the Cevennes Presbyterian church polity in all its integrity.

  • When the Whigs secured a momentary control of the state legislature in 1849 they sent Seward to the United States Senate.

  • In March 1821, Count Santorre di Santarosa and other conspirators informed Charles Albert of a constitutional and anti-Austrian plot, and asked for his help. After a momentary hesitation he informed the king; but at his request no arrests were made, and no precautions were taken.

  • According to this writer, existence is nothing but a becoming, and matter is simply the momentary product of the process of becoming, while force is this process constantly revealing itself in these products.

  • Like Arabia and similar countries, it could exercise a great momentary influence in history and produce a sudden change throughout the world; but afterwards it would sink into local insignificance.

  • But be this as it may, he had no sooner adopted his new creed than he resolved to profess it; " a momentary glow of enthusiasm " had raised him above all temporal considerations, and accordingly, on June 8, 1753, he records that having " privately abjured the heresies" of his childhood before a Catholic priest of the name of Baker, a Jesuit, in London, he announced the same to his father in an elaborate controversial epistle which his spiritual adviser much approved, and which he himself afterwards described to Lord Sheffield as having been " written with all the pomp, the dignity, and self-satisfaction of a martyr."

  • The momentary effect was immense; for some of the halo of the Holy Empire still clung round the head of the house of Habsburg, and Francis Joseph was welcomed to the ancient free city with enthusiasm.

  • This incident caused a considerable sensation, and was the prelude to a long crisis in Hungarian affairs, during which the emperor-king, while quick to repair the unfortunate impression produced by his momentary pique, held inflexibly to his resolve in the matter of the common army.

  • The union which sound religious teaching represents as realized in the submission of the will and the ethical harmony of the whole life is then reduced to a, passive experience, to something which comes and goes in time, and which may be of only momentary duration.

  • A momentary success of the English archers was quickly reversed by a flank movement on the part of Sir Robert Keith.

  • In this latter town took place the momentary union, which was more apparent than real, between the Latin and the Greek church (6th July 1 439).

  • The dependence of the island on one crop has been an artificial economic condition often of grave momentary danger to prosperity; but generally speaking, the progress of the industry has been steady.

  • In 1887 Svante Arrhenius, professor of physics at Stockholm, put forward a new theory which supposed that the freedom of the opposite ions from each other was not a mere momentary freedom at the instants of molecular collision, but a more or less permanent freedom, the ions moving independently of each other through the liquid.

  • Under the influence of the transient current, the galvanometer needle undergoes a momentary deflection, or " throw," which is proportional to Q, and therefore to 8B, and thus, if we know the deflection produced by the discharge through the galvanometer of a given quantity of electricity, we have the means of determining the value of 8B.

  • But this is only a momentary lapse, for he broadly distinguishes the two kinds.

  • An unsuccessful attempt upon Crispi's life by the anarchist Lega brought a momentary truce, but Cavallotti's attacks were soon renewed more fiercely than ever.

  • The boiling juice is run down into subsiding tanks, where it cools, and at the same time the albumen, which has been suddenly coagulated by momentary exposure to high temperature, falls to the bottom of the tank, carrying with it the vegetable and other matters which were in suspension in the juice.

  • Meteors look larger than they are, from the glare and flaming effect due to their momentary combustion.

  • He was the first in Congress to oppose the claim, which gained momentary and widespread favour in 1867, that the public debt, pledged in coin, should be paid in greenbacks.

  • There was a momentary vacillation even in Rome.

  • The momentary result was a wild panic, especially among the horses; but this panic gave the alarm to the infantry all along the road, and these (Frossard's 2nd Corps) at once stood to arms and moved forward, deployed for attack - one division to the west, another division, from Rezonville, to the south.

  • But Wimpheling had only some timid suggestions to make, and, since Maximilian was once more on happy terms with the pope, political considerations served to cool completely his momentary ardour for ecclesiastical reform.

  • Of the monks professed there during this momentary revival, one, Sigebert Buckley, lived on into the reign of James I.; and being the only survivor of the Benedictines of England, he in 1607 invested with the English habit and affiliated to Westminster Abbey and to the English congregation two English priests, already Benedictines in the Italian congregation.

  • The queen, on the prayer of the attorney-general, ordered that the proceedings of the day should be recorded, an order which caused a momentary embarrassment to the lord chancellor, as the court had no existing registrar, and no existing book in which the record should be made.

  • The Sophists were the first in Greece to dissolve knowledge into individual and momentary opinion (Protagoras), or dialectically to deny the possibility of knowledge (Gorgias).

  • Moreover, the arguments by which Heraclitus supported this theory of the universal flux are employed by Protagoras to undermine the possibility of objective truth, by dissolving all knowledge into the momentary sensation or persuasion of the individual.

  • Momentary pleasure (µov6Xpovos 7)56vn), preferably of a carnal kind, is the only good for man.

  • At Cedar Creek, during a momentary absence of the Federal commander, his camps were surprised by Early (October 19).

  • Since (following Protagoras) knowledge is solely of momentary sensations, it is useless to try, as Socrates recommended, to make calculations as to future pleasures, and to balance present enjoyment with disagreeable consequences.

  • One of her successors, Pixodarus, tried to ally himself with the rising power of Macedon, and is said to have gained the momentary consent of the young Alexander to wed his daughter.

  • In jumping an ordinary hedge or ditch at moderate speed, there is of course a moment of time during which the horse is on his hind legs, and in theory the rider should then lean forward, but, in practice, this position is so momentary, and the lash out of the hind legs in the spring is so powerful, that it is best not to lean forward at all, because of the difficulty, if not impossibility, of getting back in time for the reverse movement, when the rider should be preparing to render the horse some assistance with the bridle as his feet touch the ground.

  • In 1648 the sovereign courts of Paris procured their momentary suppression in a kind of charter of liberties which they imposed upon the crown, but which was ephemeral.

  • The fundamental objection to empiricism is that it fails to give an accurate explanation of experience; individual impressions as such are momentary, and their connexion into a body of coherent knowledge presupposes mental action distinct from mere receptivity.

  • He has not offered even a plausible explanation of the mode by which a consciousness made up of isolated momentary impressions and ideas can be aware of coexistence and number, or succession.

  • But Waldeck, hoping to profit by this momentary success, sent a portion of his right wing towards St Amand, where it merely shared the fate of his left, and the day was decided.

  • After a momentary reconciliation with Louis during his illness at Metz in 1744, Marie shut herself up more closely with her own circle of friends until her death at Versailles on the 24th of June 1768.

  • Towards the native races his policy varied according to momentary interests; but on the whole his reign tended to bring the Sicels more and more within the Greek pale.

  • the short-lasting explosive contraction of the heart muscle, can be elicited by a single, even momentary, application of a stimulus, e.g.

  • The dark shadows of this picture of the future alone could impress their minds, but a week later three of them were allowed a momentary vision of the light which shoula overcome the darkness.

  • It was the momentary power of the second which drove him into the convent, and he selected the monastic order which represented all that was best in the revival of the latter half of the 15th century - the Augustinian Eremites.

  • Whenever this occupation took place, Ptolemy became master of Palestine in 312 B.C., and though, as Josephus complains, he may have disgraced his title, Soler, by momentary severity at the outset, later he created in the minds of the Jews the impression that in Palestine or in Egypt he was - in deed as well as in name - their preserver.

  • The period of the pilgrimage caused a momentary truce to all these struggles, and in Dhu 'l-hijja, A.H.

  • With the declaration of peace the president again gained a momentary popularity much like that he had won in 1809 by his apparent willingness at that time to fight France.

  • He found that the momentary dissipation was proportional to the degree of electrification at the time, and that, when the charge was moderate, its dissipation was not altered in bodies of different kinds or shapes.

  • On the side of Nature the lowest rank (r) seems to belong to what Usener has designated " momentary " or " occasional " gods.'

  • There was an accession of new members, a momentary increase of prosperity, a brilliant new undertaking in the publication of a weekly journal, the Harbinger, in which Ripley, Charles A.

  • The second time it suited a momentary policy to set up a puppet emperor of his own, and even to accept a military commission from him.

  • The reign of Sigeric was momentary.

  • After this momentary meeting, the history of the East and West Goths again separates for a while.

  • In Italy the Goth was but a momentary invader and ruler; the Teutonic element in Italy comes from other sources.

  • In 1838 he made important investigations in regard to the conditions and range of induction from electrical currents - showing that induced currents, although merely momentary, produce still other or tertiary currents, and thus on through successive orders of induction, with alternating signs, and with reversed initial and terminal signs.

  • They were carried off and assassinated by Anastasius's brother, Eleutherius, whose reputation, however, suffered but a momentary eclipse.

  • During a momentary reaction of public opinion he resigned office in 1858, but again entered the cabinet under La Marmora in 5859 as minister of the interior.

  • In Rupert's momentary absence, the surprised Royalist cavalry could make no head against Cromwell's charge, although the latter was only made piecemeal as each unit crossed the lane and formed to the front.

  • "At this time," wrote Burke, in words of manly self-assertion, thirteen years afterwards, "having a momentary lead (1780-1782), so aided and so encouraged,.

  • Just as the phenomena of sudden conversion, complete revolutions of character occurring to outward appearance in a momentary space of time, are no valid argument against determinism - they may be due to the sudden emergence of elements in life and character long concealed - so what looks like the orderly and necessary development of a character growing and exhibiting its activity in accordance with fixed laws may in reality be due to innumerable secret struggles and momentous decisions, acts of choice of which only the results are outwardly apparent.

  • to take his kingship in earnest, thinking to cure him by war of his effeminate passions; and, in the spring of 1744, the kings grave illness at Metz gave a momentary hope of reconciliation between him and the deserted queen.

  • A momentary excitement was caused by the advance of the French armies in 1798, when he burnt most of his political papers.

  • The missions of Cardinal Peter (of St Chrysogonus), formerly bishop of Meaux, to Toulouse and the Toulousain in 1178, and of Henry, cardinal-bishop of Albano (formerly abbot of Clairvaux), in 1180-1181, obtained merely momentary successes.

  • I spent so much time on the phone talking to the Calvias she wouldn't have gotten through, Cynthia said the next morning, after breakfast was cleared, the wash loaded, and domestic matters reasonably settled—a momentary break.

  • While the resulting momentary glow wasn't much, it gave a different dimension to the landscape around him.

  • The momentary pause of the space battle quickly turned to chaos, and Mansr was struggling to outmaneuver the ships darting away from the planet.

  • David Dean felt a momentary twinge of the here-we-go-agains that floated by on the wings of his wife's question.

  • In the momentary silence that ensued Dean heard an outside door slam.

  • He felt a momentary tightness until he recognized Randy Byrne behind the wheel.

  • Society finds itself in a " state of momentary barbarism " .

  • I think our booking agent had a momentary blip.

  • Every thread seems to deal with some stumbling block or other, or at least momentary confusions.

  • Don't trade your God-given destiny for a momentary gratification; hang in there.

  • With habitual diffidence she handed a new manuscript to me and took (to the Ladies) momentary leave.

  • There was a momentary discomfort on penetrating the surface tension of the sub-space artifact.

  • A momentary military weakness was no time in which to put out peace feelers to an enemy poised to strike.

  • Considering a momentary glimpse of the world, that might flash up, sublime.

  • But surely this was the result of a momentary inattention on the part of TAC's stalwarts?

  • Surely, she could be excused her momentary lapse.

  • I only heard it because there had been a momentary lull in the barrage from the big guns.

  • momentary lapse from the tone of Mouth of the Nile.

  • momentary lull in the barrage from the big guns.

  • momentary glimpse of an elegant steam yacht cutting past.

  • momentary pause just to make sure, I hurl myself into the waiting water.

  • momentary discomfort on penetrating the surface tension of the sub-space artifact.

  • momentary panic on parting from Beth is shortened.

  • Life is but momentary, whether you have the poverty of the poorest man in rags or the wealth of the richest living person.

  • Of course, the good news is only momentary.

  • Be careful not to make even momentary short circuits with metal tools.

  • After all it might be only a chance look, or at best the token of a merely momentary impression.

  • The remote function can be configured to be either momentary or latched.

  • Draper offers the opinion that such incidents are not momentary slips on Trotsky's part.

  • Barbara's momentary panic on parting from Beth is shortened.

  • Twinkling; the momentary pause is awkwardly shrugged off.

  • The medial plica can also become nipped between patella and condyle, causing momentary pain and ' giving way ' .

  • On the 17th he developed fever; for a time he treated it as a momentary impediment to the expedition; but on the 27th his speech was gone, and the Macedonian army were suffered to pass man 1 For the Indian campaigns of Alexander see especially McCrindle, Invasion of India by Alexander the Great (1896); Vincent A.

  • In 1864 a tremendous flood almost ruined it, and another flood in 1878, and a famous strike in Denver and Leadville in 1879-1880 were further, but only momentary, checks to its prosperity.

  • In momentary peril of death for fifteen years, he restored in the Vivarais and the Cevennes Presbyterian church polity in all its integrity.

  • When the Whigs secured a momentary control of the state legislature in 1849 they sent Seward to the United States Senate.

  • In March 1821, Count Santorre di Santarosa and other conspirators informed Charles Albert of a constitutional and anti-Austrian plot, and asked for his help. After a momentary hesitation he informed the king; but at his request no arrests were made, and no precautions were taken.

  • According to this writer, existence is nothing but a becoming, and matter is simply the momentary product of the process of becoming, while force is this process constantly revealing itself in these products.

  • Like Arabia and similar countries, it could exercise a great momentary influence in history and produce a sudden change throughout the world; but afterwards it would sink into local insignificance.

  • But be this as it may, he had no sooner adopted his new creed than he resolved to profess it; " a momentary glow of enthusiasm " had raised him above all temporal considerations, and accordingly, on June 8, 1753, he records that having " privately abjured the heresies" of his childhood before a Catholic priest of the name of Baker, a Jesuit, in London, he announced the same to his father in an elaborate controversial epistle which his spiritual adviser much approved, and which he himself afterwards described to Lord Sheffield as having been " written with all the pomp, the dignity, and self-satisfaction of a martyr."

  • The momentary effect was immense; for some of the halo of the Holy Empire still clung round the head of the house of Habsburg, and Francis Joseph was welcomed to the ancient free city with enthusiasm.

  • This incident caused a considerable sensation, and was the prelude to a long crisis in Hungarian affairs, during which the emperor-king, while quick to repair the unfortunate impression produced by his momentary pique, held inflexibly to his resolve in the matter of the common army.

  • The union which sound religious teaching represents as realized in the submission of the will and the ethical harmony of the whole life is then reduced to a, passive experience, to something which comes and goes in time, and which may be of only momentary duration.

  • A momentary success of the English archers was quickly reversed by a flank movement on the part of Sir Robert Keith.

  • In this latter town took place the momentary union, which was more apparent than real, between the Latin and the Greek church (6th July 1 439).

  • The dependence of the island on one crop has been an artificial economic condition often of grave momentary danger to prosperity; but generally speaking, the progress of the industry has been steady.

  • In 1887 Svante Arrhenius, professor of physics at Stockholm, put forward a new theory which supposed that the freedom of the opposite ions from each other was not a mere momentary freedom at the instants of molecular collision, but a more or less permanent freedom, the ions moving independently of each other through the liquid.

  • If cotton or linen is used, it is usual to incorporate sulphur with the paste, and to effect vulcanization by steam heat; but, when silk or wool is employed, no sulphur is added to the paste, the dried coating of rubber being merely brought into momentary contact with the mixture of chloride of sulphur and carbon disulphide already mentioned.

  • The direct method consists in observing the times of some momentary or rapidly varying celestial phenomenon, as it appears when seen from opposite points of the earth's orbit.

  • Under the influence of the transient current, the galvanometer needle undergoes a momentary deflection, or " throw," which is proportional to Q, and therefore to 8B, and thus, if we know the deflection produced by the discharge through the galvanometer of a given quantity of electricity, we have the means of determining the value of 8B.

  • 2 The preamble, indeed, speaks of the curtailment of the liberties of the nobles by the power of certain of the kings, and at the end the right of armed resistance to any attempt to infringe the charter is conceded to " the bishops and the higher and lower nobles " of the realm; but, for the rest, its contents clearly show that it was intended to strengthen the monarchy by ensuring " that the momentary folly Andrassy, Development of Hung.

  • But this is only a momentary lapse, for he broadly distinguishes the two kinds.

  • An unsuccessful attempt upon Crispi's life by the anarchist Lega brought a momentary truce, but Cavallotti's attacks were soon renewed more fiercely than ever.

  • The boiling juice is run down into subsiding tanks, where it cools, and at the same time the albumen, which has been suddenly coagulated by momentary exposure to high temperature, falls to the bottom of the tank, carrying with it the vegetable and other matters which were in suspension in the juice.

  • 14) is probably to be explained by the fact that "Paul had found some of the brethren reluctant to undertake a journey to Macedonia, or to perform some other service which he desired, and the words only express the momentary disappointment of a man who was imprisoned and ready to die for the gospel" (Drummond).

  • Meteors look larger than they are, from the glare and flaming effect due to their momentary combustion.

  • He was the first in Congress to oppose the claim, which gained momentary and widespread favour in 1867, that the public debt, pledged in coin, should be paid in greenbacks.

  • There was a momentary vacillation even in Rome.

  • The momentary result was a wild panic, especially among the horses; but this panic gave the alarm to the infantry all along the road, and these (Frossard's 2nd Corps) at once stood to arms and moved forward, deployed for attack - one division to the west, another division, from Rezonville, to the south.

  • But Wimpheling had only some timid suggestions to make, and, since Maximilian was once more on happy terms with the pope, political considerations served to cool completely his momentary ardour for ecclesiastical reform.

  • Of the monks professed there during this momentary revival, one, Sigebert Buckley, lived on into the reign of James I.; and being the only survivor of the Benedictines of England, he in 1607 invested with the English habit and affiliated to Westminster Abbey and to the English congregation two English priests, already Benedictines in the Italian congregation.

  • The queen, on the prayer of the attorney-general, ordered that the proceedings of the day should be recorded, an order which caused a momentary embarrassment to the lord chancellor, as the court had no existing registrar, and no existing book in which the record should be made.

  • The Sophists were the first in Greece to dissolve knowledge into individual and momentary opinion (Protagoras), or dialectically to deny the possibility of knowledge (Gorgias).

  • Moreover, the arguments by which Heraclitus supported this theory of the universal flux are employed by Protagoras to undermine the possibility of objective truth, by dissolving all knowledge into the momentary sensation or persuasion of the individual.

  • Furthermore, all feeling is momentary and homogeneous.

  • Momentary pleasure (µov6Xpovos 7)56vn), preferably of a carnal kind, is the only good for man.

  • At Cedar Creek, during a momentary absence of the Federal commander, his camps were surprised by Early (October 19).

  • Since (following Protagoras) knowledge is solely of momentary sensations, it is useless to try, as Socrates recommended, to make calculations as to future pleasures, and to balance present enjoyment with disagreeable consequences.

  • One of her successors, Pixodarus, tried to ally himself with the rising power of Macedon, and is said to have gained the momentary consent of the young Alexander to wed his daughter.

  • In jumping an ordinary hedge or ditch at moderate speed, there is of course a moment of time during which the horse is on his hind legs, and in theory the rider should then lean forward, but, in practice, this position is so momentary, and the lash out of the hind legs in the spring is so powerful, that it is best not to lean forward at all, because of the difficulty, if not impossibility, of getting back in time for the reverse movement, when the rider should be preparing to render the horse some assistance with the bridle as his feet touch the ground.

  • In 1648 the sovereign courts of Paris procured their momentary suppression in a kind of charter of liberties which they imposed upon the crown, but which was ephemeral.

  • The fundamental objection to empiricism is that it fails to give an accurate explanation of experience; individual impressions as such are momentary, and their connexion into a body of coherent knowledge presupposes mental action distinct from mere receptivity.

  • He has not offered even a plausible explanation of the mode by which a consciousness made up of isolated momentary impressions and ideas can be aware of coexistence and number, or succession.

  • But Waldeck, hoping to profit by this momentary success, sent a portion of his right wing towards St Amand, where it merely shared the fate of his left, and the day was decided.

  • After a momentary reconciliation with Louis during his illness at Metz in 1744, Marie shut herself up more closely with her own circle of friends until her death at Versailles on the 24th of June 1768.

  • Towards the native races his policy varied according to momentary interests; but on the whole his reign tended to bring the Sicels more and more within the Greek pale.

  • the short-lasting explosive contraction of the heart muscle, can be elicited by a single, even momentary, application of a stimulus, e.g.

  • The dark shadows of this picture of the future alone could impress their minds, but a week later three of them were allowed a momentary vision of the light which shoula overcome the darkness.

  • It was the momentary power of the second which drove him into the convent, and he selected the monastic order which represented all that was best in the revival of the latter half of the 15th century - the Augustinian Eremites.

  • Whenever this occupation took place, Ptolemy became master of Palestine in 312 B.C., and though, as Josephus complains, he may have disgraced his title, Soler, by momentary severity at the outset, later he created in the minds of the Jews the impression that in Palestine or in Egypt he was - in deed as well as in name - their preserver.

  • The period of the pilgrimage caused a momentary truce to all these struggles, and in Dhu 'l-hijja, A.H.

  • With the declaration of peace the president again gained a momentary popularity much like that he had won in 1809 by his apparent willingness at that time to fight France.

  • Sensation alone is insufficient to explain all our intellectual phenomena; all sensation is momentary and individual (cf.

  • He found that the momentary dissipation was proportional to the degree of electrification at the time, and that, when the charge was moderate, its dissipation was not altered in bodies of different kinds or shapes.

  • On the side of Nature the lowest rank (r) seems to belong to what Usener has designated " momentary " or " occasional " gods.'

  • There was an accession of new members, a momentary increase of prosperity, a brilliant new undertaking in the publication of a weekly journal, the Harbinger, in which Ripley, Charles A.

  • Whenever such sense is evoked it is only as a momentary relief to his prevailing sense of the hideousness of contemporary life, or in protest against what he regarded as the enervating influences of art.

  • The second time it suited a momentary policy to set up a puppet emperor of his own, and even to accept a military commission from him.

  • The reign of Sigeric was momentary.

  • After this momentary meeting, the history of the East and West Goths again separates for a while.

  • In Italy the Goth was but a momentary invader and ruler; the Teutonic element in Italy comes from other sources.

  • In 1838 he made important investigations in regard to the conditions and range of induction from electrical currents - showing that induced currents, although merely momentary, produce still other or tertiary currents, and thus on through successive orders of induction, with alternating signs, and with reversed initial and terminal signs.

  • They were carried off and assassinated by Anastasius's brother, Eleutherius, whose reputation, however, suffered but a momentary eclipse.

  • During a momentary reaction of public opinion he resigned office in 1858, but again entered the cabinet under La Marmora in 5859 as minister of the interior.

  • In Rupert's momentary absence, the surprised Royalist cavalry could make no head against Cromwell's charge, although the latter was only made piecemeal as each unit crossed the lane and formed to the front.

  • "At this time," wrote Burke, in words of manly self-assertion, thirteen years afterwards, "having a momentary lead (1780-1782), so aided and so encouraged,.

  • Just as the phenomena of sudden conversion, complete revolutions of character occurring to outward appearance in a momentary space of time, are no valid argument against determinism - they may be due to the sudden emergence of elements in life and character long concealed - so what looks like the orderly and necessary development of a character growing and exhibiting its activity in accordance with fixed laws may in reality be due to innumerable secret struggles and momentous decisions, acts of choice of which only the results are outwardly apparent.

  • to take his kingship in earnest, thinking to cure him by war of his effeminate passions; and, in the spring of 1744, the kings grave illness at Metz gave a momentary hope of reconciliation between him and the deserted queen.

  • A momentary excitement was caused by the advance of the French armies in 1798, when he burnt most of his political papers.

  • The missions of Cardinal Peter (of St Chrysogonus), formerly bishop of Meaux, to Toulouse and the Toulousain in 1178, and of Henry, cardinal-bishop of Albano (formerly abbot of Clairvaux), in 1180-1181, obtained merely momentary successes.

  • Are you going to be a guardsman or a diplomatist? asked Prince Andrew after a momentary silence.

  • There was a momentary pause in the conversation; the old general cleared his throat to draw attention.

  • Don't talk nonsense, just listen! said Natasha, with momentary vexation.

  • There followed a momentary pause, which seemed very long to them all.

  • So you are one of us soldiers! he added, smiling, after a momentary pause.

  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.

  • If you are a teen contemplating hitchhiking or running away, consider the effects this momentary decision can make.

  • Momentary stimulation is just a small quick zap that immediately signals your dog to respond.

  • If there is some sensitivity upon insertion, it is momentary.

  • Your lover is naturally saddened by the momentary disruption your coming out has created.

  • The only pain involved is a momentary pinprick from the needle, and results from the test are usually available in one to two days.

  • A high-action break from reality, these films allow everyone and anyone a momentary break.

  • Perhaps men have caved to the momentary bliss women refer to as shoe therapy.

  • Weight naturally fluctuates, and there may be weeks where the scale increases, but the key is to take heart in the successes of the plan and not regress into poor habits because of a momentary lapse.

  • Sure, caffeine gives you momentary energy, but if you're truly looking for a successful diet plan, popping coated caffeine tablets isn't necessarily the answer.

  • David Gilmour and Nick Mason went on to release 'A Momentary Lapse Of Reason' under the name Pink Floyd in 1986, while Roger continued his solo career.

  • When asked about the motivation behind it, she replied that it was, "Momentary insanity, nothing more, nothing less."

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